Sample records for tary charged particles

  1. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fayolle; T. Bickel; A. Würger

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  2. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  3. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  4. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  5. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  6. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  7. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  8. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  9. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  10. Frictional cooling of positively charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Greenwald; Allen Caldwell

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the focuses of research and development towards the construction of a muon collider is muon beam preparation. Simulation of frictional cooling shows that it can achieve the desired emittance reduction to produce high-luminosity muon beams. We show that for positively charged particles, charge exchange interactions necessitate significant changes to schemes previously developed for negatively charged particles. We also demonstrate that foil-based schemes are not viable for positive particles.

  11. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  12. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone...

  13. Scattering of very light charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J C Taylor

    1993-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I advance arguments against the view that the Lee-Nauenberg-Kinoshita theorem is relevant in practice to the scattering of charged particles as their mass tends to zero. I also discuss the case of massive coloured particle scattering.

  14. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  15. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  16. Momentum computed tomography of charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Deyang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle of the momentum computed tomography of charged particles is presented. It may be useful for momentum spectroscopy of various beam-matter interactions, especially when very intense beams are involved. It is able to collect the shower of charged particles with the 4Pi solid angle, and suitable for measuring the overall perspective of the arbitrary momentum distribution of the outgoing charged particles induced by arbitrary beams, especially when the other techniques are invalid. The extended collisional region, the strong field approximation and the case without magnetic field are discussed.

  17. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), which includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions, we study the rapidity distributions of charged particles such as protons, antiprotons, pions, and kaons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC...

  18. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  19. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, Daniel S. (Livermore, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Briggs, Richard J. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  20. Why do Particle Clouds Generate Electric Charges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Pähtz; H. J. Herrmann; T. Shinbrot

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  1. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeveld, W.G.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Interaction of Gravitational Waves with Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thulsi Wickramasinghe; Will Rhodes; Mitchell Revalski

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown here that a cloud of charged particles could in principle absorb energy from gravitational waves (GWs) incident upon it, resulting in wave attenuation. This could in turn have implications for the interpretation of future data from early universe GWs.

  3. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  4. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  5. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  6. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'llMapping Particle Charges in Battery

  7. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'llMapping Particle Charges in BatteryMapping

  8. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  9. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  10. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  11. Determination of Dusty Particle Charge Taking into Account Ion Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Orazbayev, S. A. [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 96a Tole Bi St., Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Petrov, O. F.; Antipov, S. N. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS, 13/19 Izhorskaya, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to the experimental estimation of charge of dust particle that levitates in the stratum of dc glow discharge. Particle charge is determined on the basis of the balance between ion drag force, gravitational and electric forces. Electric force is obtained from the axial distribution of the light intensity of strata.

  12. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Jesse Andrew (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  13. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7217 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  14. Relativistic Particle with Torsion and Charged Particle in a Constant Electromagnetic Field: Identity of Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail S. Plyushchay

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The identity of classical motion is established for two physically different models, one of which is the relativistic particle with torsion, whose action contains higher derivatives and which is the effective system for the statistically charged particle interacting with the Chern-Simons U(1) gauge field, and another is the (2+1)-dimensional relativistic charged particle in external constant electromagnetic field.

  15. Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Particle in an Electroscalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Podgainy; O. A. Zaimidoroga

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This article devoted to relativistic dynamics of a charged massive particle in an electroscalar field. It represents a continuation of paper [1] where the authors constructed a non-relativistic theory which describes transverse electromagnetic waves along with longitudinal electroscalar ones, responsible for the wave transport of the Coulomb field. A new type of relativistic force exerted by electroscalar field on an electrically charged particle and the relativistic law of superposition of electromagnetic transverse and electroscalar longitudinal fields are established. Also, a relativistically invariant form of a Lagrangian describing the interaction between an electroscalar field and massive electrically charged particle is defined.

  16. Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Particle in an Electroscalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgainy, D V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article devoted to relativistic dynamics of a charged massive particle in an electroscalar field. It represents a continuation of paper [1] where the authors constructed a non-relativistic theory which describes transverse electromagnetic waves along with longitudinal electroscalar ones, responsible for the wave transport of the Coulomb field. A new type of relativistic force exerted by electroscalar field on an electrically charged particle and the relativistic law of superposition of electromagnetic transverse and electroscalar longitudinal fields are established. Also, a relativistically invariant form of a Lagrangian describing the interaction between an electroscalar field and massive electrically charged particle is defined.

  17. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  18. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Shabad, A. E. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vassilevich, D. V. [CMCC - Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, S.P. (Brazil); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  19. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  20. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  1. Charged-Particle Multiplicity in Proton-Proton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus; Klaus Reygers

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article summarizes and critically reviews measurements of charged-particle multiplicity distributions and pseudorapidity densities in p+p(pbar) collisions between sqrt(s) = 23.6 GeV and sqrt(s) = 1.8 TeV. Related theoretical concepts are briefly introduced. Moments of multiplicity distributions are presented as a function of sqrt(s). Feynman scaling, KNO scaling, as well as the description of multiplicity distributions with a single negative binomial distribution and with combinations of two or more negative binomial distributions are discussed. Moreover, similarities between the energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in p+p(pbar) and e+e- collisions are studied. Finally, various predictions for pseudorapidity densities, average multiplicities in full phase space, and multiplicity distributions of charged particles in p+p(pbar) collisions at the LHC energies of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, 10 TeV, and 14 TeV are summarized and compared.

  2. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy Manufacturing EnergyMapping Particle

  3. Auxiliary field Monte Carlo for charged particles A. C. Maggs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggs, Anthony

    ~ . This is the wrong statistical weight for particles interacting via Coulomb's law. While evaluation of the energy; accepted 20 November 2003 This article describes Monte Carlo algorithms for charged systems using.1063/1.1642587 I. INTRODUCTION Fast methods for calculating Coulomb interactions are of the greatest importance

  4. Photon production by charged particles in narrow optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru; C. Ray

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle passing through or by an optical fiber induces emission of light guided by the fiber. The formula giving the spontaneous emission amplitude are given in the general case when the particle trajectory is not parallel to the fiber axis. At small angle, the photon yield grows like the inverse power of the angle and in the parallel limiting case the fiber Cherenkov effect studied by Bogdankevich and Bolotovskii is recovered. Possible application to beam diagnostics are discussed, as well as resonance effects when the particle trajectory or the fiber is bent periodically.

  5. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  6. Channeling problem for charged particles produced by confining environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Derbov, V. L. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation); Krassovitskiy, P. M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan); Vinitsky, S. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Channeling problem produced by confining environment that leads to resonance scattering of charged particles via quasistationary states imbedded in the continuum is examined. Nonmonotonic dependence of physical parameters on collision energy and/or confining environment due to resonance transmission and total reflection effects is confirmed that can increase the rate of recombination processes. The reduction of the model for two identical charged ions to a boundary problem is considered together with the asymptotic behavior of the solution in the vicinity of pair-collision point and the results of R-matrix calculations. Tentative estimations of the enhancement factor and the total reflection effect are discussed.

  7. Rotating charged cylindrical black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said, Jackson Levi [Physics Department, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2080 (Malta); Adami, Kristian Zarb [Physics Department, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2080 (Malta); Physics Department, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that arbitrary center-of-mass energies may be obtained for particle collisions near the horizon of an extremal Kerr black hole. We investigate this mechanism in cylindrical topology. In particular we consider the center-of-mass energies of a cylindrical black hole with an extremal rotation and charge parameter. The geodesics are first derived with a rotating charged cylindrical black hole producing the background gravitational field. Finally the center-of-mass is determined for this background and its extremal limit is taken.

  8. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plettner, Tomas (San Ramon, CA); Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  9. Ratchet transport for a chain of interacting charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Denisov; E. S. Denisova; P. Hänggi

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study analytically and numerically the overdamped, deterministic dynamics of a chain of {\\it charged}, interacting particles driven by a longitudinal alternating electric field and additionally interacting with a smooth ratchet potential. We derive the equations of motion, analyze the general properties of their solutions and find the drift criterion for chain motion. For ratchet potentials of the form of a double-sine and a phase-modulated sine it is demonstrated that both, a so-called integer and fractional transport of the chain can occur. Explicit results for the directed chain transport for these two classes of ratchet potentials are presented.

  10. Parallel Multiphysics Simulations of Charged Particles in Microfluidic Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartuschat, Dominik

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article describes parallel multiphysics simulations of charged particles in microfluidic flows with the waLBerla framework. To this end, three physical effects are coupled: rigid body dynamics, fluid flow modelled by a lattice Boltzmann algorithm, and electric potentials represented by a finite volume discretisation. For solving the finite volume discretisation for the electrostatic forces, a cell-centered multigrid algorithm is developed that conforms to the lattice Boltzmann meshes and the parallel communication structure of waLBerla. The new functionality is validated with suitable benchmark scenarios. Additionally, the parallel scaling and the numerical efficiency of the algorithms are analysed on an advanced supercomputer.

  11. A Search for Charged Massive Stable Particles at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eads, Michael T

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The signature is two particles reconstructed as muons, but with speed and invariant mass inconsistent with beam-produced muons. No excess of events is observed and limits are set on the production cross-section for pair-produced stable stau sleptons based on 390 pb{sup -1} of data. Limits vary from 0.06 pb to 0.62 pb, depending on the stau mass, and are the strictest Tevatron limits to date. Mass limits are also set for stable charginos. The limits are 140 GeV/c{sup 2} for a higgsino-like chargino and 174 GeV/c{sup 2} for a gaugino-like chargino. These are currently the best limits to date for stable charginos.

  12. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barov, Nikolai (San Diego, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  13. Charged particle acceleration in dense plasma channels I. Y. Dodin and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charged particle acceleration in dense plasma channels I. Y. Dodin and N. J. Fisch Department amplitude and the energy of a charged particle accelerated in a plasma channel. The maximum energy gain accelerators can operate at much higher magnitudes as they utilize electrostatic fields due to charge

  14. Integral charged particle nuclear date bibliography. Editon 1, Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.; Dunford, C.L.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is divided into three sections, ''References'', ''Target Index'', and ''Residual Index.'' The ''References'' section contains all references satisfying the following criteria: excitation functions, thick targets, or product yield leading to the formation of a ground or metastable state; the atomic mass and charge of the incident particle must be greater than or equal to 1; the atomic mass of the target must be greater than or equal to 1; and the atomic masses of the outgoing and residual nuclei must be greater than or equal to 1 with the exception of processes which do not lead to a definite residual nucleus and of gamma-ray production cross sections. The ''Target Index'' section contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite target nucleus and reaction. These reference lines contain the Journal name, followed by the volume and page number. The ''Residual Index'' section also contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite residual nucleus and a definite target-reaction.

  15. ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES ASSOCIATED WITH STRONG INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacalone, Joe [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze observations of energetic charged particles associated with many strong interplanetary shocks seen by Advanced Composition Explorer. We focus primarily on 47-187 keV suprathermal protons and restrict our analysis to strong interplanetary shocks (Alfven Mach number >3 and the shock density compression >2.5). Eighteen shocks meeting this criterion from 1998 to 2003 were analyzed. All 18 had enhancements of the 47-65 keV proton intensity above the intensity seen one day before the shock. In 17 events, the particle intensity either rose to a quasi-plateau or peaked within 10 minutes of the shock. Most had intensities at the shock exceeding 100 times more than that seen the day before the shock arrived. The time-intensity profiles of the energetic proton events in many cases reveal a rise before the shock passage reaching a quasi-plateau or local peak at the shock, followed by a gradual decline. This suggests that the shock itself is the source of energetic particles. Energy spectra behind the shock were fit to an assumed power law over the interval from 46 to 187 keV, and the resulting spectral index was compared to the plasma density jump across each shock. Most events agree with the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory to within the observational uncertainties. We also analyzed a few selected events to determine the particle spatial diffusion coefficients and acceleration timescales. We find that the time to accelerate protons to {approx}50 keV is of the order of an hour.

  16. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  17. The Landau Distribution for Charged Particles Traversing Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo D. Marucho; C. A. Garcia Canal; H. Fanchiotti

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landau distribution as well as its first and second momenta are well suited for describing the energy loss of charged particles traversing a thin layer of matter. At present, just rational approximations and asymptotic expressions for these functions were obtained. In this paper we present a direct calculation of the integral representation of these functions obtaining perturbative and nonperturvative solutions expressed in terms of fast convergent series. We also provide a simple numerical algorithm which allows to control speed and precision of the results. The testing runs have provided, in reasonable computing times, correct results up to 13-14 significant digits on the density and distribution functions and 9-10 on the first and second momenta. If necessary, this accuracy could be improved by adding more coefficients to the algorithm.

  18. Electrical charge acquired by 0.31 um [micrometer] aerosol particles from unequal concentrations of bipolar ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauntt, Randall Owen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert A. Fjeld Bipolar charging experiments were conducted in a laminar flow charging chamber for 0. 31 micrometer diameter polystyrene latex aerosol particles in the presence of a charging electric field strength... by the aerosol particles (Cooper and Reist, 1973, and Liu and Pui, 1974). Charging experiments have been conducted extensively in the case of unipolar charging, equilibrium bipolar charging, and im- balanced bipolar charging for large particles; however...

  19. Effect of net surface charge on particle sizing and material recognition by using phase Doppler anemometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Jun; Xie Li

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking net surface charge into consideration, the scattering field of particles illuminated by dual laser beams of phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) is computed based on Mie's theory, and the effect of net surface charge on the phase-diameter relationship and the phase ratio is studied. It is found that the phase-diameter relationship and the relationship between the phase ratio and the refractive index of charged particles could be significantly different from those of uncharged particles, which would lead to errors in particle sizing and the measurement of refractive indices. A method of recognizing charged particles and determining the value of their surface conductivity, which is related to net surface charge, is proposed by utilizing the effect of net surface charge on the measurement of refractive indices using PDA.

  20. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, David Richard (Georgetown, MA)

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  1. PoS(EPS-HEP2011)405 Charged particle identification (PID) for SuperB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PoS(EPS-HEP2011)405 Charged particle identification (PID) for SuperB Nicolas ARNAUD Laboratoire de3.fr Charged particle identification (PID) is a key input for the physics program of the Super of SuperB to extend the PID coverage in this region. This innovative time-of-flight detector will use new

  2. Rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions and particle acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; B. Pourhassan; H. Farahani

    2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  3. The Consequences of the Charge for the Mass of the Elementary Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the consequences which the presence of an elementary electric charge in mu^(+-) and pi^(+-) has for the rest mass of mu^(+-) and pi^(+-). The addition of the electric charges e^(+-) to the massive neutral bodies of these particles does not increase the energy in the rest mass of the muon and pion, but rather decreases their energy by the binding energy of the electric charge to the neutral bodies of the muon and pion. The addition of a charge to the neutral neutrino lattices of the muon or pion changes the simple cubic lattices of the neutral particles to face-centered cubic lattices of the charged particles, which is essential for the stability of the particles.

  4. Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Misra, Shikha, E-mail: shikhamish@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

  5. Scaling of Charged Particle Production in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The measured pseudorapidity distributions of primary charged particles over a wide pseudorapidity range of |eta| N^{pp}_{ch} and the energy dependence of the density of charged particles produced in the fragmentation region exhibits extensive longitudinal scaling.

  6. APS/123-QED Influence of the ambipolar-to-free diffusion transition on dust particle charge in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the thermophoretic force [10, 11]. Dust particle charge is a key parameter in a complex plasma. It determines

  7. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  8. Charging and de-charging of dust particles in bulk region of a radio frequency discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis to investigate the effect of the dust particle size and density on the floating potential of the dust particles of uniform radius and other plasma parameters in the bulk region plasma of a RF-discharge in collisionless/collisional regime has been presented herein. For this purpose, the average charge theory based on charge balance on dust and number balance of plasma constituents has been utilized; a derivation for the accretion rate of electrons corresponding to a drifting Maxwellian energy distribution in the presence of an oscillatory RF field has been given and the resulting expression has been used to determine the floating potential of the dust grains. Further, the de-charging of the dust grains after switching off the RF field has also been discussed.

  9. Study of high transverse momentum charged particle suppression in heavy ion collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Andre Sungho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged particle spectrum at large transverse momentum (PT), dominated by hadrons originating from parton fragmentation, is an important observable for studying the properties of the hot, dense medium produced in ...

  10. Development, characterization, and application of a charged particle microbeam for radiobiological research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkert, Michael R. (Michael Ryan), 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to develop a charged-particle microbeam for use in radiobiological research at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). The purpose of this device is to precisely explore the ...

  11. Reactivity of nanocolloidal particles -Fe2O3 at charged interfaces: 2-Electrochemical conversion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    synthesis of magnetic and conductive liquids. The reactivity of charged colloidal10 particles occurs in two by methyl viologen), nanoparticles of hematite and goethite (-FeOOH: d = 50 nm) are invo

  12. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  13. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  14. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  15. Electrodynamics of a generalized charged particle in doubly special relativity framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pramanik, Souvik, E-mail: souvick.in@gmail.com [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B. T. Road, Kolkata 700 108 (India); Ghosh, Subir, E-mail: subir_ghosh2@rediffmail.com [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B. T. Road, Kolkata 700 108 (India); Pal, Probir, E-mail: probirkumarpal@rediffmail.com [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, dynamics of generalized charged particles are studied in the presence of external electromagnetic interactions. This particular extension of the free relativistic particle model lives in Non-Commutative ?-Minkowski space–time, compatible with Doubly Special Relativity, that is motivated to describe Quantum Gravity effects. Furthermore we have also considered the electromagnetic field to be dynamical and have derived the modified forms of Lienard–Wiechert like potentials for these extended charged particle models. In all the above cases we exploit the new and extended form of ?-Minkowski algebra where electromagnetic effects are incorporated in the lowest order, in the Dirac framework of Hamiltonian constraint analysis.

  16. Method and apparatus for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux for analysis of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger (Tucson, AZ), Koppenaal, David W. (Richland, WA), Barinaga, Charles J. (Richland, WA), Hieftje, Gary (Bloomington, IN), Barnes, IV, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Atlas, Eugene (Irvine, CA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle detector and method are disclosed providing for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux in a measurement cycle. The detector provides multiple and independently selectable levels of integration and/or gain in a fully addressable readout manner.

  17. Light charged particle emission from hot $^{32}$S$^{*}$ formed in $^{20}$Ne + $^{12}$C reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aparajita Dey; S. Bhattacharya; C. Bhattacharya; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; S. Kundu; S. R. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; R. Saha

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive energy distributions for light charged particles ($p, d, t$ and $\\alpha$) have been measured in the $^{20}$Ne (158, 170, 180, 200 MeV) + $^{12}$C reactions in the angular range 10$^{o}$ -- 50$^{o}$. Exclusive light charged particle energy distribution measurements were also done for the same system at 158 MeV bombarding energy by in-plane light charged particle -- fragment coincidence. Pre-equilibrium components have been separated out from proton energy spectra using moving source model considering two sources. The data have been compared with the predictions of the statistical model code CASCADE. It has been observed that significant deformation effects were needed to be introduced in the compound nucleus in order to explain the shape of the evaporated $d, t$ energy spectra. For protons, evaporated energy spectra were rather insensitive to nuclear deformation, though angular distributions could not be explained without deformation. Decay sequence of the hot $^{32}$S nucleus has been investigated through exclusive light charged particle measurements using the $^{20}$Ne (158 MeV) + $^{12}$C reaction. Information on the sequential decay chain has been extracted through comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the statistical model. It is observed from the present analysis that exclusive light charged particle data may be used as a powerful tool to probe the decay sequence of hot light compound systems.

  18. Charged Particles' Acceleration through Reconnecting Current Sheets in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    . We set B0=100 Gauss as a reference value of the main magnetic field component. A particle (c4 + 1 2 y2 )2 + 1 2 (I2 - z + y)2 - z (3) where py, and c4 = z-y2 /2 are the canonical momenta

  19. A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Allen L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cieren, Emmanuel B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feltman, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leibs, Christopher A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarthy, Colleen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murthy, Karthik S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yijie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

  20. Quantum Vacuum Charge and the New HyperCP Particle X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. F. Diether III; A. E. Inopin

    2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unique geometrical model based on our findings of a quantum vacuum charge scenario to predict the recent experimental find of the new HyperCP 214 MeV particle state X. This model, which we call the Spin Matrix, also predicts many more states; some of which represent known particles and some states that aren't represented directly by known particles or haven't been experimentally found yet. We demonstrate a parameter-free description of the lowest energy particles in nature.

  1. Integral charged particle nuclear data bibliography: Literature scanned from April 11, 1987 through November 10, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is the annual supplement to the first edition published in 1984. The primary goal of this publication has been to satisfy the need expressed by the Nuclear Reaction Data Center Network for a concise and comprehensive bibliography of integral charged-particle cross section data. The reader is referred to a partial list of other bibliographies relevant to charged-particle-induced reaction data and to ''A Source List of Nuclear Data Bibliographies, Compilations, and Evaluations'' for a more comprehensive list. Since this publication is not cumulative, earlier versions are also shown in this paper. This publication makes use of a modification to the database of the Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file. This modification allows the retrieval of integral charged particle nuclear data entries from the NSR file. In recent years, the presentation of various sections was changed, as a result of users' suggestions. The authors continue to welcome users' comments. 190 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effect of charged particle's multiplicity fluctuations on flow harmonics in even-by-event hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nucleon-nucleon collisions, charged particle's multiplicity fluctuates. We have studied the effect of multiplicity fluctuation on flow harmonics in nucleus-nucleus collision in event-by-event hydrodynamics. Assuming that the charged particle's multiplicity fluctuations are governed by the negative binomial distribution, the Monte-Carlo Glauber model of initial condition is generalised to include the fluctuations. Explicit simulations with the generalised Monte-Carlo Glauber model initial conditions indicate that the multiplicity fluctuations do not have large effect on the flow harmonics.

  3. Effect of charged particle's multiplicity fluctuations on flow harmonics in even-by-event hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In nucleon-nucleon collisions, charged particle's multiplicity fluctuates. We have studied the effect of multiplicity fluctuation on flow harmonics in nucleus-nucleus collision in event-by-event hydrodynamics. Assuming that the charged particle's multiplicity fluctuations are governed by the negative binomial distribution, the Monte-Carlo Glauber model of initial condition is generalised to include the fluctuations. Explicit simulations with the generalised Monte-Carlo Glauber model initial conditions indicate that the multiplicity fluctuations do not have large effect on the flow harmonics.

  4. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGE SOLID ANGLE SPECTROMETER WITH CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION FOR THE BEVALAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, M.R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of charged particles in a Plastic Ball module. (XBL 7910-of Califomia. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGEBerkeley, California Summary PLASTIC 8/>Ll PLASTIC WALL For

  5. A Novel Scheme to Search for Fractional Charge Particles in Low Energy Accelerator Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianguo Bian; Jiahui Wang

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the quarks and anti-quarks have fractional charge equal to $\\pm1/3$ or $\\pm2/3$ of the electron's charge. There has been a large number of experiments searching for fractional charge, isolatable, elementary particles using a variety of methods, including $e^+e^-$ collisions using dE/dx ionization energy loss measurements, but no evidence has been found to confirm existence of free fractional charge particles, which leads to the quark confinement theory. In this paper, a proposal to search for this kind particles is presented, which is based on the conservation law of four-momentum. Thanks to the CLEOc and BESIII detectors' large coverage, good particle identification, precision measurements of tracks' momenta and their large recorded data samples, these features make the scheme feasible in practice. The advantage of the scheme is independent of any theoretical models and sensitive for a small fraction of the quarks transitioning to the unconfinement phase from the confinement phase.

  6. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  7. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, Francisco J., E-mail: fjimenez@ualberta.ca; Dew, Steven K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada); Field, David J. [Smith and Nephew (Alberta) Inc., Fort Saskatchewan T8L 4K4 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  8. Slow wave structures using twisted waveguides for charged particle applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Yoon W.; Fathy, Aly E.; Wilson, Joshua L.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapidly twisted electromagnetic accelerating structure includes a waveguide body having a central axis, one or more helical channels defined by the body and disposed around a substantially linear central axial channel, with central portions of the helical channels merging with the linear central axial channel. The structure propagates electromagnetic waves in the helical channels which support particle beam acceleration in the central axial channel at a phase velocity equal to or slower than the speed of light in free space. Since there is no variation in the shape of the transversal cross-section along the axis of the structure, inexpensive mechanical fabrication processes can be used to form the structure, such as extrusion, casting or injection molding. Also, because the field and frequency of the resonant mode depend on the whole structure rather than on dimensional tolerances of individual cells, no tuning of individual cells is needed. Accordingly, the overall operating frequency may be varied with a tuning/phase shifting device located outside the resonant waveguide structure.

