National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tary charged particles

  1. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  2. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Friday, 26 July 2013 14:18 The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks...

  3. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  4. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  5. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  6. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  7. Frictional cooling of positively charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Greenwald; Allen Caldwell

    2011-11-14

    One of the focuses of research and development towards the construction of a muon collider is muon beam preparation. Simulation of frictional cooling shows that it can achieve the desired emittance reduction to produce high-luminosity muon beams. We show that for positively charged particles, charge exchange interactions necessitate significant changes to schemes previously developed for negatively charged particles. We also demonstrate that foil-based schemes are not viable for positive particles.

  8. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the porous electrode. Using the STXM lithium maps and the high-resolution TEM images, researchers found that LFP battery particles do not charge simultaneously....

  9. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone...

  10. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  11. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeveld, W.G.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. The electric charge and magnetic moment of neutral fundamental particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaushik Bhattacharya

    2009-05-27

    The article focuses on the issue of the two definitions of charge, mainly the gauge charge and the effective charge of fundamental particles. Most textbooks on classical electromagnetism and quantum field theory only works with the gauge charges while the concept of the induced charge remains unattended. In this article it has been shown that for intrinsically charged particles both of the charges remain the same but there can be situations where an electrically neutral particle picks up some electrical charge from its plasma surrounding. The physical origin and the scope of application of the induced charge concept has been briefly discussed in the article.

  13. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  14. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  15. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01

    in transverse momentum. Also, a suppression factor of 0.30 is used for strange quark-antiquark pair pro- duction relative to the light quark-antiquark pair production. Charged particle rapidity distribution Zi-wei Lin,1 Subrata Pal,1 C. M. 1Cyclotron... the experimental data from central Pb1Pb collisions at center-of-mass energy of 17A GeV @20#. Specifically, to ?2001 The American Physical Society1 RAPID COMMUNICATIONS LIN, PAL, KO, LI, AND ZHANG PHYSICAL REVIEW C 64 011902~R! Hadrons are then formed from...

  16. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  17. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  18. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  19. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  20. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery charging and discharging. Researchers first charged commercial-grade battery cells to 50% full in 30 minutes, mimicking real world conditions. Then, the battery cell...

  1. Inclusive charged and neutral particle production and search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge at the CERN p$\\overline{p}$ collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, M; Bonaudi, Franco; Borer, K; Borghini, Michel; Chollet, J C; Clark, A G; Conta, C; Darriulat, Pierre; Di Lella, L; Dines-Hansen, J; Dorsaz, P A; Fayard, Louis; Fraternali, M; Froidevaux, Daniel; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gildemeister, O; Goggi, Giorgio V; Grote, H; Hahn, B; Hänni, H; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P; Himel, Thomas M; Hungerbühler, V; Jenni, Peter; Kofoed-Hansen, Otto Møgens; Livan, M; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Madsen, B; Mani, P; Mansoulié, B; Mantovani, G C; Mapelli, Livio P; Merkel, B; Mermikides, Michael E; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B; Onions, Christopher J; Parrour, G; Pastore, F; Plothow-Besch, Hartmute; Prévot, N; Repellin, J P; Rothenberg, A F; Roussarie, A; Sauvage, G; Schacher, J; Siegrist, J L; Stocker, F; Teiger, J; Vercesi, V; Williams, H H; Zaccone, Henri; Zeller, W; Zylberstejn, A

    1983-01-01

    Inclusive charged and neutral particle production and search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge at the CERN p$\\overline{p}$ collider

  2. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Jesse Andrew (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  3. Motion of charged particles in ABC magnetic fields Alejandro Luque #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motion of charged particles in ABC magnetic fields Alejandro Luque # Departament de Matemâ?? atica consequences of our study are the existence of confinement regions of charges near some magnetic lines, magnetic field, Hamiltonian dynamical system, el­ liptic equilibrium point, quasi­periodic solution

  4. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  5. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  6. Long Lived Charged Massive Particles and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunori Kohri; Fumihiro Takayama

    2006-11-06

    We consider Big Bang Nucleosynthesis(BBN) with long lived charged massive particles. Before decaying, the long lived massive particles recombines with a light element to form a bound state like a hydrogen atom. We discuss the possible change of primordial light element abundances due to formations of such bound states.

  7. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery...

  8. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion...

  9. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  10. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  11. Design of an electronic charged particle spectrometer to measure S R< on inertial fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G permanent magnet, this instrument will uniquely determine particle identities and measure particle energies or more different positions are used simultaneously . The main reactions generating such charged particles

  12. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergy Efficiency »5Mapping Particle

  13. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergy Efficiency »5Mapping ParticleMapping

  14. Electrostatic plasma lens for focusing negatively charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, A. A.; Dobrovolskiy, A. M.; Dunets, S. M.; Litovko, I. V.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.

    2012-02-15

    We describe the current status of ongoing research and development of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating intense negatively charged particle beams, electrons, and negative ions. The physical principle of this kind of plasma lens is based on magnetic isolation electrons providing creation of a dynamical positive space charge cloud in shortly restricted volume propagating beam. Here, the new results of experimental investigations and computer simulations of wide-aperture, intense electron beam focusing by plasma lens with positive space charge cloud produced due to the cylindrical anode layer accelerator creating a positive ion stream towards an axis system is presented.

  15. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-11-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Brownian Dynamics of charged particles in a constant magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, L J; Piel, A; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-01

    Numerical algorithms are proposed for simulating the Brownian dynamics of charged particles in an external magnetic field, taking into account the Brownian motion of charged particles, damping effect and the effect of magnetic field self-consistently. Performance of these algorithms is tested in terms of their accuracy and long-time stability by using a three-dimensional Brownian oscillator model with constant magnetic field. Step-by-step recipes for implementing these algorithms are given in detail. It is expected that these algorithms can be directly used to study particle dynamics in various dispersed systems in the presence of a magnetic field, including polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions and, particularly complex (dusty) plasmas. The proposed algorithms can also be used as thermostat in the usual molecular dynamics simulation in the presence of magnetic field.

  17. Calibration of charge state conversion surfaces for neutral particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlstroem, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Wurz, P.; Hertzberg, E.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular oxygen and hydrogen ions were scattered off hydrogen terminated diamondlike carbon (DLC) charge state conversion surfaces at incident grazing angles. The energy range of the scattered particles was 390-1000 eV, and the surface roughness of the DLC surface was of the order of 1 A rms. For all surfaces almost equal angular scattering and negative ion fractions were found within the uncertainties of the measurement. This result supports the fact that charge state conversion with DLC surfaces is a reliable technology for neutral particle sensing instruments. Furthermore, these instruments can work in the laboratory as well as in the harsh environment on board a satellite.The surfaces measured here are used in the IBEX-lo sensor, a neutral particle sensing instrument on the NASA IBEX mission, which is scheduled for launch into orbit around Earth in July 2008.

  18. Hamiltonian theory of adiabatic motion of relativistic charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Xin; Chan, Anthony A.; Brizard, Alain J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    A general Hamiltonian theory for the adiabatic motion of relativistic charged particles confined by slowly varying background electromagnetic fields is presented based on a unified Lie-transform perturbation analysis in extended phase space (which includes energy and time as independent coordinates) for all three adiabatic invariants. First, the guiding-center equations of motion for a relativistic particle are derived from the particle Lagrangian. Covariant aspects of the resulting relativistic guiding-center equations of motion are discussed and contrasted with previous works. Next, the second and third invariants for the bounce motion and drift motion, respectively, are obtained by successively removing the bounce phase and the drift phase from the guiding-center Lagrangian. First-order corrections to the second and third adiabatic invariants for a relativistic particle are derived. These results simplify and generalize previous works to all three adiabatic motions of relativistic magnetically trapped particles.

  19. Nonstationary stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shotorban, B.

    2011-06-15

    Stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle that are due to discreteness of electrons and ions in plasmas can be described by a one-step process master equation [T. Matsoukas and M. Russell, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 4285 (1995)] with no exact solution. In the present work, using the system size expansion method of Van Kampen along with the linear noise approximation, a Fokker-Planck equation with an exact Gaussian solution is developed by expanding the master equation. The Gaussian solution has time-dependent mean and variance governed by two ordinary differential equations modeling the nonstationary process of dust particle charging. The model is tested via the comparison of its results to the results obtained by solving the master equation numerically. The electron and ion currents are calculated through the orbital motion limited theory. At various times of the nonstationary process of charging, the model results are in a very good agreement with the master equation results. The deviation is more significant when the standard deviation of the charge is comparable to the mean charge in magnitude.

  20. Cosmological Evolution of Statistical System of Scalar Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat'ev, Yurii; Mikhailov, Mikhail; Ignatyev, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    In the paper we consider the macroscopic model of plasma of scalar charged particles, obtained by means of the statistical averaging of the microscopic equations of particle dynamics in a scalar field. On the basis of kinetic equations, obtained from averaging, and their strict integral consequences, a self-consistent set of equations is formulated which describes the self-gravitating plasma of scalar charged particles. It was obtained the corresponding closed cosmological model which also was numerically simulated for the case of one-component degenerated Fermi gas and two-component Boltzmann system. It was shown that results depend weakly on the choice of a statistical model. Two specific features of cosmological evolution of a statistical system of scalar charged particles were obtained with respect to cosmological evolution of the minimal interaction models: appearance of giant bursts of invariant cosmological acceleration $\\Omega$ at the time interval $8\\cdot10^3\\div2\\cdot10^4 t_{Pl}$ and strong heating ...

  1. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  2. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, M.J.

    1998-10-13

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility. 7 figs.

  3. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Michael J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility.

  4. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, I.D.

    2010-01-01

    2002). J.D. Lawson, “Physics of Charged Particles Beams”, (B. Kusse, J. Moschella, Physics of Fluids 30 , 245 (1987).Davidson and H. Qin, “ Physics of Intense Charged Particle

  5. Bounding Lorentz violation at particle colliders by tracking the motion of charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altschul, Brett [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    In the presence of Lorentz violation, the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field is distorted. By measuring the eccentricities of particles' elliptical orbits and studying how those eccentricities vary with the absolute orientation of the laboratory, it is possible to constrain the Lorentz-violating c{sub JK} parameters. For each observed species, this method can provide constraints on four linear combinations of coefficients for which, in some species, there are presently no two-sided bounds.

  6. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plettner, Tomas (San Ramon, CA); Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA)

    2011-08-09

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  7. Hamilton-Dirac systems for charged particles in gauge fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando Jimenez

    2015-04-07

    In this work, we use the Sternberg phase space (which may be considered as the classical phase space of particles in gauge fields) in order to explore the dynamics of such particles in the context of Hamilton-Dirac systems and their associated Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principles. For this, we develop an analogue of the Pontryagin bundle in the case of the Sternberg phase space. Moreover, we show the link of this new bundle to the so-called magnetized Tulczyjew triple, which is an analogue of the link between the Pontryagin bundle and the usual Tulczyjew triple. Taking advantage of the symplectic nature of the Sternberg space, we induce a Dirac structure on the Sternberg-Pontryagin bundle which leads to the Hamilton-Dirac structure that we are looking for. We also analyze the intrinsic and variational nature of the equations of motion of particles in gauge fields in regards of the defined new geometry. Lastly, we illustrate our theory through the case of a $U(1)$ gauge group, leading to the paradigmatic example of an electrically charged particle in an electromagnetic field.

  8. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barov, Nikolai (San Diego, CA)

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  9. Integral charged particle nuclear date bibliography. Editon 1, Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.; Dunford, C.L.

    1986-04-01

    This bibliography is divided into three sections, ''References'', ''Target Index'', and ''Residual Index.'' The ''References'' section contains all references satisfying the following criteria: excitation functions, thick targets, or product yield leading to the formation of a ground or metastable state; the atomic mass and charge of the incident particle must be greater than or equal to 1; the atomic mass of the target must be greater than or equal to 1; and the atomic masses of the outgoing and residual nuclei must be greater than or equal to 1 with the exception of processes which do not lead to a definite residual nucleus and of gamma-ray production cross sections. The ''Target Index'' section contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite target nucleus and reaction. These reference lines contain the Journal name, followed by the volume and page number. The ''Residual Index'' section also contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite residual nucleus and a definite target-reaction.

  10. Can nonextremal Reissner-Nordstrom black hole become extremal by assimilating infalling charged particle and shell?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Wang; Ru-Keng Su; P. K. N. Yu; E. C. M. Young

    1998-02-16

    By using the gedanken experiments suggested by Bekenstein and Rosenzweig, we have shown that nonextremal Reissner-Nordstrom black hole cannot turn into extremal one by assimilating infalling charged particle and charged spherical shell.

  11. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  12. Contemporary Instrumentation and Application of Charge Exchange Neutral Particle Diagnostics in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medley, S. S.; Donné, A. J.H.; Kaita, R.; Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2007-07-21

    An overview of the developments post-circa 1980's of the instrumentation and application of charge exchange neutral particle diagnostics on Magnetic Fusion Energy experiments is presented.

  13. A Non-Invasive Energy/Angle Diagnostic for Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, C. R.

    2012-03-16

    A diagnostic for charged particle beams based on Compton scattering is presented. The particular case of an electron beam is treated in detail relativistically.

  14. Properties of Jets Measured with Charged Particles with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenz, Seth Conrad

    2011-01-01

    Tracking Efficiencies and Distributions . . . . . . . Jet6 Results and Discussion 6.1 Charged particle jet crossand multiplicity in jets . . . . . . . . . . 7 Conclusions

  15. First Direct Limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with Electric Charge Less than e/6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnese, R.

    While the standard model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS ...

  16. Charge of a particle generated by a captured pair of photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert Weiss

    2006-09-20

    The model of charge generation is based on the wave model of a particle, for which a brief description is given. The particle is comprised of two photons, captured in the volume of the particle, and reveals the complete relativistic behaviour. The electromagnetic waves of the two photons are supposed to induce an electrostatic field. The surface integral of this electrostatic field is identified with the charge of the particle. The magnitude of the electric field is derived from the energy density of the photons. The volume and the surface are related to the wavelength of the photons, thus leading to a charge of the particle, which is independent of its mass.

  17. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Bound States of Long-lived Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manoj Kaplinghat; Arvind Rajaraman

    2007-01-18

    Charged particles (X) decaying after primordial nucleosynthesis are constrained by the requirement that their decay products should not change the light element abundances drastically. If the decaying particle is negatively charged (X-) then it will bind to the nuclei. We consider the effects of the decay of X when bound to Helium-4 and show that this will modify the Lithium abundances.

  18. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Agnese; A. J. Anderson; D. Balakishiyeva; R. Basu Thakur; D. A. Bauer; J. Billard; A. Borgland; M. A. Bowles; D. Brandt; P. L. Brink; R. Bunker; B. Cabrera; D. O. Caldwell; D. G. Cerdeno; H. Chagani; Y. Chen; J. Cooley; B. Cornell; C. H. Crewdson; P. Cushman; M. Daal; P. C. F. Di Stefano; T. Doughty; L. Esteban; S. Fallows; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; G. L. Godfrey; S. R. Golwala; J. Hall; H. R. Harris; S. A. Hertel; T. Hofer; D. Holmgren; L. Hsu; M. E. Huber; A. Jastram; O. Kamaev; B. Kara; M. H. Kelsey; A. Kennedy; M. Kiveni; K. Koch; A. Leder; B. Loer; E. Lopez Asamar; R. Mahapatra; V. Mandic; C. Martinez; K. A. McCarthy; N. Mirabolfathi; R. A. Moffatt; D. C. Moore; H. Nelson; R. H. Nelson; R. W. Ogburn; K. Page; W. A. Page; R. Partridge; M. Pepin; A. Phipps; K. Prasad; M. Pyle; H. Qiu; W. Rau; P. Redl; A. Reisetter; Y. Ricci; H. E. Rogers; T. Saab; B. Sadoulet; J. Sander; K. Schneck; R. W. Schnee; S. Scorza; B. Serfass; B. Shank; D. Speller; S. Upadhyayula; A. N. Villano; B. Welliver; D. H. Wright; S. Yellin; J. J. Yen; B. A. Young; J. Zhang

    2015-02-03

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  19. Dynamics of a charged particle around a weakly magnetized naked singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulmina Zaman Babar; Mubasher Jamil; Yen-Kheng Lim

    2015-10-17

    We examine the motion of a charged particle in the vicinity of a weakly magnetized naked singularity. The escape velocity and energy of the particle moving around the naked singularity after being kicked by another particle or photon are investigated. Also at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) escape velocity and energy are examined. Effective potential and angular momentum of the particle are also discussed. We discuss the center of mass energy after collision between two particles having same mass and opposite charges moving along the same circular orbit in the opposite direction. It is investigated that under what conditions maximum energy can be produced as a result of collision.

  20. Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Misra, Shikha, E-mail: shikhamish@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-07-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

  1. Scaling of Charged Particle Production in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2004-09-24

    The measured pseudorapidity distributions of primary charged particles over a wide pseudorapidity range of |eta| N^{pp}_{ch} and the energy dependence of the density of charged particles produced in the fragmentation region exhibits extensive longitudinal scaling.

  2. Equilibrium Orbit And Linear Oscillations Of Charged particles In axisymmetric E X B Fields And Application To Electron Ring accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiser, M

    1973-01-01

    Equilibrium Orbit And Linear Oscillations Of Charged particles In axisymmetric E X B Fields And Application To Electron Ring accelerator

  3. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  4. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-04-26

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  5. Chemical equilibration of U(1) charged particles in a thermal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Redlich; V. Koch; A. Tounsi

    2001-11-20

    We discuss chemical equilibration of particles carrying non-vanishing quantum numbers related with U(1) internal symmetry. We construct the transport equation for the time evolution of particle multiplicities and their probability functions. The solution of these equations is obtained in different limiting cases. It is argued that a U(1) charged particles, dependent on thermal conditions inside a fireball, approaches different equilibrium limits. The differences between kinetics of abundantly and rarely produced particles are explained.

  6. Anomalous deflection of a charged-particle beam by bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taratin, A.M.; Vorobev, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    Using computer simulations of particle trajectory, a deflection of part of the beam in the direction opposite to the curvature is discovered for charged particles passing through a bent crystal. The passage of a proton beam of energy E(0) = 1 GeV through a curved silicon single crystal is considered, and only particles that move through the single crystal in a quasi-channel mode are deflected. It is suggested that the observed anomalous deflection can be used to deflect beams of high energy charged particles through angles that are tens of times greater than the critical angle for channeling, with application to experimental nuclear physics. 6 references.

  7. Development, characterization, and application of a charged particle microbeam for radiobiological research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkert, Michael R. (Michael Ryan), 1975-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a charged-particle microbeam for use in radiobiological research at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). The purpose of this device is to precisely explore the ...

  8. Reactivity of nanocolloidal particles -Fe2O3 at charged interfaces: 2-Electrochemical conversion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    synthesis of magnetic and conductive liquids. The reactivity of charged colloidal10 particles occurs in two by methyl viologen), nanoparticles of hematite and goethite (-FeOOH: d = 50 nm) are invo

  9. Characterization of mono-energetic charged-particle radiography for high energy density physics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Mario John-Errol

    2008-01-01

    Charged-particle radiography, specifically protons and alphas, has recently been used to image various High-Energy-Density Physics objects of interest, including Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules during their implosions, ...

  10. Study of high transverse momentum charged particle suppression in heavy ion collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Andre Sungho

    2012-01-01

    The charged particle spectrum at large transverse momentum (PT), dominated by hadrons originating from parton fragmentation, is an important observable for studying the properties of the hot, dense medium produced in ...

  11. Charging and de-charging of dust particles in bulk region of a radio frequency discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15

    An analysis to investigate the effect of the dust particle size and density on the floating potential of the dust particles of uniform radius and other plasma parameters in the bulk region plasma of a RF-discharge in collisionless/collisional regime has been presented herein. For this purpose, the average charge theory based on charge balance on dust and number balance of plasma constituents has been utilized; a derivation for the accretion rate of electrons corresponding to a drifting Maxwellian energy distribution in the presence of an oscillatory RF field has been given and the resulting expression has been used to determine the floating potential of the dust grains. Further, the de-charging of the dust grains after switching off the RF field has also been discussed.

  12. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Qingjiang

    2015-01-01

    energy and high-energy particles are transported along flowsimilar energies and pitch angles are not only transportedenergy electron fluxes: (1) hot and tenuous plasmas are transported

  13. 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON GUNS; BEAM EMITTANCE; CHARGE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPACE 430200* -- Particle Accelerators-- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics The evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is...

  14. Development of analytical and numerical models predicting the deposition rate of electrically charged particles in turbulent channel flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Hanseo

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model is established to predict an electrostatically charged particle deposition as a function of particle size in fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. The convectivediffusion flux equation is solved for the particle concentration as a...

  15. Thermodynamics of Three-dimensional Black Holes via Charged Particle Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwak, Bogeun

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that changes occur in a (2+1)-dimensional charged black hole by adding a charged probe. The particle increases the entropy of the black hole and guarantees the second law of thermodynamics. The first law of thermodynamics is derived from the change in the black hole mass. Using the particle absorption, we test the extremal black hole and find out that the mass of the extremal black hole increases more than the electric charge. Therefore, the outer horizon of the black hole still exists. However, the extremal condition becomes non-extremal.

  16. Possible applications of the steering of charged particles by bent single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Gibson, W.M.; Sun, C.R.; Tsyganov, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews some aspects of the steering of charged particles using channeling in bent crystals. Crystal angular and spatial acceptance, deflection dechanneling, and radiation damage are discussed. Examples of possible bent transport, focusing, the possibility of charm particle separated beams, and magnetic moment determination.

  17. Charged-particle tracking for neutron-deuteron breakup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boddy, Kimberly K

    2007-01-01

    Particle tracking software has been developed to measure the energy of protons scattered in the breakup process d(n, np)n. The nd breakup experiment is performed at the Weapons Neutron Research facilities at Los Alamos ...

  18. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. PACS in TFTR. These simulations are compared to profiles directly measured with the pellet charge exchange

  19. Quantum Vacuum Charge and the New HyperCP Particle X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. F. Diether III; A. E. Inopin

    2006-01-16

    We present a unique geometrical model based on our findings of a quantum vacuum charge scenario to predict the recent experimental find of the new HyperCP 214 MeV particle state X. This model, which we call the Spin Matrix, also predicts many more states; some of which represent known particles and some states that aren't represented directly by known particles or haven't been experimentally found yet. We demonstrate a parameter-free description of the lowest energy particles in nature.

  20. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  1. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGE SOLID ANGLE SPECTROMETER WITH CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION FOR THE BEVALAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    of charged particles in a Plastic Ball module. (XBL 7910-of Califomia. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGEBerkeley, California Summary PLASTIC 8/>Ll PLASTIC WALL For

  2. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-10-17

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Modeling fine particle (dusty) plasmas and charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions as inhomogeneous Yukawa systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2014-01-01

    In order to give a basis to the structure and correlation analysis of fine particle (dusty) plasma and colloidal suspensions, thermodynamic treatment of mixtures of macroscopic and microscopic charged particles within the adiabatic response of the latter is extended to include the case where the system is finite and weakly inhomogeneous. It is shown that the effective potential for macroscopic particles is composed of two elements: mutual Yukawa repulsion and a confining (attractive) Yukawa potential from their `shadow' or the average charge density of macroscopic particles multiplied by the minus sign. The result clarifies the relation between two approaches hitherto taken where either a parabolic one-body potential is assumed or the average distribution is assumed to be flat with finite extension.

  4. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, Francisco J., E-mail: fjimenez@ualberta.ca; Dew, Steven K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada); Field, David J. [Smith and Nephew (Alberta) Inc., Fort Saskatchewan T8L 4K4 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  5. Slow wave structures using twisted waveguides for charged particle applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Yoon W.; Fathy, Aly E.; Wilson, Joshua L.