  9. SEARCH FOR CHARGED -PARTICLE d -d FUSION PRODUCTS IN AN ENCAPSULATED Pd THIN FILM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuhauser, Barbara

    SEARCH FOR CHARGED - PARTICLE d - d FUSION PRODUCTS IN AN ENCAPSULATED Pd THIN FILM E. López, B the possibility of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion at room temperature within the bulk palladium electrode / Pd ratio exceeding 100 %. The palladium film was encapsulated with a thin layer of silicon nitride

  10. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  11. Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

  12. Numerical studies of emittance exchange in 2-D charged-particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, F.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe results obtained from a two-dimensional particle-following computer code that simulates a continuous, nonrelativistic, elliptical charged-particle beam with linear continuous focusing. Emittances and focusing strengths can be different in the two transverse directions. The results can be applied, for example, for a quadrupole transport system in a smooth approximation to a real beam with unequal emittances in the two planes. The code was used to study emittance changes caused by kinetic-energy exchange between transverse directions and by shifts in charge distributions. Simulation results for space-charge-dominated beams agree well with analytic formulas. From simulation results, an empirical formula was developed for a ''partition parameter'' (the ratio of kinetic energies in the two directions) as a function of initial conditions and beamline length. Quantitative emittance changes for each transverse direction can be predicted by using this parameter. Simulation results also agree with Hofmann's generalized differential equation relating emittance and field energy.

  13. Salt-induced reentrant stability of polyion-decorated particles with tunable surface charge density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simona Sennato; Laura Carlini; Domenico Truzzolillo; Federico Bordi

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic complexation between DOTAP-DOPC unilamellar liposomes and an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (NaPA) has been investigated in a wide range of the liposome surface charge density. We systematically characterized the "reentrant condensation" and the charge inversion of polyelectrolyte-decorated liposomes by means of dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis. We explored the stability of this model polyelectrolyte/colloid system by fixing each time the charge of the bare liposomes and by changing two independent control parameters of the suspensions: the polyelectrolyte/colloid charge ratio and the ionic strength of the aqueous suspending medium. The progressive addition of neutral DOPC lipid within the liposome membrane gave rise to a new intriguing phenomenon: the stability diagram of the suspensions showed a novel reentrance due to the crossing of the desorption threshold of the polyelectrolyte. Indeed, at fixed charge density of the bare DOTAP/DOPC liposomes and for a wide range of polyion concentrations, we showed that the simple electrolyte addition first (low salt regime) destabilizes the suspensions because of the enhanced screening of the residual repulsion between the complexes, and then (high salt regime) determines the onset of a new stable phase, originated by the absence of polyelectrolyte adsorption on the particle surfaces. We show that the observed phenomenology can be rationalized within the Velegol-Thwar model for heterogeneously charged particles and that the polyelectrolyte desorption fits well the predictions of the adsorption theory of Winkler and Cherstvy. Our findings unambiguously support the picture of the reentrant condensation as driven by the correlated adsorption of the polyelectrolyte chains on the particle surface, providing interesting insights into possible mechanisms for tailoring complex colloids via salt-induced effects.

  14. `Majorana mass' fermions as particles rather endowed with pseudoscalar-type charges than genuinely neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Ziino

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of a `Majorana mass' to make a chiral neutrino really neutral is here reconsidered. It is pointed out that such an approach, unlike Majorana's (non-chiral) old one, does not strictly lead, in general, to a true self-conjugate particle. This can be seen on directly using the basic definition (or fundamental representation) of charge conjugation $C$ in Quantum Field Theory, as an operation just acting on annihilation and creation operators and just expressing particle$-$antiparticle interchange. It is found, indeed, that the `active' and `sterile' whole fields which can be obtained from mixing the chiral components of two mutually charge-conjugate Dirac fields are themselves `charge conjugate' to each other (rather than individually self-conjugate), and so it is only by imposing them to coincide that they may truly give rise to a Majorana particle. These fields, taken as mass eigenfields (as in the `Majorana mass' case), are actually shown to describe particles carrying pseudoscalar-type charges and being neutral relative to scalar-type charges only. For them, `$CP$ symmetry' would be nothing but pure mirror symmetry, and $C$ violation (just implied in their respective `active' and `sterile' behaviors) should therefore involve, as a counterbalance, time-reversal violation as well. The related (no longer strictly chargeless) `Majorana mass' neutrino model still proves, however, neither to affect the usual expectation for a neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay, nor to prevent `active' and `sterile' neutrino varieties from taking generally different mass values. One has, on the other hand, that a fermion being instead a genuine (i.e. truly self-conjugate) Majorana particle cannot really come in two distinct $-$ `active' and `sterile' $-$ versions, and it can only bear a unified mass kind which may at once be said to be either a `Majorana-like' or a `Dirac-like' mass kind.

  15. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  16. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R. (Newport News, VA); Benson, Stephen V. (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  17. Pellet charge exchange helium measurement using neutral particle analyzer in large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Veshchev, E.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H. [High Energy Particle Group, Wave Heating Group and LHD Experimental Group, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takase, Y.; Ohsako, T. [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of {alpha} particles, which will be produced by nuclear reactions in ITER and fusion reactors. The pellet charge exchange (PCX) measurement is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of the {alpha} particle energy spectra in a plasma. In the large helical device, PCX using tracer encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) has been tried in many hydrogen and helium plasmas, including helium accelerated by using the cyclotron resonance heating. In the PCX, we use the compact neutral particle analyzer without simultaneous mass separation ability. The helium particle measurement can be achieved by the application of voltage in the condenser plate. The scattering of hydrogen particle is carefully considered during the estimation of the helium amount. The radial helium profiles can also be obtained by comparing four TESPEL injection shots with/without higher harmonic fast wave heating and at applied plate voltages for He or H, respectively.

  18. Particle Environment in Low-and High-Earth Orbit! Sacrificial Charge and Particle Background!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    energy due to sacrificial charge. "Solar Min Solar Max · Calibration sources - Radioactive Fe-55/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Measured energy scale evolution is due to radiation damage modified is higher and subject to variations due to the solar cycle and solar storms. This is in contrast to the rate

  19. Particle Acceleration through Multiple Conversions from Charged into Neutral State and Back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Derishev; F. A. Aharonian; V. V. Kocharovsky; Vl. V. Kocharovsky

    2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new way of quick and very efficient acceleration of protons and/or electrons in relativistic bulk flows. The new mechanism takes advantage of conversion of particles from the charged state (protons or electrons/positrons) into neutral state (neutrons or photons) and back. In most cases, the conversion is photon-induced and requires presence of intense radiation fields, but the converter acceleration mechanism may also operate via inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions. Like in the traditional model -- ``stochastic'' (or diffusive) acceleration, -- the acceleration cycle in our scenario consists of escape of particles from the relativistic flow followed by their return back after deflection from the ambient magnetic field. The difference is that the charge-changing reactions, which occur during the cycle, allow accelerated particles to increase their energies in each cycle by a factor roughly equal to the bulk Lorentz factor squared. The emerging spectra of accelerated particles can be very hard and their cut-off energy in some cases is larger than in the standard mechanism. This drastically reduces the required energy budget of the sources of the highest-energy particles observed in cosmic rays. Also, the proposed acceleration mechanism may serve as an efficient means of transferring the energy of bulk motion to gamma-radiation and, if the accelerated particles are nucleons, routinely produces high-energy neutrinos at $\\sim 50 %$ relative efficiency.

  20. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  1. Screening properties of four mesoscale smoothed charge models, with application to dissipative particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Warren; Andrey Vlasov

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend our previous study [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204907 (2013)] to quantify the screening properties of four mesoscale smoothed charge models used in dissipative particle dynamics. Using a combination of the hypernetted chain integral equation closure and the random phase approximation, we identify regions where the models exhibit a real-valued screening length, and the extent to which this agrees with the Debye length in the physical system. We find that the second moment of the smoothed charge distribution is a good predictor of this behaviour. We are thus able to recommend a consistent set of parameters for the models.

  2. Effect of electrostatic field of implanted space charge in the slowing down of fast heavy nonrelativistic particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remizovich, F.S.; Rudenko, A.I.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic solution is obtained of the transport equation for fast particles allowing for the effect of the space-charge field. We investigate the dependence of the mean free path on the irradiation time, the flux density of the moving particles as a function of depth, and also the time-dependent spatial distribution of the density of the stopped particles. The influence of space charge leakage is analyzed.

  3. New density estimation methods for charged particle beams with applications to microbunching instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terzic, B.; Bassi, G.

    2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2D code of Bassi et al. [G. Bassi, J.A. Ellison, K. Heinemann and R. Warnock Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12 080704 (2009)G. Bassi and B. Terzic, in Proceedings of the 23rd Particle Accelerator Conference, Vancouver, Canada, 2009 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2009), TH5PFP043], designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform; and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into the CSR code [G. Bassi, J.A. Ellison, K. Heinemann and R. Warnock Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12 080704 (2009)], and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  4. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles Using the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yunhe; /Brown U.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data. The speed of the particle has been calculated based on the time-of-flight and position information in the muon system. The present research is limited to direct pair-production of the charged massive long-lived particles. We do not consider CMSPs that result from the cascade decays of heavier particles. In this analysis, the exact values of the model parameters of the entire supersymmetric particle mass spectrum, relevant for cascade decays, are not important. We found no evidence of the signal. 95% CL cross-section upper limits have been set on the pair-productions of the stable scaler tau lepton, the gaugino-like charginos, and the higgsino-like charginos. The upper cross section limits vary from 0.31 pb to 0.04 pb, for stau masses in the range between 60 GeV and 300 GeV. We use the nominal value of the theoretical cross section to set limits on the mass of the pair produced charginos. We exclude the pair-produced stable gaugino-like charginos with mass below 206 GeV, and higgsino-like charginos below 171 GeV, respectively. Although the present sensitivity is insufficient to test the model of the pair produced stable staus, we do set cross section limits which can be applied to the pair production of any charged massive stable particle candidates with similar kinematics. These are the most restrictive limits to the present on the cross sections for CMSPs and the first published from the Tevatron Collider Run II. The manuscript has been published by Physical Review Letters in April 2009 and is available at arXiv as.

  5. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  6. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  7. Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charged-particle acceleration and energy loss in laser-produced plasmas D. G. Hicks,a) C. K. Li, F, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple model for the accelerating T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 1997 . Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types

  8. Fast and stable manipulation of a charged particle in a Penning trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kiely; J. P. L. McGuinness; J. G. Muga; A. Ruschhaupt

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose shortcuts to adiabaticity which achieve fast and stable control of the state of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field. In particular we design a non-adiabatic change of the magnetic field strength in a Penning trap which changes the radial spread without final excitations. We apply a streamlined version of the fast-forward formalism as well as an invariant based inverse engineering approach. We compare both methods and examine their stability.

  9. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  10. Ultrafine aerosol diffusion charging: an improved interaction potential for metallic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaowei, d 1963-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appreciation to my committee chairman Dr. W. H. Marlow for his guidance and encouragement for the entire duration of the work. He stimulated my interest in aerosol research via, the radon charging problem. He also provided the materials and support needed...' correction 39 11 Collision rate vs. diameter of particle, using Marlow's correction CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. l Introduction In recent years, the radiological dose to humans from airborne radioactivity associ- ated with naturally occurring radon has...

  11. Quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a background magnetic field interacting with linearized gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dynamics of a charged particle interacting with background electromagnetic field under the influence of linearized gravitational waves in the long wave-length and low-velocity limit. Following the prescription in \\cite{speli}, the system is quantized and the Hamiltonian is then solved by using standard algebraic iterative methods. The solution is in conformity with the classical analysis and shows the possibility of tuning the frequency by changing the magnetic field to set up resonance.

  12. Nearest-neighbor distributions of free radicals produced within charged-particle tracks in liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Miles Clay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radicals, and hydrated electrons was tabulated in order to develop a radiochemical description of the charged-particle tracks. These radicals are of biological importance since they can damage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) through chemical action. For low... t2 s. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for hydrated electrons at 10 s . . 13 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for OH radicals at 10-6 s . . 14 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for H radicals at 10-s s...

  13. Transport mechanisms and experimental evidence of positively charged dust particles in an argon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.A.; Hareland, W.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collins, S.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that dense particle clouds often reside within the steady-state plasma; however, particle transport in the critical post-plasma period has not yet been fully explored. To better understand and characterize particle behavior, charge and transport properties of dust particles in an argon plasma, contained within a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell, were studied in the steady-state and post-plasma regimes of a 500 mTorr, 25 W argon discharge. Using separate water chillers to control independently the temperatures of the upper and lower electrodes, various temperature gradients were imposed on the plasma and thermophoretic transport of the particle clouds observed for both steady and decaying discharges. Next, using a pulsed rf power supply and a tuned Langmuir probe, the decay times of electrons and ions were measured in the afterglow. Finally, utilizing high-speed video in concert with 10 mW He-Ne laser light, post-plasma particle trajectories were observed for various electric fields and electrode temperatures. Results were then compared to calculations from a net force model that included gravity, the electric field, fluid flow, ion drag, and thermophoresis. It was found that temperature gradients greater than {approximately} 10 C/cm significantly altered particle cloud configurations in steady plasmas, and provided a strong transport mechanism in the afterglow. Electrically, the measured ion density decay time was approximately equal to that of the electrons, consistent with ambipolar diffusion.

  14. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, H. S. [SSL, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Woods, T. N., E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Dr., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  15. Pseudorapidity Distribution of Charged Particles in d + Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The measured pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in minimum-bias d + Au collisions at ${\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = \\rm {200 GeV}}$ is presented for the first time. This distribution falls off less rapidly in the gold direction as compared to the deuteron direction. The average value of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at midrapidity is ${\\rm _{\\mid \\eta \\mid \\le 0.6} = 9.4 \\pm 0.7(syst)}$ and the integrated primary charged particle multiplicity in the measured region is 82 $\\pm$ 6(syst). Estimates of the total charged particle production, based on extrapolations outside the measured pseudorapidity region, are also presented. The pseudorapidity distribution, normalized to the number of participants in d + Au collisions, is compared to those of Au + Au and ${\\rm p}+\\bar{\\rm p}$ systems at the same energy. The d + Au distribution is also compared to the predictions of the parton saturation model, as well as microscopic models.

  16. Charge Transport Properties in TiO2 Network with Different Particle Sizes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    the large improvement in performance of dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) achieved in 1991, mesoporousCharge Transport Properties in TiO2 Network with Different Particle Sizes for Dye Sensitized Solar sensitized solar cells, nanoparticle size, impedance, charge transport properties INTRODUCTION Since

  17. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)] [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  18. Birkeland currents and charged particles in the high-latitude prenoon region: A new interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bythrow, P.F.; Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous, conjugate measurements of magnetic fields and charged particles at low altitude in the high-latitude prenoon sector and the magnetosheath were made with the DMSP F7, HILAT, and Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE satellites on November 1, 1984. These data show that the low-latitude portion of the traditional ''cusp'' particle signature is coincident with the prenoon region 1 current system in both hemispheres and for both northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland currents are associated with the dispersion region of cusp ions when the IMF is directed southward and with electron fluxes that are slightly enhanced over polar rain intensities. Finally, electron spectra measured by AMPTE CCE in the magnetosheath near 1000 MLT are similar in shape and energy to those acquired at low altitude by both DMSP F7 and HILAT. These observations indicate that for both northward and southward IMF, the traditional ''cusp particle'' signature is coincident with the region 1 Birkeland current system and maps to low altitude along field lines that thread the dayside boundary layer. The traditional ''cusp'' Birkeland current system flows along field lines that lie poleward of the region of cusp particles and the region 1 current system. These field lines thread the plasma mantle. Thus, we suggest that the traditional ''cusp'' current system might be appropriately renamed the ''mantle'' Birkeland current system. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  19. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Metcalfe; I. Mejia; J. Murphy; M. Quevedo; L. Smith; J. Alvarado; B. Gnade; H. Takai

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  20. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grigorenko, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the -decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of -decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the -delayed three proton emission.

  1. Charged-Particle Decay from Giant Monopole Resonance in Si-28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toba, Y.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Garg, U.; Grabmayr, P.; Knopfle, K. T.; Riedesel, H.; Wagner, G. J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 41, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1990 Charged particle decay from giant monopole resonance in Si Y. Toba, Y.-W. Lui, and D. H. Youngblood Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 U. Garg Physics... elusive with only a few percent of the sum rule located in most nuclei. Lui et al. reported the identification of 66/o of the EO EWSR with a width of 4.8 MeV centered at 17.9 MeV in Si. Si was also investigated by Kailas et al. , using 115 MeV proton...

  2. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clary, R.; Smirnov, A.; Dettrick, S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Ruskov, E. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

  3. Generalized Pearson distributions for charged particles interacting with an electric and/or a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rossani; A. M. Scarfone

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear Boltzmann equation for elastic and/or inelastic scattering is applied to derive the distribution function of a spatially homogeneous system of charged particles spreading in a host medium of two-level atoms and subjected to external electric and/or magnetic fields. We construct a Fokker-Planck approximation to the kinetic equations and derive the most general class of distributions for the given problem by discussing in detail some physically meaningful cases. The equivalence with the transport theory of electrons in a phonon background is also discussed.

  4. Gravitational waves interacting with a spinning charged particle in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations which determine the response of a spinning charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field to an incident gravitational wave are derived in the linearized approximation to general relativity. We verify that 1) the components of the 4-momentum, 4-velocity and the components of the spinning tensor, both electric and magnetic moments, exhibit resonances and 2) the co-existence of the uniform magnetic field and the GW are responsible for the resonances appearing in our equations. In the absence of the GW, the magnetic field and the components of the spin tensor decouple and the magnetic resonances disappear.

  5. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalfe, J; Murphy, J; Quevedo, M; Smith, L; Alvarado, J; Gnade, B; Takai, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  6. Light charged particle evaporation from hot ${31}^$P nucleus at E$^*$ ~ 60 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bandyopadhyay; C. Bhattacharya; K. Krishan; S. Bhattacharya; S. K. Basu; A. Chatterjee; S. Kailas; A. Srivastava; K. Mahata

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectra of evaporated light charged particles (LCP) $\\alpha$, p, d and t have been measured in $7^$Li(47 MeV) + ${24}^$Mg and ${19}^$F(96 MeV)+ ${12}^$C reactions. Both the systems populate the same compound nucleus ${31}^$F at excitation energy E$^*$ ~ 60 MeV. It has been observed that the light particle spectra obtained in Li + Mg reaction follow standard statistical model prediction, whereas a deformed configuration of the compound nucleus is needed to explain the LCP spectra for F + C reaction, which has been attributed to the effect of larger input angular momentum in the case of ${19}^$F(96 MeV)+ ${12}^$C system.

  7. Interaction of a circularly polarised gravitational wave with a charged particle in a static magnetic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha; Swarup Saha

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of a charged particle in a static magnetic background, i.e., a Landau system with circularly polarised gravitational wave (GW) is studied quantum mechanically in the long wavelength and low velocity limit. We quantize the classical Hamiltonian following \\cite{speli}. The rotating polarization vectors of the circularly polarized GW are employed to form a unique directional triad which served as the coordinate axes. The Schrodinger equations for the system are cast in the form of a set of coupled linear differential equations. This system is solved by iterative technique. We compute the time-evolution of the position and momentum expectation values of the particle. The results show that the resonance behaviour obtained earlier\\cite{emgw_classical} by classical treatements of the system has a quantum analogue not only for the linearly polarized GW \\cite{emgw_1_lin}, but for circularly polarized GW as well.

  8. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-order (v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt < 2 GeV, the v[2] and v[3] values of K0S particles are larger than those of Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the same pt. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v[2] and v[3] for K0S particles are observed to be consistent with those for Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.

  9. Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foroutan, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhoundi, A. [Nanostructure Material Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

  10. Non-intrusive measurement of particle charge: Electrostatic dry coal cleaning. Technical progress report No. 11, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As has been previously reported, the charge measurement portion of this project has been broadened to include direct measurement techniques which yield an average particle charge per unit mass. These methods, which now include current measurements from the charging loop, an electrolytic collection solution and a Faraday cage have been employed to expand the charge measurement capabilities over those that were originally developed using the PDPA. The effects of gas velocity, humidity and temperature as well as particle size on charge was evaluated for different coals and silica. The charge accumulated on silica particles was linearly dependent on their velocity in the tribocharger for the velocities and mass loadings which were investigated. For coals, a linear increase in charge occurred over a more limited velocity range. Transport gas humidity had a much stronger effect on the charge established on silica particles than on coal particles.

  11. Charged Particle Radiation Therapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhen, E-mail: Wang.Zhen@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Nabhan, Mohammed [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)] [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott L.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Foote, Robert L.; Murad, M. Hassan [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged particle therapy (CPT) delivered with either protons, helium ions, or carbon ions, has been used to treat uveal melanoma. The present analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of CPT for uveal melanoma. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and SciVerse Scopus and cross-referenced recent systematic reviews through January 2012. Two independent reviewers identified clinical trials and observational studies of CPT (protons, helium ions, and carbon ions). These reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality. Twenty-seven studies enrolling 8809 uveal melanoma patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of local recurrence was significantly less with CPT than with brachytherapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.23). There were no significant differences in mortality or enucleation rates. Results were robust in multiple sensitivity analyses. CPT was also associated with lower retinopathy and cataract formation rates. Data suggest better outcomes may be possible with charged particle therapy with respect to local recurrence, retinopathy, and cataract formation rates. The overall quality of the evidence is low, and higher quality comparative effectiveness studies are needed to provide better evidence.

  12. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D. (Bellevue, WA); Romea, Richard D. (Seattle, WA); Steinhauer, Loren C. (Bothell, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  13. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-ordermore »(v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt « less

  14. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of the $\\gamma_{dir}$ energy within uncertainties. These measurements indicate that the parton energy loss, in the covered kinematic range, is insensitive to the parton path length.

  15. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of t...

  16. Charged-particle pseudorapidity density distributions from Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN)=130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dNch/deta has been measured for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN)=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most central Au+Au collisions for |eta|<=5.4 is found to be 4200+-470. The evolution of dNch/deta with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at mid-rapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  17. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Raghunath; Behera, Nirbhay K; Nandi, Basanta K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like...

  18. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grigorenko, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, Mustafa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the beta-decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of beta-decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the beta-delayed three proton emission.

  19. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  20. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  1. Energy Dependence of the Transverse Momentum Distributions of Charged Particles in pp Collisions Measured by ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of $p_{\\rm T}$ have been measured at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV at the LHC. The $p_{\\rm T}$ spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual $\\sqrt{s}$ cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with $\\sqrt{s}$ is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 2.76 and 5.02 TeV up to $p_{\\rm T}$ = 50 GeV/$c$ as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  2. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B.; Frenje, J.? A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. ?K.; Collins, G.? W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S.? B.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e˛/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories inmore »WDM plasma.« less

  3. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm-dense plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A.? B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J.? A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grabowski, P. E. [Univ. of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, C. ?K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Collins, G.? W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Graziani, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, S.? B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Johnson, M. Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Keiter, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Reynolds, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Rygg, J.? R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically-heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ~32 eV, corresponding to moderately-coupled [(e˛/a/(kBTe + EF ) ~ 0.3] and moderately-degenerate [kBTe/EF ~2] 'warm dense matter' (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad-hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories in WDM plasma.

  4. Metastable and charged particle decay in neon afterglow studied by the breakdown time delay measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovic, V. Lj.; Gocic, S. R.; Stamenkovic, S. N.; Petrovic, Z. Lj. [Department of Physics, University of Nis, P.O. Box 224, 18001 Nis (Serbia); Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Memory effect--the long time variation of the electrical breakdown time delay on the relaxation time t{sub d}({tau}) in neon--was explained by the Ne({sup 3}P{sub 2}) (1s{sub 5}) metastable state remaining from the preceding glow [Dj. A. Bosan, M. K. Radovic, and Dj. M. Krmpotic, J. Phys. D 19, 2343 (1986)]. However, the authors neglected the quenching processes that reduce the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that of the memory effect observations. In this paper the time delay measurements were carried out in neon at the pressure of 6.6 mbar in a gas tube with gold-plated copper cathode, and the approximate and exact numerical models are developed in order to study the metastable and charged particle decay in afterglow. It was found that the metastable hypothesis completely failed to explain the afterglow kinetics, which is governed by the decay of molecular neon ions and molecular nitrogen ions produced in Ne{sub 2}{sup +} collisions with nitrogen impurities; i.e., Ne{sub 2}{sup +}+N{sub 2}{yields}N{sub 2}{sup +}+2Ne. Charged particle decay is followed up to hundreds of milliseconds in afterglow, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit. After that, the late afterglow kinetics in neon can be explained by the nitrogen atoms recombining on the cathode surface and providing secondary electrons that determine the breakdown time delay down to the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level.