    2012-12-11

    A rapidly twisted electromagnetic accelerating structure includes a waveguide body having a central axis, one or more helical channels defined by the body and disposed around a substantially linear central axial channel, with central portions of the helical channels merging with the linear central axial channel. The structure propagates electromagnetic waves in the helical channels which support particle beam acceleration in the central axial channel at a phase velocity equal to or slower than the speed of light in free space. Since there is no variation in the shape of the transversal cross-section along the axis of the structure, inexpensive mechanical fabrication processes can be used to form the structure, such as extrusion, casting or injection molding. Also, because the field and frequency of the resonant mode depend on the whole structure rather than on dimensional tolerances of individual cells, no tuning of individual cells is needed. Accordingly, the overall operating frequency may be varied with a tuning/phase shifting device located outside the resonant waveguide structure.

  6. ß-delayed ?-proton Decay in 56Zn: Analysis of the Charged-particle Spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S.E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = -2 nucleus 56Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focussing on the charged particle spectrum.

  7. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  8. Motion of charged particles in magnetic fields created by symmetric configurations of wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Furthermore, the circular wire system can be interpreted as a simplified model of the levitated magnetic, this paper illustrates that very simple magnetic con- figurations can give rise to complicated, even chaoticMotion of charged particles in magnetic fields created by symmetric configurations of wires Jacobo

  9. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity ...

  10. SEARCH FOR CHARGED -PARTICLE d -d FUSION PRODUCTS IN AN ENCAPSULATED Pd THIN FILM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuhauser, Barbara

    of activity in two nearby Geiger counters were observed with the film loaded to a nominal 150% deuterium-to-palladium the deuterated palladium film from being sputtered by the deuterium ion beam during the implantation for charged particle reaction products from d-d fusion in a deuterated palladium thin film. A silicon nitride

  11. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  12. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1982-09-21

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  13. Interaction between Interpenetrating Charge Clouds and Collision of High-Energy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mukherji

    2009-03-19

    Interaction between two interpenetrating spherically symmetric charge distributions has been calculated. Limited range terms appear in addition to the Coulomb potential. Its strength increases and range decreases with reducing sizes of the interacting particles. Between two hydrogen atoms it yields the Morse Potential. Soft core potentials are obtained between pairs of nucleons. It has been shown that when high-energy particles approach one another the potential between them increases with increasing relative speed. They are not likely to disintegrate on impact. A possible way of smashing particles by 3-body collisions is indicated. PACS no. 11.90.+t 12.40.-y

  14. Tunnelling of scalar and Dirac particles from squashed charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko

    2014-10-08

    Thermal radiation of scalar particles and Dirac fermions from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional black holes is considered. To obtain temperature of the black holes we use the tunnelling method. In case of scalar particles we make use of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. To consider tunnelling of fermions the Dirac equation was investigated. The examination shows that radial parts of the action for scalar particles and fermions in quasi-classical limit in the vicinity of horizon are almost the same and as a consequence it gives rise to the identical expressions for the temperature in both cases.

  15. Salt-induced reentrant stability of polyion-decorated particles with tunable surface charge density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simona Sennato; Laura Carlini; Domenico Truzzolillo; Federico Bordi

    2015-03-10

    The electrostatic complexation between DOTAP-DOPC unilamellar liposomes and an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (NaPA) has been investigated in a wide range of the liposome surface charge density. We systematically characterized the "reentrant condensation" and the charge inversion of polyelectrolyte-decorated liposomes by means of dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis. We explored the stability of this model polyelectrolyte/colloid system by fixing each time the charge of the bare liposomes and by changing two independent control parameters of the suspensions: the polyelectrolyte/colloid charge ratio and the ionic strength of the aqueous suspending medium. The progressive addition of neutral DOPC lipid within the liposome membrane gave rise to a new intriguing phenomenon: the stability diagram of the suspensions showed a novel reentrance due to the crossing of the desorption threshold of the polyelectrolyte. Indeed, at fixed charge density of the bare DOTAP/DOPC liposomes and for a wide range of polyion concentrations, we showed that the simple electrolyte addition first (low salt regime) destabilizes the suspensions because of the enhanced screening of the residual repulsion between the complexes, and then (high salt regime) determines the onset of a new stable phase, originated by the absence of polyelectrolyte adsorption on the particle surfaces. We show that the observed phenomenology can be rationalized within the Velegol-Thwar model for heterogeneously charged particles and that the polyelectrolyte desorption fits well the predictions of the adsorption theory of Winkler and Cherstvy. Our findings unambiguously support the picture of the reentrant condensation as driven by the correlated adsorption of the polyelectrolyte chains on the particle surface, providing interesting insights into possible mechanisms for tailoring complex colloids via salt-induced effects.

  16. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  17. Pellet charge exchange helium measurement using neutral particle analyzer in large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Veshchev, E.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H. [High Energy Particle Group, Wave Heating Group and LHD Experimental Group, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takase, Y.; Ohsako, T. [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of {alpha} particles, which will be produced by nuclear reactions in ITER and fusion reactors. The pellet charge exchange (PCX) measurement is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of the {alpha} particle energy spectra in a plasma. In the large helical device, PCX using tracer encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) has been tried in many hydrogen and helium plasmas, including helium accelerated by using the cyclotron resonance heating. In the PCX, we use the compact neutral particle analyzer without simultaneous mass separation ability. The helium particle measurement can be achieved by the application of voltage in the condenser plate. The scattering of hydrogen particle is carefully considered during the estimation of the helium amount. The radial helium profiles can also be obtained by comparing four TESPEL injection shots with/without higher harmonic fast wave heating and at applied plate voltages for He or H, respectively.

  18. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  19. Particle Environment in Low-and High-Earth Orbit! Sacrificial Charge and Particle Background!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    energy due to sacrificial charge. "Solar Min Solar Max · Calibration sources - Radioactive Fe-55/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Measured energy scale evolution is due to radiation damage modified and the warmer focal plane temperature of the XIS. The low-Earth orbit of Suzaku has the advantage of a lower

  20. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-01-01

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{c...

  1. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-12-28

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+} = \\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}: E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb} = \\left(\\frac{3+\\sqrt{5}}{2}\\right)\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}:E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO} = 4\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}} = \\infty: 3.23 : 2.6$. Which is exactly \\emph{similar} to the spherically symmetric extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.}

  2. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redi, Martha H.

    1 Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. PACS: 52.25.Fi, 52.55.Fa, 52.55.Pi, 52.65.-y a redi@princeton.edu b. These simulations are compared to profiles directly measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic (PCX) [4, 5

  3. Geodesics of electrically and magnetically charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordström space-time: analytical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskia Grunau; Valeria Kagramanova

    2010-11-24

    We present the full set of analytical solutions of the geodesic equations of charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om space-time in terms of the Weierstra{\\ss} $\\wp$, $\\sigma$ and $\\zeta$ elliptic functions. Based on the study of the polynomials in the $\\vartheta$ and $r$ equations we characterize the motion of test particles and discuss their properties. The motion of charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om space-time is compared with the motion of neutral test particles in the field of a gravitomagnetic monopole. Electrically or magnetically charged particles in the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om space-time with magnetic or electric charges, respectively, move on cones similar to neutral test particles in the Taub-NUT space-times.

  4. Charged particle multiplicities in pA interactions at the LHC from the Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir H. Rezaeian

    2012-01-05

    The forthcoming LHC measurement of hadron multiplicity in proton-nucleus collisions is a crucial test of the k_t factorization and gluon saturation based models. Here, we provide quantitative predictions for the pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles produced in minimum bias proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC based on the idea of gluon saturation in the color-glass condensate framework. Our formulation gives good descriptions of the LHC and RHIC data for the charged-hadron multiplicities in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions, and also the deep inelastic scattering at HERA at small Bjorken-x.

  5. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Deyang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking the advantages of high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two 128-channel Faraday cup arrays are built, and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  6. Screening properties of four mesoscale smoothed charge models, with application to dissipative particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Warren; Andrey Vlasov

    2014-02-25

    We extend our previous study [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204907 (2013)] to quantify the screening properties of four mesoscale smoothed charge models used in dissipative particle dynamics. Using a combination of the hypernetted chain integral equation closure and the random phase approximation, we identify regions where the models exhibit a real-valued screening length, and the extent to which this agrees with the Debye length in the physical system. We find that the second moment of the smoothed charge distribution is a good predictor of this behaviour. We are thus able to recommend a consistent set of parameters for the models.

  7. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles Using the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yunhe; /Brown U.

    2009-05-01

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data. The speed of the particle has been calculated based on the time-of-flight and position information in the muon system. The present research is limited to direct pair-production of the charged massive long-lived particles. We do not consider CMSPs that result from the cascade decays of heavier particles. In this analysis, the exact values of the model parameters of the entire supersymmetric particle mass spectrum, relevant for cascade decays, are not important. We found no evidence of the signal. 95% CL cross-section upper limits have been set on the pair-productions of the stable scaler tau lepton, the gaugino-like charginos, and the higgsino-like charginos. The upper cross section limits vary from 0.31 pb to 0.04 pb, for stau masses in the range between 60 GeV and 300 GeV. We use the nominal value of the theoretical cross section to set limits on the mass of the pair produced charginos. We exclude the pair-produced stable gaugino-like charginos with mass below 206 GeV, and higgsino-like charginos below 171 GeV, respectively. Although the present sensitivity is insufficient to test the model of the pair produced stable staus, we do set cross section limits which can be applied to the pair production of any charged massive stable particle candidates with similar kinematics. These are the most restrictive limits to the present on the cross sections for CMSPs and the first published from the Tevatron Collider Run II. The manuscript has been published by Physical Review Letters in April 2009 and is available at arXiv as.

  8. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  9. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  10. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  11. Fast and stable manipulation of a charged particle in a Penning trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kiely; J. P. L. McGuinness; J. G. Muga; A. Ruschhaupt

    2014-12-16

    We propose shortcuts to adiabaticity which achieve fast and stable control of the state of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field. In particular we design a non-adiabatic change of the magnetic field strength in a Penning trap which changes the radial spread without final excitations. We apply a streamlined version of the fast-forward formalism as well as an invariant based inverse engineering approach. We compare both methods and examine their stability.

  12. Extended Poisson-Boltzmann descriptions of the electrostatic double layer: implications for charged particles at interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek Frydel; Martin Oettel

    2012-11-12

    The work reviews on a general level various modified Poisson-Boltzmann equations and demonstrates their use on the specific system of charged particles at an interface. This system is special, first, because it exhibits the long-range interactions on account of an air-water interface, and two, because the strength of these interactions depends on the structure of a double-layer. Thus, this system is particularly sensitive to the type of the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation used.

  13. Observation of high iron charge states at low energies in solar energetic particle events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Möbius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Connell, J. J.; Popecki, M. A.; Klecker, B.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Mason, G. M.

    2014-04-10

    The ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide direct information about the source plasma, the acceleration environment, and their transport. Recent studies report that both gradual and impulsive SEP events show mean iron charge states (Q {sub Fe}) ? 10-14 at low energies E ? 0.1 MeV nuc{sup –1}, consistent with their origin from typical corona material at temperatures 1-2 MK. Observed increases of (Q {sub Fe}) up to 20 at energies 0.1-0.5 MeV nuc{sup –1} in impulsive SEPs are attributed to stripping during acceleration. However, Q {sub Fe} > 16 is occasionally found in the solar wind, particularly coming from active regions, in contrast to the exclusively reported (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14 for low energy SEPs. Here we report results from a survey of all 89 SEP events observed with Advanced Composition Explorer Solar Energetic Particle Ionic Charge Analyzer (SEPICA) in 1998-2000 for iron charge states augmented at low energy with Solar and Heliospheric Observatory CELIAS suprathermal time-of-flight (STOF). Nine SEP events with (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14 throughout the entire SEPICA and STOF energy range have been identified. Four of the nine events are impulsive events identified through velocity dispersion that are consistent with source temperatures ?2 MK up to ?4 MK. The other five events show evidence of interplanetary acceleration. Four of them involve re-acceleration of impulsive material, whose original energy dependent charge states appear re-distributed to varying extent bringing higher charge states to lower energy. One event, which shows flat but elevated (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14.2 over the entire energy range, can be associated with interplanetary acceleration of high temperature material. This event may exemplify a rare situation when a second shock plows through high temperature coronal mass ejection material.

  14. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Achenbach; C. Ayerbe Gayoso; J. C. Bernauer; R. Böhm; D. Bosnar; M. Bösz; L. Debenjak; M. O. Distler; A. Esser; I. Friš?i?; M. Gómez Rodríguez de la Paz; M. Makek; H. Merkel; U. Müller; L. Nungesser; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Sánchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; S. Širca; M. Weinriefer

    2011-04-21

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the spectrometer the efficiencies depend also on the particle species.

  15. Electromagnetic Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-20

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b} >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r{sub w}. The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Weibel} >> (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Harris}) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability.

  16. Long-range behavior of the optical potential for the elastic scattering of charged composite particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. O. Alt; A. M. Mukhamedzhanov

    1995-03-20

    The asymptotic behavior of the optical potential, describing elastic scattering of a charged particle $\\alpha$ off a bound state of two charged, or one charged and one neutral, particles at small momentum transfer $\\Delta_{\\alpha}$ or equivalently at large intercluster distance $\\rho_{\\alpha}$, is investigated within the framework of the exact three-body theory. For the three-charged-particle Green function that occurs in the exact expression for the optical potential, a recently derived expression, which is appropriate for the asymptotic region under consideration, is used. We find that for arbitrary values of the energy parameter the non-static part of the optical potential behaves for $\\Delta_{\\alpha} \\rightarrow 0$ as $C_{1}\\Delta_{\\alpha} + o\\,(\\Delta_{\\alpha})$. From this we derive for the Fourier transform of its on-shell restriction for $\\rho_{\\alpha} \\rightarrow \\infty$ the behavior $-a/2\\rho_{\\alpha}^4 + o\\,(1/\\rho_{\\alpha}^4)$, i.e., dipole or quadrupole terms do not occur in the coordinate-space asymptotics. This result corroborates the standard one, which is obtained by perturbative methods. The general, energy-dependent expression for the dynamic polarisability $C_{1}$ is derived; on the energy shell it reduces to the conventional polarisability $a$ which is independent of the energy. We emphasize that the present derivation is {\\em non-perturbative}, i.e., it does not make use of adiabatic or similar approximations, and is valid for energies {\\em below as well as above the three-body dissociation threshold}.

  17. Wave theories of non-laminar charged particle beams: from quantum to thermal regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato Fedele; Fatema Tanjia; Dusan Jovanovic; Sergio De Nicola; Concetta Ronsivalle

    2013-04-01

    The standard classical description of non-laminar charge particle beams in paraxial approximation is extended to the context of two wave theories. The first theory is the so-called Thermal Wave Model (TWM) that interprets the paraxial thermal spreading of the beam particles as the analog of the quantum diffraction. The other theory, hereafter called Quantum Wave Model (QWM), that takes into account the individual quantum nature of the single beam particle (uncertainty principle and spin) and provides the collective description of the beam transport in the presence of the quantum paraxial diffraction. QWM can be applied to beams that are sufficiently cold to allow the particles to manifest their individual quantum nature but sufficiently warm to make overlapping-less the single-particle wave functions. In both theories, the propagation of the beam transport in plasmas or in vacuo is provided by fully similar set of nonlinear and nonlocal governing equations, where in the case of TWM the Compton wavelength (fundamental emittance) is replaced by the beam thermal emittance. In both models, the beam transport in the presence of the self-fields (space charge and inductive effects) is governed by a suitable nonlinear nonlocal 2D Schroedinger equation that is used to obtain the envelope beam equation in quantum and quantum-like regimes, respectively. An envelope equation is derived for both TWM and QWM regimes. In TWM we recover the well known Sacherer equation whilst, in QWM we obtain the evolution equation of the single-particle spot size, i.e., single quantum ray spot in the transverse plane (Compton regime). We show that such a quantum evolution equation contains the same information carried out by an evolution equation for the beam spot size (description of the beam as a whole). This is done by defining the lowest QWM state reachable by a system of overlapping-less Fermions.

  18. About the probability of close collisions during stochastic deflection of positively charged particles by a bent crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesnokov, Yu A; Scandale, W; Shul'Ga, N F; Truten', V I

    2014-01-01

    The probability of close interactions of high-energy positively charged particle with atoms in a bent crystal was considered as a function of the angle between the initial particle momentum and the bending plane. The results of simulation of particle motion presented in the article show the great efficiency of high-energy positively charged particle deflection by a bent crystal due to the stochastic deflection mechanism and strong reduction of the probability of close collisions during the stochastic deflection in comparison to the planar channeling in a bent crystal.

  19. Quasi-harmonic oscillatory motion of charged particles around a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in an uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Kološ; Zden?k Stuchlík; Arman Tursunov

    2015-06-22

    In order to test the role of large-scale magnetic fields in quasiperiodic oscillation phenomena observed in microquasars, we study oscillatory motion of charged particles in vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole immersed into an external asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We determine the fundamental frequencies of small harmonic oscillations of charged test particles around stable circular orbits in the equatorial plane of a magnetized black hole, and discuss the radial profiles of frequencies of the radial and latitudinal harmonic oscillations in dependence on the mass of the black hole and the strength of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that assuming relevance of resonant phenomena of the radial and latitudinal oscillations of charged particles at their frequency ratio $3:2$, the oscillatory frequencies of charged particles can be well related to the frequencies of the twin high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the microquasars GRS 1915+105, XTE 1550-564 and GRO 1655-40.

  20. Quasi-harmonic oscillatory motion of charged particles around a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in an uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kološ, Martin; Tursunov, Arman

    2015-01-01

    In order to test the role of large-scale magnetic fields in quasiperiodic oscillation phenomena observed in microquasars, we study oscillatory motion of charged particles in vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole immersed into an external asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We determine the fundamental frequencies of small harmonic oscillations of charged test particles around stable circular orbits in the equatorial plane of a magnetized black hole, and discuss the radial profiles of frequencies of the radial and latitudinal harmonic oscillations in dependence on the mass of the black hole and the strength of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that assuming relevance of resonant phenomena of the radial and latitudinal oscillations of charged particles at their frequency ratio $3:2$, the oscillatory frequencies of charged particles can be well related to the frequencies of the twin high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the microquasars GRS 1915+105, XTE 1550-564 and GRO 1655-40.

  1. Pseudorapidity Distribution of Charged Particles in d + Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2003-11-10

    The measured pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in minimum-bias d + Au collisions at ${\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = \\rm {200 GeV}}$ is presented for the first time. This distribution falls off less rapidly in the gold direction as compared to the deuteron direction. The average value of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at midrapidity is ${\\rm _{\\mid \\eta \\mid \\le 0.6} = 9.4 \\pm 0.7(syst)}$ and the integrated primary charged particle multiplicity in the measured region is 82 $\\pm$ 6(syst). Estimates of the total charged particle production, based on extrapolations outside the measured pseudorapidity region, are also presented. The pseudorapidity distribution, normalized to the number of participants in d + Au collisions, is compared to those of Au + Au and ${\\rm p}+\\bar{\\rm p}$ systems at the same energy. The d + Au distribution is also compared to the predictions of the parton saturation model, as well as microscopic models.

  2. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)] [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  3. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating $^{88}$Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Valdré; S. Piantelli; G. Casini; S. Barlini; S. Carboni; M. Ciema?a; M. Kmiecik; A. Maj; K. Mazurek; M. Cinausero; F. Gramegna; V. L. Kravchuk; L. Morelli; T. Marchi; G. Baiocco; L. Bardelli; P. Bednarczyk; G. Benzoni; M. Bini; N. Blasi; A. Bracco; S. Brambilla; M. Bruno; F. Camera; A. Chbihi; A. Corsi; F. C. L. Crespi; M. D'Agostino; M. Degerlier; D. Fabris; B. Fornal; A. Giaz; M. Krzysiek; S. Leoni; M. Matejska-Minda; I. Mazumdar; W. M?czy?ski; B. Million; D. Montanari; S. Myalski; R. Nicolini; A. Olmi; G. Pasquali; G. Prete; O. J. Roberts; J. Stycze?; B. Szpak; B. Wasilewska; O. Wieland; J. P. Wieleczko; M. Zi?bli?ski

    2015-09-10

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the $^{88}$Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction $^{48}$Ti + $^{40}$Ca at 300, 450 and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the Gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted $\\alpha$-particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as Deep Inelastic Collisions, QuasiFission/QuasiFusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  4. Particle-Level Modeling of the Charge-Discharge Behavior of Nanoparticulate Phase-Separating Li-Ion Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orvananos, Bernardo; Yu, Hui-Chia; Bazant, Martin Z; Thornton, Katsuyo

    2013-01-01

    In nanoparticulate phase-separating electrodes, phase separation inside the particles can be hindered during their charge/discharge cycles even when a thermodynamic driving force for phase separation exists. In such cases, particles may (de)lithiate discretely in a process referred to as mosaic instability. This instability could be the key to elucidating the complex charge/discharge dynamics in nanoparticulate phase-separating electrodes. In this paper, the dynamics of the mosaic instability is studied using Smoothed Boundary Method simulations at the particle level, where the concentration and electrostatic potential fields are spatially resolved around individual particles. Two sets of configurations consisting of spherical particles with an identical radius are employed to study the instability in detail. The effect of an activity-dependent exchange current density on the mosaic instability, which leads to asymmetric charge/discharge, is also studied. While we show that our model reproduces the results of...

  5. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791, Korea and Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kino, Yasushi [Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mathews, Grant J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Primordial {sup 7}Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is {sup 7}Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X{sup ?}. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X{sup ?} capture by {sup 7}Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of {sup 7}Be and X{sup ?} ({sup 7}Be{sub x}) is a possible {sup 7}Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li originates mainly from {sup 7}Li produced via the electron capture of {sup 7}Be after BBN, the {sup 7}Be destruction provides a solution to the {sup 7}Li problem. We suggest a new route of {sup 7}Be{sub x} formation, that is the {sup 7}Be charge exchange at the reaction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion and X{sup ?}. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion, the charge exchange cross section of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+}, and the probability that excited states {sup 7}Be{sub x}* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of {sup 7}Be and X{sup ?}. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  6. Gravitational waves interacting with a spinning charged particle in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2003-12-23

    The equations which determine the response of a spinning charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field to an incident gravitational wave are derived in the linearized approximation to general relativity. We verify that 1) the components of the 4-momentum, 4-velocity and the components of the spinning tensor, both electric and magnetic moments, exhibit resonances and 2) the co-existence of the uniform magnetic field and the GW are responsible for the resonances appearing in our equations. In the absence of the GW, the magnetic field and the components of the spin tensor decouple and the magnetic resonances disappear.

  7. Charged Particle in a Time-dependent Electric Field: A White Noise Functional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravador, E. B.; Bornales, J. B.; Liwanag, M. J.

    2008-06-18

    The propagator for a charged particle in a time-dependent electric field is calculated following Hida and Streit's framework where the propagator is the T-transform of Feynman functional. However, we have to regard the potential V = -qE({tau})x{identical_to}{radical}((m/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}))){xi}x following C. C. Bernido and M. V. Carpio-Bernido's prescription of time-dependent potentials. The result agrees with the limiting form of Eqn. (16) of N. Morgenstern Horing, H. L. Cui, and G. Fiorenza, when the magnetic field is switched off, and Eqn. (17) of [3] when the electric field is constant in time.

  8. Generalized Pearson distributions for charged particles interacting with an electric and/or a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rossani; A. M. Scarfone

    2009-03-05

    The linear Boltzmann equation for elastic and/or inelastic scattering is applied to derive the distribution function of a spatially homogeneous system of charged particles spreading in a host medium of two-level atoms and subjected to external electric and/or magnetic fields. We construct a Fokker-Planck approximation to the kinetic equations and derive the most general class of distributions for the given problem by discussing in detail some physically meaningful cases. The equivalence with the transport theory of electrons in a phonon background is also discussed.

  9. Propagator of a Charged Particle with a Spin in Uniform Magnetic and Perpendicular Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Cordero-Soto; Raquel M. Lopez; Erwin Suazo; Sergei K. Suslov

    2008-02-05

    We construct an explicit solution of the Cauchy initial value problem for the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a charged particle with a spin moving in a uniform magnetic field and a perpendicular electric field varying with time. The corresponding Green function (propagator) is given in terms of elementary functions and certain integrals of the fields with a characteristic function, which should be found as an analytic or numerical solution of the equation of motion for the classical oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. We discuss a particular solution of a related nonlinear Schroedinger equation and some special and limiting cases are outlined.

  10. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Metcalfe; I. Mejia; J. Murphy; M. Quevedo; L. Smith; J. Alvarado; B. Gnade; H. Takai

    2014-11-06

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  11. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  12. Interaction of a circularly polarised gravitational wave with a charged particle in a static magnetic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha; Swarup Saha

    2014-12-24

    Interaction of a charged particle in a static magnetic background, i.e., a Landau system with circularly polarised gravitational wave (GW) is studied quantum mechanically in the long wavelength and low velocity limit. We quantize the classical Hamiltonian following \\cite{speli}. The rotating polarization vectors of the circularly polarized GW are employed to form a unique directional triad which served as the coordinate axes. The Schrodinger equations for the system are cast in the form of a set of coupled linear differential equations. This system is solved by iterative technique. We compute the time-evolution of the position and momentum expectation values of the particle. The results show that the resonance behaviour obtained earlier\\cite{emgw_classical} by classical treatements of the system has a quantum analogue not only for the linearly polarized GW \\cite{emgw_1_lin}, but for circularly polarized GW as well.

  13. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-order (v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt < 2 GeV, the v[2] and v[3] values of K0S particles are larger than those of Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the same pt. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v[2] and v[3] for K0S particles are observed to be consistent with those for Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.

  14. Synchro-curvature radiation of charged particles in the strong curved magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelner, S. R.; Prosekin, A. Yu.; Aharonian, F. A., E-mail: Stanislav.Kelner@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: Anton.Prosekin@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: Felix.Aharonian@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that the radiation of relativistic particles in a curved magnetic field proceeds in either the synchrotron or the curvature radiation modes. In this paper we show that in strong curved magnetic fields a significant fraction of the energy of relativistic electrons can be radiated away in the intermediate, the so-called synchro-curvature regime. Because of the persistent change of the trajectory curvature, the radiation varies with the frequency of particle gyration. While this effect can be ignored in the synchrotron and curvature regimes, the variability plays a key role in the formation of the synchro-curvature radiation. Using the Hamiltonian formalism, we find that the particle trajectory has the form of a helix wound around the drift trajectory. This allows us to calculate analytically the intensity and energy distribution of prompt radiation in the general case of magnetic bremsstrahlung in the curved magnetic field. We show that the transition to the limit of the synchrotron and curvature radiation regimes is determined by the relation between the drift velocity and the component of the particle velocity perpendicular to the drift trajectory. The detailed numerical calculations, which take into account the energy losses of particles, confirm the principal conclusions based on the simplified analytical treatment of the problem, and allow us to analyze quantitatively the transition between different radiation regimes for a broad range of initial pitch angles. These calculations demonstrate that even very small pitch angles may lead to significant deviations from the spectrum of the standard curvature radiation when it is formally assumed that a charged particle moves strictly along the magnetic line. We argue that in the case of realization of specific configurations of the electric and magnetic fields, the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar magnetospheres can be dominated by the component radiated in the synchro-curvature regime.

  15. Exploration of jet energy loss via direct $?$-charged particle azimuthal correlation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Hamed

    2009-09-25

    The multiplicities of charged particles azimuthally associated with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ have been measured for Au+Au, p+p, and d+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment. Charged particles with transverse momentum 0.5 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for p+p and d+Au, and 3 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for Au+Au and pseudorapidity $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 1.5 in coincidence with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ of high transverse momentum 8 $<$ $p_T^{\\gamma,\\pi^{0}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c at $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 0.9 have been used for this analysis. Within the considered range of kinematics, the observed suppressions of the associated yields per direct $\\gamma$ in central Au+Au relative to p+p and d+Au are similar and constant with direct photon fractional energy $z_{T}$ ($z_{T}=p_{T}^{h^{\\pm}}/p_{T}^{\\gamma}$). The measured suppressions of the associated yields with direct $\\gamma$ are comparable to those with $\\pi^{0}$. The data are compared to theoretical predictions.

  16. Evidence for MeV-particle emission from Ti charged with low-energy deuterium ions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, G.P.; Hubler, G.K.; Grabowski, K.S.

    1991-12-18

    Thin titanium films have been bombarded with low energy (350 eV) deuterium ions at high current density (0.2-0.4 mA.cm2) to investigate the reported occurrence of nuclear reactions at ambient temperatures in deuterium charged metals. A silicon charged particle detector was used to search for charged particles produced by such reactions. Evidence is reported for the detection of hydrogen isotopes with 5 MeV energy at a rate of 10-16 events/deuteron pair/s. Low energy deuterium (350 eV) ions produced by an ECR microwave source impinge normally on a thin metal film in vacuum, while a Si particle detector placed directly behind the film detects particle emission. The advantages of this method are rapid and efficient deuterium charging of any material (including insulators), high particle detection efficiency and sensitivity (low background), and the ability to measure the particle energy and determine the particle type. Titanium was chosen as the target because previous work by Jones had shown neutron emission and because Ti retains more hydrogen near room temperature than does PD.

  17. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-ordermore »(v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt « less

  18. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D. (Bellevue, WA); Romea, Richard D. (Seattle, WA); Steinhauer, Loren C. (Bothell, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  19. Charged-particle pseudorapidity density distributions from Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN)=130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2001-06-06

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dNch/deta has been measured for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN)=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most central Au+Au collisions for |eta|<=5.4 is found to be 4200+-470. The evolution of dNch/deta with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at mid-rapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  20. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  1. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J.? A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grabowski, P. E. [Univ. of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, C. ?K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Collins, G.? W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Graziani, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, S.? B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Johnson, M. Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Keiter, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Reynolds, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Rygg, J.? R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e²/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories in WDM plasma.

  2. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B.; Frenje, J.? A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. ?K.; Collins, G.? W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S.? B.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2015-05-27

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e²/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories inmore »WDM plasma.« less

  3. The unit of electric charge and the mass hierarchy of heavy particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lopez Castro; J. Pestieau

    2006-09-13

    We propose some empirical formulae relating the masses of the heaviest particles in the standard model (the W,Z,H bosons and the t quark) to the charge of the positron $e$ and the Higgs condensate v. The relations for the masses of gauge bosons m_W = (1+e)v/4 and m_Z=sqrt{(1+e^2)/2}*(v/2) are in excellent agreement with experimental values. By requiring the electroweak standard model to be free from quadratic divergencies at the one-loop level, we find: m_t=v/sqrt{2} and m_H=v/sqrt{2e}, or the very simple ratio (m_t/m_H)^2=e.

  4. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  5. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  6. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P.? E.; Li, C.? K.; Collins, G.? W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S.? B.; Hu, S.? X.; et al

    2015-05-01

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV , corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e²/a)/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm-dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theoriesmore »in WDM plasma.« less

  7. Ultrafine aerosol diffusion charging: an improved interaction potential for metallic particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaowei, d 1963-

    1989-01-01

    ) KLDEN 2. 0aAlaBESSEL(L+0. 5) K L ( I ) HY LNUN/K LDEN X 1. 0 PHI(l)M. B DO 14 J 1, 50 X X+0. 05 Aaal Xal. BE7 BLNLAML-Al KL(I ) BLDEN (L+1+AleKL(I)) AUX' (2 L+2) PHI(I)WLN AUBLDENaE4500. 0/2. 0 WRITE(I+5. ~ ) A. PHI(I) 1 ~ CONTINUE 11... (Chair of Commi t tee) M. E. McLain (XIember) J. W. (Member) J. W. Poston (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Ultrafine Aerosol Diffusion Charging: An Improved Interaction Potential for Metallic Particles. (December 1989I Xiaowei Zhu, B...

  8. Production of .sup.64 Cu and other radionuclides using a charged-particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Michael J. (Creve Couer, MO); McCarthy, Deborah W. (Maryland Heights, MO); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclides are produced according to the present invention at commercially significant yields and at specific activities which are suitable for use in radiodiagnostic agents such as PET imaging agents and radiotherapeutic agents and/or compositions. In the method and system of the present invention, a solid target having an isotopically enriched target layer electroplated on an inert substrate is positioned in a specially designed target holder and irradiated with a charged-particle beam. The beam is preferably generated using an accelerator such as a biomedical cyclotron at energies ranging from about 5 MeV to about 25 MeV. The target is preferably directly irradiated, without an intervening attenuating foil, and with the charged particle beam impinging an area which substantially matches the target area. The irradiated target is remotely and automatically transferred from the target holder, preferably without transferring any target holder subassemblies, to a conveyance system which is preferably a pneumatic or hydraulic conveyance system, and then further transferred to an automated separation system. The system is effective for processing a single target or a plurality of targets. After separation, the unreacted target material can be recycled for preparation of other targets. In a preferred application of the invention, a biomedical cyclotron has been used to produce over 500 mCi of .sup.64 Cu having a specific activity of over 300 mCi/.mu.g Cu according to the reaction .sup.64 Ni(p,n).sup.64 Cu. These results indicate that accelerator-produced .sup.64 Cu is suitable for radiopharmaceutical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  9. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  10. Modified theory of secondary electron emission from spherical particles and its effect on dust charging in complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Department of Education Building, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2013-01-15

    The authors have modified Chow's theory of secondary electron emission (SEE) to take account of the fact that the path length of a primary electron in a spherical particle varies between zero to the diameter or x{sub m} the penetration depth depending on the distance of the path from the centre of the particle. Further by including this modified expression for SEE efficiency, the charging kinetics of spherical grains in a Maxwellian plasma has been developed; it is based on charge balance over dust particles and number balance of electrons and ionic species. It is seen that this effect is more pronounced for smaller particles and higher plasma temperatures. Desirable experimental work has also been discussed.

  11. Search for Long-Lived Massive Charged Particles in 1.96 TeV pp-bar Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We performed a signature-based search for long-lived charged massive particles produced in 1.0??fb[superscript -1] of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector using a high transverse-momentum ...

  12. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (?dir) and pi0 are measured in p+p and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A ...

  13. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  14. Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles.1088/0741-3335/52/12/124027 Diagnosing indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions with charged particles C K Li1 , F H S are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction Achieving inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF

  15. Eikonal approximation in the theory of energy loss by fast charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matveev, V. I., E-mail: matveev.victor@pomorsu.ru; Makarov, D. N.; Gusarevich, E. S. [Lomonosov Pomor State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    Energy losses in fast charged particles as a result of collisions with atoms are considered in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the nonperturbative contribution to effective stopping in the range of intermediate impact parameters (comparable with the characteristic sizes of the electron shells of the target atoms) may turn out to be significant as compared to shell corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula calculated in perturbation theory. The simplifying assumptions are formulated under which the Bethe-Bloch formula can be derived in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the allowance for nonperturbative effects may lead to considerable (up to 50%) corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula. The applicability range for the Bethe-Bloch formula is analyzed. It is concluded that calculation of the energy loss in the eikonal approximation (in the range of impact parameters for which the Bethe-Bloch formula is normally used) is much more advantageous than analysis based on the Bethe-Bloch formula and its modifications because not only the Bloch correction is included in the former calculations, the range of intermediate impact parameters is also taken into account nonperturbatively; in addition, direct generalization to the cases of collisions of complex projectiles and targets is possible in this case.

  16. Methods for two-dimensional charged-particle transport in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forslund, D.W.; Brackbill, J.U.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for modeling multi-dimensional charged particle transport in self-consistent electric and magnetic fields is presented. An implicit formulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations removes the usual restrictions on time and mesh spacing so that low frequency and large scale-length plasma phenomena can be studied. The improvement over previous explicit methods is literally orders of magnitude. As developed in a new code VENUS, we describe the algorithm and its stability and accuracy properties. This method allows one to bridge the enormous gap between the high frequency short scale-length collective plasma phenomena and the slow time scales and large-scale lengths of hydrodynamic processes. It should result in a significant improvement of phenomenological models of transport in existing hydrodynamics codes. Applications are given that include the discovery of the important role of self-generated magnetic fields in the convective transport of electron energy in laser irradiated plasmas. The transport, which occurs in the magnetized collisionless plasma corona, carries energy large distances from the laser deposition region in agreement with a wide variety of experimental data on apparent inhibited electron transport and fast ion loss.

  17. Generation of excited coherent states for a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojaveri, B.; Dehghani, A. E-mail: alireza.dehghani@gmail.com

    2015-04-15

    We introduce excited coherent states, |?,?;nгЂ‰?a{sup †n}|?,?гЂ‰, where n is an integer and states |?,?гЂ‰ denote the coherent states of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. States |?,?гЂ‰ minimize the Schrödinger-Robertson uncertainty relation while having the nonclassical properties. It has been shown that the resolution of identity condition is realized with respect to an appropriate measure on the complex plane. Some of the nonclassical features such as sub-Poissonian statistics and quadrature squeezing of these states are investigated. Our results are compared with similar Agarwal’s type photon added coherent states (PACSs) and it is shown that, while photon-counting statistics of |?,?,nгЂ‰ are the same as PACSs, their squeezing properties are different. It is also shown that for large values of |?|, while they are squeezed, they minimize the uncertainty condition. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that by changing the magnitude of the external magnetic field, B{sub ext}, the squeezing effect is transferred from one component to another. Finally, a new scheme is proposed to generate states |?,?;nгЂ‰ in cavities.?.

  18. Limiting current of axisymmetric relativistic charged-particle beam propagating in strong axial magnetic field in coaxial drift tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yatsenko, T.; Ilyenko, K.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2012-06-15

    In the strong axial magnetic field approximation, we calculate the space-charge limited (SCL) current of axisymmetric relativistic charged-particle beam in a coaxial drift tube of finite length. Results are compared to analytical estimates and numerical modeling of SCL current in the infinitely long drift tube. For the infinitely long drift tube, which inner conductor is biased and the outer conductor is lined with a finite-width dielectric insert, analytic approximations for the SCL current in the bias voltage are developed.

  19. Third Harmonic Flow of Charged Particles in Au+Au Collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; F. Ding; A. Dion; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; S. Gliske; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L. -X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; A. Luszczak; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; J. Novak; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; C. B. Powell; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; B. Sharma; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2013-07-15

    We report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, v_3, known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV, based on data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Two-particle correlations as a function of their pseudorapidity separation are fit with narrow and wide Gaussians. Measurements of triangular flow are extracted from the wide Gaussian, from two-particle cumulants with a pseudorapidity gap, and also from event plane analysis methods with a large pseudorapidity gap between the particles and the event plane. These results are reported as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. A large dependence on the pseudorapidity gap is found. Results are compared with other experiments and model calculations.

  20. Third Harmonic Flow of Charged Particles in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav Pandit; for the STAR Collaboration

    2012-09-03

    In this proceedings, we report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, $v_{3}$, known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles near midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} $ = 200 GeV, based on data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Triangular flow as a function of centrality, pseudorapidity and transverse momentum are reported using various methods, including a study of the signal for particle pairs as a function of their pseudorapidity separation. Results are compared with other experiments and model predictions.

  1. Stopping power for a charged particle moving through three-dimensional nonideal finite-temperature electron gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Ya; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the interaction of a charged particle with nonideal 3D electron gases by using the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. The stopping power for a nonideal electron gas at a finite-temperature has been theoretically analyzed and numerically calculated. In our calculation, the impact of nonideality and temperature on stopping power is stressed and clearly presented. The QHD dielectric function is obtained and compared to random-phase approximation result. It is shown that the QHD theory can properly describe the stopping power for higher particle velocities greater than the Bohr velocity.

  2. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  3. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Balek

    2015-09-03

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  4. Exact solution of the EM radiation-reaction problem for classical finite-size and Lorentzian charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremaschini, Claudio; 10.1140/epjp/i2011-11042-8

    2012-01-01

    An exact solution is given to the classical electromagnetic (EM) radiation-reaction (RR) problem, originally posed by Lorentz. This refers to the dynamics of classical non-rotating and quasi-rigid finite size particles subject to an external prescribed EM field. A variational formulation of the problem is presented. It is shown that a covariant representation for the EM potential of the self-field generated by the extended charge can be uniquely determined, consistent with the principles of classical electrodynamics and relativity. By construction, the retarded self 4-potential does not possess any divergence, contrary to the case of point charges. As a fundamental consequence, based on Hamilton variational principle, an exact representation is obtained for the relativistic equation describing the dynamics of a finite-size charged particle (RR equation), which is shown to be realized by a second-order delay-type ODE. Such equation is proved to apply also to the treatment of Lorentzian particles, i.e., point-m...

  5. Charged Particle Multiplicity and Limiting Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies Using the Phobos Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachid Nouicer

    2002-08-01

    The first measurements of charged particle pseudorapidity distributions obtained from Au + Au collisions at the maximum RHIC energy sqrt(s_{NN}) = 200 GeV) using the PHOBOS detector are presented. A comparison of the pseudorapidity distributions at energies 130 and 200 GeV for different centrality bins is made, including an estimate of the total number of charged particles. Away from the mid-rapidity region, a comparison between Pb + Pb at SPS energy sqrt(s_{NN}) = 17.3 GeV and Au + Au at RHIC energy sqrt(s_{NN}) = 130 GeV indicates that the extent of the limiting fragmentation region grows by about 1.5 units of eta - y_{beam} over this energy range. We also observe that the extent of the limiting fragmentation region is independent of centrality at the same energy, but that the particle production per participant in the limiting fragmentation region grows at high eta - y_{beam} >= -1.5 for more peripheral collisions. In combination with results from lower energies and from bar{p} + p collisions, these data permit a systematic analysis of particle production mechanisms in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  6. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large time steps and cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy consid...

  7. Measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy for charged particle production in ?s[subscript NN]=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Differential measurements of charged particle azimuthal anisotropy are presented for lead-lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, based on an integrated luminosity of approximately ...

  8. Measurement of underlying event characteristics using charged particles in pp collisions at [sqrt]s=900??GeV and 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of charged particle distributions, sensitive to the underlying event, have been performed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are based on data collected using a minimum-bias trigger to select ...

  9. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Robert P.

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along ...

  10. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2011-03-18

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  11. Self-interaction in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics: Can the observable mass of a charged particle depend on its acceleration?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zayats, Alexei E., E-mail: Alexei.Zayats@kpfu.ru

    2014-03-15

    In this paper we obtain the expression for the self-force in the model with the Lagrangian containing additional terms, quadratic in Maxwell tensor derivatives (so-called Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics). Features of this force are analyzed for various limiting cases. When a charged particle moves along straight line with a uniform acceleration, an explicit formula is found. In the framework of the considered model, an observable renormalized particle mass is shown to depend on its acceleration. This dependence allows, in principle, to extract experimentally a value of the particle bare mass. -- Highlights: •An expression for the self-force in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics is given. •For a uniformly accelerated charged particle an explicit formula for the self-force is obtained. •Dependence between the observable mass of a charged particle and its acceleration is found.

  12. Impact of Electric Current Fluctuations Arising from Power Supplies on Charged-Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, P S

    2008-01-01

    Electric current fluctuations are one type of unavoidable machine imperfections,and induce magnetic-field perturbations as a source of instabilities in accelerators. This paper presents measurement-based methodology of modeling the fluctuating electric current arising from the power system of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron to discuss the ramifications of the presence of ripple current and space-charge defocusing effects. We also present the method of generating stochastic noise and the measurement and analysis methods of ripple current and offending electromagnetic interferences residing in the Booster power system. This stochastic noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the fluctuating power-supply current, when coupled to space charge and impinging upon a beam, can substantially enhance beam degradation phenomena--such as emittance growth and halo formation--during the Booster injection period. With idealized and uniform charge-density distribution, fractional gro...

  13. An iterative procedure to obtain inverse response functions for thick-target correction of measured charged-particle spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pomp; U. Tippawan

    2006-08-25

    A new method for correcting charged-particle spectra for thick target effects is described. Starting with a trial function, inverse response functions are found by an iterative procedure. The variances corresponding to the measured spectrum are treated similiarly and in parallel. Oscillations of the solution are avoided by rebinning the data to finer bins during a correction iteration and back to the original or wider binning after each iteration. This thick-target correction method has been used for data obtained with the MEDLEY facility at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden, and is here presented in detail and demonstrated for two test cases.

  14. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 82, 034909 (2010) Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev...,17 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,15 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C...

  15. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over 4 units of pseudorapidity in non-single-diffractive (NSD) p-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81 $\\pm$ 0.71 (syst.), which corresponds to 2.14 $\\pm$ 0.17 (syst.) per participating nucleon. This is 16% lower than in NSD pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy, and 84% higher than in d-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p-Pb collisions is compared to model predictions, and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  16. Pauli equation for a charged spin particle on a curved surface in an electric and magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Long Wang; Long Du; Chang-Tan Xu; Xiao-Jun Liu; Hong-Shi Zong

    2014-11-05

    We derive the Pauli equation for a charged spin particle confined to move on a spatially curved surface $\\mathcal{S}$ in an electromagnetic field. Using the thin-layer quantization scheme to constrain the particle on $\\mathcal{S}$, and in the transformed spinor representations, we obtain the well-known geometric potential $V_g$ and the presence of $e^{-i\\varphi}$, which can generate additive spin connection geometric potentials by the curvilinear coordinate derivatives, and we find that the two fundamental evidences in the literature [Giulio Ferrari and Giampaolo Cuoghi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 230403 (2008).] are still valid in the present system without source current perpendicular to $\\mathcal{S}$. Finally, we apply the surface Pauli equation to spherical, cylindrical, and toroidal surfaces, in which we obtain expectantly the geometric potentials and new spin connection geometric potentials, and find that only the normal Pauli matrix appears in these equations.

  17. Charged-Particle Decay from Giant Monopole Resonance in Si-28 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toba, Y.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Garg, U.; Grabmayr, P.; Knopfle, K. T.; Riedesel, H.; Wagner, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    resonance region of "Si excited with a 129 MeV alpha particle beam has been measured in coincidence with inelastic alpha particles detected at O'. The angular correlation data show the presence of decay from both EO and E2 giant resonances. The EO giant... and alpha particles with en- ergies between 100 and 170 MeV. To identify the mono- pole, the experiments were performed at small angles, in- cluding 0' where the monopole is excited most strongly. In medium and heavy nuclei (mass number A ) 64), the GMR...

  18. Centrality Dependence of Charged Particle Multiplicity at Mid-Rapidity in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS collaboration

    2001-05-18

    We present a measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles near mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV as a function of the number of participating nucleons. These results are compared to models in an attempt to discriminate between competing scenarios of particle production in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Fundamentals of Non-relativistic Collisionless Shock Physics: V. Acceleration of Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

    2008-06-25

    A comprehensive review is given of the various processes proposed for accelerating particles by shocks to high energies. These energies are limited by several bounds: the non-relativistic nature of the heliospheric collisionless shocks to which this review restricts, the finite size of these shocks, the finite width of the downstream region, and to the nature of turbulence. In general, collisionless shocks in the heliosphere cannot accelerate particles to very high energies. As a fundamental problem of the acceleration mechanism the injection of see particles is identified. Some mecchanisms for production of seed particles are invoked. Acceleration of electrons begins to uncover its nature. The following problems are covered in this chapter: 1. Introduction -- first and second order Fermi acceleration, 2. Accelerating ions when they are already fast, diffusive acceleration, convection diffusion equation, Lee's self-consistent quasilinear shock acceleration model, 3. Observations, 4. The injection problem, ion surfing, test particle simulations, self-consistent shock acceleration simulations, downstream leakage, trapped particle acceleration, 5. Accelerating electrons, Sonnerup-Wu mechanism, Hoshino's electron shock surfing on quasi-perpendicular shocks, quasiparallel shock surfing.