  5. Production of .sup.64 Cu and other radionuclides using a charged-particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Michael J. (Creve Couer, MO); McCarthy, Deborah W. (Maryland Heights, MO); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides are produced according to the present invention at commercially significant yields and at specific activities which are suitable for use in radiodiagnostic agents such as PET imaging agents and radiotherapeutic agents and/or compositions. In the method and system of the present invention, a solid target having an isotopically enriched target layer electroplated on an inert substrate is positioned in a specially designed target holder and irradiated with a charged-particle beam. The beam is preferably generated using an accelerator such as a biomedical cyclotron at energies ranging from about 5 MeV to about 25 MeV. The target is preferably directly irradiated, without an intervening attenuating foil, and with the charged particle beam impinging an area which substantially matches the target area. The irradiated target is remotely and automatically transferred from the target holder, preferably without transferring any target holder subassemblies, to a conveyance system which is preferably a pneumatic or hydraulic conveyance system, and then further transferred to an automated separation system. The system is effective for processing a single target or a plurality of targets. After separation, the unreacted target material can be recycled for preparation of other targets. In a preferred application of the invention, a biomedical cyclotron has been used to produce over 500 mCi of .sup.64 Cu having a specific activity of over 300 mCi/.mu.g Cu according to the reaction .sup.64 Ni(p,n).sup.64 Cu. These results indicate that accelerator-produced .sup.64 Cu is suitable for radiopharmaceutical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  6. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  7. The role of charged particles in the positive corona-generated photon count in a rod to plane air gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, X. M.; Wang, Y. J.; MacAlpine, J. M. K.; Chen, L.; Wang, L. M.; Guan, Z. C. [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China)] [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Wan, S. W. [State Grid Chongqing Nan'an Power Supply Company, 401336 Chongqing (China)] [State Grid Chongqing Nan'an Power Supply Company, 401336 Chongqing (China); Liu, L. [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)] [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the calculated charged-particle densities in positive corona, the rate of streamer production, and the photon count from the corona were investigated and found to be closely related. Both the densities of electrons and positive ions peaked at 11.8 kV, near the corona inception voltage; they then fell rapidly before slowly rising again. This behavior was exactly matched by the measured photon count. The calculation of the charged-particle density in a positive corona was achieved by means of a fluid model.

  8. Modified theory of secondary electron emission from spherical particles and its effect on dust charging in complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Department of Education Building, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have modified Chow's theory of secondary electron emission (SEE) to take account of the fact that the path length of a primary electron in a spherical particle varies between zero to the diameter or x{sub m} the penetration depth depending on the distance of the path from the centre of the particle. Further by including this modified expression for SEE efficiency, the charging kinetics of spherical grains in a Maxwellian plasma has been developed; it is based on charge balance over dust particles and number balance of electrons and ionic species. It is seen that this effect is more pronounced for smaller particles and higher plasma temperatures. Desirable experimental work has also been discussed.

  9. Transverse collective flow and midrapidity emission of isotopically identified light charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; Wuenschel, S.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Yennello, S. J. [Chemistry Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Colonna, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Di Toro, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania (Italy); Zielinska-Pfabe, M. [Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts (United States); Hagel, K.; Tripathi, R.; Shetty, D. V.; Galanopoulos, S.; Smith, W. B. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bonasera, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Souliotis, G. A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens GR-15771 (Greece); Mehlman, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Physics and Astronomy Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse flow and relative midrapidity yield of isotopically identified light charged particles (LCPs) has been examined for the 35 MeV/nucleon {sup 70}Zn+{sup 70}Zn, {sup 64}Zn+{sup 64}Zn, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni systems. A large enhancement of the midrapidity yield of the LCPs was observed relative to the yield near the projectile rapidity. In particular, this enhancement was increased for the more neutron-rich LCPs demonstrating a preference for the production of neutron-rich fragments in the midrapidity region. Additionally, the transverse flow of the LCPs was extracted, which provides insight into the average movement of the particles in the midrapidity region. Isotopic and isobaric effects were observed in the transverse flow of the fragments. In both cases, the transverse flow was shown to decrease with an increasing neutron content in the fragments. A clear inverse relationship between the transverse flow and the relative midrapidity yield is shown. The increased relative midrapidity emission produces a decreased transverse flow. The stochastic mean-field model was used for comparison to the experimental data. The results showed that the model was able to reproduce the general isotopic and isobaric trends for the midrapidity emission and transverse flow. The sensitivity of these observables to the density dependence of the symmetry energy was explored. The results indicate that the transverse flow and midrapidity emission of the LCPs are sensitive to the denisty dependence of the symmetry energy.

  10. On the fraction of dark matter in charged massive particles (CHAMPs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F J; Magana, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From various cosmological, astrophysical and terrestrial requirements, we derive conservative upper bounds on the present-day fraction of the mass of the Galactic dark matter (DM) halo in charged massive particles (CHAMPs). If dark matter particles are neutral but decay lately into CHAMPs, the lack of detection of heavy hydrogen in sea water and the vertical pressure equilibrium in the Galactic disc turn out to put the most stringent bounds. Adopting very conservative assumptions about the recoiling velocity of CHAMPs in the decay and on the decay energy deposited in baryonic gas, we find that the lifetime for decaying neutral DM must be > (0.9-3.4)x 10^3 Gyr. Even assuming the gyroradii of CHAMPs in the Galactic magnetic field are too small for halo CHAMPs to reach Earth, the present-day fraction of the mass of the Galactic halo in CHAMPs should be < (0.4-1.4)x 10^{-2}. We show that redistributing the DM through the coupling between CHAMPs and the ubiquitous magnetic fields cannot be a solution to the cus...

  11. Non-intrusive measurement of particle charge: Electrostatic dry coal cleaning. Technical progress report No. 8, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we reported in the Technical Progress Report No. 7, there are surges of electric current in the charging loop during triboelectrification of all particles. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system was developed to monitor and record the current pattern. There is no known report on such charge-discharge surges in the literature. The mechanism for it is yet to be understood. The on-line computerized electric current measurement also leads to an observation of charging effects as a function of particle feeding rate. It is shown that feed rate greatly alters particle charge. Such an effect is mostly overlooked by researchers and it could have a important role in process design where the feed rate would be maximized. The initial results for coal and mineral particles demonstrated that the average charge was lower when the feed rate was increased. Further investigation is scheduled to identify potential controlling factors, eg, the solid volume fraction and particle number density could be important process factors. The study of charging velocity and particle size was continued. It was found that particle charge was linearly dependent on the charging velocity for all samples investigated. However, the slope of this linear dependence varied for particles having different diameters. In addition, the charge-velocity relationships were dependent on feeding rates. Hence, the data discussed below include these interrelationships.

  12. Search for Long-Lived Massive Charged Particles in 1.96 TeV pp-bar Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We performed a signature-based search for long-lived charged massive particles produced in 1.0??fb[superscript -1] of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector using a high transverse-momentum ...

  13. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra; Nirbhay K. Behera; Basanta K. Nandi

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons and the transverse energy measurement.

  14. Determination of Dose From Light Charged Ions Relevant to Hadron Therapy Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport System (PHITS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butkus, Michael Patrick

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................. 10 Quality Factor for Charged Particles .............................................. 13 Effects of Dose Fractionation ......................................................... 15 Fragmentation and Scattering... for Various Ion Beams ...................................................... 33 15 Dose Percentage Rates for Various Ion Beams in a Tumor and in Different Regions of a Body Relative to the Tumor .............................. 36 16 Quality Factors...

  15. Description of the Nonlinear and Collective Behavior of Charged-Particle Beams by means of a Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedele, Renato [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita Federico II, Napoli Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Napoli Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Jovanovic, Dusan [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, Yu-11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle beams are employed for a number of scientific and technological applications. The conventional description of their collective behavior is usually given in terms of the Vlasov equation. In the last 15 years some alternative descriptions have been developed in terms of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation governing the collective dynamics of the beam while interacting with the surrounding medium. This approach gives new insights, providing an alternative 'key of reading' of the charged-particle beam dynamics, and have been applied to a number of physical problems concerning conventional particle accelerating machines as well as plasma-based accelerator schemes. Remarkably, it is based on a mathematical formalism fully similar to those used for the propagation of e.m. radiation beams in nonlinear media a well as the nonlinear dynamics of the Bose-Einsten condensates.In this paper, a presentation of some significant nonlinear collective effects of a charged-particle beam in particle accelerators, that have been recently investigated in the framework of the above Schroedinger-like descriptions, is given.

  16. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  17. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons at forward pseudorapidity in Au plus Au collisons at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Blyth, SL; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, JH; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, HA; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cosentino, MR; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, KSF; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gorbunov, YG; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horner, MJ; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kim, BC; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, CH; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, MJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timmins, AR; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, IK; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zhong, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the centrality-dependent measurement of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV. The charged particles and photons are measured in the pseudorapidity region...

  18. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive ?(s)=7??TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Ĺkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Ĺsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarăes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse thrust, thrust minor, and transverse sphericity, each defined using the final-state charged particles’ momentum components perpendicular to the beam direction. Events with at least six charged particles are selected by a minimum-bias trigger. In addition to the differential distributions, the evolution of each event shape variable as a function of the leading charged-particle transverse momentum, charged-particle multiplicity, and summed transverse momentum is presented. Predictions from several Monte Carlo models show significant deviations from data.

  19. Eikonal approximation in the theory of energy loss by fast charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matveev, V. I., E-mail: matveev.victor@pomorsu.ru; Makarov, D. N.; Gusarevich, E. S. [Lomonosov Pomor State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy losses in fast charged particles as a result of collisions with atoms are considered in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the nonperturbative contribution to effective stopping in the range of intermediate impact parameters (comparable with the characteristic sizes of the electron shells of the target atoms) may turn out to be significant as compared to shell corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula calculated in perturbation theory. The simplifying assumptions are formulated under which the Bethe-Bloch formula can be derived in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the allowance for nonperturbative effects may lead to considerable (up to 50%) corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula. The applicability range for the Bethe-Bloch formula is analyzed. It is concluded that calculation of the energy loss in the eikonal approximation (in the range of impact parameters for which the Bethe-Bloch formula is normally used) is much more advantageous than analysis based on the Bethe-Bloch formula and its modifications because not only the Bloch correction is included in the former calculations, the range of intermediate impact parameters is also taken into account nonperturbatively; in addition, direct generalization to the cases of collisions of complex projectiles and targets is possible in this case.

  20. Methods for two-dimensional charged-particle transport in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forslund, D.W.; Brackbill, J.U.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for modeling multi-dimensional charged particle transport in self-consistent electric and magnetic fields is presented. An implicit formulation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations removes the usual restrictions on time and mesh spacing so that low frequency and large scale-length plasma phenomena can be studied. The improvement over previous explicit methods is literally orders of magnitude. As developed in a new code VENUS, we describe the algorithm and its stability and accuracy properties. This method allows one to bridge the enormous gap between the high frequency short scale-length collective plasma phenomena and the slow time scales and large-scale lengths of hydrodynamic processes. It should result in a significant improvement of phenomenological models of transport in existing hydrodynamics codes. Applications are given that include the discovery of the important role of self-generated magnetic fields in the convective transport of electron energy in laser irradiated plasmas. The transport, which occurs in the magnetized collisionless plasma corona, carries energy large distances from the laser deposition region in agreement with a wide variety of experimental data on apparent inhibited electron transport and fast ion loss.

  1. DownloadedBy:[CDLJournalsAccount]At:17:2014March2008 Particle Charging and Transmission Efficiencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    efficiencywere measured for three types of charge neutralizers commonly used in aerosol research: two transmission efficiencies,with losses up to 25% at the smallest tested size of 3 nm, varying with size and flow in general agreement with diffusion loss theory. Charging efficiencywas measured for a singly charged

  2. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of. the 1991 Particle Accelerator Conference (Ref. [3]), p.of the l J J3 Particle Accelerator Conference, Washington,Beam Physics, US Particle Accelerator School Notes, http://

  3. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wiedermann, Particle Accelerator Physics, Springer-Verlag (invariants applied to accelerator physics. Remains one ofWiedemann, Particle Accelerator Physics II: Nonlinear and

  4. A charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field accelerated by a time periodic Aharonov-Bohm flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kalvoda; P. Stovicek

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a nonrelativistic quantum charged particle moving on a plane under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and driven by a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. We observe an acceleration effect in the case when the Aharonov-Bohm flux depends on time as a sinusoidal function whose frequency is in resonance with the cyclotron frequency. In particular, the energy of the particle increases linearly for large times. An explicit formula for the acceleration rate is derived with the aid of the quantum averaging method, and then it is checked against a numerical solution with a very good agreement.

  5. Third Harmonic Flow of Charged Particles in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav Pandit; for the STAR Collaboration

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings, we report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, $v_{3}$, known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles near midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} $ = 200 GeV, based on data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Triangular flow as a function of centrality, pseudorapidity and transverse momentum are reported using various methods, including a study of the signal for particle pairs as a function of their pseudorapidity separation. Results are compared with other experiments and model predictions.

  6. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles Sbastien Fayolle, Thomas Bickel, and Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic by the Onsager recip- rocal rules [1]. The present work is concerned with the thermophoretic coefficient DT

  7. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large time steps and cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy consid...

  8. Charged-particle multiplicities in $pp$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Ackers, M; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Ĺkesson, P F; Ĺkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Aleppo, M; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, J; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Ambrosini, G; Ambrosio, G; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amoros, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antos, J; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arms, K E; Armstrong, S R; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Ĺsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Athar, B; Atoian, G; Aubert, B; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Bachy, G; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, M; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartheld, V; Bartko, H; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Battistoni, G; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger, G A N; Belanger-Champagne, C; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, G; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belymam, A; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, S; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieri, M; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Binder, M; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bischof, R; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanch, O; Blanchard, J B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Boaretto, C; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Bocian, D; Bock, R; Boehler, M; Boehm, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Bonino, R; Boonekamp, M; Boorman, G; Boosten, M; Booth, C N; Booth, P S L; Booth, P; Booth, J R A; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borer, K; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyer, B H; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Braccini, S; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Brambilla, E; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Bravo, S; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Bright-Thomas, P G; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Buira-Clark, D; Buis, E J; Bujor, F; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first measurements from proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Data were collected in December 2009 using a minimum-bias trigger during collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity, and the relationship between mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |eta|500 MeV. The measurements are compared to Monte Carlo models of proton-proton collisions and to results from other experiments at the same centre-of-mass energy. The charged-particle multiplicity per event and unit of pseudorapidity at eta = 0 is measured to be 1.333 +/- 0.003 (stat.) +/- 0.040 (syst.), which is 5-15% higher than the Monte Carlo models predict.

  9. LATE EFFECTS OF HEAVY CHARGED PARTICLES ON THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE MOUSE CORONARY ARTERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, V.V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. REFERENCES 1. P. Rubin andEnergy under contract W-7405-ENG-48. Running Title: ChargedEnergy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This document

  10. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H. [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Olshausenstrasse 40-60, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  11. Optimization of the Orbiting Wide-angle Light Collectors (OWL) Mission for Charged-Particle and Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krizmanic, John F; Streitmatter, Robert E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OWL uses the Earth's atmosphere as a vast calorimeter to fully enable the emerging field of charged-particle astronomy with high-statistics measurements of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) and a search for sources of UHE neutrinos and photons. Confirmation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) suppression above ~4 x 10^19 eV suggests that most UHECR originate in astrophysical objects. Higher energy particles must come from sources within about 100 Mpc and are deflected by ~1 degree by predicted intergalactic/galactic magnetic fields. The Pierre Auger Array, Telescope Array and the future JEM-EUSO ISS mission will open charged-particle astronomy, but much greater exposure will be required to fully identify and measure the spectra of individual sources. OWL uses two large telescopes with 3 m optical apertures and 45 degree FOV in near-equatorial orbits. Simulations of a five-year OWL mission indicate ~10^6 km^2 sr yr of exposure with full aperture at ~6 x 10^19 eV. Observations at different altitudes and sp...

  12. Self-interaction in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics: Can the observable mass of a charged particle depend on its acceleration?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zayats, Alexei E., E-mail: Alexei.Zayats@kpfu.ru

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we obtain the expression for the self-force in the model with the Lagrangian containing additional terms, quadratic in Maxwell tensor derivatives (so-called Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics). Features of this force are analyzed for various limiting cases. When a charged particle moves along straight line with a uniform acceleration, an explicit formula is found. In the framework of the considered model, an observable renormalized particle mass is shown to depend on its acceleration. This dependence allows, in principle, to extract experimentally a value of the particle bare mass. -- Highlights: •An expression for the self-force in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics is given. •For a uniformly accelerated charged particle an explicit formula for the self-force is obtained. •Dependence between the observable mass of a charged particle and its acceleration is found.

  13. Search for Heavy Stable Charged Particles at CMS Using Tracker dE/dx Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jie

    2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    on searching for these particles. The main content of this dissertation is discussing the physics potential of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) detector at the large hadron collider (LHC) in detecting such high-mass particles, primarily using dE/dx information...

  14. Alpha-Cluster Model, Charge Symmetry of Nuclear Force and Single Particle Bound State Potential in Symmetrical Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Nie

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological alpha-cluster model based on the charge symmetry of nuclear force allows one to estimate the last proton position radius (LPPR) in a symmetrical nucleus. The values of LPPR obtained for the symmetrical nuclei with 5=15 it is inappropriate to represent a single particle bound state by the Woods-Saxon potential. For the nuclei with 5<=Z<=14 the error of the spectroscopic factor obtained with standard parameters in DWBA analysis of pure peripheral one nucleon transfer reactions is estimated. It is shown that for some nuclei using the standard parameters brings an error more than 20%.

  15. Validity of the single-particle description and charge noise resilience for multi-electron quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiel A. Bakker; Sebastian Mehl; Tuukka Hiltunen; Ari Harju; David P. DiVincenzo

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an optimal set of single-particle states for few-electron quantum dots (QDs) using the method of natural orbitals (NOs). The NOs include also the effects of the Coulomb repulsion between electrons. We find that they agree well with the noniteracting orbitals for GaAs QDs of realistic parameters, while the Coulomb interactions only rescale the radius of the NOs compared to the noninteracting case. We use NOs to show that four-electron QDs are less susceptible to charge noise than their two-electron counterparts.

  16. Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rod-like particle suspensions due to induced charge electroosmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, K A; Hoffman, B; Saintillan, D; Shaqfeh, E G; Santiago, J G

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the motion and dispersion of metal rod-like particles in the presence of an externally applied electric field. In these systems, the electric field polarizes the particles and induces an electroosmosis flow relative to the surface of each particle. The simulations include the effect of the gravitational body force, buoyancy, far-field hydrodynamic interactions, near-field lubrication forces, and electric field interactions. The particles in the simulations and experiments were observed to experience repeated pairing interactions in which they come together axially with their ends approaching each other, slide past one another until their centers approach, and then push apart. These interactions were confirmed in measurements of particle orientations and velocities, pair distribution functions, and net dispersion of the suspension. For large electric fields, the pair distribution functions show accumulation and depletion regions consistent with many pairing events. For particle concentrations of 1e8 particles/mL and higher, dispersion within the suspension dramatically increases with increased field strength.

  17. Higher harmonic anisotropic flow measurements of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the triangular v3, quadrangular v4, and pentagonal v5 charged particle flow in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV measured with the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We show that the triangular flow can be described in terms of the initial spatial anisotropy and its fluctuations, which provides strong constraints on its origin. In the most central events, where the elliptic flow v2 and v3 have similar magnitude, a double peaked structure in the two-particle azimuthal correlations is observed, which is often interpreted as a Mach cone response to fast partons. We show that this structure can be naturally explained from the measured anisotropic flow Fourier coefficients.

  18. Centrality Dependence of Charged Particle Multiplicity at Mid-Rapidity in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS collaboration

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles near mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV as a function of the number of participating nucleons. These results are compared to models in an attempt to discriminate between competing scenarios of particle production in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SBIR SBIR 62 63 I Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Management Active Charged indicate that secondary neutrons, with energies ranging between 0.5 to >150 MeV, make a significant discriminate between the fraction of dose, which results from secondary neutrons, and that which results from

  20. Pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles from pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The particle densities are sensitive to the relative con- tributions of \\soft" and \\hard" scattering between #6;18 m from the nominal interaction point and measure neutrons that are emitted at small angles

  1. Spectroscopy of {Beta}-Delayed Charged Particles at Projectile Fragment Separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janas, Zenon

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of projectile fragmentation reactions and in-flight separation has proved to be a powerful tool to produce nuclei at the limits of stability. Decay studies of very neutron-deficient projectile fragments led to the discovery of several new {beta}-delayed particle emitters. Basic principles of the method are described and various aspects of extracting interesting spectroscopic information from {beta}-delayed particle studies at projectile fragment separators are discussed.

  2. Fundamentals of Non-relativistic Collisionless Shock Physics: V. Acceleration of Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive review is given of the various processes proposed for accelerating particles by shocks to high energies. These energies are limited by several bounds: the non-relativistic nature of the heliospheric collisionless shocks to which this review restricts, the finite size of these shocks, the finite width of the downstream region, and to the nature of turbulence. In general, collisionless shocks in the heliosphere cannot accelerate particles to very high energies. As a fundamental problem of the acceleration mechanism the injection of see particles is identified. Some mecchanisms for production of seed particles are invoked. Acceleration of electrons begins to uncover its nature. The following problems are covered in this chapter: 1. Introduction -- first and second order Fermi acceleration, 2. Accelerating ions when they are already fast, diffusive acceleration, convection diffusion equation, Lee's self-consistent quasilinear shock acceleration model, 3. Observations, 4. The injection problem, ion surfing, test particle simulations, self-consistent shock acceleration simulations, downstream leakage, trapped particle acceleration, 5. Accelerating electrons, Sonnerup-Wu mechanism, Hoshino's electron shock surfing on quasi-perpendicular shocks, quasiparallel shock surfing.

  3. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly sensitive explosives can be also caused by intense charge-dipole attacks of surrounding water vapor molecules electrostatically attracted from ambient humid air and strongly accelerated towards charged sites on explosive surfaces. Emission of electrons, photons and heat from ionized hot spots randomly migrating on charged surface of highly sensitive explosive aerosol nanoparticles converts such particles into the form of short-circuited thermionic nanobatteries.

  4. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

  5. Radiation induced by charged particles in optical fibers Xavier Artru and Cedric Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . If the fiber radius is large enough and the particle passes trough it, as in Fig. 1, both PIGL and oustide) = = 1/137. 2.1 Expansion of the field in proper modes The fiber is along the ^z axis. The cylindrical inside a cylindrical box. The quantized magnetic field is expanded like in (1). am and a m obey

  6. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  7. Jet and underlying event properties as a function of charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of multi-particle production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity, N[ch]. The produced particles are separated into two classes: those belonging to jets and those belonging to the underlying event. Charged particles are measured with pseudorapidity abs(eta) < 2.4 and transverse momentum pt > 0.25 GeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged-particles only and required to have pt > 5 GeV. The distributions of jet pt, average pt of charged particles belonging to the underlying event or to jets, jet rates, and jet shapes are presented as functions of N[ch] and compared to the predictions of the PYTHIA and HERWIG event generators. Predictions without multi-parton interactions fail completely to describe the N[ch]-dependence observed in the data. For increasing N[ch], PYTHIA systematically predicts higher jet rates and harder pt spectra than seen in the data, whereas HERWIG shows the opposite trends. At the highest multiplicity, the data-model agreement is worse for most observables, indicating the need for further tuning and/or new model ingredients.

  8. Analytical methods for describing charged particle dynamics in general focusing lattices using generalized Courant-Snyder theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Hong; Burby, J W; Chung, Moses

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of charged particles in general linear focusing lattices with quadrupole, skew-quadrupole, dipole, and solenoidal components, as well as torsion of the fiducial orbit and variation of beam energy is parameterized using a generalized Courant-Snyder (CS) theory, which extends the original CS theory for one degree of freedom to higher dimensions. The envelope function is generalized into an envelope matrix, and the phase advance is generalized into a 4D symplectic rotation, or an U(2) element. The 1D envelope equation, also known as the Ermakov-Milne-Pinney equation in quantum mechanics, is generalized to an envelope matrix equation in higher dimensions. Other components of the original CS theory, such as the transfer matrix, Twiss functions, and CS invariant (also known as the Lewis invariant) all have their counterparts, with remarkably similar expressions, in the generalized theory. The gauge group structure of the generalized theory is analyzed. By fixing the gauge freedom with a desired symmetr...