  20. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at ?s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at ?s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  1. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at s?=8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  2. System Size, Energy and Centrality Dependence of Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alver; B. B. Back; M. D. Baker; M. Ballintijn; D. S. Barton; R. R. Betts; R. Bindel; W. Busza; Z. Chai; V. Chetluru; E. García; T. Gburek; K. Gulbrandsen; J. Hamblen; I. Harnarine; C. Henderson; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; R. Ho?y?ski; B. Holzman; A. Iordanova; J. L. Kane; P. Kulinich; C. M. Kuo; W. Li; W. T. Lin; C. Loizides; S. Manly; A. C. Mignerey; R. Nouicer; A. Olszewski; R. Pak; C. Reed; E. Richardson; C. Roland; G. Roland; J. Sagerer; I. Sedykh; C. E. Smith; M. A. Stankiewicz; P. Steinberg; G. S. F. Stephans; A. Sukhanov; A. Szostak; M. B. Tonjes; A. Trzupek; G. J. van Nieuwenhuizen; S. S. Vaurynovich; R. Verdier; G. I. Veres; P. Walters; E. Wenger; D. Willhelm; F. L. H. Wolfs; B. Wosiek; K. Wo?niak; S. Wyngaardt; B. Wys?ouch

    2007-09-25

    We present the first measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions as a function of collision centrality and energy, \\sqrtsnn = 22.4, 62.4 and 200 GeV, over a wide range of pseudorapidity, using the PHOBOS detector. Making a global comparison of Cu+Cu and Au+Au results, we find that the total number of produced charged particles and the rough shape (height and width) of the pseudorapidity distributions are determined by the number of nucleon participants. More detailed studies reveal that a more precise matching of the shape of the Cu+Cu and Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions over the full range of pseudorapidity occurs for the same Npart/2A value rather than the same Npart value. In other words, it is the collision geometry rather than just the number of nucleon participants that drives the detailed shape of the pseudorapidity distribution and its centrality dependence at RHIC energies.

  3. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2013-07-17

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly sensitive explosives can be also caused by intense charge-dipole attacks of surrounding water vapor molecules electrostatically attracted from ambient humid air and strongly accelerated towards charged sites on explosive surfaces. Emission of electrons, photons and heat from ionized hot spots randomly migrating on charged surface of highly sensitive explosive aerosol nanoparticles converts such particles into the form of short-circuited thermionic nanobatteries.

  4. Acceleration and Compression of Charged Particle Bunches Using Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Shvets; N. J. Fisch; A. Pukhov

    2000-10-17

    The nonlinear interaction between counter-propagating laser beams in a plasma results in the generation of large (enhanced) plasma wakes. The two beams need to be slightly detuned in frequency, and one of them has to be ultra-short (shorter than a plasma period). Thus produced wakes have a phase velocity close to the speed of light and can be used for acceleration and compression of charged bunches. The physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced wake generation is qualitatively described and compared with the conventional laser wakefield mechanism. The authors also demonstrate that, depending on the sign of the frequency difference between the lasers, the enhanced wake can be used as a ``snow-plow'' to accelerate and compress either positively or negatively charged bunches. This ability can be utilized in an electron-positron injector.

  5. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of {sup 16}N and {sup 16}F nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S. [Physics Department, College of Science, Kirkuk University, Kirkuk (Iraq)

    2013-12-16

    The nuclear structure of {sup 16}N (closed shell + ? ? ?) and {sup 16}F (closed shell + ? ? ?) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  6. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

  7. Centrality Dependence of Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Distributions from d Au Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark 8 Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 9 Department dynamics, with both the saturation model [3,4] and calculations that instead focus on the energy- loss classes. The results allow for a detailed comparison to model predictions of particle production at RHIC

  8. Rapidity Dependence of Charged Antiparticle-to-Particle Ratios in Au+Au Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark 8 Texas A of the dynamics of high en- ergy nucleus-nucleus collisions [1, 2]. At the energy of sNN =200 GeV considerable is significant and produc- tion mechanisms other than particle-antiparticle pair production play a substantial

  9. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  10. Jet and underlying event properties as a function of charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2013-12-17

    Characteristics of multi-particle production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity, N[ch]. The produced particles are separated into two classes: those belonging to jets and those belonging to the underlying event. Charged particles are measured with pseudorapidity abs(eta) < 2.4 and transverse momentum pt > 0.25 GeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged-particles only and required to have pt > 5 GeV. The distributions of jet pt, average pt of charged particles belonging to the underlying event or to jets, jet rates, and jet shapes are presented as functions of N[ch] and compared to the predictions of the PYTHIA and HERWIG event generators. Predictions without multi-parton interactions fail completely to describe the N[ch]-dependence observed in the data. For increasing N[ch], PYTHIA systematically predicts higher jet rates and harder pt spectra than seen in the data, whereas HERWIG shows the opposite trends. At the highest multiplicity, the data-model agreement is worse for most observables, indicating the need for further tuning and/or new model ingredients.

  11. Tau decays with one charged particle plus multiple pi(0)'s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-03-01

    particle and a single pi0. We find B(h2pi)0/B(hpi)0 = 0.345 +/- 0.006 +/- 0.016, B(h3pi)0/B(hpi)0 = 0.041 +/- 0.003 +/- 0.005, and B(h4pi)0/B(hpi)0 = 0.006 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.002....

  12. Search for magnetic monopoles and stable particles with high electric charges in 8 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina

    2015-01-01

    A search for highly ionizing particles produced in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV center-of-mass energy is performed by the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 7.0 fb$^{-1}$. A customized trigger significantly increases the sensitivity, permitting a search for such particles with charges and energies beyond what was previously accessible. No event is found in the signal region, leading to production cross-section upper limits in the mass range 200--2500 GeV for magnetic monopoles with magnetic charge in the range $0.5g_{D}electric charge in the range $10<|z|<60$. Model-dependent limits are presented in given pair-production scenarios, and model-independent limits are presented in fiducial regions of particle energy and pseudorapidity.

  13. Search for magnetic monopoles and stable particles with high electric charges in 8 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-09-27

    A search for highly ionizing particles produced in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV center-of-mass energy is performed by the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 7.0 fb$^{-1}$. A customized trigger significantly increases the sensitivity, permitting a search for such particles with charges and energies beyond what was previously accessible. No event is found in the signal region, leading to production cross-section upper limits in the mass range 200-2500 GeV for magnetic monopoles with magnetic charge in the range $0.5g_{D}electric charge in the range $10<|z|<60$. Model-dependent limits are presented in given pair-production scenarios, and model-independent limits are presented in fiducial regions of particle energy and pseudorapidity.

  14. Asymptotic scattering wave function for three charged particles and astrophysical capture processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirlepesov, Fakhriddin

    2006-08-16

    in the six-dimensional hyperspace when the hyperradius R arrowrightinfinity[18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24]. Such methods, in principle, require knowledge of the asymptotic behaviour of the scattered wave function in all asymptotic regions of the confifguration... by the Schr? equation {E -H}psi(+)k (r)=0, (3.5) 19 Fig. 1. Jacobi coordinate system. 20 where eta = z1z2?k is Coulomb parameter, E = k22? is the relative kinetic energy of the interacting particles 1 and 2, H = -triangler2? +V is two body Hamiltonian...

  15. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup ?1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  16. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzoganis, Vasilis, E-mail: vasileios.tzoganis@cockcroft.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); RIKEN Nishina Centre, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-19

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup ?7} down to below 10{sup ?11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5?keV electron beam are discussed.

  17. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  18. Developments in accelerators and instrumentation relevant to imaging with charged particles and positron emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    In past years particle accelerators have become increasingly important tools for the advancement of medical science. From the pace of advancing technology and current directions in medical research, it is clear that this relationship between accelerators and medicine will only grow stronger in future years. In view of this importance, this relationship is investigated in some detail, with an eye not so much towards the medical uses of the beams produced, but more towards the technology associated with these accelerators and the criteria which make for successful incorporation of these machines into the clinical environment. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the different kinds of accelerators found in medical use today are reviewed briefly discussing salient points of each.

  19. Search for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for long-lived charged particles reaching the muon spectrometer is performed using a data sample of 37 pb[superscript ?1] from pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2010. No ...

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in Pb-Pb collisions at ?s NN=2.76TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pT) range up to approximately 60??GeV/c. The data cover ...

  1. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Pseudorapidity ( ? ) distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges |?|<2.2 and 5.3<|?|<6.4 covered by the CMS and TOTEM detectors, ...

  2. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 5.02 TeV, in the range 0.4 < p[subscript T] < 120 GeV/c and pseudorapidity ...

  3. Light Charged Particle Emission Following the Fusion of 18O Ions with 12C Nuclei at Energies Near and Below the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Light Charged Particle Emission Following the Fusion of 18O Ions with 12C Nuclei at Energies Near Releases more energy in a few hours than our sun does in a decade X-ray superbursts thought to be fueled by 12C+12C fusion in the outer crust Temperature of the outer crust is too low (~3×106 K) relative

  4. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive ?(s)=7??TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse ...

  5. Charge exchange neutral particle measurements with natural diamond detector under the deuterium-deuterium neutron field on JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kusama, Y.; Takechi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A.; Kaschuck, Yu. A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-0193 (Japan); Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gihu 509-5292 (Japan); Troitsk Institute of Innovating and Fusion Research (TRINITI) Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092 (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-01

    A natural diamond detector (NDD) has been installed on the JT-60U tokamak to measure the flux and the energy distribution of charge exchange (CX) fast neutral particles. A NDD has many important advantages to be used as a CX neutral particle analyzer, for example very compact size, high energy resolution, and high radiation hardness etc., while the neutrons and {gamma} rays are a large noise source in the deuterium plasma. The shield was set up around the NDD to reduce those noises. Time-resolved energy distribution of CX neutral particles corresponding to injected beam energy have been successfully obtained under high intensity neutron yield Y{sub n}>10{sup 15} n/s. Further enhanced neutral particle fluxes during sawtooth oscillation and Alfven eigenmodes were observed with the NDD. The performance of the NDD as CX neutral particle spectrometer under high intensity neutron yield was demonstrated for the first time on JT-60U in this work.

  6. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 15 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 9 APRIL 2001 New Mechanism of X-Ray Radiation from a Relativistic Charged Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transition is utilized to detect the x-ray radiation energy deposited on the grain. The detection-Ray Radiation from a Relativistic Charged Particle in a Dielectric Random Medium Zh. S. Gevorkian,1,2, * C. P, we propose a new mechanism of x-ray radiation from a relativistic charged particle moving in a system

  7. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, B. K. Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2014-07-15

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region.

  8. Compact multichannel neutral particle analyzer for measurement of energetic charge-exchanged neutrals in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, V.; Liptac, J.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Fiore, C. L.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Leiter, R.; Mcduffee, S.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    A four-channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) based on operating small Si diode detectors in pulse-height analysis (PHA) mode is used to measure energetic hydrogen minority ions with energies between {approx}50 and 350 keV stemming from ion-cyclotron range-of-frequency heated D(H) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with both active and passive charge exchange (CX). First core minority ion distribution results from Alcator C-Mod discharges and a detailed description of the diagnostic are presented. The diagnostic employs integrated electronics and fast digitization of the shaping amplifier voltage. The digitized data are stored for postshot PHA, which removes the constraints of real-time PHA and allows for improved performance via elimination of base line shift effects and potentially relieving pileup through Gaussian fitting routines. The CNPA is insensitive to the large gamma and neutron background in Alcator C-Mod discharges but is susceptible to the plasma's soft x-ray flux. The soft x-ray flux limits the CNPA energy resolution to {approx}15-20 keV. A simple model is used to interpret the active CNPA data which permits rapid estimates of the core hydrogen minority temperatures and anisotropy with a time resolution of {approx}100 ms. Hydrogenlike boron is identified as an important electron donor for the CX signal.

  9. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K[0 over S] or [? over [bar over ?

  10. Analytical methods for describing charged particle dynamics in general focusing lattices using generalized Courant-Snyder theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Qin; Ronald C. Davidson; J. W. Burby; Moses Chung

    2015-04-16

    The dynamics of charged particles in general linear focusing lattices with quadrupole, skew-quadrupole, dipole, and solenoidal components, as well as torsion of the fiducial orbit and variation of beam energy is parameterized using a generalized Courant-Snyder (CS) theory, which extends the original CS theory for one degree of freedom to higher dimensions. The envelope function is generalized into an envelope matrix, and the phase advance is generalized into a 4D symplectic rotation, or an U(2) element. The 1D envelope equation, also known as the Ermakov-Milne-Pinney equation in quantum mechanics, is generalized to an envelope matrix equation in higher dimensions. Other components of the original CS theory, such as the transfer matrix, Twiss functions, and CS invariant (also known as the Lewis invariant) all have their counterparts, with remarkably similar expressions, in the generalized theory. The gauge group structure of the generalized theory is analyzed. By fixing the gauge freedom with a desired symmetry, the generalized CS parameterization assumes the form of the modified Iwasawa decomposition, whose importance in phase space optics and phase space quantum mechanics has been recently realized. This gauge fixing also symmetrizes the generalized envelope equation and express the theory using only the generalized Twiss function \\beta.The generalized phase advance completely determines the spectral and structural stability properties of a general focusing lattice. For structural stability, the generalized CS theory enables application of the Krein-Moser theory to greatly simplify the stability analysis. The generalized CS theory provides an effective tool to study coupled dynamics and to discover more optimized lattice design in the larger parameter space of general focusing lattices.

  11. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  12. Analytical methods for describing charged particle dynamics in general focusing lattices using generalized Courant-Snyder theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Burby, Joshua W.; Chung, Moses

    2014-04-08

    The dynamics of charged particles in general linear focusing lattices with quadrupole, skew-quadrupole, dipole, and solenoidal components, as well as torsion of the fiducial orbit and variation of beam energy is parametrized using a generalized Courant-Snyder (CS) theory, which extends the original CS theory for one degree of freedom to higher dimensions. The envelope function is generalized into an envelope matrix, and the phase advance is generalized into a 4D symplectic rotation, or a Uð2Þ element. The 1D envelope equation, also known as the Ermakov-Milne-Pinney equation in quantum mechanics, is generalized to an envelope matrix equation in higher dimensions. Other components of the original CS theory, such as the transfer matrix, Twiss functions, and CS invariant (also known as the Lewis invariant) all have their counterparts, with remarkably similar expressions, in the generalized theory. The gauge group structure of the generalized theory is analyzed. By fixing the gauge freedom with a desired symmetry, the generalized CS parametrization assumes the form of the modified Iwasawa decomposition, whose importance in phase space optics and phase space quantum mechanics has been recently realized. This gauge fixing also symmetrizes the generalized envelope equation and expresses the theory using only the generalized Twiss function ?. The generalized phase advance completely determines the spectral and structural stability properties of a general focusing lattice. For structural stability, the generalized CS theory enables application of the Krein-Moser theory to greatly simplify the stability analysis. The generalized CS theory provides an effective tool to study coupled dynamics and to discover more optimized lattice designs in the larger parameter space of general focusing lattices.

  13. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc; Ryan Fitzgerald

    2010-04-23

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this series (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this series (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  14. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|? jet| T jet T jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |?| T > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore »transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  15. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV in the range 0.4 T CM| T CM = 0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at ?sNN = 5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lowermore »center-of-mass energies. The pT distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with pT > 20 GeV/c compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations that include antishadowing modifications of nPDFs.« less

  16. Centrality Dependence of the Charged Particle Multiplicity near Mid-Rapidity in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-01-12

    The PHOBOS experiment has measured the charged particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV as a function of the collision centrality. Results on dN/deta(eta, are presented as a function of . As was found from similar data at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV, the data can be equally well described by parton saturation models and two-component fits which include contributions that scale as Npart and the number of binary collisions, Ncoll. We compare the data at the two energies by means of the ratio R(200/130) of the charged particle multiplicity for the two different energies as a function of . For events with >100$, we find that this ratio is consistent with a constant value of 1.14+-0.01(stat.)+-0.05(syst.).

  17. Comment on 'Geometric phase of the gyromotion for charged particles in a time-dependent magnetic field'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072505 (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brizard, Alain J. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States); Guillebon, Loiec de [Centre de Physique Theorique Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS (UMR 7332), 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2012-09-15

    The geometric analysis of the gyromotion for charged particles in a time-dependent magnetic field by Liu and Qin [Phys. Plasmas 18, 072505 (2011)] is reformulated in terms of the spatial angles that represent the instantaneous orientation of the magnetic field. This new formulation, which includes the equation of motion for the pitch angle, clarifies the decomposition of the gyroangle-averaged equation of motion for the gyrophase into its dynamic and geometric contributions.

  18. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-29

    Pseudorapidity ( $\\eta $ ) distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $~\\text {TeV}$ are measured in the ranges $|\\eta | more »depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.« less

  19. Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the interpretation of their spectra. Strong electric fields are created when hot electrons, generated by laser energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing fundamental charged as the corona where strong electric fields may exist. As a result, the energy spectrum of charged fusion

  20. IonCCD™ for direct position-sensitive charged-particle detection: from electrons and keV ions to hyperthermal biomolecular ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjar, Omar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Kibelka, Gottfried; Shill, Scott M.; Kuhn, Ken; Cameron, Chad; Kassan, Scott

    2011-04-01

    A novel charged-particle sensitive, pixel based detector array is described and its usage is demonstrated for a variety of applications, from detection of elemental particles (electrons) to hyper-thermal large biomolecular positive and negative ions including keV light atomic and molecular ions. The array detector is a modified light-sensitive charged coupled device (CCD). The IonCCDTM was engineered for direct charged particle detection by replacing the semi-conductor part of the CCD pixel by a conductor1. In contrast with the CCD, where the semi-conductive pixel is responsible for electron-hole pair formation upon photon bombardment, the IonCCD uses a capacitor coupled to the conductive electrode for direct charge integration. The detector can be operated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum since no high voltages are needed. The IonCCD, presented in this work is an array of 2126 active pixels with 21 um pixel width and 3 um pixel gap. The detection area is 1.5x51mm2 where 1.5 mm and 51 mm are pixel and detector array length, respectively. The result is a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector with 24 um spatial resolution and 88 % pixel area ratio (PAR). In this work we demonstrate the capabilities and the performance of the detector. For the first time we show the direct detection of 250 eV electrons providing linearity response and detection efficiency of the IonCCD as function of electron beam current. Using positive ions from and electron impact source (E-I), we demonstrate that the detection efficiency of the IonCCD is virtually independent of particle energy [250 eV, 1250 eV], particle impact angle [45o, 90o] and particle flux. By combining the IonCCD with a double focusing sector field of Mattauch-Herzog geometry (M-H), we demonstrate fast acquisition of mass spectra in direct air sniffing mode. A first step towards fast in vivo breath analysis is presented. Detection of hyper-thermal biomolecular ions produced using an electrospray ionization source (ESI) is presented. The IonCCD was used as beam profiler to characterize the beam shape and intensity of 15 eV protonated and deprotonated biomolecular ions at the exit of an RF only collisional quadrupole. We present simultaneous detection of 140 eV doubly protonated biomolecular ions when the IonCCD is combined with the M-H analyzer. The latter, demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous separation and micro-array deposition of biological material using a miniature sector field.

  1. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kino, Yasushi [Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mathews, Grant J., E-mail: motohiko@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: cheoun@ssu.ac.kr, E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: y.k@m.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ? 100 GeV, the d-wave ? 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  2. Measurement of the centrality dependence of the charged particle pseudorapidity distribution in lead–lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the centrality dependence of charged particle pseudorapidity distributions over |?|<2 in lead–lead collisions at a nucleon–nucleon centre-of-mass energy of ?s[subscript NN] = ...

  3. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Charged-Particle Fragmentation Functions in Pb+Pb Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of charged-particle fragmentation functions of jets produced in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions can provide insight into the modification of parton showers in the hot, dense medium created in the collisions. ...

  4. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  5. Suppression of Charged Particle Production at Large Transverse Momentum in Central Pb-Pb Collisions at sNN = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamodt, K. [University of Oslo, Norway; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; ALICE, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of primary charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.76 TeV have been measured by the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC. The data are presented for central and peripheral collisions, corresponding to 0--5% and 70-80% of the hadronic Pb-PB cross section. The measured charged particle spectra in |{eta}| < 0.8 and 0.3 < p{sub T} < 20 GeV/c are compared to the expectation in pp collisions at the same {radical}s{sub NN}, scaled by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions. The comparison is expressed in terms of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}. The result indicates only weak medium effects (R{sub AA} {approx} 0.7) in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, R{sub AA} reaches a minimum of about 0.14 at p{sub T} = 6--7 GeV/c and increases significantly at larger p{sub T}. The measured suppression of high-p{sub T} particles is stronger than that observed at lower collision energies, indicating that a very dense medium is formed in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  6. Pseudorapidity and centrality dependence of the collective flow of charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2002-05-29

    This paper describes the measurement of collective flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN}} = 130 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). An azimuthal anisotropy is observed in the charged particle hit distribution in the PHOBOS multiplicity detector. This anisotropy is presented over a wide range of pseudorapidity (eta) for the first time at this energy. The size of the anisotropy (v_{2}) is thought to probe the degree of equilibration achieved in these collisions. The result here,averaged over momenta and particle species, is observed to reach 7% for peripheral collisions at mid-rapidity, falling off with centrality and increasing |eta|. Data are presented as a function of centrality for |eta|<1.0 and as a function of eta, averaged over centrality, in the angular region -5.0

  7. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data samplemore »corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.« less

  8. Abstract--The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure charged cosmic rays spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Abstract--The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle physics experiment in space to be placed hundred GeV. AMS is a superconducting spectrometer with large acceptance, long duration (3 years

  9. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CMS collaboration; The TOTEM Collaboration

    2014-11-05

    Pseudorapidity (eta) distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges abs(eta) proton-proton cross section. The other two categories are disjoint subsets of the inclusive sample that are either enhanced or depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  10. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  11. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons at forward pseudorapidity in Au plus Au collisons at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Blyth, SL; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, JH; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, HA; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cosentino, MR; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, KSF; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gorbunov, YG; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horner, MJ; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kim, BC; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, CH; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, MJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timmins, AR; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, IK; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zhong, C.

    2006-01-01

    gains for normalization and by studying the azimuthal dependence of the photon density of the detector in an ? window to be 13.5% for central and 15% for peripheral collisions. The total systematic error inN? is?17% for both central and peripheral... centrality classes inAu+Aucollisions at?sNN = 62.4GeV. Solid line is a straight line fit to the data points. have a characteristic shape with a steep rise that corresponds to the most peripheral events. The plateaus in the photon and charged particle...

  12. Electrical charge acquired by 0.31 um [micrometer] aerosol particles from unequal concentrations of bipolar ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauntt, Randall Owen

    1979-01-01

    The Boltzmann distribution. Cumulative Boltzmann distribution Differential distribution 2:1 Differential distribution 3:1 Differential distribution 5:1 Differential distribution 10:l. Differential distribution 5000:1. Cumulative distribution 1... t Differential mobility tests were conducted for positive to negative current density ratios of 2:1, 3:1, 5:1, 10:1, and 5000:1. The dominant current density (positive) is 1. 64xl0' ions/cm -sec and the charging time in all cases is one second. Charge...

  13. A shape of charged particle lateral distribution in individual EAS events with energy above 10^19 eV arriving from different celestial regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Sabourov; M. I. Pravdin; S. P. Knurenko

    2007-11-15

    A shape of lateral distribution for charged particles in events with energy above 10^19eV is considered. Two methods were used for individual LDF parametrization. In the first approach, the index of power was determined for generalized Greisen-Linsley approximation. In second, mean square radius of the shower was determined for approximation proposed by Lagutin et al. Comparison of resulted parameters is presented for individual events arrived from different celestial regions -- Galactic planes and the region with increased flux of particles with E(0)>=10^19eV (according to Yakutsk array): 1.7h-3.7h right ascension; 45-60 degrees declination.

  14. Diagnosing fuel R and R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged-particle spectrometry at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnosing fuel R and R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged; published online 22 April 2009 Determining fuel areal density R in moderate- R 100­200 mg/cm2 cryogenic-on deuterons KO-Ds , elastically scattered by primary DT neutrons, from which a fuel R can be inferred

  15. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-07-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pt) range up to approximately 60 GeV. The data cover both the low-pt region associated with hydrodynamic flow phenomena and the high-pt region where the anisotropies may reflect the path-length dependence of parton energy loss in the created medium. The anisotropy parameter (v2) of the particles is extracted by correlating charged tracks with respect to the event-plane reconstructed by using the energy deposited in forward-angle calorimeters. For the six bins of collision centrality studied, spanning the range of 0-60% most-central events, the observed v2 values are found to first increase with pt, reaching a maximum around pt = 3 GeV, and then to gradually decrease to almost zero, with the decline persisting up to at least pt = 40 GeV over the full centrality range measured.

  16. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2005-09-28

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV has been measured over a wide range of impact parameters and compared to results obtained at other energies. As a function of collision energy, the pseudorapidity distribution grows systematically both in height and width. The mid-rapidity density is found to grow approximately logarithmically between AGS energies and the top RHIC energy. As a function of centrality, there is an approximate factorization of the centrality dependence of the mid-rapidity yields and the overall multiplicity scale. The new results at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV confirm the previously observed phenomenon of ``extended longitudinal scaling'' in the pseudorapidity distributions when viewed in the rest frame of one of the colliding nuclei. It is also found that the evolution of the shape of the distribution with centrality is energy independent, when viewed in this reference frame. As a function of centrality, the total charged particle multiplicity scales linearly with the number of participant pairs as it was observed at other energies.

  17. Directed and elliptic flow of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{\\bm {s_{NN}}} =$ 22.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; 1 L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2011-12-07

    This paper reports results for directed flow $v_{1}$ and elliptic flow $v_{2}$ of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 22.4 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measurements are for the 0-60% most central collisions, using charged particles observed in the STAR detector. Our measurements extend to 22.4 GeV Cu+Cu collisions the prior observation that $v_1$ is independent of the system size at 62.4 and 200 GeV, and also extend the scaling of $v_1$ with $\\eta/y_{\\rm beam}$ to this system. The measured $v_2(p_T)$ in Cu+Cu collisions is similar for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 22.4-200$ GeV. We also report a comparison with results from transport model (UrQMD and AMPT) calculations. The model results do not agree quantitatively with the measured $v_1(\\eta), v_2(p_T)$ and $v_2(\\eta)$.

  18. Charged particle spectra in [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p[sub T] dN/dp[sub T] and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be [Delta]y [approximately] 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p[sub T]. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T[sub f] [approximately] 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  19. Charged particle spectra in {sup 32}S + {sup 32}S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p{sub T} dN/dp{sub T} and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central {sup 32}S + {sup 32}S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be {Delta}y {approximately} 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p{sub T}. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T{sub f} {approximately} 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  20. Rapidity Dependence of Charged AntiparticletoParticle Ratios in Au+Au Collisions at # s NN = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark 8 Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 17843, USA 9 University­nucleus collisions [1, 2]. At the energy of # s NN =200 GeV considerable transparency is ex­ pected for Au­ tion mechanisms other than particle­antiparticle pair production play a substantial role. Therefore � p

  1. Characterization of solid state nuclear track detectors of the polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39/PM-355) type for light charged particle spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowska, A. Jaskó?a, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Szyd?owski, A.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a method which uses the characteristics of the etch pits induced in a polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (PADC) detector of the CR-39/PM-355 type to estimate particle energy. This method is based on the data provided by a semiautomatic system that selects tracks according to two parameters, crater diameters, and mean gray level values. In this paper we used the results of the calibration measurements that were obtained in our laboratory in the period 2000–2014. Combining the information on the two parameters it is possible to determine unambiguously the incident projectile energy values. The paper presents the results of an attempt to estimate the energy resolution of the method when analyzing the tracks produced in the CR-39/PM-355 detector by energetic ions such as alpha particles, protons, and deuterons. We discuss the energy resolution of the measurement of light charged particle energy which is based on the parameters (crater diameter and mean gray level value) of tracks induced in solid state nuclear track detectors of the PADC type.

  2. Multi-purpose two- and three-dimensional momentum imaging of charged particles for attosecond experiments at 1 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Månsson, Erik P. Sorensen, Stacey L.; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Arnold, Cord L.; Kroon, David; Guénot, Diego; Fordell, Thomas; Johnsson, Per; L’Huillier, Anne; Lépine, Franck

    2014-12-15

    We report on the versatile design and operation of a two-sided spectrometer for the imaging of charged-particle momenta in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). The benefits of 3D detection are to discern particles of different mass and to study correlations between fragments from multi-ionization processes, while 2D detectors are more efficient for single-ionization applications. Combining these detector types in one instrument allows us to detect positive and negative particles simultaneously and to reduce acquisition times by using the 2D detector at a higher ionization rate when the third dimension is not required. The combined access to electronic and nuclear dynamics available when both sides are used together is important for studying photoreactions in samples of increasing complexity. The possibilities and limitations of 3D momentum imaging of electrons or ions in the same spectrometer geometry are investigated analytically and three different modes of operation demonstrated experimentally, with infrared or extreme ultraviolet light and an atomic/molecular beam.

  3. Transverse Momentum Distribution and Nuclear Modification Factor of Charged Particles in p-Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_T$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured in non single-diffractive p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The $p_T$ spectra measured near central rapidity in the range 0.5 < $p_T$ < 20 GeV/c exhibit a weak pseudorapidity dependence. The nuclear modification factor $R_{pPb}$ is consistent with unity for $p_T$ above 2 GeV/c. This measurement indicates that the strong suppression of hadron production at high $p_T$ observed in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC is not due to an initial-state effect. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations.

  4. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami

    2014-01-01

    Pseudorapidity ($\\eta$) distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges abs($\\eta$) < 2.2 and 5.3 < abs($\\eta$) < 6.4 covered by the CMS and TOTEM detectors, respectively. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 45 inverse microbarns. Measurements are presented for three event categories. The most inclusive category is sensitive to 91-96% of the total inelastic proton-proton cross section. The other two categories are disjoint subsets of the inclusive sample that are either enhanced or depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  5. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Phys. Inst. (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-10-01

    Pseudorapidity ( $\\eta $ ) distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $~\\text {TeV}$ are measured in the ranges $|\\eta | < 2.2$ and $5.3 < |\\eta | < 6.4$ covered by the CMS and TOTEM detectors, respectively. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal {L} = 45 \\mu {\\mathrm {b}}^{-1}$ . Measurements are presented for three event categories. The most inclusive category is sensitive to 91–96 % of the total inelastic proton–proton cross section. The other two categories are disjoint subsets of the inclusive sample that are either enhanced or depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  6. Centrality dependence of charged antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity in d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2003-09-17

    The ratios of the yields of charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near mid-rapidity for d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV as a function of centrality. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1

  7. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris–Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toggweiler, Matthias; Adelmann, Andreas; Arbenz, Peter; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-09-15

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self-field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. Building on recent work, a more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a clearer analysis by introducing separate time steps for external field and self-field integration, turned out to be useful by its own, for a large class of problems.

  8. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.8 fb$^{-1}$ from proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan(beta) between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production is considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squar...

  9. One-dimensional kinetic description of nonlinear traveling-pulse and traveling-wave disturbances in long coasting charged particle beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2015-09-21

    This paper makes use of a one-dimensional kinetic model to investigate the nonlinear longitudinal dynamics of a long coasting beam propagating through a perfectly conducting circular pipe with radius r w . The average axial electric field is expressed as z >=–(?/?z)=–ebg???b/?z – ebg2r2w?3?b/?z3, where g0 and g2 are constant geometric factors, ?b(z,t)=?dpz Fb (z,pz,t) is the line density of beam particles, and F b (z,pz,t) satisfies the 1D Vlasov equation. Detailed nonlinear properties of traveling-wave and traveling-pulse (soliton) solutions with time-stationary waveform are examined for a wide range of system parameters extending from moderate-amplitudes to large-amplitude modulations ofmore »the beam charge density. Two classes of solutions for the beam distribution function are considered, corresponding to: (i) the nonlinear waterbag distribution, where Fb = const in a bounded region of pz-space; and (ii) nonlinear Bernstein-Green-Kruskal (BGK)-like solutions, allowing for both trapped and untrapped particle distributions to interact with the self-generated electric field.« less

  10. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

    2013-10-26

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

  11. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-14

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.1 fb-1 from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan ? between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production ismore »considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. As a result, R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squark or top squark, are excluded up to a mass of 1270, 845 and 900 GeV, respectively, using the full detector; and up to a mass of 1260, 835 and 870 GeV using an approach disregarding information from the muon spectrometer.« less

  12. Spin-exchange optically pumped polarized {sup 3}He target for low-energy charged particle scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katabuchi, T.; Buscemi, S.; Cesaratto, J.M.; Clegg, T.B.; Daniels, T.V.; Fassler, M.; Neufeld, R.B.; Kadlecek, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Amersham Health, 2500 Meridian Parkway, Suite 150, Durham, North Carolina 27713 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    We have constructed, tested, and calibrated a polarized {sup 3}He target system which facilitates p-{sup 3}He elastic scattering at proton energies as low as 2 MeV. This system consists of a target cell placed in a uniform B field inside a scattering chamber and an external optical pumping station utilizing Rb spin exchange. Computer-controlled valves allow polarized {sup 3}He gas to be transferred quickly between the optical pumping station and the spherical Pyrex target cell, which has Kapton film covering apertures for the passing beam and the scattering particles. The magnetic field required to maintain {sup 3}He polarization in the target cell is created with a compact, shielded sine-theta coil. Target gas polarimetry is accomplished using nuclear magnetic resonance and calibrated using the known analyzing power of {alpha}-{sup 3}He scattering.

  13. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 MAY 2002 Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles from Au 1 Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of particle production at the highest RHIC energy. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.202301 PACS numbers: 25.75.Dw Distributions of Charged Particles from Au 1 Au Collisions at the Maximum RHIC Energy, p sNN p sNN p sNN 5 200 Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 8 Texas A&M University, College

  14. Measurement of the pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow of charged particles in lead–lead collisions at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter describes the measurement of elliptic flow of charged particles in lead–lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=2.76 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The results are based on an ...

  15. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly s...

  16. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Jamel, A; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bai, X; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Black, D; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bryslawskyj, J; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Ge, H; Germain, M; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, S; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isinhue, A; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y -S; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kofarago, M; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, G H; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Maruyama, T; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Midori, J; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of midrapidity charged particle multiplicity distributions, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, $dE_T/d\\eta$, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ and 62.4 GeV, Cu$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, U$+$U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=193$ GeV, $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, and the number of constituent quark participants, $N_{q{\\rm p}}$. For all $A$$+$$A$ collisions down to $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7$ GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with $N_{q{\\rm p}}$ than scalin...

  17. Charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2004-09-02

    The ratios of the yields of primary charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. Ratios of =1.000 +/- 0.012 (stat.) +/- 0.019 (syst.), =0.93 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (syst.), and =0.85 +/- 0.04 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (syst.) have been measured. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1

  18. Clifford Residues and Charge Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus S. Cohen

    2002-07-26

    We derive the quantization of action, particle number, and electric charge in a Lagrangian spin bundle over M equivalent M_# union D_J, Penrose's conformal compactification of Minkowsky space, with the world tubes of massive particles removed.

  19. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; A. Al-Jamel; H. Al-Ta'ani; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; X. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. Black; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; J. Bryslawskyj; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; P. Castera; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; N. Cronin; N. Crossette; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; D. Danley; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; P. B. Diss; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; H. Ge; M. Germain; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. Guragain; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; H. F. Hamilton; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; S. Hasegawa; T. O. S. Haseler; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; S. Hayashi; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; N. Hotvedt; J. Huang; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; Y. Imazu; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; A. Isinhue; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; S. J. Jeon; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kanda; M. Kaneta; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; P. K. Khandai; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; G. W. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; M. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; B. Kimelman; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; R. Kitamura; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klatsky; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; M. Kofarago; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; G. H. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; S Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; X. H. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; T. Maruyama; L. Mašek; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake

    2015-09-22

    Measurements of midrapidity charged particle multiplicity distributions, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, $dE_T/d\\eta$, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ and 62.4 GeV, Cu$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, U$+$U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=193$ GeV, $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, and the number of constituent quark participants, $N_{q{\\rm p}}$. For all $A$$+$$A$ collisions down to $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7$ GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with $N_{q{\\rm p}}$ than scaling with $N_{\\rm part}$. Also presented are estimates of the Bjorken energy density, $\\varepsilon_{\\rm BJ}$, and the ratio of $dE_T/d\\eta$ to $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.

  20. A Summary of Recent Experimental Research on Ion Energy and Charge States of Pulsed Vacuum Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2008-06-16

    The paper reviews the results of vacuum arc experimental investigations made collaboratively by research groups from Berkeley and Tomsk over the last two years, i.e. since the last ISDEIV in 2006. Vacuum arc plasma of various metals was produced in pulses of a few hundred microseconds duration, and the research focussed on three topics: (i) the energy distribution functions for different ion charge states, (ii) the temporal development of the ion charge state distribution, and (iii) the evolution of the mean directed ion velocities during plasma expansion. A combined quadruple mass-to-charge and energy ana-lyzer (EQP by HIDEN Ltd) and a time-of-flight spectrometer were employed. Cross-checking data by those complimen-tary techniques helped to avoid possible pitfalls in interpre-tation. It was found that the ion energy distribution func-tions in the plasma were independent of the ion charge state, which implies that the energy distribution on a substrate are not equal to due to acceleration in the substrate's sheath. In pulsed arc mode, the individual ion charge states fractions showed changes leading to a decrease of the mean charge state toward a steady-state value. This decrease can be re-duced by lower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate and reduced length of the discharge gap. It was also found that the directed ion velocity slightly decreased as the plasma expanded into vacuum.

  1. Characterization of Fundamental Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben J Baten

    2009-05-25

    This report provides an alternative to the Standard Model of particle physics. The model described here is based on results from Quantum Field Mechanics, according to which all fundamental particles and interactions originate from the interaction of two pre-space/pre-time protofields. In contrast with the Standard Model, (virtual) interaction-particles are absent in the description of any of the four fundamental interactions. Electrons perform a single quantum beat process while mesons and baryons have, respectively, two and three bound quantum beat processes. Quantum Field Mechanics suggests that the charge of an electron and positron can be identified with the two possible phases of a quantum beat process as observed in the electromagnetic protofield. This report assumes that short-range binding interaction between quantum beat processes has a masking effect on the externally observable charge of hadrons. Using this assumption, the internal structure of particles is derived from their known particle charges and relative masses. The particle structures are used to obtain the so-called charge-quantum phase law. The fractional charge of quantum beat processes inside a particle is deduced by rewriting the charge-quantum phase law in terms of a linear combination of charge contributions of individual constituent quantum beat processes. Strangeness and isospin are mathematically defined in terms of the quantum beat phases of sets of particles of the same type. Application of conservation laws to particle processes leads to relations between quantum phase, strangeness and isospin.

  2. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference ?-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of ?-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.

  3. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZEmore »particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference ?-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of ?-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.« less

  4. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles from Au+Au collisions at the maximum RHIC energy, root s(NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, H.; Norris, J.; Sanders, Stephen J.

    2002-05-01

    of the detector to a single particle. The ZDCs are located 618 m from the nominal interac- tion point and measure neutrons that are emitted at small angles with respect to the beam direction [13]. Clean se- lection of minimum-biased events required a coincidence...

  5. Constraints on the pMSSM, AMSB model and on other models from the search for long-lived charged particles in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-07-17

    Stringent limits are set on the long-lived lepton-like sector of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model (pMSSM) and the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The limits are derived from the results presented in a recent search for long-lived charged particles in proton–proton collisions, based on data collected by the CMS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. In the pMSSM parameter sub-space considered, 95.9 % of the points predicting charginos with a lifetime of at least 10 ns are excluded. These constraints on the pMSSM are the first obtained at the LHC. Charginos withmore »a lifetime greater than 100 ns and masses up to about 800 GeV in the AMSB model are also excluded. The method described can also be used to set constraints on other models.« less

  6. Study of Charged Particle Species Produced in Association with B0, B-, and Bs Mesons in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usynin, Denys

    2005-12-01

    The authors study the yields of charged kaons, charged pions, and protons produced in association with B mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1960 GeV using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This is the first reported measurements of these yields at a hadron collider. The B mesons are reconstructed using their semileptonic decays: B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D{sup -}X, D{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D*{sup -}X, D*{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{bar D}{sup 0},{bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{bar D}{sup 0}X, {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sub s}{yields}{ell}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}X, D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi},{phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The K, {pi}, and p are identified using the Time of Flight detector (TOF), the CDF spectrometer, and the specific ionization (dE/dx) measured in the central drift chamber (COT). The fraction of charged kaons produced in association with {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger than the fraction produced in association with the {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} mesons, as expected from naive models of heavy quark hadronization to mesons. The particle species yields are found to be in qualitative agreement with simulation of B meson production in hadron collisions from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo, although the yield of kaons around {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger in the simulation when compared to the data. These studies are important for understanding methods of identifying the flavor of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons in measurement of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} flavor oscillations and charge conjugation-parity (CP) violation in {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays.

  7. Study of charged particle motion in fields of different configurations for developing the concept of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, V. P.; Samokhin, A. A.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V., E-mail: gavrikov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15

    The concept of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in an electric potential of special configuration is developed. A specific feature of the proposed approach consists in using an accelerating potential for reducing energy and angular spread of plasma ions at the entrance to the separator chamber and a potential well for the spatial separation of ions with different masses. The trajectories of ions of the substance imitating spent nuclear fuel are calculated. The calculations are performed for azimuthal and axial magnetic fields and model electric field configurations corresponding to different geometries of the separator chamber. It is shown that, using magnetic fields with a characteristic strength of 1 kG and electric potentials of up to 1 kV inside a region with a linear size less than 100 cm, it is possible to separate ions of spent nuclear fuel with energies from 0.2 to 3 eV. The calculations were performed for a collisionless mode in the single-particle approximation. Possible variants of the experimental facility for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel are proposed.

  8. Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged Mirjam E. Leunissen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leunissen, Mirjam

    Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged particles Mirjam E. Leunissen1 *, Christina G charged particles can be tuned such that large ionic colloidal crystals form readily, with our theory, the stoichio- metry of our colloidal crystals is not dictated by charge neutrality; this allows us to obtain

  9. Charged fermion tunnelling from electrically and magnetically charged rotating black hole in de Sitter space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko

    2013-06-10

    Thermal radiation of electrically charged fermions from rotating black hole with electric and magnetic charges in de Sitter space is considered. The tunnelling probabilities for outgoing and incoming particles are obtained and the Hawking temperature is calculated. The relation for the classical action for the particles in the black hole's background is also found.

  10. On the Mechanism of the Volume Reflection of Relativistic Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalev, Gennady V

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the volume reflection of positively and negatively charged relativistic particles in a bent crystal have been analyzed. It has been shown that the empty core effect is significant for the negatively charged particles. The average reflection angle of the negatively charged particles has been determined and the conditions for the observation of the reflection and refraction are discussed.

  11. Measurement of charged-particle spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    Charged-particle spectra obtained in Pb+Pb interactions at \\( \\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76 \\) TeV and pp interactions at \\( \\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented, using data with integrated luminosities of 0.15 nb?¹ and 4.2 pb?¹, respectively, in a wide transverse momentum (0.5 T AA and RCP are presented in detail asmore »a function of centrality, pT and ?. They show a distinct pT-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7 GeV. Above 60 GeV, RAA is consistent with a plateau at a centrality-dependent value, within the uncertainties. The value is 0.55 ± 0.01(stat.) ± 0.04(syst.) in the most central collisions. The RAA distribution is consistent with flat |?| dependence over the whole transverse momentum range in all centrality classes.« less

  12. Charge, from EM fields only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Collins

    2007-03-04

    Consider the electric field E about an electron. Its source has been thought a substance called charge, enclosed within a small volume that defines the size of the electron. Scattering experiments find no size at all. Charge is useful, but mysterious. This study concludes that charge is not real. Useful, but not real. Absent real charge, the electric field must look to a different source. We know another electric field, vxB, not sourced by charge. A simple model of the electron, using EM fields only, has been found that generates an electric field vxB very like E. Gauss' law finds the model contains charge, but div vxB cannot find the charge density. The model contains a permanent magnetic flux quantum, configured as a dipole. The dipolar B fields spin around the symmetry axis, accounting for angular momentum. Spin stabilizes the magnetic flux quantum, and creates the vxB electric field. Stability in this model is dynamic. Energy is exchanged between the dipolar magnetic moment and an encircling toroidal displacement current, at the Compton frequency, mc^2/h = 1.24x10^20 Hz. The electric field undulates at this rate, instead of being static like E associated with charge. Absent any real charge, we have to abandon the notion that size of a charged particle is that of a small sack full of charge. The only electric field is vxB, and its source is not charge. What is the size of an electron? Coulomb scattering finds it point-like, but its spinning B fields extend to infinity.

  13. Solid state cloaking for electrical charge carrier mobility control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, Bolin; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-07-07

    An electrical mobility-controlled material includes a solid state host material having a controllable Fermi energy level and electrical charge carriers with a charge carrier mobility. At least one Fermi level energy at which a peak in charge carrier mobility is to occur is prespecified for the host material. A plurality of particles are distributed in the host material, with at least one particle disposed with an effective mass and a radius that minimize scattering of the electrical charge carriers for the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy of peak charge carrier mobility. The minimized scattering of electrical charge carriers produces the peak charge carrier mobility only at the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy, set by the particle effective mass and radius, the charge carrier mobility being less than the peak charge carrier mobility at Fermi level energies other than the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy.

  14. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  15. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  16. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  17. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  18. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget || Department ofDubeyMapping

  19. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget || Department ofDubeyMappingMapping

  20. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergy Efficiency »5 CondonSpecificMapping

  1. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergy Efficiency »5

  2. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergy Efficiency »5Mapping

  3. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Low Energy Electron Beams The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region...

  4. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  5. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  6. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  7. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  8. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  9. HPSS Charging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29 1.921HEPCharging HPSS Charging

  10. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16

    range particle-particle attraction and recovery of the expected DLVO particle-wall interactions for all concentrations examined. The possible influence of charge heterogeneity and particle size polydispersity on measured distribution functions...

  11. Particle production at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Debbe; for the BRAHMS collaboration

    2003-08-06

    This paper presents recent results from the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC; including results on particle production in rapidity space extending from y=0 to y ~ 3 and on the transverse momentum distribution of fully identified charged particles. These results were obtained from the 5% most central Au-Au collisions recorded during RHIC Run-2 at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV.

  12. Charged fermions tunneling from accelerating and rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K., E-mail: mudassir051@yahoo.com, E-mail: saifullah@qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-03-01

    We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions from accelerating and rotating black holes with electric and magnetic charges. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of incoming and outgoing fermionic particles and find the Hawking temperature of these black holes. We also provide an explicit expression of the classical action for the massive and massless particles in the background of these black holes.

  13. Full Action for an Electromagnetic Field with Electrical and Magnetic Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Serova; S. A. Serov

    2010-09-25

    The paper offers the full action for an electromagnetic field with electrical and magnetic charges; Feynman laws are formulated for the calculation of the interaction cross-sections for electrically and magnetically charged particles on the base of offered action within relativistic quantum field theory. Derived with formulated Feynman rules cross-section of the interaction between an elementary particle with magnetic charge and an elementary particle with electrical charge proves to be equal zero.

  14. The bipolar charging of submicrometer particles (0.03 [micrometers is less than or equal to] Dp [is less than or equal to] 0.31 [ micrometers]) by bipolar air ions: an experimental study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Gary Jay

    1982-01-01

    accumul ates charge . The char gi ng rate resulting from this treatment is given by: 3KE 2 u N ~ ? - Q - u N ~~+ ? + Q (3) where: E = the electric f1eld strength (statvolt/cm) K = the d1electric constant (dimensionless) + + The product term... in these experiments were 3, 10 and (unipolar posit1ve), and the time dependence of charging, characterized by the dom1nant ion conductivity- + + charging t1me product (u N t), was investigated between the limits ot 10 and 10 (statvolts ~ cm) . The result1ng aerosol...