  9. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  10. System tests of the LHCb RICH detectors in a charged particle beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skottowe, Hugh

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RICH detectors of the LHCb experiment will provide efficient particle identification over the momentum range 1-100 GeV=c. Results are presented from a beam test of the LHCb RICH system using final production pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors, the final readout electronics and an adapted version of LHCb RICH reconstruction software. Measurements of the photon yields and Cherenkov angle resolutions for both nitrogen and C4F10 radiators agree well with full simulations. The quality of the data and the results obtained demonstrate that all aspects meet the stringent physics requirements of the experiment are now ready for first data.

  11. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Dyatko, N. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Russian State Research Center (Russian Federation); Kostenko, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup ?1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  12. Charged particle transverse momentum spectra in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged particle transverse momentum (pT) spectra are presented for pp collisions at sqrt(s)=0.9 and 7 TeV. The data samples were collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 231 inverse microbarns and 2.96 inverse picobarns, respectively. Calorimeter-based high-transverse-energy triggers are employed to enhance the statistical reach of the high-pT measurements. The results are compared with both leading-order QCD and with an empirical scaling of measurements at different collision energies using the scaling variable xT = 2 pT/sqrt(s) over the pT range up to 200 GeV/c. Using a combination of xT scaling and direct interpolation at fixed pT, a reference transverse momentum spectrum at sqrt(s)=2.76 TeV is constructed, which can be used for studying high-pT particle suppression in the dense QCD medium produced in heavy-ion collisions at that centre-of-mass energy.

  13. Progresses in the Studies of Adiabatic Splitting of Charged Particles Beams by Crossing Nonlinear Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchi, A; Giovannozzi, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-turn extraction from a circular particle accelerator is performed by trapping the beam inside stable islands of the horizontal phase space. In general, by crossing a resonance of order n, n+1 beamlets are created whenever the resonance is stable, whereas if the resonance is unstable the beam is split in n parts. Islands are generated by non-linear magnetic fields, whereas the trapping is realized by means of a given tune variation so to cross adiabatically a resonance. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron carried out in 2007 gave the evidence of protons trapped in stable islands while crossing the one-third and one-fifth resonances. Dedicated experiments were also carried out to study the trapping process and its reversibility properties. The results of these measurement campaigns are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  15. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  16. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzoganis, Vasilis, E-mail: vasileios.tzoganis@cockcroft.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); RIKEN Nishina Centre, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup ?7} down to below 10{sup ?11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5?keV electron beam are discussed.

  17. Light Charged Particle Emission Following the Fusion of 18O Ions with 12C Nuclei at Energies Near and Below the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Light Charged Particle Emission Following the Fusion of 18O Ions with 12C Nuclei at Energies Near Releases more energy in a few hours than our sun does in a decade X-ray superbursts thought to be fueled by 12C+12C fusion in the outer crust Temperature of the outer crust is too low (~3×106 K) relative

  18. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in Pb-Pb collisions at ?s NN=2.76TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at ?sNN=2.76??TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pT) range up to approximately 60??GeV/c. The data cover ...

  19. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Pernič, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudorapidity ($\\eta$) distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges abs($\\eta$) energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  20. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Pseudorapidity ( ? ) distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges |?|<2.2 and 5.3<|?|<6.4 covered by the CMS and TOTEM detectors, ...

  1. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive ?(s)=7??TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse ...

  2. Charged-particle and neutron-capture processes in the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernovae.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Truran, J.W.; Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Astrophysics; Univ. Mainz; Virtual Inst. for Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics; Max-Planck-Insti. fur Chemie; Univ. of Basel

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e}, and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e}, beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a {beta}-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from {beta}-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and {beta}-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low metallicity stars.

  3. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W. [Department of Astrophysics and Astronomy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [HGF Virtuelles Institut fuer Kernstruktur und Nukleare Astrophysik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K., E-mail: farouqi@uchicago.ed, E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed, E-mail: BPfeiffe@uni-mainz.d, E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d, E-mail: Thomas.Rauscher@unibas.c, E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c [Department of Physics, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low metallicity stars.

  4. Charge exchange neutral particle measurements with natural diamond detector under the deuterium-deuterium neutron field on JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kusama, Y.; Takechi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A.; Kaschuck, Yu. A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-0193 (Japan); Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gihu 509-5292 (Japan); Troitsk Institute of Innovating and Fusion Research (TRINITI) Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092 (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural diamond detector (NDD) has been installed on the JT-60U tokamak to measure the flux and the energy distribution of charge exchange (CX) fast neutral particles. A NDD has many important advantages to be used as a CX neutral particle analyzer, for example very compact size, high energy resolution, and high radiation hardness etc., while the neutrons and {gamma} rays are a large noise source in the deuterium plasma. The shield was set up around the NDD to reduce those noises. Time-resolved energy distribution of CX neutral particles corresponding to injected beam energy have been successfully obtained under high intensity neutron yield Y{sub n}>10{sup 15} n/s. Further enhanced neutral particle fluxes during sawtooth oscillation and Alfven eigenmodes were observed with the NDD. The performance of the NDD as CX neutral particle spectrometer under high intensity neutron yield was demonstrated for the first time on JT-60U in this work.

  5. Particle separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  6. Compact multichannel neutral particle analyzer for measurement of energetic charge-exchanged neutrals in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, V.; Liptac, J.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Fiore, C. L.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Leiter, R.; Mcduffee, S.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A four-channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) based on operating small Si diode detectors in pulse-height analysis (PHA) mode is used to measure energetic hydrogen minority ions with energies between {approx}50 and 350 keV stemming from ion-cyclotron range-of-frequency heated D(H) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with both active and passive charge exchange (CX). First core minority ion distribution results from Alcator C-Mod discharges and a detailed description of the diagnostic are presented. The diagnostic employs integrated electronics and fast digitization of the shaping amplifier voltage. The digitized data are stored for postshot PHA, which removes the constraints of real-time PHA and allows for improved performance via elimination of base line shift effects and potentially relieving pileup through Gaussian fitting routines. The CNPA is insensitive to the large gamma and neutron background in Alcator C-Mod discharges but is susceptible to the plasma's soft x-ray flux. The soft x-ray flux limits the CNPA energy resolution to {approx}15-20 keV. A simple model is used to interpret the active CNPA data which permits rapid estimates of the core hydrogen minority temperatures and anisotropy with a time resolution of {approx}100 ms. Hydrogenlike boron is identified as an important electron donor for the CX signal.

  7. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, B. K., E-mail: bdyt.ds@rediffmail.com; Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Tepesia-782402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M., E-mail: mainak@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382025, Gujarat (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region.

  8. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  9. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc; Ryan Fitzgerald

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this series (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this series (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  10. Centrality Dependence of the Charged Particle Multiplicity near Mid-Rapidity in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHOBOS experiment has measured the charged particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV as a function of the collision centrality. Results on dN/deta(eta, are presented as a function of . As was found from similar data at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV, the data can be equally well described by parton saturation models and two-component fits which include contributions that scale as Npart and the number of binary collisions, Ncoll. We compare the data at the two energies by means of the ratio R(200/130) of the charged particle multiplicity for the two different energies as a function of . For events with >100$, we find that this ratio is consistent with a constant value of 1.14+-0.01(stat.)+-0.05(syst.).

  11. Charged-particle multiplicity measurement in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with ALICE at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Abramyan; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshauser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Aysto; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badala; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnafoldi; L. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; V. Borshchov; A. Borisov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Bottger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; S. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. De Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D'Erasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; R. Divia; O. Djuvsland; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Donigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. DonO. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; O. Fateev; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garcia Trapaga; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glassel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez Jimenez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; A. Harutyunyan; D. Hasch; D. Hasegan

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The pseudorapidity density and multiplicity distribution of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC, at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, were measured in the central pseudorapidity region |eta| < 1. Comparisons are made with previous measurements at sqrt(s) = 0.9 TeV and 2.36 TeV. At sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, for events with at least one charged particle in |eta| < 1, we obtain dNch/deta = 6.01 +- 0.01 (stat.) +0.20 -0.12 (syst.). This corresponds to an increase of 57.6% +- 0.4% (stat.) +3.6 -1.8% (syst.) relative to collisions at 0.9 TeV, significantly higher than calculations from commonly used models. The multiplicity distribution at 7 TeV is described fairly well by the negative binomial distribution.

  12. Charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE collaboration; K. Aamodt; B. Abelev; A. Abrahantes Quintana; D. Adamová; A. M. Adare; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad Masoodi; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; A. Alkin; E. Almaráz Avińa; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; I. Altsybeev; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; V. Anguelov; C. Anson; T. Anti\\vci?; F. Antinori; P. Antonioli; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshäuser; N. Arbor; S. Arcelli; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Äystö; M. D. Azmi; M. Bach; A. Badalŕ; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; R. Baldini Ferroli; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; F. Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa; J. Bán; R. Barbera; F. Barile; G. G. Barnaföldi; L. S. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; M. Basile; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; H. Beck; I. Belikov; F. Bellini; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; C. Bergmann; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Biel\\vcík; J. Biel\\vc\\'\\iková; A. Bilandzic; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. B\\oggild; M. Bogolyubsky; L. Boldizsár; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; J. Book; H. Borel; A. Borissov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; F. Bossú; M. Botje; S. Böttger; B. Boyer; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; M. Broz; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; K. Bugaiev; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Calvo Villar; P. Camerini; V. Canoa Roman; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova D\\'\\iaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; V. Catanescu; C. Cavicchioli; J. Cepila; P. Cerello; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; F. Coccetti; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; T. M. Cormier; Y. Corrales Morales; I. Cortés Maldonado; P. Cortese; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; G. D Erasmo; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; D. Das; I. Das; K. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; S. De; A. De Azevedo Moregula; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; P. R. Debski; E. Del Castillo Sanchez; H. Delagrange; Y. Delgado Mercado; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Dénes; A. Deppman; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; T. Dietel; R. Diviŕ; Ř. Djuvsland; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; I. Dom\\'\\inguez; B. Dönigus; O. Dordic; O. Driga; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; H. Engel; H. A. Erdal; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; G. Feofilov; A. Fernández Téllez; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; J. Figiel; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; D. Finogeev; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardh\\oje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; D. R. Gangadharan; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; E. Garcia-Solis; I. Garishvili; R. Gemme; J. Gerhard; M. Germain; C. Geuna; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; P. Gianotti; M. R. Girard; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; P. Glässel; R. Gomez; E. G. Ferreiro; H. González Santos; L. H. González-Trueba; P. González-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; C. Guerra Gutierrez; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. Gutbrod; Ř. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; D. Hasegan; D. Hatzifotiadou; A. Hayrapetyan; M. Heide; M. Heinz; H. Helstrup; A. Herghelegiu; C. Hernández; G. Herrera Corral; N. Herrmann; K. F. Hetland; B. Hicks; P. T. Hille; B. Hippolyte; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; P. Hristov; I. H\\vrivná\\vcová

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The first measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV is presented. For an event sample corresponding to the most central 5% of the hadronic cross section the pseudo-rapidity density of primary charged particles at mid-rapidity is 1584 +- 4 (stat) +- 76 (sys.), which corresponds to 8.3 +- 0.4 (sys.) per participating nucleon pair. This represents an increase of about a factor 1.9 relative to pp collisions at similar collision energies, and about a factor 2.2 to central Au-Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 0.2 TeV. This measurement provides the first experimental constraint for models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies.

  13. Final Report: Measurements of Core Conditions, Implosion Symmetry, and Anomaloes Acceleration Mechanisms on Omega through Charged Particle Spectroscopy, November 1, 1997 - December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrasso, R.; Li, C.K.

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This work concerns the first spectroscopic measurements of energetic charged particles on Omega. Individual line profiles include D-3He protons (14.7 MeV) and alphas (3.6 MeV), D-T alphas (3.5 MeV), D-D protons (3.0 MeV), and D-D tutons (1.0 MeV)

  14. Charged-coupled devices for charged-particle spectroscopy on OMEGA C. K. Li, D. G. Hicks, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Seguin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technologies, Inc.11 They are about 14 m in ``sensitive'' thickness 11 m depletion depth, 3 m field free re, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Seguin Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology on several back-illuminated CCDs in order to establish their utility for determining particle energy

  15. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kino, Yasushi [Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mathews, Grant J., E-mail: motohiko@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: cheoun@ssu.ac.kr, E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: y.k@m.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ? 100 GeV, the d-wave ? 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  16. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Charged-Particle Fragmentation Functions in Pb+Pb Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of charged-particle fragmentation functions of jets produced in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions can provide insight into the modification of parton showers in the hot, dense medium created in the collisions. ...

  17. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  18. Pseudorapidity and centrality dependence of the collective flow of charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the measurement of collective flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN}} = 130 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). An azimuthal anisotropy is observed in the charged particle hit distribution in the PHOBOS multiplicity detector. This anisotropy is presented over a wide range of pseudorapidity (eta) for the first time at this energy. The size of the anisotropy (v_{2}) is thought to probe the degree of equilibration achieved in these collisions. The result here,averaged over momenta and particle species, is observed to reach 7% for peripheral collisions at mid-rapidity, falling off with centrality and increasing |eta|. Data are presented as a function of centrality for |eta|<1.0 and as a function of eta, averaged over centrality, in the angular region -5.0

  19. Local pellet based and line-integrated nonperturbing charge exchange measurements with a compact neutral particle analyzer on Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, P. R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; Veshchev, E. A.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Krasilnikov, A. V. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); St. Petersburg Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on suprathermal ion physics are carried out on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with a 40 channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The analyzer is used both in passive nonperturbing chord-integral neutral particle flux measurements and for local probing with an impurity pellet. The analyzer observes trapped particles with vertical bar v{sub parallel}/v vertical bar <0.25 and the pitch angle cosine value v{sub parallel}/v changes sign along the diagnostic sight line. The measurable energy range for H{sup 0} is 1-170 keV. Radially resolved data on local H{sup 0} atomic energy spectra have been obtained on LHD by the pellet charge exchange method with CNPA, as well as chord-integral atomic energy distribution data for electron cyclotron heated, neutral beam injected, and high power ion cyclotron heated plasma. The article addresses the diagnostic technical background and the analysis scheme of measurement results taking into account the helical geometry and the species and densities of the charge exchange targets.

  20. Charged-particle multiplicity measurement in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 2.36 TeV with ALICE at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Abramyan; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshauser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Aysto; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badala; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnafoldi; L. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; V. Borshchov; A. Borisov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Bottger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; S. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. De Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D'Erasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; R. Divia; O. Djuvsland; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Donigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. Don O. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; O. Fateev; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garcia Trapaga; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glassel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez Jimenez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; A. Harutyunyan; D. Hasch; D. Hasegan

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle production was studied in proton-proton collisions collected at the LHC with the ALICE detector at centre-of-mass energies 0.9 TeV and 2.36 TeV in the pseudorapidity range |eta| < 1.4. In the central region (|eta| < 0.5), at 0.9 TeV, we measure charged-particle pseudorapidity density dNch/deta = 3.02 +- 0.01 (stat.) +0.08 -0.05 (syst.) for inelastic interactions, and dNch/deta = 3.58 +- 0.01 (stat.) +0.12 -0.12 (syst.) for non-single-diffractive interactions. At 2.36 TeV, we find dNch/deta = 3.77 +- 0.01 (stat.) +0.25 -0.12 (syst.) for inelastic, and dNch/deta = 4.43 +- 0.01 (stat.) +0.17 -0.12 (syst.) for non-single-diffractive collisions. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from the lower to higher energy is 24.7% +- 0.5% (stat.) +5.7% -2.8% (syst.) for inelastic and 23.7% +- 0.5% (stat.) +4.6% -1.1% (syst.) for non-single-diffractive interactions. This increase is consistent with that reported by the CMS collaboration for non-single-diffractive events and larger than that found by a number of commonly used models. The multiplicity distribution was measured in different pseudorapidity intervals and studied in terms of KNO variables at both energies. The results are compared to proton-antiproton data and to model predictions.

  1. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CMS collaboration; The TOTEM Collaboration

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudorapidity (eta) distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are measured in the ranges abs(eta) proton-proton cross section. The other two categories are disjoint subsets of the inclusive sample that are either enhanced or depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  2. Charged particle's $p_T$ spectra and elliptic flow in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV Au+Au collisions: QGP vs. hadronic resonance gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that if the hadronic resonance gas (HRG), with viscosity to entropy ratio $\\eta/s\\approx$0.24, is physical at temperature $T\\approx$220 MeV, charged particles $p_T$ spectra and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, over a wide range of collision centrality do not distinguish between initial QGP fluid and initial hadronic resonance gas. Unambiguous identification of bulk of the matter produced in Au+Au collisions require clear demonstration that HRG is unphysical at temperature $T<$200 MeV. It calls for precise lattice simulations with realistic boundary conditions.

  3. Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 900$~GeV with ALICE at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration; K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Abramyan; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshäuser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Äystö; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badalŕ; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnaföldi; L. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; A. Borisov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Böttger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Calvo; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. De Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; Y. Delgado; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D'Erasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; R. Diviŕ; O. Djuvsland; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Dönigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. Don; O. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; O. Fateev; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garcia Trapaga; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glässel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez Jimenez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; C. Guerra; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris

    2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive charged particle transverse momentum distribution is measured in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 900$~GeV at the LHC using the ALICE detector. The measurement is performed in the central pseudorapidity region $(|\\eta|_{\\rm INEL}=0.483\\pm0.001$~(stat.)~$\\pm0.007$~(syst.)~GeV/$c$ and $\\left_{\\rm NSD}=0.489\\pm0.001$~(stat.)~$\\pm0.007$~(syst.)~GeV/$c$, respectively. The data exhibit a slightly larger $\\left$ than measurements in wider pseudorapidity intervals. The results are compared to simulations with the Monte Carlo event generators PYTHIA and PHOJET.

  4. Study of quark fragmentation in e(+)e(-) annihilation at 29 GeV: Charged-particle multiplicity and single-particle rapidity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -hadronic interactions are thought to represent a collective process yielding a forward and back- ward cone dominated by one lea@ng particle, usually with the same quantum numbers as the initial beam or target, accompanied by a large number of soft particles produced...- sured in a two-layer outer drift-chamber system The vacuum pipe of PEP and the inner cylinder of the drift-chamber vessel are made of beryllium so that there was typically 1.4% of a radiation length of material be- tween the interaction point...

  5. Diagnosing fuel R and R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged-particle spectrometry at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnosing fuel R and R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged; published online 22 April 2009 Determining fuel areal density R in moderate- R 100­200 mg/cm2 cryogenic-on deuterons KO-Ds , elastically scattered by primary DT neutrons, from which a fuel R can be inferred

  6. Centrality dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration; K. Aamodt; A. Abrahantes Quintana; D. Adamová; A. M. Adare; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; N. Ahmad; A. Ahmad Masoodi; S. U. Ahn; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; A. Alkin; E. Almaráz Avińa; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; I. Altsybeev; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; V. Anguelov; C. Anson; T. Anti\\vci?; F. Antinori; P. Antonioli; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshäuser; N. Arbor; S. Arcelli; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Äystö; M. D. Azmi; M. Bach; A. Badalŕ; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; R. Baldini Ferroli; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Bán; R. Barbera; F. Barile; G. G. Barnaföldi; L. S. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; M. Basile; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; H. Beck; I. Belikov; F. Bellini; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Biel\\vc\\'\\ik; J. Biel\\vc\\'\\iková; A. Bilandzic; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. B\\oggild; M. Bogolyubsky; L. Boldizsár; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; J. Book; H. Borel; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; F. Bossú; M. Botje; S. Böttger; B. Boyer; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; M. Broz; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Calvo Villar; P. Camerini; V. Canoa Roman; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova D\\'\\iaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; V. Catanescu; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; F. Coccetti; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; T. M. Cormier; Y. Corrales Morales; I. Cortés Maldonado; P. Cortese; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; G. D Erasmo; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; D. Das; I. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; S. De; A. De Azevedo Moregula; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; D. De Gruttola; N. De Marco; S. De Pasquale; R. De Remigis; R. de Rooij; H. Delagrange; Y. Delgado Mercado; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Dénes; A. Deppman; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; T. Dietel; R. Diviŕ; Ř. Djuvsland; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; I. Dom\\'\\inguez; B. Dönigus; O. Dordic; O. Driga; A. K. Dubey; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; H. Engel; H. A. Erdal; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; G. Feofilov; A. Fernández Téllez; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; D. Finogeev; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardh\\oje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; C. Garabatos; R. Gemme; J. Gerhard; M. Germain; C. Geuna; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; M. R. Girard; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; P. Glässel; R. Gomez; L. H. González-Trueba; P. González-Zamora; H. González Santos; S. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; S. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; C. Guerra Gutierrez; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. Gutbrod; Ř. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; D. Hasegan; D. Hatzifotiadou; A. Hayrapetyan; M. Heide; M. Heinz; H. Helstrup; A. Herghelegiu; C. Hernández; G. Herrera Corral; N. Herrmann; K. F. Hetland; B. Hicks; P. T. Hille; B. Hippolyte; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; P. Hristov; I. H\\vrivná\\vcová; M. Huang; S. Huber; T. J. Humanic; D. S. Hwang; R. Ichou; R. Ilkaev; I. Ilkiv; M. Inaba; E. Incani; G. M. Innocenti; P. G. Innocenti; M. Ippolitov; M. Irfan; C. Ivan; A. Ivanov; M. Ivanov; V. Ivanov; A. Jacho\\lkowski; P. M. Jacobs; L. Jancurová

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV is presented. The charged-particle density normalized per participating nucleon pair increases by about a factor 2 from peripheral (70-80%) to central (0-5%) collisions. The centrality dependence is found to be similar to that observed at lower collision energies. The data are compared with models based on different mechanisms for particle production in nuclear collisions.

  7. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV has been measured over a wide range of impact parameters and compared to results obtained at other energies. As a function of collision energy, the pseudorapidity distribution grows systematically both in height and width. The mid-rapidity density is found to grow approximately logarithmically between AGS energies and the top RHIC energy. As a function of centrality, there is an approximate factorization of the centrality dependence of the mid-rapidity yields and the overall multiplicity scale. The new results at sqrt(s_NN)=62.4 GeV confirm the previously observed phenomenon of ``extended longitudinal scaling'' in the pseudorapidity distributions when viewed in the rest frame of one of the colliding nuclei. It is also found that the evolution of the shape of the distribution with centrality is energy independent, when viewed in this reference frame. As a function of centrality, the total charged particle multiplicity scales linearly with the number of participant pairs as it was observed at other energies.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles at high transverse momenta in PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC over an extended transverse momentum (pt) range up to approximately 60 GeV. The data cover both the low-pt region associated with hydrodynamic flow phenomena and the high-pt region where the anisotropies may reflect the path-length dependence of parton energy loss in the created medium. The anisotropy parameter (v2) of the particles is extracted by correlating charged tracks with respect to the event-plane reconstructed by using the energy deposited in forward-angle calorimeters. For the six bins of collision centrality studied, spanning the range of 0-60% most-central events, the observed v2 values are found to first increase with pt, reaching a maximum around pt = 3 GeV, and then to gradually decrease to almost zero, with the decline persisting up to at least pt = 40 GeV over the full centrality range measured.

  9. Directed and elliptic flow of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{\\bm {s_{NN}}} =$ 22.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; 1 L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbćk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports results for directed flow $v_{1}$ and elliptic flow $v_{2}$ of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 22.4 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measurements are for the 0-60% most central collisions, using charged particles observed in the STAR detector. Our measurements extend to 22.4 GeV Cu+Cu collisions the prior observation that $v_1$ is independent of the system size at 62.4 and 200 GeV, and also extend the scaling of $v_1$ with $\\eta/y_{\\rm beam}$ to this system. The measured $v_2(p_T)$ in Cu+Cu collisions is similar for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 22.4-200$ GeV. We also report a comparison with results from transport model (UrQMD and AMPT) calculations. The model results do not agree quantitatively with the measured $v_1(\\eta), v_2(p_T)$ and $v_2(\\eta)$.

  10. Separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general non-extremal rotating charged black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang-Qing Wu

    2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue to investigate the separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general, non-extremal, rotating, charged, Chong-Cvetic-Lu-Pope black holes with two independent angular momenta and a non-zero cosmological constant in minimal D = 5 gauged supergravity theory. We show that the complex Klein-Gordon equation and the modified Dirac equation with the inclusion of an extra counter-term can be separated by variables into purely radial and purely angular parts in this general Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons background spacetime. A second order symmetry operator that commutes with the complex Laplacian operator is constructed from the separated solutions and expressed compactly in terms of a rank-2 Stackel-Killing tensor which admits a simple diagonal form in the chosen pentad one-forms so that it can be understood as the square of a rank-3 totally anti-symmetric tensor. A first order symmetry operator that commutes with the modified Dirac operator is expressed in terms of a rank-3 generalized Killing-Yano tensor and its covariant derivative. The Hodge dual of this generalized Killing-Yano tensor is a generalized principal conformal Killing-Yano tensor of rank-2, which can generate a `tower' of generalized (conformal) Killing-Yano and Stackel-Killing tensors that are responsible for the whole hidden symmetries of this general, rotating, charged, Kerr-AdS black hole geometry. In addition, the first laws of black hole thermodynamics have been generalized to the case that the cosmological constant can be viewed as a thermodynamical variable.

  11. I - Matter, antimatter and geometry II - The twin universe model : a solution to the problem of negative energy particles III - The twin universe model plus electric charges and matter-antimatter symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Henry-Couannier; Gilles D'Agostini; Jean-Pierre Petit

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new dynamical group whose coadjoint action on its momentum space takes account of matter-antimatter symmetry on pure geometrical grounds. According to this description the energy and the spin are unchanged under matter-antimatter symmetry. We recall that the antichron components of the Poincar\\'{e} group, ruling relativistic motions of a mass-point particle, generate negative energy particles. The model with two twin universes, inspired by Sakharov's one, solves the stability issue. Positive and negative energy particles motions hold in two distinct folds. The model is extended to charged particles. As a result, the matter-antimatter duality holds in both universes.

  12. HEAVY-ION FRACTIONATION IN THE IMPULSIVE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT OF 2002 AUGUST 20: ELEMENTS, ISOTOPES, AND INFERRED CHARGE STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T., E-mail: mark.e.wiedenbeck@jpl.nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of heavy-ion elemental and isotopic composition in the energy range {approx}12-60 MeV nucleon{sup -1} are reported from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/SIS) instrument for the solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 2002 August 20. We investigate fractionation in this particularly intense impulsive event by examining the enhancements of elemental and isotopic abundance ratios relative to corresponding values in the solar wind. The elemental enhancement pattern is similar to those in other impulsive events detected by ACE/SIS and in compilations of average impulsive-event composition. For individual elements, the abundance of a heavy isotope (mass M {sub 2}) is enhanced relative to that of a lighter isotope (M{sub 1}) by a factor {approx}(M {sub 1}/M {sub 2}){sup {alpha}} with {alpha} {approx_equal} -15. Previous studies have reported elemental abundance enhancements organized as a power law in Q/M, the ratio of estimated ionic charge to mass in the material being fractionated. We consider the possibility that a fractionation law of this form could be responsible for the isotopic fractionation as a power law in the mass ratio and then explore the implications it would have for the ionic charge states in the source material. Assuming that carbon is fully stripped (Q{sub C} = 6), we infer mean values of the ionic charge during the fractionation process, Q{sub Z} , for a variety of elements with atomic numbers 7 {<=} Z {<=} 28. We find that Q{sub Fe} {approx_equal} 21-22, comparable to the highest observed values that have been reported at lower energies in impulsive SEP events from direct measurements near 1 AU. The inferred charge states as a function of Z are characterized by several step increases in the number of attached electrons, Z - Q{sub Z} . We discuss how this step structure, together with the known masses of the elements, might account for a variety of features in the observed pattern of elemental abundance enhancements. We also briefly consider alternative fractionation laws and the relationship between the charge states we infer in the source material and those derived from in situ observations.

  13. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Phys. Inst. (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudorapidity ( $\\eta $ ) distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $~\\text {TeV}$ are measured in the ranges $|\\eta | < 2.2$ and $5.3 < |\\eta | < 6.4$ covered by the CMS and TOTEM detectors, respectively. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal {L} = 45 \\mu {\\mathrm {b}}^{-1}$ . Measurements are presented for three event categories. The most inclusive category is sensitive to 91–96 % of the total inelastic proton–proton cross section. The other two categories are disjoint subsets of the inclusive sample that are either enhanced or depleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.

  14. Centrality dependence of charged antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity in d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratios of the yields of charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near mid-rapidity for d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV as a function of centrality. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1

  15. {Hydrodynamical analysis of centrality dependence of charged particle's multiplicity in $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative hydrodynamic, we have analyzed the recent ALICE data for the centrality dependence of charged particle multiplicity per participant nucleon pair in $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions. Hydrodynamical evolution of QGP fluid, with viscosity to entropy ratio $\\eta/s=1/4\\pi$, initialized to energy density $\\epsilon_i=126 \\pm 9$ $GeV/fm^3$ at initial time $\\tau_i$=0.6 fm or to energy density $\\epsilon_i=72\\pm 5$ $GeV/fm^3$ at initial time $\\tau_i$=1.0 fm reproduces the experimental data. Smaller initial time $\\tau_i$=0.2 fm is not favored by the data.

  16. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris-Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Toggweiler; Andreas Adelmann; Peter Arbenz; Jianjun J. Yang

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework, and is compared to the existing code. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. In this paper we build up on first observations made in recent work. A more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a clearer analysis by introducing separate time steps for external field and self field integration, turned out to be useful in itself already for a large class of problems.

  17. Underground Neutrino Detectors for Particle and Astroparticle Science: the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rubbia

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the CERN program is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), however, CERN is engaged in long baseline neutrino physics with the CNGS project and supports T2K as recognized CERN RE13, and for good reasons: a number of observed phenomena in high-energy physics and cosmology lack their resolution within the Standard Model of particle physics; these puzzles include the origin of neutrino masses, CP-violation in the leptonic sector, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe. They will only partially be addressed at LHC. A positive measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>0.01$ would certainly give a tremendous boost to neutrino physics by opening the possibility to study CP violation in the lepton sector and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with upgraded conventional super-beams. These experiments (so called ``Phase II'') require, in addition to an upgraded beam power, next generation very massive neutrino detectors with excellent energy resolution and high detection efficiency in a wide neutrino energy range, to cover 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima, and excellent particle identification and $\\pi^0$ background suppression. Two generations of large water Cherenkov detectors at Kamioka (Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande) have been extremely successful. And there are good reasons to consider a third generation water Cherenkov detector with an order of magnitude larger mass than Super-Kamiokande for both non-accelerator (proton decay, supernovae, ...) and accelerator-based physics. On the other hand, a very massive underground liquid Argon detector of about 100 kton could represent a credible alternative for the precision measurements of ``Phase II'' and aim at significantly new results in neutrino astroparticle and non-accelerator-based particle physics (e.g. proton decay).

  18. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

    2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

  19. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 MAY 2002 Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles from Au 1 Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of particle production at the highest RHIC energy. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.202301 PACS numbers: 25.75.Dw Distributions of Charged Particles from Au 1 Au Collisions at the Maximum RHIC Energy, p sNN p sNN p sNN 5 200 Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 8 Texas A&M University, College

  20. Underground Neutrino Detectors for Particle and Astroparticle Science the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubbia, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the CERN program is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), however, CERN is engaged in long baseline neutrino physics with the CNGS project and supports T2K as recognized CERN RE13, and for good reasons: a number of observed phenomena in high-energy physics and cosmology lack their resolution within the Standard Model of particle physics; these puzzles include the origin of neutrino masses, CP-violation in the leptonic sector, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe. They will only partially be addressed at LHC. A positive measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>0.01$ would certainly give a tremendous boost to neutrino physics by opening the possibility to study CP violation in the lepton sector and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with upgraded conventional super-beams. These experiments (so called ``Phase II'') require, in addition to an upgraded beam power, next generation very massive neutrino detectors with excellent energy resolution and high detection efficiency in a wide neutrin...

  1. Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly s...

  2. One-dimensional kinetic description of nonlinear traveling-pulse (soliton) and traveling-wave disturbances in long coasting charged particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ronald C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper makes use of a one-dimensional kinetic model to investigate the nonlinear longitudinal dynamics of a long coasting beam propagating through a perfectly conducting circular pipe with radius $r_{w}$. The average axial electric field is expressed as $\\langle E_{z}\\rangle=-(\\partial/\\partial z)\\langle\\phi\\rangle=-e_{b}g_{0}\\partial\\lambda_{b}/\\partial z-e_{b}g_{2}r_{w}^{2}\\partial^{3}\\lambda_{b}/\\partial z^{3}$, where $g_{0}$ and $g_{2}$ are constant geometric factors, $\\lambda_{b}(z,t)=\\int dp_{z}F_{b}(z,p_{z},t)$ is the line density of beam particles, and $F_{b}(z,p_{z},t)$ satisfies the 1D Vlasov equation. Detailed nonlinear properties of traveling-wave and traveling-pulse (solitons) solutions with time-stationary waveform are examined for a wide range of system parameters extending from moderate-amplitudes to large-amplitude modulations of the beam charge density. Two classes of solutions for the beam distribution function are considered, corresponding to: (a) the nonlinear waterbag distribution, w...

  3. Charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PHOBOS Collaboration; B. B. Back

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratios of the yields of primary charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for p+p collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. Ratios of =1.000 +/- 0.012 (stat.) +/- 0.019 (syst.), =0.93 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (syst.), and =0.85 +/- 0.04 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (syst.) have been measured. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1

  4. High rate resistive plate chambers: An inexpensive, fast, large area detector of energetic charged particles for accelerator and non-accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuest, C.R.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R.M.; Clamp, O.; Haro, M.; Mauger, G.J.; Miller, K.; Olson, H.; Ramsey, P.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive Plate Chambers, or RPCs, have been used until recently as large detectors of cosmic ray muons. They are now finding use as fast large-area trigger and muon detection systems for different high energy physics detectors such the L3 Detector at LEP and future detectors to be built at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. RPC systems at these accelerators must operate with high efficiency, providing nanosecond timing resolution in particle fluences up to a few tens of kHz/cm{sup 2} -- with thousands of square meters of active area. RPCs are simple and cheap to construct. The authors report here recent work on RPCs using new materials that exhibit a combination of desirable RPC features such as low bulk resistivity, high dielectric strength, low mass, and low cost. These new materials were originally developed for use in electronics assembly areas and other applications, where static electric charge buildup can damage sensitive electrical systems.

  5. Electrically charged compact stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subharthi Ray; Manuel Malheiro; Jose' P. S. Lemos; Vilson T. Zanchin

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We review here the classical argument used to justify the electrical neutrality of stars and show that if the pressure and density of the matter and gravitational field inside the star are large, then a charge and a strong electric field can be present. For a neutron star with high pressure (~ 10^{33} to 10^{35} dynes /cm^2) and strong gravitational field (~ 10^{14} cm/s^2), these conditions are satisfied. The hydrostatic equation which arises from general relativity, is modified considerably to meet the requirements of the inclusion of the charge. In order to see any appreciable effect on the phenomenology of the neutron stars, the charge and the electrical fields have to be huge (~ 10^{21} Volts/cm). These stars are not however stable from the viewpoint that each charged particle is unbound to the uncharged particles, and thus the system collapses one step further to a charged black hole

  6. Measurement of the yields of positively charged particles at an angle of 35 Degree-Sign in proton interactions with nuclear targets at an energy of 50 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammosov, V. V.; Antonov, N. N. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)] [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Baldin, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Viktorov, V. A.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gapienko, G. S.; Golovin, A. A.; Gres, V. N.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Koreshev, V. I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Mysnik, A. I.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Semak, A. A., E-mail: Artem.Semak@ihep.ru; Terekhov, V. I.; Uglekov, V. Ya.; Ukhanov, M. N.; Chujko, B. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)] [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Shimanskii, S. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Momentum spectra of cumulative particles in the region of high transverse momenta (P{sub T}) in pA {yields} h{sup +} + X reactions were obtained for the first time. The experiment in which this was done was performed at the SPIN setup (Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino) in a beam of 50-GeV protons interacting with C, Al, Cu, and W nuclei. Positively charged particles were detected at a laboratory angle of 35 Degree-Sign and in the transverse-momentum range between 0.6 and 3.7 GeV/c. A strong dependence of the particle-production cross section on the atomic number was observed. A comparison with the results of calculations based on the HIJING and UrQMD models was performed in the subcumulative region.

  7. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  8. Collective thermoelectrophoresis of charged colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arghya Majee; Alois Würger

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally driven colloidal transport is, to a large extent, due to the thermoelectric or Seebeck effect of the charged solution.We show that, contrary to the generally adopted single-particle picture, the transport coefficient depends on the colloidal concentration. For solutions that are dilute in the hydrodynamic sense, collective effects may significantly affect the thermophoretic mobility. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental observations on polyelectrolytes and charged particles and suggest that for charged colloids collective behavior is the rule rather than the exception.

  9. Search for the production of fractionally charged particles in e(+)e(?) annihilations at s?=10.5 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the fundamental objects are quarks and leptons. Mesons con- tain quark-antiquark (qq ) pairs and baryons contain three quarks (qqq) or three antiquarks (qqq). The (anti)quarks have electric charges ( —)+ —', e and (+) — 3 e and account for the observed hadron... be evidence for the existence of unbound (free) quarks or new stable forms of matter (e.g. , qq) and would challenge our ideas of quark confinement. Many ac- celerator searches for free quarks have been made' and no evidence for their existence has been found...

  10. Constraints on the energy spectra of charged particles predicted in some model interactions of hadrons with help of the atmospheric muon flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedenko, L G; Roganova, T M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that muon flux intensities calculated in terms of the EPOS LHC and EPOS 1.99 models at the energy of 10^4 GeV exceed the data of the classical experiments L3+Cosmic, MACRO and LVD on the spectra of atmospheric muons by a factor of 1.9 and below these data at the same energy by a factor of 1.8 in case of the QGSJET II-03 model. It has been concluded that these tested models overestimate (underestimate in case of QGSJET II-03 model) the production of secondary particles with the highest energies in interactions of hadrons by a factor of ~1.5. The LHCf and TOTEM accelerator experiments show also this type of disagreements with these model predictions at highest energies of secondary particles.

  11. Charged particle multiplicities in pp interactions at sqrt(s) = 0.9, 2.36, and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of primary charged hadron multiplicity distributions are presented for non-single-diffractive events in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 0.9, 2.36, and 7 TeV, in five pseudorapidity ranges from |eta|<0.5 to |eta|<2.4. The data were collected with the minimum-bias trigger of the CMS experiment during the LHC commissioning runs in 2009 and the 7 TeV run in 2010. The multiplicity distribution at sqrt(s) = 0.9 TeV is in agreement with previous measurements. At higher energies the increase of the mean multiplicity with sqrt(s) is underestimated by most event generators. The average transverse momentum as a function of the multiplicity is also presented. The measurement of higher-order moments of the multiplicity distribution confirms the violation of Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling that has been observed at lower energies.

  12. Study of Charged Particle Species Produced in Association with B0, B-, and Bs Mesons in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usynin, Denys

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors study the yields of charged kaons, charged pions, and protons produced in association with B mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1960 GeV using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This is the first reported measurements of these yields at a hadron collider. The B mesons are reconstructed using their semileptonic decays: B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D{sup -}X, D{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D*{sup -}X, D*{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{bar D}{sup 0},{bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{bar D}{sup 0}X, {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sub s}{yields}{ell}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}X, D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi},{phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The K, {pi}, and p are identified using the Time of Flight detector (TOF), the CDF spectrometer, and the specific ionization (dE/dx) measured in the central drift chamber (COT). The fraction of charged kaons produced in association with {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger than the fraction produced in association with the {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} mesons, as expected from naive models of heavy quark hadronization to mesons. The particle species yields are found to be in qualitative agreement with simulation of B meson production in hadron collisions from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo, although the yield of kaons around {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger in the simulation when compared to the data. These studies are important for understanding methods of identifying the flavor of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons in measurement of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} flavor oscillations and charge conjugation-parity (CP) violation in {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays.

  13. First proton--proton collisions at the LHC as observed with the ALICE detector: measurement of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ALICE Collaboration; K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Acero; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshauser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Aysto; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badala; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnafoldi; L. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; V. Borshchov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Bottger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; K. Bugaev; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; S. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. de Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; A. P. de Haas; N. De Marco; R. de Rooij; S. De Pasquale; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D~RErasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; H. Ding; R. Divia; O. Djuvsland; G. do Amaral Valdiviesso; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Donigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. Don; O. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garc; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glassel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; C. Guarnaccia; F. Guber; R. Guernane; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; A. Harutyunyan

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 23rd November 2009, during the early commissioning of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two counter-rotating proton bunches were circulated for the first time concurrently in the machine, at the LHC injection energy of 450 GeV per beam. Although the proton intensity was very low, with only one pilot bunch per beam, and no systematic attempt was made to optimize the collision optics, all LHC experiments reported a number of collision candidates. In the ALICE experiment, the collision region was centred very well in both the longitudinal and transverse directions and 284 events were recorded in coincidence with the two passing proton bunches. The events were immediately reconstructed and analyzed both online and offline. We have used these events to measure the pseudorapidity density of charged primary particles in the central region. In the range |eta| < 0.5, we obtain dNch/deta = 3.10 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.22 (syst.) for all inelastic interactions, and dNch/deta = 3.51 +- 0.15 (stat.) +- 0.25 (syst.) for non-single diffractive interactions. These results are consistent with previous measurements in proton--antiproton interactions at the same centre-of-mass energy at the CERN SppS collider. They also illustrate the excellent functioning and rapid progress of the LHC accelerator, and of both the hardware and software of the ALICE experiment, in this early start-up phase.

  14. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  15. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  16. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Electrodes Print Friday, 26 July 2013 14:18 The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone...

  17. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  18. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  19. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  20. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    !. @13# M. Gyulassy, Y. Pang, and B. Zhang, Nucl. Phys. A626, 999 011902- @24# X. N. Wang and M. Gyulassy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1480 ~1992!. @25# B. Zhang, C. M. Ko, and M. Gyulassy, Phys. Lett. B 455, 45 ~1999!. @26# B. Zhang, C. M. Ko, B. A. Li, Z...

  1. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy Manufacturing Energy

  2. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy Manufacturing EnergyMapping

  3. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy Manufacturing EnergyMappingMapping

  4. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electronEnergy Manufacturing EnergyMappingMappingMapping

  5. Point of zero charge determination in soils and minerals via traditional methods and detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    -specific ion adsorption as a function of pH and I (point of zero net charge), and (3) electroacoustic mobility Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Point of zero charge; Point of zero net charge; Point, or positive, or no charge. The pH where the net total particle charge is zero is called the point of zero

  6. Electromagnetic Radiation and Motion of Real Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2001-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistically covariant equation of motion for real dust particle under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived. The particle is neutral in charge. Equation of motion is expressed in terms of particle's optical properties, standardly used in optics for stationary particles.

  7. RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION A. O. Benz Abstract The solar corona is a very be considered as a particle accelerator. The free mobility of charged particles in a dilute plasma to accelerate particles in resonance. From a plasma physics point of view, acceleration is not surprising

  8. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  9. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  10. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Workplace Charging Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    guidelines used by one Workplace Charging Challenge partner to keep their program running safe and successfully. Sample Workplace Charging Policy More Documents & Publications...

  12. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  13. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  14. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  15. Soret Motion of a Charged Spherical Colloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyyed Nader Rasuli; Ramin Golestanian

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophoretic motion of a charged spherical colloidal particle and its accompanying cloud of counterions and co-ions in a temperature gradient is studied theoretically. Using the Debye-Huckel approximation, the Soret drift velocity of a weakly charged colloid is calculated analytically. For highly charged colloids, the nonlinear system of electrokinetic equations is solved numerically, and the effects of high surface potential, dielectrophoresis, and convection are examined. Our results are in good agreement with some of the recent experiments on highly charged colloids without using adjustable parameters.

  16. Radiation from charges in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianconescu, Reuven [Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, Ramat Gan 52526 (Israel)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that an accelerating charge radiates according to Larmor formula. On the other hand, any DC current following a curvilinear path, consists of accelerating charges, but in such case the radiated power is 0. The scope of this paper is to analyze and quantify how a system of charges goes from a radiating state to a non radiating state when the charges distribution goes to the continuum limit. Understanding this is important from the theoretical point of view and the results of this work are applicable to particle accelerator, cyclotron and other high energy devices.

  17. Dynamics and thermodynamics of decay in charged clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Mark A; Moerland, Christian P; Gray, Sarah J; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for quantifying charge-driven instabilities in clusters, based on equilibrium simulations under confinement at constant external pressure. This approach makes no assumptions about the mode of decay and allows different clusters to be compared on an equal footing. A comprehensive survey of stability in model clusters of 309 Lennard-Jones particles augmented with Coulomb interactions is presented. We proceed to examine dynamic signatures of instability, finding that rate constants for ejection of charged particles increase smoothly as a function of total charge with no sudden changes. For clusters where many particles carry charge, ejection of individual charges competes with a fission process that leads to more symmetric division of the cluster into large fragments. The rate constants for fission depend much more sensitively on total charge than those for ejection of individual particles.

  18. Net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Elage, JE; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Ganti, MS; Gutierrez, TD; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, R.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kolleger, T.; Konstantmov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Lindenbatim, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, E.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Ma, YG; Maestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mangotra, LK; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, LJ; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Singaraju, RN; Simon, F.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suite, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trivedi, MD; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasiliev, AN; Vasiliev, M.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, W.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, HY; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, J.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of charged particle fluctuations measurements in Au+Au collisions at rootS(NN)=130 GeV using the STAR detector. Dynamical fluctuations measurements are presented for inclusive charged particle multiplicities as well...

  19. Spreading of triboelectrically charged granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepak Kumar; A. Sane; Smita Gohil; P. R. Bandaru; S. Bhattacharya; Shankar Ghosh

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the spreading of triboelectrically charged glass particles on an oppositely charged surface of a plastic cylindrical container in the presence of a constant mechanical agitation. The particles spread via sticking, as a monolayer on the cylinder's surface. Continued agitation initiates a sequence of instabilities of this monolayer, which first forms periodic wavy-stripe-shaped transverse density modulation in the monolayer and then ejects narrow and long particle-jets from the tips of these stripes. These jets finally coalesce laterally to form a homogeneous spreading front that is layered along the spreading direction. These remarkable growth patterns are related to a time evolving frictional drag between the moving charged glass particles and the countercharges on the plastic container. The results provide insight into the multiscale time-dependent tribolelectric processes and motivates further investigation into the microscopic causes of these macroscopic dynamical instabilities and spatial structures.

  20. Jet Charge at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Krohn; Tongyan Lin; Matthew D. Schwartz; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the Standard Model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-Standard-Model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pile-up, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as Standard Model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically-decaying W bosons in t-tbar events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multi-hadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte-Carlo fragmentation models.

  1. uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    H uge particle accelerators have been at the vanguard of research in particle physics for more than counterparts, positrons, can then `surf' the electric field of a wave's wake. Particles have been accelerated accelerator, charged particles such as electrons, protons or their antiparticles are accelerated by an alterna

  2. Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Gosselin; Herve Mohrbach

    2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium properties of particles adsorption is investigated theoretically. The model relies on a free energy formulation which allows to generalize the Maxwell-Boltzmann description to solutions for which the bulk volume fraction of potentially adsorbed particles is very high. As an application we consider the equilibrium physical adsorption of neutral and charged particles from solution onto two parallel adsorbing surfaces.

  3. Charged Cylindrical Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson Levi Said; Joseph Sultana; Kristian Zarb Adami

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering cylindrical topology we present the static solution for a charged black hole in conformal gravity. We show that unlike the general relativistic case there are two different solutions, both including a factor that when set to zero recovers the familiar static charged black string solution in Einstein's theory. This factor gives rise to a linear term in the potential that also features in the neutral case and may have significant ramifications for particle trajectories.

  4. Minijet Deformation and Charge-independent Two-particleCorrelations on Momentum Subspace (eta,phi) In Au-Au Collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth,C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la BarcaSanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip,P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry,T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann,G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein,S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda,L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; et al.