  15. Classical Models of Subatomic Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann; M. S. Morris

    1993-07-21

    We look at the program of modelling a subatomic particle---one having mass, charge, and angular momentum---as an interior solution joined to a classical general-relativistic Kerr-Newman exterior spacetime. We find that the assumption of stationarity upon which the validity of the Kerr-Newman exterior solution depends is in fact violated quantum mechanically for all known subatomic particles. We conclude that the appropriate stationary spacetime matched to any known subatomic particle is flat space.

  16. Electric discharge in vacuum by minicharged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of a laboratory search for light minicharged particles carrying electric charge that is a small fraction $\\epsilon$ of that of electron. We point out that the production of pairs of such particles in an electric field would result in a measurable discharge in vacuum of electrically charged objects. A realistic experiment may be sensitive to such particles at least down to $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-8}$ if their mass is below $\\sim 10^{-4}$eV.

  17. Electric discharge in vacuum by minicharged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Li; M. B. Voloshin

    2013-12-30

    We discuss the possibility of a laboratory search for light minicharged particles carrying electric charge that is a small fraction $\\epsilon$ of that of electron. We point out that the production of pairs of such particles in an electric field would result in a measurable discharge in vacuum of electrically charged objects. A realistic experiment may be sensitive to such particles at least down to $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-8}$ if their mass is below $\\sim 10^{-4}$eV.

  18. Pileup per particle identification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used tomore »rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.« less

  19. Pileup per particle identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  20. Particle beam injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guethlein, Gary

    2013-06-18

    Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Workplace Charging Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review the policy guidelines used by one Workplace Charging Challenge partner to keep their program running safe and successfully.

  2. Electric Vehicle Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Twitter Attend local EV events Share your story Currently have 13 ChargePoint charging stations scattered throughout Vermont 2015 - 12 Freedom Stations & 10...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge, committing to install charging for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) at their worksites. By taking on this Challenge, they are helping...

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    Fact sheet about the EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge which is to increase the number of American employers offering workplace charging by tenfold in the next five years.

  5. Charged Cylindrical Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson Levi Said; Joseph Sultana; Kristian Zarb Adami

    2013-01-04

    Considering cylindrical topology we present the static solution for a charged black hole in conformal gravity. We show that unlike the general relativistic case there are two different solutions, both including a factor that when set to zero recovers the familiar static charged black string solution in Einstein's theory. This factor gives rise to a linear term in the potential that also features in the neutral case and may have significant ramifications for particle trajectories.

  6. Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rod-like particle suspensions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rod-like particle suspensions due to induced charge electroosmosis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrodynamic...

  7. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  8. EUROPEAN LABORATORY FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERNEP/98068

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EUROPEAN LABORATORY FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERN­EP/98­068 May 7, 1998 Bose­Einstein Correlations of Three Charged Pions in Hadronic Z 0 Decays The OPAL Collaboration Abstract Bose­Einstein Correlations

  9. Search for Lightly Ionizing Particles Using CDMS-II Data and Fabrication of CDMS Detectors with Improved Homogeneity in Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-10

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e /3. While this is a well-established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge ...

  10. A BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAPPED PARTICLES IN A SURFACE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vignal, Marie-Hélène

    A BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAPPED PARTICLES IN A SURFACE POTENTIAL PIERRE DEGOND, C´ELINE PARZANI particles in a surface potential. The potential confines particles close to the surface increasing the charged particle model with some numerical simulations of a gas discharge on a satellite solar array. We

  11. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  12. Fractal index, central charge and fractons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington da Cruz; Rosevaldo de Oliveira

    2000-10-10

    We introduce the notion of fractal index associated with the universal class $h$ of particles or quasiparticles, termed fractons, which obey specific fractal statistics. A connection between fractons and conformal field theory(CFT)-quasiparticles is established taking into account the central charge $c[\

  13. Particle generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  14. Outlook for Charged Higgs Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2009-01-15

    Almost all extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons. This talk focuses on the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM), which is relatively predictive. The outlook for detecting supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at the LHC are discussed, as are the prospects for finding indirect effects of supersymmetric Higgs bosons at low energies, e.g., in K decays. The outlook for discovering observable effects of CP-violating supersymmetric phases at high energies or in B decays is also mentioned.

  15. Accelerator and detector prospects of elementary particle A. N. Skrinskii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of methods of cooling charged-particle beams, preparation for serious application of super- conducting with colliding beams involving the development of methods of cooling charged-particle beams, designing) Electrons 1)Positrons m) Photons n) Muons o) Neutrinos Colliding 647 5. The "proton klystron" 650 6. The V I

  16. Noncentral Forces in Crystals of Charged Colloids D. Reinke,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Andrew B.

    Noncentral Forces in Crystals of Charged Colloids D. Reinke,1 H. Stark,2 H.-H. von Gru¨nberg,3 properties of fcc crystals consisting of charge stabilized colloidal particles are determined from real space, the question arises whether the elastic proper- ties of colloidal crystals are comparable to metals and whether

  17. Solar Energy Program: Chapter from the Energy and Environmental Division Annual Report 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and Environment Division

    1981-01-01

    SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM PERSONNEL Small Particle SuspensionsStrategies for Active Solar Energy Systems M. Warren, S.tary for Conservation and Solar Energy, Office of Solar

  18. Solar Energy Program: Chapter from the Energy and Environmental Division Annual Report 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and Environment Division

    1981-01-01

    SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM PERSONNEL Small Particle SuspensionsStrategies for Active Solar Energy Systems M. Warren, S.tary for Conservation and Solar Energy, Office of Advanced

  19. Charge regulation circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    corporate leadership and innovation, demonstrating a willingness to adopt advanced technology. Sustainability Providing PEV charging can enhance corporate sustainability efforts,...

  1. Nuclear charge radius of $^8$He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mueller; I. A. Sulai; A. C. C. Villari; J. A. Alcantara-Nunez; R. Alves-Conde; K. Bailey; G. W. F. Drake; M. Dubois; C. Eleon; G. Gaubert; R. J. Holt; R. V. F. Janssens; N. Lecesne; Z. -T. Lu; T. P. O'Connor; M. -G. Saint-Laurent; J. -C. Thomas; L. -B. Wang

    2008-01-03

    The root-mean-square (rms) nuclear charge radius of ^8He, the most neutron-rich of all particle-stable nuclei, has been determined for the first time to be 1.93(3) fm. In addition, the rms charge radius of ^6He was measured to be 2.068(11) fm, in excellent agreement with a previous result. The significant reduction in charge radius from ^6He to ^8He is an indication of the change in the correlations of the excess neutrons and is consistent with the ^8He neutron halo structure. The experiment was based on laser spectroscopy of individual helium atoms cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap. Charge radii were extracted from the measured isotope shifts with the help of precision atomic theory calculations.

  2. Charge exchange system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Oscar A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  3. Thermite charge - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Trademark Office Marketing Summary: Linear Thermite Charge Abstract: The present invention provides for cutting operations using linear thermite charges; the charges cut one...

  4. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Management for Urban EV Charging Systems”, 2013 IEEEfor Large Scale Public EV Charging Facilities”, 2013 IEEESmart Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging and Grid Integration

  5. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  6. Particle Production and Fragmentation at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Saxon

    2006-01-06

    Recent results from HERA are presented on a range of topics: charged multiplicities, production of non-strange mesons and strange particles, charm fragmentation, baryons decaying to strange particles, antideuteron production, Bose-Einstein correlations, and new interpretations of results on prompt photon production in DIS.

  7. High spatial resolution particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

  8. Particle Merging Algorithm for PIC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vranic, Marija; Martins, Joana L; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2014-01-01

    Particle-in-cell merging algorithms aim to resample dynamically the six-dimensional phase space occupied by particles without distorting substantially the physical description of the system. Whereas various approaches have been proposed in previous works, none of them seemed to be able to conserve fully charge, momentum, energy and their associated distributions. We describe here an alternative algorithm based on the coalescence of N massive or massless particles, considered to be close enough in phase space, into two new macro-particles. The local conservation of charge, momentum and energy are ensured by the resolution of a system of scalar equations. Various simulation comparisons have been carried out with and without the merging algorithm, from classical plasma physics problems to extreme scenarios where quantum electrodynamics is taken into account, showing in addition to the conservation of local quantities, the good reproducibility of the particle distributions. In case where the number of particles o...

  9. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan R&D Manager Office of Technology and Innovations Phone: 847 768 0812

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  10. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  11. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014: Employers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge The Workplace Charging Challenge...

  13. Optimal charging profiles for mechanically constrained lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suthar, B; Ramadesigan, V; De, S; Braatz, RD; Subramanian, VR

    2014-01-01

    The cost and safety related issues of lithium-ion batteries require intelligent charging profiles that can efficiently utilize the battery. This paper illustrates the application of dynamic optimization in obtaining the optimal current profile for charging a lithium-ion battery using a single-particle model while incorporating intercalation-induced stress generation. In this paper, we focus on the problem of maximizing the charge stored in a given time while restricting the development of stresses inside the particle. Conventional charging profiles for lithium-ion batteries (e.g., constant current followed by constant voltage) were not derived by considering capacity fade mechanisms. These charging profiles are not only inefficient in terms of lifetime usage of the batteries but are also slower since they do not exploit the changing dynamics of the system. Dynamic optimization based approaches have been used to derive optimal charging and discharging profiles with different objective functions. The progress made in understanding the capacity fade mechanisms has paved the way for inclusion of that knowledge in deriving optimal controls. While past efforts included thermal constraints, this paper for the first time presents strategies for optimally charging batteries by guaranteeing minimal mechanical damage to the electrode particles during intercalation. In addition, an executable form of the code has been developed and provided. This code can be used to identify optimal charging profiles for any material and design parameters.

  14. Strongly coupled plasma with electric and magnetic charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinfeng Liao; Edward Shuryak

    2006-12-12

    A number of theoretical and lattice results lead us to believe that Quark-Gluon Plasma not too far from $T_c$ contains not only electrically charged quasiparticles -- quarks and gluons -- but magnetically charged ones -- monopoles and dyons -- as well. Although binary systems like charge-monopole and charge-dyon were considered in details before in both classical and quantum settings, it is the first study of coexisting electric and magnetic particles in many-body context. We perform Molecular Dynamics study of strongly coupled plasmas with $\\sim 1000$ particles and different fraction of magnetic charges. Correlation functions and Kubo formulae lead to such transport properties as diffusion constant, shear viscosity and electric conductivity: we compare the first two with empirical data from RHIC experiments as well as results from AdS/CFT correspondence. We also study a number of collective excitations in these systems.

  15. Particle preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank J. (Russellville, NM); Custer, Chad A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  16. Particle preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank J. (Russellville, SC); Custer, Chad A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  17. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  18. Particle preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  19. Physica B 293 (2001) 283}288 Bose}Einstein condensation of noninteracting charged Bose gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayindir, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    Physica B 293 (2001) 283}288 Bose}Einstein condensation of noninteracting charged Bose gas of charged Bose particles. We conclude that Bose}Einstein condensation of the charged Bose gas occurs.75.Fi; 05.30.Jp; 67.40.Kh; 64.60.!i Keywords: Bose}Einstein condensation; External potentials; Density

  20. Electrophoretic mobility without charge driven by quadrupolar polarization of the nanoparticle/water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-01-01

    Quadrupolar polarization of the interfacial water layer, typically found for water at contact with hydrophobic solutes, couples with the uniform external field to produce the force acting on a suspended particle. This force exists even in the absence of a net particle charge and its direction is consistent with an effectively negative surface charge. The surface charge density scales as $R^{-2}$ with the particle radius $R$, and the corresponding contribution to the $\\zeta$-potential scales as $R^{-1}$. The charge density and $\\zeta$-potential are consistent with the values typically reported for oil drops and bubbles in water at $R\\simeq 3-10$ nm, but decay below those values for larger particles. The study indicates that electrophoretic mobility without charge is possible, but is limited to relatively small particles a few nanometers in size.

  1. Automakers and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenge Initiative Arguably the most important infrastructure strategy to accelerate adoption of PEVs. Why are we doing Workplace Charging? * PEV Market Growth - Critical now...

  2. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: stability and pattern formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam David Christdoss Pushpam; Madivala G. Basavaraj; Ethayaraja Mani

    2015-10-20

    Binary mixture of oppositely charged of colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interactions between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square and hexagonal arrangement of particles on emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. Distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous-shells derived from thereof.

  3. Computer Simulations of charged systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Holm; K. Kremer

    2002-03-26

    In this brief contribution to the Proceedings of the NATO-ASI on ``Electrostatic Effects in Soft Matter and Biophysics'', which took place in Les Houches from Oct. 1-13, 2000, we summarize in short aspects of the simulations methods to study charged systems. After describing some basics of Monte Carlo and Molecular dynamics techniques, we describe a few methods to compute long range interactions in periodic systems. After a brief detour to mean-field models, we describe our results obtained for flexible polyelectrolytes in good and bad solvents. We follow with a description of the inhomogeneity of the counterion distribution around finite chains, and continue then with infinitely long, rodlike systems. The last part is devoted to the phenomenon of overcharging for colloidal particles and its explanation in terms of simple electrostatic arguments.

  4. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01

    11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . .ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . . . 12.

  5. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01

    ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.3. Particle Physics Information Platforms . . . . . . . . .14. Particle Physics Education and Outreach

  6. The Impact of Solar Particle Events on Radiation Risk for Human Explorers of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorguinpour, Camron Saul

    2010-01-01

    of Radiation Interaction and Matter and Detection. Worldof Radiation Interaction and Matter and Detection. WorldDetection Efficiency of Charged Particles and Electromagnetic radiation

  7. taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramani, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

  8. Carbon particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  9. Photon: history, mass, charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Okun

    2006-02-13

    The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

  10. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Gr\\'{i}msv\\"{o}tn eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houghton, Isobel M P; Nicoll, Keri A

    2013-01-01

    Triboelectric charging of different size fractions of a sample of volcanic ash is studied experimentally. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the normalised span of the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated. Previous measurements of the volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of km away from the vent, which indicates the the ash particles continue to be charged in the plume through the mechanism of triboelectrification [Harrison et al., Env. Res. Lett. 5 024004 (2010), Hatakeyama J. Met. Soc. Japan 27 372 (1949)]. The influence of the normalised span on plume charging suggests that all ash plumes are likely to be charged, with implications for remote sensing and plume lifetime.

  11. International aeronautical user charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1985-01-01

    Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

  12. Trends in Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Donofrio Ford Motor Company Trends in Workplace Charging Est EV NA NA approx 21 70-100 Miles: What Types of Chargers are Being Used? Considerations for Campus Installations *...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fast Charge - November 2012 WirelessInductive Charging Inductive charging, also known as wireless charging, uses an electromagnetic field to transfer electricity to a PEV without...

  14. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA); Hunt, Angus L. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  15. Synergia: An accelerator modeling tool with 3-D space charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Computing Division, CEPA/PSM, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spentzouris, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Computing Division, CEPA/PSM, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)]. E-mail: spentz@fnal.gov; Qiang, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ryne, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-01-01

    High precision modeling of space-charge effects, together with accurate treatment of single-particle dynamics, is essential for designing future accelerators as well as optimizing the performance of existing machines. We describe Synergia, a high-fidelity parallel beam dynamics simulation package with fully three-dimensional space-charge capabilities and a higher order optics implementation. We describe the computational techniques, the advanced human interface, and the parallel performance obtained using large numbers of macroparticles. We also perform code benchmarks comparing to semi-analytic results and other codes. Finally, we present initial results on particle tune spread, beam halo creation, and emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster accelerator.

  16. Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2011-11-29

    Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

  17. Particle identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Particle IDentification (PID) is fundamental to particle physics experiments. This paper reviews PID strategies and methods used by the large LHC experiments, which provide outstanding examples of the state-of-the-art. The first part focuses on the general design of these experiments with respect to PID and the technologies used. Three PID techniques are discussed in more detail: ionization measurements, time-of-flight measurements and Cherenkov imaging. Four examples of the implementation of these techniques at the LHC are given, together with selections of relevant examples from other experiments and short overviews on new developments. Finally, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS 02) experiment is briefly described as an impressive example of a space-based experiment using a number of familiar PID techniques.

  18. Particle identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Lippmann

    2011-06-12

    Particle IDentification (PID) is fundamental to particle physics experiments. This paper reviews PID strategies and methods used by the large LHC experiments, which provide outstanding examples of the state-of-the-art. The first part focuses on the general design of these experiments with respect to PID and the technologies used. Three PID techniques are discussed in more detail: ionization measurements, time-of-flight measurements and Cherenkov imaging. Four examples of the implementation of these techniques at the LHC are given, together with selections of relevant examples from other experiments and short overviews on new developments. Finally, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS 02) experiment is briefly described as an impressive example of a space-based experiment using a number of familiar PID techniques.

  19. Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Use Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01

    residential customers in California are on ?at-rate tari?s that charge the same price for electricityelectricity prices that PG&E’s larger residential users face are well out of the norm both nationwide and historically in California.

  20. Collision integrals for charged-charged interaction in two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2013-09-15

    Choice of an appropriate form of shielding distance in the estimation of collision integrals under screened coulomb potential for two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma is addressed. Simple expressions for collision integrals for charged-charged interactions are derived. It is shown that while some of the formalisms used earlier completely ignore the presence of ions, the others incorporating it may result in negative collision integrals for the interactions involving particles at higher charged states. The parametric regimes of concern and impact of different formalisms on the computed transport properties are investigated with specific reference to nitrogen plasma. A revised definition of the shielding distance is proposed, which incorporates both electrons and ions, avoids the problem of negative collision integrals in all practical regimes of interest and results in calculated property values in close agreement with experimentally observed results.

  1. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lal, Amit (Madison, WI); Li, Hui (Madison, WI); Blanchard, James P. (Madison, WI); Henderson, Douglass L. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  2. Microtextural characterization of copper shaped charge jet fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, S.I.; Bingert, J.F.; Zernow, L.

    1995-09-01

    The microstructures of two soft-caught copper shaped charge jet particles were investigated. In particular, the spatial distributions of crystallographic texture within the particles were characterized using point specific measurements of crystallographic orientation. Significant variations in preferred orientation were observed. These results are discussed in fight of previous computer simulations of the jetting process which showed significant radial gradients in both strain and strain rate.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Behavior of Charged Particles in a Biological Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    form: September 29, 2010 Abstract Exposure to electromagnetic fields is a research area that has are vectors) in a magnetic field B is always perpendicular to v and B (Popp, 1994). The biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) are limited by the position of the biological system with respect to the field

  4. CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutbrod, H.H.

    2010-01-01

    WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier,WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier*,of modules of the Plastic Ball detector for positive pions

  5. System and method for collisional activation of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

    2013-09-24

    A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

  6. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1996-04-16

    A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

  7. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

  8. Tailored charged particle beams from single-component plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Tobin Robert

    2010-01-01

    Ch. 5 brie?y reports the results of RW compression in lowWe here report a recent e?ort to operate the RW in lower ?

  9. Tailored charged particle beams from single-component plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Tobin Robert

    2010-01-01

    has su?cient kinetic and potential energy to pass over asum of the potential and kinetic energy in motion parallel

  10. Europhysics Letters PREPRINT Charge reversal of colloidal particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    accounts for the behavior observed in the experiments and simulations. The Model. ­ Consider a colloidal

  11. Squeezing of the Cavity Vacuum by Charged-Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BECKER, W.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    1987-01-01

    , and 70 g ai ha-1 resulted in visual soybean injury that did not exeed 9, 19, and 35%, respectively. Adding imazethapyr at 36 g ha-1 or imazaquin at 70 g ha-1 to AC 263,222 in a tank mixture did not increase soybean injury over the individual rate of AC...

  12. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  13. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Qingjiang

    2015-01-01

    Owen (2011), Plasma jet braking: energy dissipation and non-Hones Jr. (1979), High-energy magnetospheric protons andof energetic electrons energy ( E ? 200 keV ) in the earth’s

  14. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Qingjiang

    2015-01-01

    Maxwellian and high-energy power law electrons is consistentdistribution with a high-energy power law tail [Pan et al. ,that adding a high- energy power law tail with E ? ~ 10 keV

  15. Application of channeling in bent crystals to charged particle beams

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements of structural genomics CitationImagingdecays

  16. Transverse Focussing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSS A-Z Site MapEffects for

  17. Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSS A-Z Site MapEffects

  18. The effect of a direct current field on the microparticle charge in the plasma afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wörner, L.; Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans ; Ivlev, A. V.; Huber, P.; Hagl, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Couëdel, L.; Schwabe, M.; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Skvortsov, A.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2013-12-15

    Residual charges of individual microparticles forming dense clouds were measured in a RF discharge afterglow. Experiments were performed under microgravity conditions on board the International Space Station, which ensured particle levitation inside the gas volume after the plasma switch-off. The distribution of residual charges as well as the spatial distribution of charged particles across the cloud were analyzed by applying a low-frequency voltage to the electrodes and measuring amplitudes of the resulting particle oscillations. Upon “free decharging” conditions, the charge distribution had a sharp peak at zero and was rather symmetric (with charges concentrated between ?10e and +10e), yet positively and negatively charged particles were homogeneously distributed over the cloud. However, when decharging evolved in the presence of an external DC field (applied shortly before the plasma switch-off) practically all residual charges were positive. In this case, the overall charge distribution had a sharp peak at about +15e and was highly asymmetric, while the spatial distribution exhibited a significant charge gradient along the direction of the applied DC field.

  19. Charged Vacuum Bubble Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    1998-10-20

    A type of scenario is considered where electrically charged vacuum bubbles, formed from degenerate or nearly degenerate vacuua separated by a thin domain wall, are cosmologically produced due to the breaking of a discrete symmetry, with the bubble charge arising from fermions residing within the domain wall. Stability issues associated with wall tension, fermion gas, and Coulombic effects for such configurations are examined. The stability of a bubble depends upon parameters such as the symmetry breaking scale and the fermion coupling. A dominance of either the Fermi gas or the Coulomb contribution may be realized under certain conditions, depending upon parameter values.

  20. The electrically charged universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Düren

    2012-01-31

    The paper discusses the possibility of a universe that is not electrically neutral but has a net positive charge. It is claimed that such a universe contains a homogeneous distribution of protons that are not bound to galaxies and fill up the intergalactic space. This proton `gas' charges macroscopic objects like stars and planets, but it does not generate electrostatic or magnetic fields that affect the motion of these bodies significantly. However, the proton gas may contribute significantly to the total dark matter of the universe and its electrostatic potential may contribute to the dark energy and to the expansion of the universe.

  1. Landau like states in Neutral Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikat Banerjee; Hans Ågren; Alexander V. Balatsky

    2015-04-24

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms where we find an interesting similarity with the spectrum for 2-Dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. In strong contrast to the equi-distant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for the 2-Dimensional neutral particle increases in a particular electric field. Moreover, the spin-orbit nature of the coupling of neutral particles to the electric field confines only one component of the spin. The idea is motivated by the developments in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher.

  2. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  3. Image Charge Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f organic molecules such as heavy crude oils. Heavy crudes are some of the most complex organic mixtures found in nature. As the crude oil industry grows in size and demand for crude oil increases, techniques

  4. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  5. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  6. ccsd00004163, Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004163, version 1 ­ 4 Feb 2005 Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption Pierre Gosselin a free energy formalism to the study of the equilibrium properties of neutral and charged particles adsorption onto two parallel adsorbing surfaces. Another advantage of the free energy formalism lays

  7. Real-time Shape-based Particle Separation and Detailed In-situ Particle Shape Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beranek, Josef; Imre, D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-02-07

    Particle shape is an important attribute that is very difficult to characterize. We present a new portable system that offers, for the first time, the opportunity to separate particles with different shapes and characterize their chemical and physical properties, including their dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in the transition and free-molecular regimes, with high precision, in-situ, and in real-time. The system uses a new generation aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM) to classify particles based on their masses and transport them to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) that is used to select particles of one charge, one mass, and one shape. These highly uniform particles are ready for use and/or characterization by any application or analytical tool. We combine APM and DMA with our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT II, to form the ADS, and demonstrate its utility to measure in real-time individual particle compositions and vacuum aerodynamic diameters to yield, for each selected shape, particle DSFs in two flow regimes. We apply the ADS to characterize aspherical ammonium sulfate and NaCl particles and show that both particle types have wide distribution of particle shapes with DSFs from nearly 1 to 1.5.