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements of charge-independent correlations on momentum-space difference variables {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} (pseudorapidity) and {phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2} (azimuth) for charged primary hadrons with transverse momentum within 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c and |{eta}| {le} 1.3 from Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. We observe strong charge-independent correlations associated with minijets and elliptic flow. The width of the minijet peak on {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} increases by a factor 2.3 from peripheral to central collisions, suggesting strong coupling of partons to a longitudinally-expanding colored medium. New methods of jet analysis introduced here reveal nonperturbative medium effects in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Particle beam injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guethlein, Gary

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

  6. Studies of space-charge physics in beams for advanced accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J. G.; Bernal, S.; Chin, P.; Kishek, R. A.; Li, Y.; Reiser, M.; Venturini, M.; Zhang, W. W.; Zou, Y.; Godlove, T.; Kehne, D.; Haber, I.; York, R. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); FM Technologies, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States); Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1998-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review experimental observations of space-charge effects and collective phenomena in charged particle beams for accelerator applications. These include halo formation and emittance growth, bunch profile evolution, space-charge waves, and longitudinal instabilities. We also report on the development of the University of Maryland Electron Ring for the study of space-charge physics in a circular lattice.

  7. Pileup Per Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Philip Harris; Matthew Low; Nhan Tran

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing "pileup per particle identification" (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape $\\alpha$ which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of $\\alpha$ for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet $p_T$ and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  8. New charge radius relations for atomic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. H. Sun; Y. Lu; J. P. Peng; C. Y. Liu; Y. M. Zhao

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the charge radii of neighboring atomic nuclei, independent of atomic number and charge, follow remarkably very simple relations, despite the fact that atomic nuclei are complex finite many-body systems governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. These relations can be understood within the picture of independent-particle motion and by assuming neighboring nuclei having similar pattern in the charge density distribution. A root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.0078 fm is obtained between the predictions in these relations and the experimental values, i.e., a comparable precision as modern experimental techniques. Such high accuracy relations are very useful to check the consistence of nuclear charge radius surface and moreover to predict unknown nuclear charge radii, while large deviations from experimental data is seen to reveal the appearance of nuclear shape transition or coexsitence.

  9. air particle detectors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    way of measuring energetic charged particles involves scintillation detectors. Here. Aerogels are very light, so they can be easily flown on a balloon and offer little scattering...

  10. Twisted waveguides for particle accelerator applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Joshua L.

    A novel microwave device for accelerating charged particles based on twisted waveguide is presented. Twisted guides support slow-wave TM modes whose phase velocity could reach the speed of light c. The axial electric field ...

  11. Detection of energetic particles and gamma rays General radiation detection concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    Detection of energetic particles and gamma rays General radiation detection concepts Peter · heavy charged particles · electrons ­ neutral particles · neutrons · neutrinos · General radiation detection concepts ­ pulse mode operation ­ energy spectrum ­ detector efficiency ­ timing · Radiation

  12. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  13. Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic Pulse Propagating to plasma physics and particle accelerators. The interaction physics of fields with particles has also been, Colchester CO4 3SQ, U.K. Abstract. The motion of a charged particle driven by an electromagnetic pulse

  14. The bipolar charging of submicrometer particles (0.03 [micrometers is less than or equal to] Dp [is less than or equal to] 0.31 [ micrometers]) by bipolar air ions: an experimental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Gary Jay

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    =3. u N+t = 1. 87x109 statvolts cm IO o ? EXPERIMENT X = IO E 0 I L CONTINUUM Dl FFU SIC N ~ THEORY g o THEORY 4J O m O. l O. OI O. I PARTICLE DIAMETER, D&(porn) 1. 0 Fig. 10: Comparison of experimental data (extrapolated to zero...

  15. Net-charge fluctuations and balance functions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Weber; for the ALICE collaboration

    2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of event-by-event fluctuations and charge-dependent particle correlations are used to study properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures as produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We present results for event-by-event net-charge fluctuations and charge balance functions in \\Delta\\eta\\ and \\Delta\\phi\\ in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN)= 2.76 TeV.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  17. Charge regulation circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  18. Electrically charged pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Alloy; D. P. Menezes

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    n the present work we investigate one possible variation on the usual electrically neutral pulsars: the inclusion of electric charge. We study the effect of electric charge in pulsars assuming that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. All calculations were performed for zero temperature and fixed entropy equations of state.

  19. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  20. First Result of Net-Charge Jet-Correlations from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan Wang

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We presented results on azimuthal correlation of net-charge with high $p_T$ trigger particles. It is found that the net-charge correlation shape is similar to that of total-charge. On the near-side, the net-charge and total-charge $p_T$ spectra have similar shape and both are harder than the inclusives. On the away-side, the correlated spectra are not much harder than the inclusives, and the net-charge/total-charge ratio increases with $p_T$ and is similar to the inclusive ratio.

  1. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some general arguments suggest that strictly massless charge does not not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for {\\em ab initio} massless particle of zero spin. Provided $E^2\\gg eH$, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at $\\hbar \\omega=E/3$, and the average photon energy is $4E/9$. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on $E$ nor on $H$. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Our results are consistent with the view (sup...

  2. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan; D Manager

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  3. A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration K.T. McDonald Princeton U. (with Max Zolotorev, LBNL) March 31, 1998 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/accel/ 1 #12;The Newtonian View A charge e and B change the particle's momentum, but only E can change it's energy. Integrate equation of motion

  4. A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration K.T. McDonald Princeton U. (with Max Zolotorev, LBNL) March 31, 1998 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/accel/ 1 #12; The Newtonian View A charge e): ) Both E and B change the particle's momentum, but only E can change it's energy. ) Integrate equation

  5. A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration K.T. McDonald Princeton U. (with Max Zolotorev, LBNL) April 19, 1998 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/accel/ 1 #12;The Newtonian View A charge e and B change the particle's momentum, but only E can change it's energy. Integrate equation of motion

  6. A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    A Maxwellian Perspective on Particle Acceleration K.T. McDonald Princeton U. (with Max Zolotorev, LBNL) April 19, 1998 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/accel/ 1 #12; The Newtonian View A charge e): ) Both E and B change the particle's momentum, but only E can change it's energy. ) Integrate equation

  7. Particle Production and Fragmentation at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Saxon

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from HERA are presented on a range of topics: charged multiplicities, production of non-strange mesons and strange particles, charm fragmentation, baryons decaying to strange particles, antideuteron production, Bose-Einstein correlations, and new interpretations of results on prompt photon production in DIS.

  8. High spatial resolution particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

  9. Fermion space charge in narrow-band gap semiconductors, Weyl semimetals and around highly charged nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene B. Kolomeisky; Joseph P. Straley; Hussain Zaidi

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of charged impurities in narrow-band gap semiconductors and Weyl semimetals can create electron-hole pairs when the total charge $Ze$ of the impurity exceeds a value $Z_{c}e$. The particles of one charge escape to infinity, leaving a screening space charge. The result is that the observable dimensionless impurity charge $Q_{\\infty}$ is less than $Z$ but greater than $Z_{c}$. There is a corresponding effect for nuclei with $Z >Z_{c} \\approx 170$, however in the condensed matter setting we find $Z_{c} \\simeq 10$. Thomas-Fermi theory indicates that $Q_{\\infty} = 0$ for the Weyl semimetal, but we argue that this is a defect of the theory. For the case of a highly-charged recombination center in a narrow band-gap semiconductor (or of a supercharged nucleus), the observable charge takes on a nearly universal value. In Weyl semimetals the observable charge takes on the universal value $Q_{\\infty} = Z_{c}$ set by the reciprocal of material's fine structure constant.

  10. The Interaction of Debye-Shielded Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, Richard J.; Riley, Merle E.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroscopic particles or solid surfaces in contact with a typical low-temperature plasma immediately charge negatively and surround themselves with an electron-depleted region of positive charge. This Debye shielding effect is involved in the Debye-Huckel theory in liquids and plasma sheath formation in the gas phase. In this report, the interaction between such screened particles is found by using the same basic approximation that is used in constructing the Debye shielding potential itself. The results demonstrate that a significant attraction exists between the particles, and, if conditions are right, this attractive force can contribute to the generation of particulate plasma crystals.

  11. General Groves takes charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    takes charge Colonel James C. Marshall, head of the DSM project (Development of Substitute Materials), did not make much headway, yet he did accomplish some things that lasted....

  12. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  13. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  14. Solar Energy Program: Chapter from the Energy and Environmental Division Annual Report 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and Environment Division

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM PERSONNEL Small Particle SuspensionsStrategies for Active Solar Energy Systems M. Warren, S.tary for Conservation and Solar Energy, Office of Advanced

  15. Measuring and interpreting charge dependent anisotropic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Voloshin; Ronald Belmont

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW) [1] predicts a dependence of the positive and negative particle elliptic flow on the event charge asymmetry. Such a dependence has been observed by the STAR Collaboration [2]. However, it is rather difficult to interpret the results of this measurement, as well as to perform cross-experiment comparisons, due to the dependence of the observable on experimental inefficiencies and the kinematic acceptance used to determine the net asymmetry. We propose another observable that is free from these deficiencies. It also provides possibilities for differential measurements clarifying the interpretation of the results. We use this new observable to study the effect of the local charge conservation that can mimic the effect of the CMW in charge dependent flow measurements.

  16. ccsd00004163, Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004163, version 1 ­ 4 Feb 2005 Free Energy Formalism for Particle Adsorption Pierre Gosselin The equilibrium properties of particles adsorption is investigated theoretically. The model relies on a free the equilibrium physical adsorption of neutral and charged particles from solution onto two parallel adsorbing

  17. Charging Black Saturn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenda Chng; Robert Mann; Eugen Radu; Cristian Stelea

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct new charged static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in five dimensions via a solution generation technique utilizing the symmetries of the reduced Lagrangian. By applying our method on the multi-Reissner-Nordstrom solution in four dimensions, we generate the multi-Reissner-Nordstrom solution in five dimensions. We focus on the five-dimensional solution describing a pair of charged black objects with general masses and electric charges. This solution includes the double Reissner-Nordstrom solution as well as the charged version of the five-dimensional static black Saturn. However, all the black Saturn configurations that we could find present either a conical singularity or a naked singularity. We also obtain a non-extremal configuration of charged black strings that reduces in the extremal limit to a Majumdar-Papapetrou like solution in five dimensions.

  18. Studies of space-charge physics in beams for advanced accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.G.; Bernal, S.; Chin, P.; Kishek, R.A.; Li, Y.; Reiser, M.; Venturini, M.; Zhang, W.W.; Zou, Y. [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Godlove, T.; Kehne, D. [FM Technologies, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States); Haber, I. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); York, R.C. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review experimental observations of space-charge effects and collective phenomena in charged particle beams for accelerator applications. These include halo formation and emittance growth, bunch profile evolution, space-charge waves, and longitudinal instabilities. We also report on the development of the University of Maryland Electron Ring for the study of space-charge physics in a circular lattice. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramani, Praveen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

  20. Radiation and Dynamics of Dust Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistically covariant form of equation of motion for arbitrarily shaped dust particle (neutral in charge) under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived -- emission, scattering and absorption of radiation is considered. The result is presented in the form of optical quantities used in optics of dust particles. The obtained equation of motion represents a generalization of the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) effect, which is standardly used in orbital evolution of dust particles in astrophysics. Simultaneous action of electromagnetic radiation and gravitational fields of the central body -- star -- on the motion of the particle is discussed.

  1. Thermophoresis at a charged surface: the role of hydrodynamic slip Julien Morthomas and Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the thermophoretic mobility of charged particles as a function of the Navier slip length b. A moderate value of b at a particle-uid interface. The thermophoretic mobility is de...ned through the drift velocity of the solute]. In the present work, we derive the thermophoretic mo- bility as a function of the particle size a, the Debye

  2. Abstract adiabatic charge pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Joye; V. Brosco; F. Hekking

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of an abstract formula describing quantum adiabatic charge pumping in a general context. We consider closed systems characterized by a slowly varying time-dependent Hamiltonian depending on an external parameter $\\alpha$. The current operator, defined as the derivative of the Hamiltonian with respect to $\\alpha$, once integrated over some time interval, gives rise to a charge pumped through the system over that time span. We determine the first two leading terms in the adiabatic parameter of this pumped charge under the usual gap hypothesis. In particular, in case the Hamiltonian is time periodic and has discrete non-degenerate spectrum, the charge pumped over a period is given to leading order by the derivative with respect to $\\alpha$ of the corresponding dynamical and geometric phases.

  3. International aeronautical user charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

  4. Isovector spin observables in nuclear charge reactions at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, J.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LAMPF has undertaken a major development program to upgrade facilities for nuclear charge-exchange studies at intermediate energies. The major components of this upgrade are a medium-resolution spectrometer and neutron time-of-flight system for good resolution (delta E < 1 MeV) charge-exchange perograms in (n,p) and (p,n) respectively. Major emphasis is placed on polarization phenomena using polarized beams and analyzing the polarization of the outgoing particle.

  5. Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandrachood, Madhavi (Sunnyvale, CA); Ghanayem, Steve G. (Sunnyvale, CA); Cantwell, Nancy (Milpitas, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Geller, Anthony S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

  6. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA); Hunt, Angus L. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  7. Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

  8. Experimental simulation of charge conservation violation and Majorana dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Keil; C. Noh; A. Rai; S. Stützer; S. Nolte; D. G. Angelakis; A. Szameit

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Unphysical particles are commonly ruled out from the solution of physical equations, as they fundamentally cannot exist in any real system and, hence, cannot be examined experimentally in a direct fashion. One of the most celebrated equations that allows unphysical solutions is the relativistic Majorana equation\\cite{Majorana} which might describe neutrinos and other exotic particles beyond the Standard Model. The equation's physical solutions, the Majorana fermions, are predicted to be their own anti-particles and as a consequence they have to be neutrally charged; the charged version however (called Majoranon) is, due to charge non-conservation, unphysical and cannot exist. On the other hand, charge conservation violation has been contemplated in alternative theories associated with higher spacetime dimensions or a non-vanishing photon mass; theories whose exotic nature makes experimental testing with current technology an impossible task. In our work, we present an experimental scheme based on optics with which we simulate the dynamics of a Majoranon, involving the implementation of unphysical charge conjugation and complex conjugation. We show that the internal dynamics of the Majoranon is fundamentally different from that of its close cousin, the Dirac particle, to illustrate the nature of the unphysical operations. For this we exploit the fact that in quantum mechanics the wave function itself is not a measurable quantity. Therefore, wave functions of real physical particles, in our case Dirac particles with opposite masses, can be superposed to a wave function of an unphysical particle, the Majoranon. Our results open a new front in the field of quantum simulations of exotic phenomena, with possible applications in condensed matter physics, topological quantum computing, and testing theories within and beyond the Standard Model with existing technology.

  9. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  10. Transverse-Momentum and Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Hadrons in pp Collisions at s?=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg A.; Murray, Michael J.; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen J.; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of reconstructed hits, hit pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity dNch/d?|(|?|)<0.5=5.78±0.01(stat)±0.23(syst) for non-single-diffractive events...

  11. Reactive Blast Waves from Composite Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigated here is the performance of composite explosives - measured in terms of the blast wave they drive into the surrounding environment. The composite charge configuration studied here was a spherical booster (1/3 charge mass), surrounded by aluminum (Al) powder (2/3 charge mass) at an initial density of {rho}{sub 0} = 0.604 g/cc. The Al powder acts as a fuel but does not detonate - thereby providing an extreme example of a 'non-ideal' explosive (where 2/3 of the charge does not detonate). Detonation of the booster charge creates a blast wave that disperses the Al powder and ignites the ensuing Al-air mixture - thereby forming a two-phase combustion cloud embedded in the explosion. Afterburning of the booster detonation products with air also enhances and promotes the Al-air combustion process. Pressure waves from such reactive blast waves have been measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Here we describe numerical simulations of those experiments. A Heterogeneous Continuum Model was used to model the dispersion and combustion of the Al particle cloud. It combines the gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a dilute continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models of Khasainov. It incorporates a combustion model based on mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) was used to capture the energy-bearing scales of the turbulent flow on the computational grid, and to track/resolve reaction zones. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g and 10-kg composite charges were performed. Computed pressure histories (red curve) are compared with measured waveforms (black curves) in Fig. 1. Comparison of these results with a waveform for a non-combustion case in nitrogen (blue curve) demonstrates that a reactive blast wave was formed. Cross-sectional views of the temperature field at various times are presented in Fig. 2, which shows that the flow is turbulent. Initially, combustion occurs at the fuel-air interface, and the energy release rate is controlled by the rate of turbulent mixing. Eventually, oxidizer becomes distributed throughout the cloud via ballistic mixing of the particles with air; energy release then occurs in a distributed combustion mode, and Al particle kinetics controls the energy release rate. Details of the Heterogeneous Continuum Model and results of the numerical simulations of composite charge explosions will be described in the paper.

  12. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lal, Amit (Madison, WI); Li, Hui (Madison, WI); Blanchard, James P. (Madison, WI); Henderson, Douglass L. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  13. The effect of a direct current field on the microparticle charge in the plasma afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wörner, L. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans (France); Ivlev, A. V.; Huber, P.; Hagl, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Couëdel, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille-Université, Laboiratoire de Physique des Intéractions Ioniques et Moléculaires, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)] [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille-Université, Laboiratoire de Physique des Intéractions Ioniques et Moléculaires, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France); Schwabe, M. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L. [Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans (France)] [Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans (France); Skvortsov, A. [Yuri Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Center, RU-141160 Star City (Russian Federation)] [Yuri Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Center, RU-141160 Star City (Russian Federation); Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RU-125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RU-125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual charges of individual microparticles forming dense clouds were measured in a RF discharge afterglow. Experiments were performed under microgravity conditions on board the International Space Station, which ensured particle levitation inside the gas volume after the plasma switch-off. The distribution of residual charges as well as the spatial distribution of charged particles across the cloud were analyzed by applying a low-frequency voltage to the electrodes and measuring amplitudes of the resulting particle oscillations. Upon “free decharging” conditions, the charge distribution had a sharp peak at zero and was rather symmetric (with charges concentrated between ?10e and +10e), yet positively and negatively charged particles were homogeneously distributed over the cloud. However, when decharging evolved in the presence of an external DC field (applied shortly before the plasma switch-off) practically all residual charges were positive. In this case, the overall charge distribution had a sharp peak at about +15e and was highly asymmetric, while the spatial distribution exhibited a significant charge gradient along the direction of the applied DC field.

  14. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  15. Surfatron acceleration of a relativistic particle by electromagnetic plane wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Neishtadt; A. A. Vasiliev; A. V. Artemyev

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study motion of a relativistic charged particle in a plane slow electromagnetic wave and background uniform magnetic field. The wave propagates normally to the background field. Under certain conditions, the resonance between the wave and the Larmor motion of the particle is possible. Capture into this resonance results in acceleration of the particle along the wave front (surfatron acceleration). We analyse the phenomenon of capture and show that a captured particle never leaves the resonance and its energy infinitely grows. Scattering on the resonance is also studied. We find that this scattering results in diffusive growth of the particle energy. Finally, we estimate energy losses due to radiation by an accelerated particle.

  16. Holographic Charge Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Blake; Aristomenis Donos; David Tong

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reissner-Nordstrom black hole provides the prototypical description of a holographic system at finite density. We study the response of this system to the presence of a local, charged impurity. Below a critical temperature, the induced charge density, which screens the impurity, exhibits oscillations. These oscillations can be traced to the singularities in the density-density correlation function moving in the complex momentum plane. At finite temperature, the oscillations are very similar to the Friedel oscillations seen in Fermi liquids. However, at zero temperature the oscillations in the black hole background remain exponentially damped, while Friedel oscillations relax to a power-law

  17. Overview of charge symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.A. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge independence and symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature. The observations of the small charge symmetry breaking effects and the consequences of those effects are reviewed. The effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and the off shell dependence {ital q}{sup 2} of {rho}{sup 0}-{omega} mixing are stressed. We find that models which predict a strong {ital q}{sup 2} dependence of {rho}{sup 0}-{omega} mixing seem also to predict a strong {ital q}{sup 2} variation for the {rho}{sup 0}-{gamma}* matrix element, in contradiction with experiment.

  18. SOME RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN NUCLEAR CHARGED PARTICLE DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stelzer, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which is exposed to nuclear radiation. Noble gases are theby the incoming nuclear radiation. It is f a s t , with aby the incoming nuclear radiation which compares favorably

  19. System and method for collisional activation of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

  20. Measurement of Charged Particles from the Hadronic Final State of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University College London

    Scattering at a Centre of Mass Energy of 296 GeV Corinna Catterall University College, London A thesis. The evolution of multiplicity and scaled momentum distributions with increasing virtuality Q of the mediating photon are shown and compared with data from e + e \\Gamma annihilation experiments. The increased effect

  1. CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutbrod, H.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier,WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier*,of modules of the Plastic Ball detector for positive pions

  2. Space Charge Compensation in Laser Particle Accelerators L.C...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shown in Fig. 1, is composed of an energy modulator (e.g. an inverse free-electron laser) followed by a drift section. A macrobunch with little energy spread enters the...

  3. On the determination of phosphorous via charged particle activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poland, John Edward

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the prompt gamma 32 rays from S produced by the P(p, y) S reaction (Ep= 31 0. 355 and 0. 440 NeV); the primary gamma ray is at 2. 20 NeV for both proton energies. The beam current was limited to 1 uA which produced a detection limit of 1 ppm. Fiarman et... al. (21) suggested the use of a Van de Graaff accelerator utilizing the P (p, c, , y) Si 31 28* reaction. This procedure is based on a proton resonance energy of 3. 102 NeV which produces an exited state that emits a 1. 78 NeV gamma ray...

  4. Electrostatic quadrupole array for focusing parallel beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodowski, John (Smithtown, NY)

    1982-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of electrostatic quadrupoles, capable of providing strong electrostatic focusing simultaneously on multiple beams, is easily fabricated from a single array element comprising a support rod and multiple electrodes spaced at intervals along the rod. The rods are secured to four terminals which are isolated by only four insulators. This structure requires bias voltage to be supplied to only two terminals and eliminates the need for individual electrode bias and insulators, as well as increases life by eliminating beam plating of insulators.

  5. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  6. Transverse Focussing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHSSEffects for

  7. Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHSSEffects

  8. Is the composite fermion a Dirac particle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam Thanh Son

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a particle-hole symmetric theory of the Fermi-liquid ground state of a half-filled Landau level. This theory should be applicable for a Dirac fermion in magnetic field at charge neutrality, as well as for the $\

  9. Gas-Solid Coexistence in Highly Charged Colloidal Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Mohanty; B. V. R. Tata; A. Toyotama; T. Sawada

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous suspensions of highly charged polystyrene particles with different volume fractions have been investigated for structural ordering and phase behavior using static light scattering (SLS) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Under deionized conditions, suspensions of high charge density colloidal particles remained disordered whereas suspensions of relatively low charge density showed crystallization by exhibiting iridescence for the visible light. Though for unaided eye crystallized suspensions appeared homogeneous, static light scattering measurements and CLSM observations have revealed their inhomogeneous nature in the form of coexistence of voids with dense ordered regions. CLSM investigations on disordered suspensions showed their inhomogeneous nature in the form coexistence of voids with dense disordered (amorphous) regions. Our studies on highly charged colloids confirm the occurrence of gas-solid transition and are in accordance with predictions of Monte Carlo simulations using a pair-potential having a long-range attractive term [Mohanty and Tata, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 2003, 264, 101]. Based on our experimental and simulation results we argue that the reported reentrant disordered state [Yamanaka et al Phys. Rev. Lett. 1998, 80, 5806 and Toyotama et al Langmuir, 2003, 19, 3236] in charged colloids observed at high charge densities is a gas-solid coexistence state.

  10. AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced...

  11. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H. [Department of Physics, Akdeniz University, TR-07058, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  12. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hesse, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Schindler, K. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  13. Charge detection in semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Kenneth (Kenneth MacLean, III)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis nanometer scale charge sensors are used to study charge transport in two solid state systems: Lateral GaAs quantum dots and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). In both of these experiments we use ...

  14. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  15. General 2 charge geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marika Taylor

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  16. On the Proton charge extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gluck

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the recent determination of the various proton charge extensions is compatible with Standard Model expectations.

  17. Black hole evaporation in a noncommutative charged Vaidya model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Javed, W. [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the black hole evaporation and Hawking radiation for a noncommutative charged Vaidya black hole. For this purpose, we determine a spherically symmetric charged Vaidya model and then formulate a noncommutative Reissner-Nordstroem-like solution of this model, which leads to an exact (t - r)-dependent metric. The behavior of the temporal component of this metric and the corresponding Hawking temperature are investigated. The results are shown in the form of graphs. Further, we examine the tunneling process of charged massive particles through the quantum horizon. We find that the tunneling amplitude is modified due to noncommutativity. Also, it turns out that the black hole evaporates completely in the limits of large time and horizon radius. The effect of charge is to reduce the temperature from a maximum value to zero. We note that the final stage of black hole evaporation is a naked singularity.

  18. Plasma effect in Silicon Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Estrada; Jorge Molina; J. Blostein; G. Fernandez

    2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing alpha-particles with energies in the range 0.5 - 5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agrees with previous measurements in the high energy region (>3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using alpha-particles produced by (n,alpha) reactions of neutrons in a Boron-10 target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of alpha particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  19. Search for Lightly Ionizing Particles Using CDMS-II Data and Fabrication of CDMS Detectors with Improved Homogeneity in Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent...

  20. Tools for charged Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar Stĺl

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of publicly available software tools applicable to charged Higgs physics. A selection of codes are highlighted in more detail, focusing on new developments that have taken place since the previous charged Higgs workshop in 2008. We conclude that phenomenologists now have the tools ready to face the LHC data. A new webpage collecting charged Higgs resources is presented.

  1. Search for Lightly Ionizing Particles Using CDMS-II Data and Fabrication of CDMS Detectors with Improved Homogeneity in Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    .4 Multiple U(1)s and Charge Dequantization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4.1 Implementing Dynamical Mixing of U(1) Gauge Bosons . . . . 23 2.4.2 Phenomenological Constructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.5 Experimental Limits from Cosmic Ray... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. MOTIVATION FOR FRACTIONALLY CHARGED PARTICLES . . . . . 12 2.1 Magnetic Monopoles and Charge Quantization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.2 “Compactness” Restrictions on Allowable Fractional Charges . . . . . 14 2.3 Charge Dequantization Within...

  2. Dynamics of Charged Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachas, Constantin [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex (France); Bunster, Claudio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Avenida Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Henneaux, Marc [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB Campus Plaine C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Avenida Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In three spacetime dimensions the world volume of a magnetic source is a single point, an event. We make the event dynamical by regarding it as the imprint of a flux-carrying particle impinging from an extra dimension. This can be generalized to higher spacetime dimensions and to extended events. We exhibit universal observable consequences of the existence of events and argue that events are as important as particles or branes. We explain how events arise on the world volume of membranes in M theory, and in a Josephson junction in superconductivity.

  3. Charged anisotropic matter with linear or nonlinear equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varela, Victor; Rahaman, Farook; Ray, Saibal; Chakraborty, Koushik; Kalam, Mehedi [Institute of Mathematics, Kings College, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Department of Physics, Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Kolkata 700 010, West Bengal (India); Department of Physics, Government Training College, Hooghly 712103 (India)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ivanov pointed out substantial analytical difficulties associated with self-gravitating, static, isotropic fluid spheres when pressure explicitly depends on matter density. Simplifications achieved with the introduction of electric charge were noticed as well. We deal with self-gravitating, charged, anisotropic fluids and get even more flexibility in solving the Einstein-Maxwell equations. In order to discuss analytical solutions we extend Krori and Barua's method to include pressure anisotropy and linear or nonlinear equations of state. The field equations are reduced to a system of three algebraic equations for the anisotropic pressures as well as matter and electrostatic energy densities. Attention is paid to compact sources characterized by positive matter density and positive radial pressure. Arising solutions satisfy the energy conditions of general relativity. Spheres with vanishing net charge contain fluid elements with unbounded proper charge density located at the fluid-vacuum interface. Notably the electric force acting on these fluid elements is finite, although the acting electric field is zero. Net charges can be huge (10{sup 19}C) and maximum electric field intensities are very large (10{sup 23}-10{sup 24} statvolt/cm) even in the case of zero net charge. Inward-directed fluid forces caused by pressure anisotropy may allow equilibrium configurations with larger net charges and electric field intensities than those found in studies of charged isotropic fluids. Links of these results with charged strange quark stars as well as models of dark matter including massive charged particles are highlighted. The van der Waals equation of state leading to matter densities constrained by cubic polynomial equations is briefly considered. The fundamental question of stability is left open.

  4. String black hole: Can it be a particle accelerator ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharmanthie Fernando

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have studied the possibility of the center-of-mass energy of two particles colliding near the horizon of a static charged black hole in string theory. Various cases corresponding to the electric charge and the angular momentum of the particles were considered. The studies were done for the general black hole as well as for the extreme black hole. There were two scenarios where the center-of-mass energy reach very large values if the appropriate properties of the particles are chosen.

  5. Electromechanics of dielectric particles in dielectric liquids acted on by a microelectrode array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Cheong Soo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the particle. Dielectrophoresis does not include forces due to an electric field acting on a free charge, either within the volume or on the particle/liquid interface. If a free charge exists within the particle, then an additional term must be added... seen that this force is a quadratic function of the coefficients. Therefore, changing the sign of the coefficients does not change the sign of the dielectrophoresis force. Because the direction of the dielectrophoresis force is invariant under a...

  6. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  7. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, C. Benedetti, Cs. Toth, C. G. R. Geddes, W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    recent experimental success using lasers and particle beam drivers for plasma acceler- ationPLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, C. Benedetti, Cs. T be driven by the ponderomo- tive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle

  8. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy University Managing Increased Charging

  9. Automakers and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName4ServicesTribalWorkplace Charging Summit

  10. NERSC HPSS Charging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal: Submit2014 2015Charging HPSS

  11. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuffner, Francis K. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. (Richland, WA); Hammerstrom, Donald J. (West Richland, WA); Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  12. Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Efficiency Considerations of Diesel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Poster...

  13. Pipeline charging of coke ovens with a preheated charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpov, A.V.; Khadzhioglo, A.V.; Kuznichenko, V.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work to test a pipeline charging method was conducted at the Konetsk Coke Works (a PK-2K coke oven system with a single gas main, oven width 407 mm, height 4300 mm, effective column 20.0 cm/sub 3/). This method consists of transporting the heated coal charge to the ovens through a pipe by means of steam. the charge is transported by high pressure chamber groups, and loaded by means of systems equipped with devices for separation, withdrawal and treatment of the spent steam. The principal goal of the present investigation was to test technical advances in the emission-free charging of preheated charges. The problem was, first, to create a reliable technology for separation of the steam from the charge immediately before loading it into the oven and, second, to provide a total elimination of emissions, thereby protecting the environment against toxic substances.

  14. A new method to calculate the beam charge for an integrating current transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Yuchi; Han Dan; Zhu Bin; Dong Kegong; Tan Fang; Gu Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrating current transformer (ICT) is a magnetic sensor widely used to precisely measure the charge of an ultra-short-pulse charged particle beam generated by traditional accelerators and new laser-plasma particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a new method to calculate the beam charge in an ICT based on circuit analysis. The output transfer function shows an invariable signal profile for an ultra-short electron bunch, so the function can be used to evaluate the signal quality and calculate the beam charge through signal fitting. We obtain a set of parameters in the output function from a standard signal generated by an ultra-short electron bunch (about 1 ps in duration) at a radio frequency linear electron accelerator at Tsinghua University. These parameters can be used to obtain the beam charge by signal fitting with excellent accuracy.

  15. Mechanisms and implications of air pollution particle associations with chemokines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seagrave, JeanClare [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Dr. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 (United States)], E-mail: jseagrav@LRRI.org

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine.

  16. Self force on an accelerated particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Linz; John L. Friedman; Alan G. Wiseman

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the singular field of an accelerated point particle (scalar charge, electric charge or small gravitating mass) moving on an accelerated (non-geodesic) trajectory in a generic background spacetime. Using a mode-sum regularization scheme, we obtain explicit expressions for the self-force regularization parameters. In the electromagnetic and gravitational case, we use a Lorenz gauge. This work extends the work of Barack and Ori [1] who demonstrated that the regularization parameters for a point particle in geodesic motion in a Schwarzschild spacetime can be described solely by the leading and subleading terms in the mode-sum (commonly known as the $A$ and $B$ terms) and that all terms of higher order in $\\ell$ vanish upon summation (later they showed the same behavior for geodesic motion in Kerr [2], [3]). We demonstrate that these properties are universal to point particles moving through any smooth spacetime along arbitrary (accelerated) trajectories. Our renormalization scheme is based on, but not identical to, the Quinn-Wald axioms. As we develop our approach, we review and extend work showing that that different definitions of the singular field used in the literature are equivalent to our approach. Because our approach does not assume geodesic motion of the perturbing particle, we are able use our mode-sum formalism to explicitly recover a well-known result: The self-force on static scalar charges near a Schwarzschild black hole vanishes.

  17. Electrostatic interactions in the presence of surface charge regulation: exact results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Maggs; R. Podgornik

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of charge regulation and its effects on electrostatic interactions between dissociable charge groups immersed in a univalent electrolyte, within a family of one dimensional exactly solvable models. We consider the case of both charge regulated plates, but also the interaction of pairs of finite size dielectric "particles". Using the transfer matrix formalism we are able to determine the disjoining pressure as well as the correlations between the charge and the dipole moments of the objects as a function of their separation and electrolyte concentration

  18. Metal-insulator Transition by Holographic Charge Density Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Ling; Chao Niu; Jianpin Wu; Zhuoyu Xian; Hongbao Zhang

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a gravity dual for charge density waves (CDW) in which the translational symmetry along one spatial direction is spontaneously broken. Our linear perturbation calculation on the gravity side produces the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity, which exhibits the two familiar features of charge density waves, namely the pinned collective mode and gapped single-particle excitation. These two features indicate that our gravity dual also provides a new mechanism to implement the metal to insulator phase transition by CDW, which is further supported by the fact that d.c. conductivity decreases with the decreased temperature below the critical temperature.

  19. Energy conservation for a radiating charge in classical electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singal, Ashok K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the well-known disparity in classical electrodynamics between the power radiated in electromagnetic fields and the power-loss, as calculated from the radiation reaction on a charge undergoing a non-uniform motion, is successfully resolved when a proper distinction is made between quantities expressed in terms of a "real time" and those expressed in terms of a retarded time. It is shown that the expression for the real-time radiative power loss from a charged particle is somewhat different from the familiar Larmor's formula, or in a relativistic case, from Li\\'{e}nard's formula.

  20. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The report also examines when consumers want to recharge vehicles, and to what extent pricing and incentives can encourage consumers to charge during off-peak periods. Evaluating...

  1. Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator Carl B. Schroeder1 structure is the transverse instability of the particle beam. INTRODUCTION Plasma-based accelerators have. The electromagnetic wake field response of a hollow plasma channel to a driver (laser or charged particle beam

  2. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 4. The Neutrino

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". It's the most populous particle in the universe. Millions of these subatomic particles are passing through each one of us. With no charge and virtually no mass they can penetrate vast thicknesses of matter without any interaction - indeed the sun emits huge numbers that pass through earth at the speed of light. Neutrinos are similar to the more familiar electron, with one crucial difference: neutrinos do not carry electric charge. As a result they're extremely difficult to detect . But like HG Wells' invisible man they can give themselves away by bumping into things at high energy and detectors hidden in mines are exploiting this to observe these rare interactions.

  3. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  4. Coulomb interactions between dust particles in plasma etching reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.H.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wafer contamination by particles, or dust, in plasma processing reactors remains a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. Particles charge negatively in low temperature plasmas and resemble electrically floating bodies. The transport of these particles in plasma processing reactors is dominated by electrostatic, ion-drag, fluid-drag, and thermophoretic forces. Under conditions where the particle density is large, Debye shielding may be insufficient to isolate the particles, leading to particle-particle Coulomb interactions. Such interactions are likely to occur in trapping locations, which are typically near the plasma-sheath boundaries in Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) discharges. Particles that experience Coulomb interactions may display collective behavior, an extreme example being a Coulomb liquid or solid. Particle transport in plasma processing reactors has been studied extensively to predict rates of wafer contamination thought to date particle-particle interactions have not been addressed. In this paper, the authors discuss results from a computer model for dust particle transport in RIE discharges where particle-particle Coulomb interactions are included.

  5. Sacrificial Charge and Charge Injection! Evolution of Line Width!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    . Similar structures are seen in the energy scale due to sacrificial charge. " Solar Min Solar Max increasing CTI, trailing charge and event/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Radiation damage! Catherine Grant, Bev LaMarr, Eric Miller and Mark Bautz (MIT Kavli Institute)! Instruments and Data! · Front

  6. Particle Acceleration in three dimensional Reconnection Regions: A New Test Particle Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudiger Schopper; Guido T. Birk; Harald Lesch

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Reconnection is an efficient and fast acceleration mechanism by means of direct electric field acceleration parallel to the magnetic field. Thus, acceleration of particles in reconnection regions is a very important topic in plasma astrophysics. This paper shows that the conventional analytical models and numerical test particle investigations can be misleading concerning the energy distribution of the accelerated particles, since they oversimplify the electric field structure by the assumption that the field is homogeneous. These investigations of the acceleration of charged test particles are extended by considering three-dimensional field configurations characterized by localized field-aligned electric fields. Moreover, effects of radiative losses are discussed. The comparison between homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric field acceleration in reconnection regions shows dramatic differences concerning both, the maximum particle energy and the form of the energy distribution.

  7. Net-charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions at chemical freeze-out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore net charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The distributions for strangeness, electric charge and baryon number are derived. We show that, within this model, net charge probability distributions and the resulting fluctuations can be computed directly from the measured yields of charged and multi-charged hadrons. The influence of multi-charged particles and quantum statistics on the shape of the distribution is examined. We discuss the properties of the net proton distribution along the chemical freeze-out line. The model results presented here can be compared with data at RHIC energies and at the LHC to possibly search for the relation between chemical freeze-out and QCD cross-over lines in heavy ion collisions.

  8. Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  9. Dynamics of Carroll Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Bergshoeff; Joaquim Gomis; Giorgio Longhi

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate particles whose dynamics is invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (`the Carroll particle does not move') we show that there exists non-trivial dynamics for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge the Carroll algebra and couple the Carroll particle to these gauge fields. It turns out that for such a coupled system even a single Carroll particle can have non-trivial dynamics.

  10. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moreno, Omar [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Donnelly, T. W. [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Van Orden, Jay Wallace [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Ford, William P. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. Finally, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  11. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhensheng; Zhang He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2320 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  12. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  13. Electromagnetic Radiation and Motion of Really Shaped Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistically covariant form of equation of motion for real particle (neutral in charge) under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived. Various formulations of the equation of motion in the proper frame of reference of the particle are used. Main attention is devoted to the reformulation of the equation of motion in the general frame of reference, e. g., in the frame of reference of the source of electromagnetic radiation. This is the crucial form of equation of motion in applying it to motion of particles (cosmic dust, asteroids, ...) in the Universe if electromagnetic radiation acts on the particles. General relativistic equation of motion is presented.

  14. Accelerator Cavities as a Probe of Millicharged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; A. Ringwald

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate Schwinger pair production of millicharged fermions in the strong electric field of cavities used for particle accelerators. Even without a direct detection mechanism at hand, millicharged particles, if they exist, contribute to the energy loss of the cavity and thus leave an imprint on the cavity's quality factor. Already conservative estimates substantially constrain the electric charge of these hypothetical particles; the resulting bounds are competitive with the currently best laboratory bounds which arise from experiments based on polarized laser light propagating in a magnetic field. We propose an experimental setup for measuring the electric current comprised of the millicharged particles produced in the cavity.

  15. Piston-assisted charge pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, D; Mourokh, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine charge transport through a system of three sites connected in series in the situation when an oscillating charged piston modulates the energy of the middle site. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, charge can be transferred against an applied voltage. In this scenario, when the oscillating piston shifts away from the middle site, the energy of the site decreases and it is populated by a charge transferred from the lower energy site. On the other hand, when the piston returns to close proximity, the energy of the middle site increases and it is depopulated by the higher energy site. Thus through this process, the charge is pumped against the potential gradient. Our results can explain the process of proton pumping in one of the mitochondrial enzymes, Complex I. Moreover, this mechanism can be used for electron pumping in semiconductor nanostructures.

  16. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  17. Capacitive charging system for high power battery charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a project to design, build, demonstrate, and document a Level 3 capacitive charging system, and it will be based on the existing PEZIC prototype capacitive coupler. The capacitive coupler will be designed to transfer power at a maximum of 600 kW, and it will transfer power by electric fields. The power electronics will transfer power at 100 kW. The coupler will be designed to function with future increases in the power electronics output power and increases in the amp/hours capacity of sealed batteries. Battery charging algorithms will be programmed into the control electronics. The finished product will be a programmable battery charging system capable of transferring 100 kW via a capacitive coupler. The coupler will have a low power loss of less than 25 watts when transferring 240 kW (400 amps). This system will increase the energy efficiency of high power battery charging, and it will enhance mobility by reducing coupler failures. The system will be completely documented. An important deliverable of this project is information. The information will be distributed to the Army`s TACOM-TARDEC`s Advanced Concept Group, and it will be distributed to commercial organizations by the Society of Automotive Engineers. The information will be valuable for product research, development, and specification. The capacitive charging system produced in this project will be of commercial value for future electric vehicles. The coupler will be designed to rapid charge batteries that have a capacity of several thousand amp/hours at hundreds of volts. The charging system built here will rapid charge batteries with several hundred amp/hours capacity, depending on the charging voltage.

  18. Space charge emission in cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Córdoba, Rafael; Martínez-García, Edgar [Universidad Autónoma de Cd. Juárez-IIT, Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)] [Universidad Autónoma de Cd. Juárez-IIT, Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a mathematical model to describe cylindrical electron current emissions through a physics approximation method is presented. The proposed mathematical approximation consists of analyzing and solving the nonlinear Poisson's equation, with some determined mathematical restrictions. Our findings tackle the problem when charge-space creates potential barrier that disable the steady-state of the beam propagation. In this problem, the potential barrier effects of electron's speed with zero velocity emitted through the virtual cathode happens. The interaction between particles and the virtual cathode have been to find the inter-atomic potentials as boundary conditions from a quantum mechanics perspective. Furthermore, a non-stationary spatial solution of the electrical potential between anode and cathode is presented. The proposed solution is a 2D differential equation that was linearized from the generalized Poisson equation. A single condition was used solely, throughout the radial boundary conditions of the current density formation.

  19. Counter-ions at single charged wall: Sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Samaj

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For inhomogeneous classical Coulomb fluids in thermal equilibrium, like the jellium or the two-component Coulomb gas, there exists a variety of exact sum rules which relate the particle one-body and two-body densities. The necessary condition for these sum rules is that the Coulomb fluid possesses good screening properties, i.e. the particle correlation functions or the averaged charge inhomogeneity, say close to a wall, exhibit a short-range (usually exponential) decay. In this work, we study equilibrium statistical mechanics of an electric double layer with counter-ions only, i.e. a globally neutral system of equally charged point-like particles in the vicinity of a plain hard wall carrying a fixed uniform surface charge density of opposite sign. At large distances from the wall, the one-body and two-body counter-ion densities go to zero slowly according to the inverse-power law. In spite of the absence of screening, all known sum rules are shown to hold for two exactly solvable cases of the present system: in the weak-coupling Poisson-Boltzmann limit (in any spatial dimension larger than one) and at a special free-fermion coupling constant in two dimensions. This fact indicates an extended validity of the sum rules and provides a consistency check for reasonable theoretical approaches.

  20. Geometric algebra and particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose B. Almeida

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent publication the I showed how the geometric algebra ${G}_{4,1}$, the algebra of 5-dimensional space-time, can generate relativistic dynamics from the simple principle that only null geodesics should be allowed. The same paper showed also that Dirac equation could be derived from the condition that a function should be monogenic in that algebra; this construction of the Dirac equation allows a choice for the imaginary unit and it was suggested that different imaginary units could be assigned to the various elementary particles. An earlier paper had already shown the presence of standard model gauge group symmetry in complexified ${G}_{1,3}$, an algebra isomorphic to ${G}_{4,1}$. In this presentation I explore the possible choices for the imaginary unit in the Dirac equation to show that SU(3) and SU(2) symmetries arise naturally from such choices. The quantum numbers derived from the imaginary units are unusual but a simple conversion allows the derivation of electric charge and isospin, quantum numbers for two families of particles. This association to elementary particles is not final because further understanding of the role played by the imaginary unit is needed.

  1. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  2. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  3. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  4. The Energy of Charged Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Philip Solovej

    2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I will discuss some of the techniques that have been developed over the past 35 years to estimate the energy of charged matter. These techniques have been used to solve stability of (fermionic) matter in different contexts, and to control the instability of charged bosonic matter. The final goal will be to indicate how these techniques with certain improvements can be used to prove Dyson's 1967 conjecture for the energy of a charged Bose gas--the sharp $N^{7/5}$ law.

  5. Volumetric particle modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingle, Brent Michael

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    and the lifetime of each particle is infinite. 2.1.2 Growing Patterns Particle systems can also model static or instantaneous things. They have been used to model plants and fracture patterns [21, 22] as well as lightning, frost, ice or snowflakes [23... mixes with dirt particles to form mud particles................................................... 121 61 Mud drying and cracking............................................................................................... 122 62 Ice melting...

  6. Efficient wireless charging with gallium nitride FETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Theresa (Theresa I.)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though wireless charging is more convenient than traditional wired charging methods, it is currently less efficient. This not only wastes power but can also result in a longer charging time. Improving the efficiency of ...

  7. Charged Scalar-Tensor Boson Stars: Equilibrium, Stability and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Whinnett; Diego F. Torres

    1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study charged boson stars in scalar-tensor (ST) gravitational theories. We analyse the weak field limit of the solutions and analytically show that there is a maximum charge to mass ratio for the bosons above which the weak field solutions are not stable. This charge limit can be greater than the GR limit for a wide class of ST theories. We numerically investigate strong field solutions in both the Brans Dicke and power law ST theories. We find that the charge limit decreases with increasing central boson density. We discuss the gravitational evolution of charged and uncharged boson stars in a cosmological setting and show how, at any point in its evolution, the physical properties of the star may be calculated by a rescaling of a solution whose asymptotic value of the scalar field is equal to its initial asymptotic value. We focus on evolution in which the particle number of the star is conserved and we find that the energy and central density of the star decreases as the cosmological time increases. We also analyse the appearance of the scalarization phenomenon recently discovered for neutron stars configurations and, finally, we give a short discussion on how making the correct choice of mass influences the argument over which conformal frame, the Einstein frame or the Jordan frame, is physical.

  8. A Charge Separation Study to Enable the Design of a Complete Muon Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshikawa, C. [Muons, Inc.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M. [Muons, Inc.; Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc.; Derbenev, Yaroslav [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Neuffer, David [FNAL; Yonehara, K. [FNAL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most promising designs for 6D muon cooling channels operate on a specific sign of electric charge. In particular, the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) and Rectilinear RFOFO designs are the leading candidates to become the baseline 6D cooling channel in the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). Time constraints prevented the design of a realistic charge separator, so a simplified study was performed to emulate the effects of charge separation on muons exiting the front end of a muon collider. The output of the study provides particle distributions that the competing designs will use as input into their cooling channels. We report here on the study of the charge separator that created the simulated particles.

  9. A threshold for laser-driven linear particle acceleration in unbounded vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Liang Jie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We hypothesize that a charged particle in unbounded vacuum can be substantially accelerated by a force linear in the electric field of a propagating electromagnetic wave only if the accelerating field is capable of bringing ...

  10. Gibbs paradox and a possible mechanism of like-charge attraction in colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi-Lun Lee; Yiing-Rei Chen

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a reconsideration of the Gibbs paradox, we show that a residual, non-extensive term in entropy turns up upon mixing identical particles, whether they are indistinguishable or not. The positive contribution from this residual entropy leads to a decrease in free energy, and we suggest that this entropic mechanism may serve as a source of like-charge attractions between a pair of colloidal particles or other macroions. For a system of two colloidal particles along with their neutralizing counterions, such decrease in free energy is of a few thermal energies and therefore crucial to the effective interaction between the particles.

  11. Turbo-Charged Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. H. II

    TURBO-CHARGED LIGHTING DESIGN William H. Clark II Design Engineer O'Connell Robertson & Assoc Austin/ Texas ABSTRACT The task of the lighting designer has become very complex, involving thousands of choices for fixture types and hundreds...

  12. Vacuum Potentials for the Two Only Permanent Free Particles, Proton and Electron. Pair Productions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The two only species of isolatable, smallest, or unit charges +e and -e present in nature interact with the universal vacuum in a polarisable dielectric representation through two uniquely defined vacuum potential functions. All of the non-composite subatomic particles containing one-unit charges, +e or -e, are therefore formed in terms of the IED model of the respective charges, of zero rest masses, oscillating in either of the two unique vacuum potential fields, together with the radiation waves of their own charges. In this paper we give a first principles treatment of the dynamics of charge in a dielectric vacuum, based on which, combined with solutions for the radiation waves obtained previously, we subsequently derive the vacuum potential function for a given charge q, which we show to be quadratic and consist each of quantised potential levels, giving therefore rise to quantised characteristic oscillation frequencies of the charge and accordingly quantised, sharply-defined masses of the IED particles. By further combining with relevant experimental properties as input information, we determine the IED particles built from the charges +e,-e at their first excited states in the respective vacuum potential wells to be the proton and the electron, the observationally two only stable (permanently lived) and "free" particles containing one-unit charges. Their antiparticles as produced in pair productions can be accordingly determined. The characteristics of all of the other more energetic non-composite subatomic particles can also be recognised. We finally discuss the energy condition for pair production, which requires two successive energy supplies to (1) first disintegrate the bound pair of vaculeon charges +e,-e composing a vacuuon of the vacuum and (2) impart masses to the disintegrated charges.