  8. Production of Charged Hadrons in Muon Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed Sultan Al-Buriahi; Mohammed Tarek Hussein; Mohammed Tawfik Ghoneim

    2015-08-06

    The production of charged hadrons, in muon Deep inelastic scattering (DIS), at light and heavy target is presented. The particles produced by the interaction with Xenon (Xe) is compared with that produced by the interaction with Deuteron (D), to obtain information on cascading process, forward-backward productions, and the rapidity distribution in different bins of the invariant mass of the interacting system W.

  9. Limits on the thermoacoustic detectability of electric and magnetic charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerlof, C.W.

    1982-09-01

    The energy loss is estimated for a slow magnetic monopole traveling through a conductor. The thermoacoustic signal derived from this process is compared to the acoustic phonon fluctuation pressure. The results show that single-monopole detectability is strongly limited by thermal noise. These calculations also imply severe limits for the detectability of charged-particle cascades.

  10. Charged nanograins in the Enceladus plume T. W. Hill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    in the spacecraft ram direction. In each case, CAPS detected a cold dense population of heavy charged particles in Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) images [Spencer et al., 2006], and associated eruptive jets- vided ram pointing (in the direction of spacecraft motion) for the CAPS instrument, encounters E3 (12

  11. Enhanced structural correlations accelerate diffusion in charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Overbeck; Ch. Sinn; M. Watzlawek

    1999-04-28

    Theoretical calculations for colloidal charge-stabilized and hard sphere suspensions show that hydrodynamic interactions yield a qualitatively different particle concentration dependence of the short-time self-diffusion coefficient. The effect, however, is numerically small and hardly accessible by conventional light scattering experiments. Applying multiple-scattering decorrelation equipment and a careful data analysis we show that the theoretical prediction for charged particles is in agreement with our experimental results from aqueous polystyrene latex suspensions.

  12. AVTA: ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  13. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Municipal Workplace Charging Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review the agreement proposed by one municipality to register PEV drivers and inform staff of charging policy.

  14. Charge non-conservation, dequantisation, and induced electric dipole moments in varying-alpha theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas J. Shaw

    2005-09-13

    We note that in extensions of the Standard Model that allow for a varying fine structure constant, alpha, all matter species, apart from right-handed neutrinos, will gain an intrinsic electric dipole moment (EDM). In a large subset of varying-alpha theories, all such particle species will also gain an effective electric charge. This charge will in general not be quantised and can result in macroscopic non-conservation of electric charge.

  15. Non-vanishing ponderomotive AC electrophoretic effect for particle trapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Weihau; Park, Jae Hyun nmn; Krstic, Predrag S; Reed, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We present here a study on overlooked aspects of alternating current (AC) electrokinetics AC electrophoretic (ACEP) phenomena. The dynamics of a particle with both polarizability and net charges in a non-uniform AC electric trapping field is investigated. It is found that either electrophoretic (EP) or dielectrophoretic (DEP) effects can dominate the trapping dynamics, depending on experimental conditions. A dimensionless parameter gamma is developed to predict the relative strength of EP and DEP effects in a quadrupole AC field. An ACEP trap is feasible for charged particles in salt-free or low salt concentration solutions. In contrast to DEP traps, an ACEP trap favors the downscaling of the particle size.

  16. Search for Millicharged Particles Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David C. Moore; Alexander D. Rider; Giorgio Gratta

    2014-12-16

    We report results from a search for stable particles with charge > $10^{-5}$ e in bulk matter using levitated dielectric microspheres in high vacuum. No evidence for such particles was found in a total sample of 1.4 ng, providing an upper limit on the abundance per nucleon of 2.5 x $10^{-14}$ at the 95% confidence level for the material tested. These results provide the first direct search for single particles with charge < 0.1 e bound in macroscopic quantities of matter and demonstrate the ability to perform sensitive force measurements using optically levitated microspheres in vacuum.

  17. Deciphering Deconfinement in Correlations of Conserved Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Majumder

    2006-09-21

    Diagonal and off-diagonal flavor and conserved charge susceptibilities reveal the prevalent degrees of freedom of heated strongly interacting matter. Results obtained from lattice simulations are compared with various model estimates in an effort to weed down various possible pictures of a quark gluon plasma. We argue that the vanishing of the off-diagonal quark flavor susceptibilities and its derivatives with respect to chemical potential, at temperatures above 1.5Tc, can only be understood in a picture of a gas or liquid composed of quasi-particles which carry the same quantum numbers as quarks and antiquarks. A potential new observable, blind to neutral and non-strange particles, is introduced and related via isospin symmetry to the ratio of susceptibilities of baryonic strangeness to strangeness generated in the excited matter created at RHIC.

  18. Charge detection in semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Kenneth (Kenneth MacLean, III)

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis nanometer scale charge sensors are used to study charge transport in two solid state systems: Lateral GaAs quantum dots and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). In both of these experiments we use ...

  19. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Niklasson, Eyvind; Ram, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with $A=B=C=1$ are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late time with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic (frequency $\\omega$) ABC fields the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with exponent $\\xi$ that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the PDF of kinetic energy is, at late time, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

  20. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhrubaditya Mitra; Axel Brandenburg; Brahmananda Dasgupta; Eyvind Niklasson; Abhay Ram

    2014-04-30

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients $A=B=C=1$ are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late times with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic ABC fields, the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with an exponent that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the PDF of kinetic energy is, at late times, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

  1. Automakers and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAudits and6AuidtWorkplace Charging Summit

  2. On the Proton charge extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gluck

    2015-02-03

    It is shown that the recent determination of the various proton charge extensions is compatible with Standard Model expectations.

  3. Black hole evaporation in a noncommutative charged Vaidya model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M. Javed, W.

    2012-06-15

    We study the black hole evaporation and Hawking radiation for a noncommutative charged Vaidya black hole. For this purpose, we determine a spherically symmetric charged Vaidya model and then formulate a noncommutative Reissner-Nordstroem-like solution of this model, which leads to an exact (t - r)-dependent metric. The behavior of the temporal component of this metric and the corresponding Hawking temperature are investigated. The results are shown in the form of graphs. Further, we examine the tunneling process of charged massive particles through the quantum horizon. We find that the tunneling amplitude is modified due to noncommutativity. Also, it turns out that the black hole evaporates completely in the limits of large time and horizon radius. The effect of charge is to reduce the temperature from a maximum value to zero. We note that the final stage of black hole evaporation is a naked singularity.

  4. Ion extraction and charge exchange in laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostein, D.; Doneddu, F.

    1996-02-01

    In the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process, a vapor is ionized by pulsed laser beams, and the ions are extracted by negatively biased collectors. The authors compute the unsteady dynamics of the photoplasma using a two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. Collisions between ions and neutral species are simulated by a Monte Carlo technique. The plasma dynamics is visualized by snapshots of particle positions showing the directions of their velocities. The three kinds of particles (electrons, photo-ions, and ions created by charge exchange) are marked by different colors. The graphic outputs illustrate the motion of the electrons toward the anodes, the vertical drift of the plasma, its erosion by the transient ion sheath, and nonselective ionization by charge exchange.

  5. Tools for charged Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar Stål

    2010-12-13

    We review the status of publicly available software tools applicable to charged Higgs physics. A selection of codes are highlighted in more detail, focusing on new developments that have taken place since the previous charged Higgs workshop in 2008. We conclude that phenomenologists now have the tools ready to face the LHC data. A new webpage collecting charged Higgs resources is presented.

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge Available at energy.goveerevehiclesev-everywhere-workplace-charging-challenge Workplace Charging Challenge 5 Cumulative...

  7. Nuclear charge distribution in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taofeng Wang; Liping Zhu; Liming Wang; Qinghua Men; Hongyin Han; Haihong Xia

    2015-11-29

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a dE-E particle telescope. We found that the fragment mass dependency of the average width of the charge distribution shows a systematic decreased trend with the obvious odd-even effect. The variation of widths of charge distribution with kinetic energies shows an approximate V-shape curve due to the large number of neutron emission for the high excitation energies and cold fragmentation with low excitation energies. As for the behavior of the average nuclear charge with respect to its deviation {\\Delta}Z from the unchanged charge distribution (UCD) as a function of the mass number of primary fragments A*, for asymmetric fission products {\\Delta}Z is negative value, while upon approaching mass symmetry {\\Delta}Z turns positive. Concerning the energy dependence of the most probable charge for given primary mass number A*, the obvious increasing tendencies for with the kinetic energies are observed. The correlation between the average nuclear charge and the primary mass number is given as linear function. The proton and neutron odd-even effects with light fragment kinetic energies are derived.

  8. Fractional charges and Misner-Wheeler charge without charge effect in metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov

    2014-12-08

    Optical space in metamaterials may be engineered to emulate four dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory. Nonlinear optics of such metamaterials mimics interaction of quantized electric charges. An electromagnetic wormhole is designed, which connects two points of such an optical space and changes its effective topology. Electromagnetic field configurations which exhibit fractional charges appear as a result of such topology change. Moreover, such effects as Misner-Wheeler charge without charge may be replicated.

  9. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  10. Manipulation of Negatively Charged Beams via Coherent Effects in Bent Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandale, Walter; Bagli, Enrico; Mazzolari, Andrea; Afonin, Alexander; Chesnokov, Yuri; Maisheev, Vladimir; Yazynin, Igor; Baricordi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Vincenzi, Donato; Bolognini, Davide; Hasan, Said; Prest, Michela; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Milan, Riccardo; Denisov, Alexander; Gavrikov, Yuri; Ivanov, Yuri; Lapina, Lyubov; Malyarenko, Luodmila; Skorobogatov, V.; Suvorov, Vsevolod; Vavilov, S.; Golovatyuk, Slava; Kovalenko, Alexander; Taratin, Alexander; Mattera, Andrea; Shiraishi, Satomi; Vallazza, Erik; Vomiero, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We review the experimental evidences we recorded with volume reflection and planar and axial channelings with negatively charged particles beam. High deflection efficiency was observed in all cases. The experiment was carried out by the UA9 collaboration in the external lines of the CERN SPS with a secondary beam of 150 GeV/c negative particles

  11. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuffner, Francis K. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. (Richland, WA); Hammerstrom, Donald J. (West Richland, WA); Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA)

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  12. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Quimby, J.M.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this test program was the performance and economic evaluation of a pre-charged pulse-jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial- or industrial-scale coal-fired combustor. Performance factors that were considered were the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, pulse frequency, pulse pressure, fabric types, humidity, and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency and pressure drop. Economic factors that were considered included capital costs, energy requirements, and operating and maintenance costs. The program resulted in a recommendation regarding the relative suitability of the pre-charged pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control, as compared to a pulse-jet filter without pre-charging. Fine particle control capability, ease of operation, and overall economics were taken into consideration in making comparisons. 23 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Poster...

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Maryland...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center Workplace Charging Challenge Partner:...

  15. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dreportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E...

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive...

  17. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa...

  18. Electromicroinjection of particles into living cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, F. Andrew (Los Alamos, NM); Cram, L. Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Galey, William R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for introducing particles into living cells. Fluorescently-stained human chromosomes are introduced into cultured, mitotic Chinese hamster cells using electromicroinjection. The recipient cells frequently survived the physiological perturbation imposed by a successful chromosome injection. Successfully injected recipient cells maintained viability as evidenced by their ability to be expanded. The technique relies on the surface charge of fluorescently stained chromosomes and their ability to be attracted and repelled to and from the tip of a micropipette. The apparatus includes a micropipette having a tip suitable for piercing the membrane of a target cell and an electrode inserted into the lumen thereof. The target cells and suspended particles are located in an electrically conducted solution, and the lumen of the micropipette is filled with an electrically conducting solution which contacts the electrode located therein. A second electrode is also located in the conducting solution containing the target cells and particles. Voltages applied to the electrode within the micropipette attract the particles to the region of the tip thereof. The particles adhere to the surface of the micropipette with sufficient force that insertion of the micropipette tip and attached particle through the membrane of a target cell will not dislodge the particle. By applying a voltage having the opposite polarity of the attraction voltage, the particles are expelled from the micropipette to which is then withdrawn from the cell body.

  19. Pipeline charging of coke ovens with a preheated charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpov, A.V.; Khadzhioglo, A.V.; Kuznichenko, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Work to test a pipeline charging method was conducted at the Konetsk Coke Works (a PK-2K coke oven system with a single gas main, oven width 407 mm, height 4300 mm, effective column 20.0 cm/sub 3/). This method consists of transporting the heated coal charge to the ovens through a pipe by means of steam. the charge is transported by high pressure chamber groups, and loaded by means of systems equipped with devices for separation, withdrawal and treatment of the spent steam. The principal goal of the present investigation was to test technical advances in the emission-free charging of preheated charges. The problem was, first, to create a reliable technology for separation of the steam from the charge immediately before loading it into the oven and, second, to provide a total elimination of emissions, thereby protecting the environment against toxic substances.

  20. Internally Electrodynamic Particle Model: Its Experimental Basis and Its Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng-Johansson, J X

    2008-01-01

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model was derived based on overall experimental observations, with the IED process itself being built directly on three experimental facts, a) electric charges present with all material particles, b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic waves according to Maxwell's equations and Planck energy equation and c)source motion produces Doppler effect. A set of well-known basic particle equations and properties become predictable based on first-principles solutions for the IED particles; several key solutions achieved will be outlined, including the de Broglie phase wave, de Broglie relations, Schr\\"odinger equation, mass, mass-energy relation, Newton's law of gravity, single particle self interference, and electromagnetic radiation and absorption; these equations or properties have long been broadly experimentally validated or demonstrated. The IED solution also predicts the Doebner-Goldin equation which emerges to represent a form of long-sought quantum wave ...

  1. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.

  2. Studying Jets with Identified Particles in PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Sickles

    2006-09-22

    A surprising excess of protons at intermediate $p_T$, 2-5GeV/c, has been observed in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, for which the source is not known. In p+p collisions, particles at this $p_T$ arise from jet fragmentation, however the observed baryon yield in central Au+Au collisions are not compatible with the usual jet fragmentation function. Two particle $\\Delta\\phi$ correlations are a powerful probe for quantitatively understanding the modifications to jet fragmentation from interactions with the medium. Earlier studies have shown that the excess baryons do have jet-like partners, indicating a hard scattering origin. We present new results from a systematic study of two particle correlations as a function of trigger and partner particle species, charge, $p_T$ and centrality from the high statistics Au+Au dataset. p+p collisions are also analyzed as a reference.

  3. A new method to calculate the beam charge for an integrating current transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Yuchi; Han Dan; Zhu Bin; Dong Kegong; Tan Fang; Gu Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2012-09-15

    The integrating current transformer (ICT) is a magnetic sensor widely used to precisely measure the charge of an ultra-short-pulse charged particle beam generated by traditional accelerators and new laser-plasma particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a new method to calculate the beam charge in an ICT based on circuit analysis. The output transfer function shows an invariable signal profile for an ultra-short electron bunch, so the function can be used to evaluate the signal quality and calculate the beam charge through signal fitting. We obtain a set of parameters in the output function from a standard signal generated by an ultra-short electron bunch (about 1 ps in duration) at a radio frequency linear electron accelerator at Tsinghua University. These parameters can be used to obtain the beam charge by signal fitting with excellent accuracy.

  4. Electrostatic interactions in the presence of surface charge regulation: exact results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Maggs; R. Podgornik

    2014-10-01

    We study the problem of charge regulation and its effects on electrostatic interactions between dissociable charge groups immersed in a univalent electrolyte, within a family of one dimensional exactly solvable models. We consider the case of both charge regulated plates, but also the interaction of pairs of finite size dielectric "particles". Using the transfer matrix formalism we are able to determine the disjoining pressure as well as the correlations between the charge and the dipole moments of the objects as a function of their separation and electrolyte concentration

  5. Electric charge, early universe and the Superstring Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afsar Abbas

    1999-12-05

    Very recently, it has been shown by the author that the Standard Model Higgs cannot be a physical particle. Here, on most general grounds it is established that as per the Standard Model there is no electric charge above the electro-weak phase transition temperature. Hence there was no electric charge present in the early universe. The Superstring Theories are flawed in as much as they are incompatible with this requirement. Hence the Superstring Theories are inconsistent with this basic structure and requirement of the Standard Model.

  6. Particle Acceleration in three dimensional Reconnection Regions: A New Test Particle Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudiger Schopper; Guido T. Birk; Harald Lesch

    2001-06-29

    Magnetic Reconnection is an efficient and fast acceleration mechanism by means of direct electric field acceleration parallel to the magnetic field. Thus, acceleration of particles in reconnection regions is a very important topic in plasma astrophysics. This paper shows that the conventional analytical models and numerical test particle investigations can be misleading concerning the energy distribution of the accelerated particles, since they oversimplify the electric field structure by the assumption that the field is homogeneous. These investigations of the acceleration of charged test particles are extended by considering three-dimensional field configurations characterized by localized field-aligned electric fields. Moreover, effects of radiative losses are discussed. The comparison between homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric field acceleration in reconnection regions shows dramatic differences concerning both, the maximum particle energy and the form of the energy distribution.

  7. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in annual sales of plug-in electric vehicles by 2023, which may substantially increase electricity usage and peak demand in high adoption areas. Understanding customer charging...

  8. Interactions, Dynamics and Elasticity in ChargeStabilized Colloidal Crystals Jessica A. Weiss (1) , Amy E. Larsen (2) , and David G. Grier (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Interactions, Dynamics and Elasticity in Charge­Stabilized Colloidal Crystals Jessica A. Weiss (1 of the interactions and elastic properties of charge­ stabilized colloidal crystals. Interactions between charge­stabilized latex spheres self­assembled into colloidal crystals are extracted from single­particle dynamics using

  9. Particle acceleration via reconnection processes in the supersonic solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zank, G. P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-10

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index ? = –(3 + M{sub A} )/2, where M{sub A} is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index –3(1 + ? {sub c}/(8?{sub diff})), where ? {sub c}/?{sub diff} is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio ?{sub diff}/? {sub c}. Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c {sup –5} (c particle speed) spectra observed by Fisk and Gloeckler and Mewaldt et al.

  10. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Poisson

    2004-04-01

    This review is concerned with the motion of a point scalar charge, a point electric charge, and a point mass in a specified background spacetime. In each of the three cases the particle produces a field that behaves as outgoing radiation in the wave zone, and therefore removes energy from the particle. In the near zone the field acts on the particle and gives rise to a self-force that prevents the particle from moving on a geodesic of the background spacetime. The field's action on the particle is difficult to calculate because of its singular nature: the field diverges at the position of the particle. But it is possible to isolate the field's singular part and show that it exerts no force on the particle -- its only effect is to contribute to the particle's inertia. What remains after subtraction is a smooth field that is fully responsible for the self-force. Because this field satisfies a homogeneous wave equation, it can be thought of as a free (radiative) field that interacts with the particle; it is this interaction that gives rise to the self-force. The mathematical tools required to derive the equations of motion of a point scalar charge, a point electric charge, and a point mass in a specified background spacetime are developed here from scratch. The review begins with a discussion of the basic theory of bitensors (part I). It then applies the theory to the construction of convenient coordinate systems to chart a neighbourhood of the particle's word line (part II). It continues with a thorough discussion of Green's functions in curved spacetime (part III). The review concludes with a detailed derivation of each of the three equations of motion (part IV).

  11. Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  12. Particle Physics Booklet 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al., C. Amsler

    2008-01-01

    212 25. Accelerator physics of colliders ? 26. High-energythe full Review. PARTICLE PHYSICS BOOKLET TABLE OF CONTENTSrev. ) Summary Tables of Particle Physics Gauge and Higgs

  13. SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Small Particle Heat Exchange Receiver (SPHER) for Solarof the small particle heat exchange receiver (or SPHER), asabsorption process, the heat exchange to the gas, the choice

  14. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weigel, H. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Quandt, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen University, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Graham, N. [Department of Physics, Middlebury College , Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  15. Effects of Milan's Congestion Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnovale, Maria; Gibson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice 44.5 [20] Transport for London,London, and Milan have congestion charges. In the US, the Department of Transportation

  16. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01

    technology provides PEV chargers that simultaneously connectall types, from public fast chargers that will relieve rangeto home and garage chargers used for everyday charging. As a

  17. Nuclear charge distribution in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Taofeng; Wang, Liming; Men, Qinghua; Han, Hongyin; Xia, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a dE-E particle telescope. We found that the fragment mass dependency of the average width of the charge distribution shows a systematic decreased trend with the obvious odd-even effect. The variation of widths of charge distribution with kinetic energies shows an approximate V-shape curve due to the large number of neutron emission for the high excitation energies and cold fragmentation with low excitation energies. As for the behavior of the average nuclear charge with respect to its deviation {\\Delta}Z from the unchanged charge distribution (UCD) as a function of the mass number of primary fragments A*, for asymmetric fission products {\\Delta}Z is negative value, while upon approaching mass symmetry {\\Delta}Z turns positive. Concerning the energy dependence of the most probable charge for given primary mass number A*, the obvious inc...

  18. Effective charges and virial pressure of concentrated macroion solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niels Boon; Guillermo Ivan Guerrero-Garcia; Rene van Roij; Monica Olvera de la Cruz

    2015-07-15

    The stability of colloidal suspensions is crucial in a wide variety of processes including the fabrication of photonic materials and scaffolds for biological assemblies. The ionic strength of the electrolyte that suspends charged colloids is widely used to control the physical properties of colloidal suspensions. The extensively used two-body Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) approach allows for a quantitative analysis of the effective electrostatic forces between colloidal particles. DLVO relates the ionic double-layers, which enclose the particles, to their effective electrostatic repulsion. Nevertheless, the double layer is distorted at high macroion volume fractions. Therefore, DLVO cannot describe the many-body effects that arise in concentrated suspensions. We show that this problem can be largely resolved by identifying effective point charges for the macroions using cell theory. This extrapolated point charge (EPC) method assigns effective point charges in a consistent way, taking into account the excluded volume of highly charged macroions at any concentration, and thereby naturally accounting for high volume fractions in both salt-free and added-salt conditions. We provide an analytical expression for the effective pair potential and validate the EPC method by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of macroions and monovalent microions that interact via Coulombic potentials to simulations of macroions interacting via the derived EPC effective potential. The simulations reproduce the macroion-macroion spatial correlation and the virial pressure obtained with the EPC model. Our findings provide a route to relate the physical properties such as pressure in systems of screened-Coulomb particles to experimental measurements.

  19. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, Omar [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Donnelly, T. W. [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Van Orden, Jay Wallace [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Ford, William P. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. Finally, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  20. Renormalized Jellium model for charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Trizac; Yan Levin

    2003-12-17

    We introduce a renormalized Jellium model to calculate the equation of state for charged colloidal suspensions. An almost perfect agreement with Monte Carlo simulations is found. Our self-consistent approach naturally allows to define the effective charge of particles {\\em at finite colloidal density}. Although this quantity may differ significantly from its counterpart obtained from the standard Poisson-Boltzmann cell approach, the osmotic pressures for both models are in good agreement. We argue that by construction, the effective charge obtained using the Jellium approximation is more appropriate to the study of colloidal interactions. We also discuss a possibility of a fluid-fluid critical point and show how the new equation of state can be used to shed light on the surprising results found in recent sedimentation experiments.

  1. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case ofmore »the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.« less

  2. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  3. Geometrical Scaling in Inelastic Inclusive Particle Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Praszalowicz, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing recent ALICE data on inelastic pp scattering at the LHC energies we show that charged particle distributions exhibit geometrical scaling (GS). We show also that the inelastic cross-section is scaling as well and that in this case the quality of GS is better than for multiplicities. Moreover, exponent $\\lambda$ characterizing the saturation scale is for the cross-section scaling compatible with the one found in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA. Next, by parametrizing charged particles distributions by the Tsallis-like formula, we find a somewhat unexpected solution that still exhibits GS, but differs from the "standard" one where the Tsallis temperature is proportional to the saturation scale.

  4. Geometrical Scaling in Inelastic Inclusive Particle Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Praszalowicz; Anna Francuz

    2015-07-29

    Analyzing recent ALICE data on inelastic pp scattering at the LHC energies we show that charged particle distributions exhibit geometrical scaling (GS). We show also that the inelastic cross-section is scaling as well and that in this case the quality of GS is better than for multiplicities. Moreover, exponent $\\lambda$ characterizing the saturation scale is for the cross-section scaling compatible with the one found in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA. Next, by parametrizing charged particles distributions by the Tsallis-like formula, we find a somewhat unexpected solution that still exhibits GS, but differs from the "standard" one where the Tsallis temperature is proportional to the saturation scale.

  5. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  6. Holographic thermalization of charged operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Giordano; Nicolas E. Grandi; Guillermo A. Silva

    2014-12-26

    We study a light-like charged collapsing shell in AdS-Reissner-Nordstrom spacetime, investigating whether the corresponding Vaidya metric is supported by matter that satisfies the null energy condition. We find that, if the absolute value of the charge decreases during the collapse, energy conditions are fulfilled everywhere in spacetime. On the other hand, if the absolute value of the charge increases, the metric does not satisfy energy conditions in the IR region. Therefore, from the gauge/gravity perspective, this last case is only useful to study the thermalization of the UV degrees of freedom. For all these geometries, we probe the thermalization process with two point correlators of charged operators, finding that the thermalization time grows with the charge of the operator, as well as with the dimension of space.

  7. Stratified charge internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skopil, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a main cylinder, a main piston within the main cylinder, and means for delivering a combustible charge into the main cylinder; a smaller idle cylinder, and idle piston within the idle cylinder, and means for delivering a combustible charge into the idle cylinder; an ignition passageway leading from the idle cylinder to the main cylinder; and an ignition device within the ignition passageway operable to ignite a compressed charge discharged by the idle cylinder into the ignition passageway. The passageway being positioned to discharge the ignited compressed charge from the idle cylinder into the main cylinder to ignite the compressed charge within the main cylinder.

  8. Quasilocalized charge approximation in strongly coupled plasma physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, Kenneth I. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401-1455 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401-1455 (United States); Kalman, Gabor J. [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA) was proposed in 1990 [G. Kalman and K. I. Golden, Phys. Rev. A 41, 5516 (1990)] as a formalism for the analysis of the dielectric response tensor and collective mode dispersion in strongly coupled Coulomb liquids. The approach is based on a microscopic model in which the charges are quasilocalized on a short-time scale in local potential fluctuations. The authors review the application of the QLC approach to a variety of systems which can exhibit strongly coupled plasma behavior: (i) the one-component plasma (OCP) model in three dimensions (e.g., laser-cooled trapped ions) and (ii) in two dimensions (e.g., classical 2D electron liquid trapped above the free surface of liquid helium), (iii) binary ionic mixture in a neutralizing uniform background (e.g., carbon-oxygen white dwarf interiors), (iv) charged particle bilayers (e.g., semiconductor electronic bilayers), and (v) charged particles in polarizable background (e.g., laboratory dusty plasmas). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Laser assisted charge transfer reactions in slow ion–atom collisions: Coupled dressed quasimolecular?states approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Ho, Tak-San; Laughlin, Cecil

    1984-03-01

    hydrogen are important in deter­ mining the radiation losses and neutral beam heating effi­ ciencies in Tokamak plasmas. 1 Because electron capture by a multiply charged ion on an atom generally results in the production of a highly excited state...-induced charge transfer collision, involving Ca + and Sr, has also been re­ ported. 6 More recently, Seely and Elton 7 suggested that pho­ ton-induced charge transfer reactions are also useful for the measurement of particle densities in a Tokamak plasma...

  10. Charge Correlation in Near Side Hadron-Hadron Jets at sqrt(sNN)=200GeV in PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kravitz

    2006-01-31

    We analyze the relative azimuthal ($\\Delta\\phi$) distribution of same-charge and opposite-charge particle pairs. We then remove elliptic flow background using the ZYAM method. Comparisons between near angle $\\Delta\\phi$ peak widths are presented for various centralities.

  11. Ion distribution around a charged rod in one and two component solvents: Preferential solvation and first order ionization phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ion distribution around a charged rod in one and two component solvents: Preferential solvation 2009; publisher error corrected 8 September 2009 In one and two component polar solvents, we calculate solvation of the charged particles and the short-range interaction between the rod and the solvent

  12. Measurement of neutral strange particle production in the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at s?=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Bean, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö , J.

    2013-09-03

    -particle jet pT #7; 2:5 GeV=c 3 10 Charged-particle jet pT > 2:5 GeV=c 3 3 Detector material 3 3 GEANT4 cross sections #8; #8; #8; 5 Statistical uncertainty on V0 weights 600 MeV=c pV0T pV0T pV0T < 8 GeV=c 1.4 8.3 Background estimation Charged-particle jet pT ¼ 1 GeV=c 1.1 2 Charged-particle jet pT ¼ 10 GeV=c 1.7 2 Total Charged-particle jet pT ¼ 1 GeV=c 6 14 Charged-particle jet pT ¼ 10 GeV=c 6 10 Average pT sums Source K0S (%) #1...

  13. A New Method for Indirect Mass Measurements using the Integral Charge Asymmetry at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guy Steve Muanza; Thomas Serre

    2015-06-11

    Processes producing a charged final state at the LHC have a positive integral charge asymmetry. We propose a novel method for an indirect measurement of the mass of these final states based upon the process integral charge asymmetry. First, the theoretical prediction of the integral charge asymmetry and its related uncertainties are studied through parton level cross sections calculations. Then, the experimental extraction of the integral charge asymmetry of a given signal, in the presence of some background, is performed using particle level simulations. Process dependent templates enable to convert the measured integral charge asymmetry into an estimated mass of the charged final state. Finally, a combination of the experimental and the theoretical uncertainties determines the full uncertainty of the indirect mass measurement. This new method applies to all charged current processes at the LHC. In this article, we demonstrate its effectiveness at extracting the mass of the W boson, as a first step, and the sum of the masses of a chargino and a neutralino in case these supersymmetric particles are produced by pair, as a second step.

  14. Automation of particle accelerator control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a 'mouseable' representation of a typical beamline. This responds actively to changes input from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beamline itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operator. We have incorporated the Fortran beam optics code TRANSPORT for simulation of the beam. The paper describes the experience gained in this process and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in real-time, on an operating beamline. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  16. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  17. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  18. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Poisson; Adam Pound; Ian Vega

    2011-09-26

    This review is concerned with the motion of a point scalar charge, a point electric charge, and a point mass in a specified background spacetime. In each of the three cases the particle produces a field that behaves as outgoing radiation in the wave zone, and therefore removes energy from the particle. In the near zone the field acts on the particle and gives rise to a self-force that prevents the particle from moving on a geodesic of the background spacetime. The field's action on the particle is difficult to calculate because of its singular nature: the field diverges at the position of the particle. But it is possible to isolate the field's singular part and show that it exerts no force on the particle. What remains after subtraction is a smooth field that is fully responsible for the self-force. The mathematical tools required to derive the equations of motion of a point scalar charge, a point electric charge, and a point mass in a specified background spacetime are developed here from scratch. The review begins with a discussion of the basic theory of bitensors. It then applies the theory to the construction of convenient coordinate systems to chart a neighbourhood of the particle's word line. It continues with a thorough discussion of Green's functions in curved spacetime. The review presents a detailed derivation of each of the three equations of motion. Because the notion of a point mass is problematic in general relativity, the review concludes with an alternative derivation of the equations of motion that applies to a small body of arbitrary internal structure.

  19. Real-time airborne particle analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2012-10-16

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  20. Vacuum Potentials for the Two Only Permanent Free Particles, Proton and Electron. Pair Productions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2015-02-26

    The two only species of isolatable, smallest, or unit charges +e and -e present in nature interact with the universal vacuum in a polarisable dielectric representation through two uniquely defined vacuum potential functions. All of the non-composite subatomic particles containing one-unit charges, +e or -e, are therefore formed in terms of the IED model of the respective charges, of zero rest masses, oscillating in either of the two unique vacuum potential fields, together with the radiation waves of their own charges. In this paper we give a first principles treatment of the dynamics of charge in a dielectric vacuum, based on which, combined with solutions for the radiation waves obtained previously, we subsequently derive the vacuum potential function for a given charge q, which we show to be quadratic and consist each of quantised potential levels, giving therefore rise to quantised characteristic oscillation frequencies of the charge and accordingly quantised, sharply-defined masses of the IED particles. By further combining with relevant experimental properties as input information, we determine the IED particles built from the charges +e,-e at their first excited states in the respective vacuum potential wells to be the proton and the electron, the observationally two only stable (permanently lived) and "free" particles containing one-unit charges. Their antiparticles as produced in pair productions can be accordingly determined. The characteristics of all of the other more energetic non-composite subatomic particles can also be recognised. We finally discuss the energy condition for pair production, which requires two successive energy supplies to (1) first disintegrate the bound pair of vaculeon charges +e,-e composing a vacuuon of the vacuum and (2) impart masses to the disintegrated charges.

  1. Lubrication by charged polymers , Suzanne Giasson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    .............................................................. Lubrication by charged polymers Uri lubricants between sliding charged surfaces8 . Here we show that brushes of charged polymers (polyelectro- lytes) attached to surfaces rubbing across an aqueous medium result in superior lubrication compared

  2. Efficient wireless charging with gallium nitride FETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Theresa (Theresa I.)

    2014-01-01

    Though wireless charging is more convenient than traditional wired charging methods, it is currently less efficient. This not only wastes power but can also result in a longer charging time. Improving the efficiency of ...

  3. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, K.

    2011-01-01

    electron spectrometer [24] before sending the e-beam to charge diagnostics,electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnosticselectron spectrom- eter was turned off to send e-beams to charge diagnostics.

  4. Computer simulations of single particles in external electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiajia Zhou; Friederike Schmid

    2015-07-20

    Applying electric fields is an attractive way to control and manipulate single particles or molecules, e.g., in lab-on-a-chip devices. However, the response of nanosize objects in electrolyte solution to external fields is far from trivial. It is the result of a variety of dynamical processes taking place in the ion cloud surrounding charged particles and in the bulk electrolyte, and it is governed by an intricate interplay of electrostatic and hydrodynamic interactions. Already systems composed of one single particle in electrolyte solution exhibit a complex dynamical behaviour. In this review, we discuss recent coarse-grained simulations that have been performed to obtain a molecular-level understanding of the dynamic and dielectric response of single particles and single macromolecules to external electric fields. We address both the response of charged particles to constant fields (DC fields), which can be characterized by an electrophoretic mobility, and the dielectric response of both uncharged and charged particles to alternating fields (AC fields), which is described by a complex polarizability. Furthermore, we give a brief survey of simulation algorithms and highlight some recent developments.

  5. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quimby, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this test program is the performance and economic evaluation of a pre-charged-pulse jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial or industrial scale coal fired combustor. Performance factors that will be considered are the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, fabric types, percent humidity and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency, and pressure drop. Economic factors that will be considered are capital costs, energy and other operating costs, and maintenance costs. The program will result in a recommendation regarding the relative suitability of the pre charged pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control, as compared to other control devices. Fine particle control capability, ease of operation, and overall economics will be taken into consideration in making comparisons.

  6. Preparation and characterization of selenide semiconductor particles in surfactant vesicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ancheng; Pfeiffer, W.F.; Guillaume, B.; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-05-17

    Cadmium, lead, indium, and zinc selenide particles have been in situ generated on the surfaces of negatively charged dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) and positively charged dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) vesicles. Selenide particles were formed by two different methods. In method A, MSe particles were in situ generated from M{sup 2+}-coated DHP or (MH{sub 2}EDTA){sup 2{minus}}-coated DODAB vesicles by exposure to gaseous H{sub 2}Se. In method B, MSe particles were formed by the chemical reduction of SeO{sub 2} and M{sup 2+} in the presence of DHP vesicles. Selenide particle formation was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. Increasing the amount of H{sub 2}Se added and decreasing the pH of the solution shifted the absorption edge to higher wavelengths, which indicated the formation of larger particles. On standing particles, generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to their precursors attached to DHP vesicles, underwent time-dependent growth. Selenide particles, formed by chemical reductions, and those generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to Cd/EDTA-coated DODAB vesicles appeared to be small and more stable than their counterparts in DHP vesicles.

  7. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  8. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  9. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan [Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool and Manchester and Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  10. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K. (Berkeley, CA); Neyer, David W. (Castro Valley, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Garguilo, Michael G. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  11. A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Wednesday, 28 August 2013 00:00 Accentuating the...

  12. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere...

  13. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV...

  14. Bringing Your Workplace Charging Story to Life

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    charging workshops * Other community events 10 Shannon.shea@ee.doe.gov http:energy.goveerevehiclesvehicle-technologies-office-ev-everywhere- workplace-charging-challenge 11...

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Vermont Energy Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Information VEIC's Mission Workplace Charging News June 23, 2014 VEIC now an EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge Partner The use of Electric Vehicles (EVs) is...

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase College, State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Purchase College, State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase College, State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase...

  17. AVTA: Bidirectional Fast Charging Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is an analysis of bi-directional fast charging, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  18. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

    2013-04-02

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

  19. particle physics 2009Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report particle physics 2009ª #12;2 | Contents #12;Contents | 3 contentsª º introduction 4 º News;Introduction | 5 projects, (ii) coordination of national particle physics activities and (iii) reaching outparticle physics 2009ªHighlights and Annual Report Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics

  20. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients A=B=C=1 are chaotic, and we show ...

  1. Emission of scalar particles from cylindrical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Gohar; K. Saifullah

    2011-09-27

    We study quantum tunneling of scalar particles from black strings. For this purpose we apply WKB approximation and Hamilton-Jacobi method to solve the Klein-Gordon equation for outgoing trajectories. We find the tunneling probability of outgoing charged and uncharged scalars from the event horizon of black strings, and hence the Hawking temperature for these black configurations.

  2. An evaluation of a pre-charging pulse-jet filter for small combustor particulate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quimby, J.M.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this test program is the performance and economic evaluation of a pre charged-pulse jet filter as the principal particulate control device for a commercial or industrial scale coal fired combustor. Performance factors that will be considered are the effects of particle charge, air/cloth ratio, fabric types, percent humidity and inlet particulate loading on fine particle collection efficiency, and pressure drop. Economic factors that will be considered are capital costs, energy and other operating costs, and maintenance costs.

  3. Experiment Anti-Helium (Production of Nuclei and Anti-Nuclei. Limits for "exotic" particles of long lifetime)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Giacomelli

    2013-07-24

    Data are recalled on the relative yields of charged pions,charged kaons,protons,antiprotons,tritiun nuclei, anti-tritium, He3 nuclei and anti-He3 antinuclei produced at 0 degrees by 200-240 GeV/c protons on Beryllium and Aluminium targets. A search for the production of long-lived particles with charges 2/3, 1, 4/3, is described; for negative particle production the upper limits obtained at the 95% Confidence Level were at the level of 10-11 with respect to the production of known particles.

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel John (Albuquerque, NM); Walton, Christopher (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James (Livermore, CA)

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. Interaction and Deformation of Viscoelastic Particles. 2. Adhesive Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attard, Phil

    Interaction and Deformation of Viscoelastic Particles. 2. Adhesive Particles Phil Attard Ian Wark, 2001. In Final Form: April 30, 2001 Analyzed is the mutual deformation of adhesive particles the particles' adhesion. An analytic

  6. Equilibria of EV Charging Benny Lutati1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeoh, William

    Equilibria of EV Charging Benny Lutati1 , Vadim Levit1 , Tal Grinshpoun2 , and Amnon Meisels1 1 games · EV charging · V2G · Distributed search 1 Introduction Electric Vehicles (EVs) are an important to be charged daily. When parked during office hours, EVs are expected to charge in a well-balanced pattern

  7. Morphology and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Morphology and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers R. J. KLINE AND M. D. McGEHEE Department charge transport and morphology is key to increasing the charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymers to provide insight into how the charge carriers move through a conjugated polymer film and provide a model

  8. Particle Topology, Braids, and Braided Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundance Bilson-Thompson; Jonathan Hackett; Louis H. Kauffman

    2009-03-07

    Recent work suggests that topological features of certain quantum gravity theories can be interpreted as particles, matching the known fermions and bosons of the first generation in the Standard Model. This is achieved by identifying topological structures with elements of the framed Artin braid group on three strands, and demonstrating a correspondence between the invariants used to characterise these braids (a braid is a set of non-intersecting curves, that connect one set of $N$ points with another set of $N$ points), and quantities like electric charge, colour charge, and so on. In this paper we show how to manipulate a modified form of framed braids to yield an invariant standard form for sets of isomorphic braids, characterised by a vector of real numbers. This will serve as a basis for more complete discussions of quantum numbers in future work.

  9. Alternator control for battery charging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunstetter, Craig A.; Jaye, John R.; Tallarek, Glen E.; Adams, Joseph B.

    2015-07-14

    In accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, an electrical system for an automotive vehicle has an electrical generating machine and a battery. A set point voltage, which sets an output voltage of the electrical generating machine, is set by an electronic control unit (ECU). The ECU selects one of a plurality of control modes for controlling the alternator based on an operating state of the vehicle as determined from vehicle operating parameters. The ECU selects a range for the set point voltage based on the selected control mode and then sets the set point voltage within the range based on feedback parameters for that control mode. In an aspect, the control modes include a trickle charge mode and battery charge current is the feedback parameter and the ECU controls the set point voltage within the range to maintain a predetermined battery charge current.

  10. Scattering of infrared light by dielectric core-shell particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiessen, E; Heinisch, R L; Fehske, H

    2015-01-01

    We study the scattering of infrared light by small dielectric core-shell particles taking a sapphire sphere with a CaO core as an example. The extinction efficiency of such a particle shows two intense series of resonances attached, respectively, to in-phase and out-of-phase multipolar polarization-induced surface charges build-up, respectively, at the core-shell and the shell-vacuum interface. Both series, the character of the former may be labelled bonding and the character of the latter antibonding, give rise to anomalous scattering. For a given particle radius and filling factor the Poynting vector field shows therefore around two wave numbers the complex topology of this type of light scattering. Inside the particle the topology depends on the character of the resonance. The dissipation of energy inside the particle also reflects the core-shell structure. It depends on the resonance and shows strong spatial variations.

  11. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  12. Electric Charge in Interaction with Magnetically Charged Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Kim; Sei-Hoon Moon

    2007-10-02

    We examine the angular momentum of an electric charge e placed at rest outside a dilaton black hole with magnetic charge Q. The electromagnetic angular momentum which is stored in the electromagnetic field outside the black hole shows several common features regardless of the dilaton coupling strength, though the dilaton black holes are drastically different in their spacetime structure depending on it. First, the electromagnetic angular momentum depends on the separation distance between the two objects and changes monotonically from eQ to 0 as the charge goes down from infinity to the horizon, if rotational effects of the black hole are discarded. Next, as the black hole approaches extremality, however, the electromagnetic angular momentum tends to be independent of the distance between the two objects. It is then precisely $eQ$ as in the electric charge and monopole system in flat spacetime. We discuss why these effects are exhibited and argue that the above features are to hold in widely generic settings including black hole solutions in theories with more complicated field contents, by addressing the no hair theorem for black holes and the phenomenon of field expulsion exhibited by extremal black holes.

  13. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  14. Charge Collection Efficiency Simulations of Irradiated Silicon Strip Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Peltola

    2014-11-25

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects to the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (mip). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed before and after irradiation for fluences up to $1.5\\times10^{15}$ $\\textrm{n}_{\\textrm{eq}}$cm$^{-2}$ for the n-on-p sensors. A two level and non-uniform three level defect models were applied for the proton irradiation simulations and two level model for neutrons. The results are presented together with the measurements of strip detectors irradiated by different particles and fluences and show considerable agreement for both CCE and its position dependency.

  15. General description of electromagnetic radiation processes based on instantaneous charge acceleration in ''endpoints''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Clancy W.; Falcke, Heino; Huege, Tim; Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-11-15

    We present a methodology for calculating the electromagnetic radiation from accelerated charged particles. Our formulation - the 'endpoint formulation' - combines numerous results developed in the literature in relation to radiation arising from particle acceleration using a complete, and completely general, treatment. We do this by describing particle motion via a series of discrete, instantaneous acceleration events, or 'endpoints', with each such event being treated as a source of emission. This method implicitly allows for particle creation and destruction, and is suited to direct numerical implementation in either the time or frequency domains. In this paper we demonstrate the complete generality of our method for calculating the radiated field from charged particle acceleration, and show how it reduces to the classical named radiation processes such as synchrotron, Tamm's description of Vavilov-Cherenkov, and transition radiation under appropriate limits. Using this formulation, we are immediately able to answer outstanding questions regarding the phenomenology of radio emission from ultra-high-energy particle interactions in both the earth's atmosphere and the moon. In particular, our formulation makes it apparent that the dominant emission component of the Askaryan effect (coherent radio-wave radiation from high-energy particle cascades in dense media) comes from coherent 'bremsstrahlung' from particle acceleration, rather than coherent Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation.

  16. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, A.

    1985-11-26

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  17. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Barao; M. Aguilar-Benitez; L. Arruda; B. Baret; A. Barrau; G. Barreira; E. Belmont; J. Berdugo; J. Borges; M. Buenerd; D. Casadei; J. Casaus; E. Cortina; M. Costado; D. Crespo; C. Delgado; C. Diaz; L. Derome; P. Goncalves; R. Garcia-Lopez; C. de la Guia; A. Herrero; E. Lanciotti; G. Laurenti; A. Malinin; C. Mana; J. Marin; M. Mangin-Brinet; G. Martinez; A. Menchaca-Rocha; C. Palomares; R. Pereira; M. Pimenta; A. Putze; Y. Sallaz-Damaz; E. S. Seo; I. Sevilla; A. Torrento; M. Vargas-Trevino; O. Veziant

    2007-09-13

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.

  18. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luísa Arruda; Fernando Barão; João Borges; Fernando Carmo; Patrícia Gonçalves; Mário Pimenta

    2008-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). This detector will be equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light-guides, enabling measurements of particle electric charge and velocity. A likelihood method for the Cherenkov angle reconstruction was applied leading to a velocity determination for protons with a resolution around 0.1%. The electric charge reconstruction is based on the counting of the number of photoelectrons and on an overall efficiency estimation on an event-by-event basis. Results from the application of both methods are presented.

  19. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arruda, Luísa; Borges, João; Carmo, Fernando; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Pimenta, Mário

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). This detector will be equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light-guides, enabling measurements of particle electric charge and velocity. A likelihood method for the Cherenkov angle reconstruction was applied leading to a velocity determination for protons with a resolution around 0.1%. The electric charge reconstruction is based on the counting of the number of photoelectrons and on an overall efficiency estimation on an event-by-event basis. Results from the application of both methods are presented.

  20. Anomaly and the self-energy of electric charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrei Zelnikov

    2012-10-26

    We study the self energy of a charged particle located in a static D-dimensional gravitational field. We show that the energy functional for this problem is invariant under an infinite dimensional (gauge) group of transformations parameterized by one scalar function of (D-1)-variables. We demonstrate that the problem of the calculation of the self energy for a pointlike charge is equivalent to the calculation of the fluctuations $$ for an effective (D-1)-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory. Using point-splitting regularization we obtain an expression for the self energy and show, that it possesses anomalies. Explicit calculation of the self energy and its anomaly is done for the higher dimensional Majumdar-Papapetrou spacetimes.