  13. Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  14. Structure, Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics in Magnetite (Fe3O4) (100) Surfaces from First Principles. Structure, Charge Distribution, and Electron Hopping Dynamics in...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Charging Equipment (EVSE) Testing Data Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment (EVSE) Testing Data Electric vehicle chargers (otherwise known as...

  16. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere...

  17. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

  18. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  19. Real-time airborne particle analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  20. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  1. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  2. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  3. Impact of Charge Variation on the Encapsulation of Nanoparticles by Virus Coat Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiang-Ku; Zandi, Roya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic interaction is the driving force for the encapsulation by virus coat proteins of nanoparticles such as quantum dots, gold particles and magnetic beads for, e.g., imaging and therapeutic purposes. In recent experimental work, Daniel et al. [ACS Nano 4 (2010), 3853-3860] found the encapsulation efficiency to sensitively depend on the interplay between the surface charge density of negatively charged gold nanoparticles and the number of positive charges on the RNA binding domains of the proteins. Surprisingly, these experiments reveal that despite the highly cooperative nature of the co-assembly at low pH, the efficiency of encapsulation is a gradual function of their surface charge density. We present a simple all-or-nothing mass action law combined with an electrostatic interaction model to explain the experiments. We find quantitative agreement with experimental observations, supporting the existence of a natural statistical charge distribution between nanoparticles.

  4. Impact of Charge Variation on the Encapsulation of Nanoparticles by Virus Coat Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang-Ku Lin; Paul van der Schoot; Roya Zandi

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic interaction is the driving force for the encapsulation by virus coat proteins of nanoparticles such as quantum dots, gold particles and magnetic beads for, e.g., imaging and therapeutic purposes. In recent experimental work, Daniel et al. [ACS Nano 4 (2010), 3853-3860] found the encapsulation efficiency to sensitively depend on the interplay between the surface charge density of negatively charged gold nanoparticles and the number of positive charges on the RNA binding domains of the proteins. Surprisingly, these experiments reveal that despite the highly cooperative nature of the co-assembly at low pH, the efficiency of encapsulation is a gradual function of their surface charge density. We present a simple all-or-nothing mass action law combined with an electrostatic interaction model to explain the experiments. We find quantitative agreement with experimental observations, supporting the existence of a natural statistical charge distribution between nanoparticles.

  5. Characterization of aerodynamic drag force on single particles: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kale, S.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodynamic balance was used to measure the drag coefficient and also to record the size and shape of spheres, and coal and oil shale particles (100 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m in size). The electrodynamic balance consisted of a central, and two end electrodes. The resulting electric field stably suspended a charged particle. A suspended particle, back illuminated by a light emitting diode, was viewed by a video camera. The image was analyzed for particle position control and was calibrated to give the diameter of spheres, or the area equivalent diameter of nonspherical particles. The drag coefficient was calculated from the air velocity and the dc voltage required to keep the particle at the balance center. The particle Reynolds number varied from 0.2 to 13. Three particles each of coal and oil shale were captured and photographed by a scanning electron microscope and the motion of all the particles was recorded on video tape. Drag coefficient vs Reynolds number data for spheres agreed well with correlations. Data for thirteen particles each of coal and oil shale indicated a power law relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number. All these particles exhibited higher drag than spheres and were also observed to rotate. The rotation, however, did not affect the drag coefficient. The choice of characteristic dimension affects the drag characteristics of oil shale more strongly than for coal, owing to the flake-like shape of oil shale. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Acceleration of particles by black holes: kinematic explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Zaslavskii

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new simple and general explanation of the effect of acceleration of particles by black holes to infinite energies in the centre of mass frame is suggested. It is based on kinematics of particles moving near the horizon. This effect arises when particles of two kinds collide near the horizon. For massive particles, the first kind represents a particle with the generic energy and angular momentum (I call them "usual"). Near the horizon, such a particle has a velocity almost equal to that of light in the frame that corotates with a black hole (the frame is static if a black hole is static). The second kind (called "critical") consists of particles with the velocity vvelocity approaches the speed of light c, the Lorentz factor grows unbound. This explanation applies both to generic rotating black holes and charged ones (even for radial motion of particles). If one of colliding particles is massless (photon), the critical particle is distinguished by the fact that its frequency is finite near the horizon. The existence (or absence) of the effect is determined depending on competition of two factors - gravitational blue shift for a photon propagating towards a black hole and the Doppler effect due to transformation from the locally nonrotating frame to a comoving one. Classification of all possible types of collisions is suggested depending on whether massive or massless particle is critical or usual.

  7. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan [Universities of Lancaster, Liverpool and Manchester and Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  8. Emission of scalar particles from cylindrical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Gohar; K. Saifullah

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study quantum tunneling of scalar particles from black strings. For this purpose we apply WKB approximation and Hamilton-Jacobi method to solve the Klein-Gordon equation for outgoing trajectories. We find the tunneling probability of outgoing charged and uncharged scalars from the event horizon of black strings, and hence the Hawking temperature for these black configurations.

  9. Particle Production Reactions in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah J. Müller; Christoph H. Keitel; Carsten Müller

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever higher energies in lepton colliders gives rise to the investigation of new accelerator schemes for elementary particle physics experiments. One perceivable way to increase the collision energy would be to combine conventional lepton acceleration with strong laser fields, making use of the momentum boost a charged particle experiences inside a plane electromagnetic wave. As an example for a process taking place in such a laser-boosted collision, Higgs boson creation is studied in detail. We further discuss other possible particle production processes that could be implemented in such a collider scheme and specify the required technical demands.

  10. Particle Production Reactions in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Sarah J; Müller, Carsten

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever higher energies in lepton colliders gives rise to the investigation of new accelerator schemes for elementary particle physics experiments. One perceivable way to increase the collision energy would be to combine conventional lepton acceleration with strong laser fields, making use of the momentum boost a charged particle experiences inside a plane electromagnetic wave. As an example for a process taking place in such a laser-boosted collision, Higgs boson creation is studied in detail. We further discuss other possible particle production processes that could be implemented in such a collider scheme and specify the required technical demands.

  11. Acceleration of particles in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu-Jian Mao; Ran Li; Lin-Yu Jia; Ji-Rong Ren

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been recently pointed out that, under certain conditions, the energy of particles accelerated by black holes in the center-of-mass frame can become arbitrarily high. In this Letter, we study the collision of two particles around the four-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black hole in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory. We find that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is unlimited at the horizon of charged nonrotating and extremal rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole.

  12. Sacrificial Charge and Charge Injection! Evolution of Line Width!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    MeV). Anti-correlated with the solar cycle. Similar structures are seen in the energy scale due background" which depends on solar cycle and activity." XIS energy scale and line width as a function of cut increasing CTI, trailing charge and event/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Radiation damage

  13. Magnetic moment versus tensor charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mekhfi

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We express the baryon magnetic moments in terms of the baryon tensor charges, considering the quarks as relativistic interacting objects. Once tensor charges get measured accurately, the formula for the baryon magnetic moment will serve to extract precise information on the quark anomalous magnetic moment, the quark effective mass and the ratio of the quark constituent mass to the quark effective mass. The analogous formula for the baryon electric dipole moment is of no great use as it gets eventually sizable contributions from various CP- violating sources not necessary associated to the quark electric dipole moment.

  14. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul, 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8589 (Japan) and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for {sup 12}C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  15. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  16. Pulverization Induced Charge: In-Line Dry Coal Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, J.L.; Stencel, J.M.

    1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of separating mineral matter and pyrite from coal as it is transported from pulverizers to boilers in pulverized coal combustion units will be examined. The charge imparted on coal during pulverization and transport to pulverized coal (PC) burners in a utility boiler will be quantified. In addition to field charge measurements, an existing computational model will be extended to numerically simulate charged particle motion in a turbulent gas through an electric field. Results from the field tests and numerical modeling will be employed in design and construction of a laboratory scale pulverizer/classifier. This laboratory unit will be used to quantify the magnitude and differential charge imparted on bituminous and subbituminous coals during pulverization and classification at temperatures and with gaseous constituents typical to utility PC units. An electrostatic separator, designed for in-line operation between pulverizers and PC boilers, will be used to clean prepulverized coals. Theoretical and experimental data are to be used in preparing a preliminary design for a full-scale, (15 ton/hr) in-line, electrostatic coal cleaning device. Finally, the economic potential for application to PC units will be assessed.

  17. PULVERIZATION INDUCED CHARGE: IN-LINE DRY COAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHN M. STENCEL

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of separating mineral matter and pyrite from coal as it is transported from pulverizers to burners in pulverized coal combustion units will be examined. The charge imparted on coal during pulverization and transport to pulverized coal (PC) burners in a utility boiler will be quantified. In addition to field charge measurements, an existing computational model will be extended to numerically simulate charged particle motion in a turbulent gas through an electric field. Results from the field tests and numerical modeling will be employed in design and construction of a laboratory scale pulverizer/classifier. This laboratory unit will be used to quantify the magnitude and differential charge imparted on bituminous and subbituminous coals during pulverization and classification at temperatures and with gaseous constituents typical to utility PC units. An electrostatic separator, designed for in-line operation between pulverizers and PC boilers, will be used to clean prepulverized coals. Theoretical and experimental data are to be used in preparing a preliminary design for a full-scale, (15 ton/hr) in-line, electrostatic coal cleaning device. Finally, the economic potential for application to PC units will be assessed.

  18. Pulverization Induced Charge: In-Line Dry Coal Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Stencel

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of separating mineral matter and pyrite from coal as it is transported from pulverizers to burners in pulverized coal combustion units will be examined. The charge imparted on coal during pulverization and transport to pulverized coal (PC) burners in a utility boiler will be quantified. In addition to field charge measurements, an existing computational model will be extended to numerically simulate charged particle motion in a turbulent gas through an electric field. Results from the field tests and numerical modeling will be employed in design and construction of a laboratory scale pulverizer/classifier. This laboratory unit will be used to quantify the magnitude and differential charge imparted on bituminous and subbituminous coals during pulverization and classification at temperatures and with gaseous constituents typical to utility PC units. An electrostatic separator, designed for in-line operation between pulverizers and PC boilers, will be used to clean prepulverized coals. Theoretical and experimental data are to be used in preparing a preliminary design for a full-scale, (15 ton/hr) in-line, electrostatic coal cleaning device. Finally, the economic potential for application to PC units will be assessed.

  19. Pulverization Induced Charge: In-Line Dry Coal Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Stencel

    1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of separating mineral matter and pyrite from coal as it is transported from pulverizers to burners in pulverized coal combustion units will be examined. The charge imparted on coal during pulverization and transport to pulverized coal (PC) burners in a utility boiler will be quantified. In addition to field charge measurements, an existing computational model will be extended to numerically simulate charged particle motion in a turbulent gas through an electric field. Results from the field tests and numerical modeling will be employed in design and construction of a laboratory scale pulverizer/classifier. This laboratory unit will be used to quantify the magnitude and differential charge imparted on bituminous and subbituminous coals during pulverization and classification at temperatures and with gaseous constituents typical to utility PC units. An electrostatic separator, designed for in-line operation between pulverizers and PC boilers, will be used to clean prepulverized coals. Theoretical and experimental data are to be used in preparing a preliminary design for a full-scale, (15 ton/hr) in-line, electrostatic coal cleaning device. Finally, the economic potential for application to PC units will be assessed.

  20. Radiation Bursts from Particles in the Field of Compact, Impenetrable, Astrophysical Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Papini; G. Scarpetta; V. Bozza; A. Feoli; G. Lambiase

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by charged, scalar particles in a Schwarzschild field with maximal acceleration corrections is calculated classically and in the tree approximation of quantum field theory. In both instances the particles emit radiation that has characteristics similar to those of gamma-ray bursters.

  1. Electronic Surface Structures of Coal and Mineral Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.K. Mazumder; D.A. Lindquist; K.B. Tennal; Steve Trigwell; Steve Farmer; Albert Nutsukpul; Alex Biris

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface science studies related to tribocharging and charge separation studies were performed on electrostatic beneficiation of coal. In contrast to other cleaning methods, electrostatic beneficiation is a dry cleaning process requiring no water or subsequent drying. Despite these advantages, there is still uncertainty in implementing large scale commercial electrostatic beneficiation of coal. The electronic surface states of coal macerals and minerals are difficult to describe due to their chemical complexity and variability [1]. The efficiency in separation of mineral particles from organic macerals depends upon these surface states. Therefore, to further understand and determine a reason for the bipolar charging observed in coal separation, surface analysis studies using Ultra-violet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on coal samples and several materials that are used or considered for use in tribocharging. Electrostatic charging is a surface phenomenon, so the electronic surface states of the particles, which are influenced by the environmental conditions, determine both polarity and magnitude of tribocharging. UPS was used to measure the work function of the materials as typically used in ambient air. XPS was used to determine the surface chemistry in the form of contamination and degree of oxidation under the same environmental conditions. Mineral bearing coals are those amenable to electrostatic beneficiation. Three types of coal, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Kentucky No. 9 were investigated in this study. Pulverized coal powder was tribocharged against copper. Pyritic and other ashes forming minerals in coal powders should charge with a negative polarity from triboelectrification, and organic macerals should acquire positive charge, according to the relative differences in the surface work functions between the material being charged and the charging medium. Different types of minerals exhibit different magnitudes of negative charge and some may also charge positively against copper [2]. Only the mineral sulfur fraction of the total sulfur content is accessible by the electrostatic method since organic sulfur is covalently bound with carbon in macerals. The sizes of mineral constituents in coal range from about 0.1 to 100 {micro}m, but pyrites in many coals are on the lower end of this scale necessitating fine grinding for their liberation and separation. A ready explanation for coal powder macerals to charge positively by triboelectrification is found in the large numbers of surface carbon free radicals available to release electrons to form aromatic carbocations. There is evidence that these cationic charges are delocalized over several atoms [3]. Only perhaps one in one hundred thousand of the surface atoms is charged during triboelectrification [4], making it difficult to predict charging levels since the data depends upon the surface chemical species involved in charging. Based on the high electron affinity of oxygen atoms, oxidation is expected to decrease the extent of a coal particle to charge positively. Also, ion transfer may contribute to the increasingly negative charging character of oxidized coal carbons. A variety of oxidized surface functional groups may influence charge properties. For example, carboxylic acid functions can lose protons to form carboxylate anions. The samples of coal investigated in this study showed differing degrees of beneficiation, consistent with a more extensively oxidized Illinois No. 6 coal sample relative to that of Pittsburgh No. 8. Even though oxygen in air is deleterious to coal stored prior to beneficiation, other gases might favorably influence charge properties. To this end, coal exposed to vapors of acetone, ammonia, and sulfur dioxide also were beneficiated and analyzed in this study.

  2. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel John (Albuquerque, NM); Walton, Christopher (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James (Livermore, CA)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  3. Simulation of particle agglomeration using dissipative particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokkapati, Srinivas Praveen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Attachment of particles to one another due to action of certain inter-particle forces is called as particle agglomeration. It has applications ranging from efficient capture of ultra-fine particles generated in coal-burning boilers to effective...

  4. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Barao; M. Aguilar-Benitez; L. Arruda; B. Baret; A. Barrau; G. Barreira; E. Belmont; J. Berdugo; J. Borges; M. Buenerd; D. Casadei; J. Casaus; E. Cortina; M. Costado; D. Crespo; C. Delgado; C. Diaz; L. Derome; P. Goncalves; R. Garcia-Lopez; C. de la Guia; A. Herrero; E. Lanciotti; G. Laurenti; A. Malinin; C. Mana; J. Marin; M. Mangin-Brinet; G. Martinez; A. Menchaca-Rocha; C. Palomares; R. Pereira; M. Pimenta; A. Putze; Y. Sallaz-Damaz; E. S. Seo; I. Sevilla; A. Torrento; M. Vargas-Trevino; O. Veziant

    2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.

  5. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Acconcia; A. G. Agocs; F. Barile; G. G. Barnafoldi; R. Bellwied; G. Bencedi; G. Bencze; D. Berenyi; L. Boldizsar; S. Chattopadhyay; F. Cindolo; D. D. Chinellato; S. D'Ambrosio; D. Das; K. Das; L. Das-Bose; A. K. Dash; G. De Cataldo; S. De Pasquale; D. Di Bari; A. Di Mauro; E. Futo; E. Garcia; G. Hamar; A. Harton; G. Iannone; R. T. Jimenez; D. W. Kim; J. S. Kim; A. Knospe; L. Kovacs; P. Levai; E. Nappi; C. Markert; P. Martinengo; D. Mayani; L. Molnar; L. Olah; G. Paic; C. Pastore; G. Patimo; M. E. Patino; V. Peskov; L. Pinsky; F. Piuz; S. Pochybova; I. Sgura; T. Sinha; J. Song; J. Takahashi; A. Timmins; J. B. Van Beelen; D. Varga; G. Volpe; M. Weber; L. Xaplanteris; J. Yi; I. K. Yoo

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.

  6. RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intended to recover a more significant share of fixed costs solely from solar PV customer- generators rooftop solar PV development at limited to no cost to taxpayers and non-solar utility customers. StandbyPage | i RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES: REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR

  7. RELIABILITY OF CAPACITOR CHARGING UNITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    experience little change while those using the electronic cutoff would drift due to ageing components and changing parameters. The first few shots using the electronic cutoff were less reliable than subsequentRELIABILITY OF CAPACITOR CHARGING UNITS Clint Sprott July 30, 1965 University of Wisconsin

  8. Detailed Calculation of Test-Mass Charging in the LISA Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Araujo; P. Wass; D. Shaul; G. Rochester; T. J. Sumner

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic charging of the LISA test masses due to exposure of the spacecraft to energetic particles in the space environment has implications in the design and operation of the gravitational inertial sensors and can affect the quality of the science data. Robust predictions of charging rates and associated stochastic fluctuations are therefore required for the exposure scenarios expected throughout the mission. We report on detailed charging simulations with the Geant4 toolkit, using comprehensive geometry and physics models, for Galactic cosmic-ray protons and helium nuclei. These predict positive charging rates of 50 +e/s (elementary charges per second) for solar minimum conditions, decreasing by half at solar maximum, and current fluctuations of up to 30 +e/s/Hz^{1/2}. Charging from sporadic solar events involving energetic protons was also investigated. Using an event-size distribution model, we conclude that their impact on the LISA science data is manageable. Several physical processes hitherto unexplored as potential charging mechanisms have also been assessed. Significantly, the kinetic emission of very low-energy secondary electrons due to bombardment of the inertial sensors by primary cosmic rays and their secondaries can produce charging currents comparable with the Monte Carlo rates.

  9. Scattering of infrared light by dielectric core-shell particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiessen, E; Heinisch, R L; Fehske, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the scattering of infrared light by small dielectric core-shell particles taking a sapphire sphere with a CaO core as an example. The extinction efficiency of such a particle shows two intense series of resonances attached, respectively, to in-phase and out-of-phase multipolar polarization-induced surface charges build-up, respectively, at the core-shell and the shell-vacuum interface. Both series, the character of the former may be labelled bonding and the character of the latter antibonding, give rise to anomalous scattering. For a given particle radius and filling factor the Poynting vector field shows therefore around two wave numbers the complex topology of this type of light scattering. Inside the particle the topology depends on the character of the resonance. The dissipation of energy inside the particle also reflects the core-shell structure. It depends on the resonance and shows strong spatial variations.

  10. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  11. Jet Charge with the ATLAS Detector using $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV $pp$ Collision Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Nachman

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The momentum-weighted sum of the charges of tracks associated to a jet provides an experimental handle on the electric charge of fundamental strongly-interacting particles. An overview of a study of this jet charge observable for jets produced in dijet and semileptonic $t\\bar{t}$ events using $5.8$ $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data with the ATLAS detector at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV is described here. In addition to providing a constraint on hadronization models, jet charge has many possible applications in measurements and searches. The modelling of jet charge and its performance as a charge-tagger are studied in order to establish this observable as a tool for future physics analyses.

  12. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F. [NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Tankosic, D., E-mail: Mian.M.Abbas@nasa.go [USRA/NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  13. Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge, Massachusetts 02138 Evidence has accumulated recently that a high-capacity elec- trode of a lithium-ion battery in the particle is high, possibly leading to fracture and cavitation. I. Introduction LITHIUM-ION batteries

  14. Influence of pair coherence on charge tunneling through a quantum dot connected to a superconducting lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, Tadeusz

    Influence of pair coherence on charge tunneling through a quantum dot connected the temperature below T* larger than Tc the single particle states become gradually depleted over a certain energy to a close neighborhood to the Mott insulating state, or because of competition with some other types

  15. Adsorption of Charge-Bidisperse Mixtures of Colloidal Jeffrey J. Gray and Roger T. Bonnecaze*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Adsorption of Charge-Bidisperse Mixtures of Colloidal Particles Jeffrey J. Gray and Roger T with the number of components in the system. Here, we perform simulations of the adsorption of binary mixtures%. In sequential adsorption, small amounts of the second component adsorb only for parameter combinations

  16. PPPL3173 Preprint: May 1996, UC420, 426 Design and Operation of the Pellet Charge Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL­3173 ­ Preprint: May 1996, UC­420, 426 Design and Operation of the Pellet Charge Exchange­Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D­T fusion

  17. PPPL-3173 -Preprint: May 1996, UC-420, 426 Design and Operation of the Pellet Charge Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL-3173 - Preprint: May 1996, UC-420, 426 Design and Operation of the Pellet Charge Exchange-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly

  18. Particles and Forces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amount of positive charge. How does an atom look on the inside? 1) Shooting at a bag of beans 2) Bag of equal weight but stuffed with cotton and a few small lead beads Compare the...

  19. A 900MHz RF Energy Harvesting Module TARIS Thierry, VIGNERAS Valrie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract --This paper presents a guideline to design and optimize a RF energy harvester operating in ISM-the-shelf devices. The topology of the impedance transformation block is selected to reduce the losses which sensitivity of -22.5 dBm for a dc output voltage of 200 mV up to -11 dBm for 1.08 V. A wireless power

  20. Mesoscale Phase-Field Modeling of Charge Transport in Nanocomposite Electrodes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sushko, Maria L.

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase-field model is developed to investigate the influence of microstructure, thermodynamic and kinetic properties, and charging conditions on charged particle transport in nanocomposite electrodes. Two sets of field variables are used to describe the microstructure. One is comprised of the order parameters describing size, orientation and spatial distributions of nanoparticles, and the other is comprised of the concentrations of mobile species. A porous nanoparticle microstructure filled with electrolyte is taken as a model system to test the phase-field model. Inhomogeneous and anisotropic dielectric constants and mobilities of charged particles, and stresses associated with lattice deformation due to Li-ion insertion/extraction are considered in the model. Iteration methods are used to find the elastic and electric fields in an elastically and electrically inhomogeneous medium. The results demonstrate that the model is capable of predicting charge separation associated with the formation of a double layer at the electrochemical interface between solid and electrolyte, and the effect of microstructure, inhomogeneous and anisotropic thermodynamic and kinetic properties, charge rates, and stresses on voltage versus current density and capacity during charging and discharging.

  1. AVTA: ChargePoint America Recovery Act Charging Infrastructure Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of data collected through the Chargepoint America project, which deployed 4,600 public and home charging stations throughout the U.S. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  2. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  3. Energy Dependent Growth of Nucleon and Inclusive Charged Hadron Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongmin Wang; Zhao-Yu Hou; Xian-Jing Sun

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Color Glass Condensate formalism, charged hadron p_{T} distributions in p+p collisions are studied by considering an energy-dependent broadening of nucleon's density distribution. Then, in the Glasma flux tube picture, the n-particle multiplicity distributions at different pseudo-rapidity ranges are investigated. Both of the theoretical results show good agreement with the recent experimental data from ALICE and CMS at \\sqrt{s}=0.9, 2.36, 7 TeV. The predictive results for p_{T} and multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider are also given in this paper.

  4. Particle in cell calculation of plasma force on a small grain in a non-uniform collisional sheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Ian H.

    The plasma force on grains of specified charge and height in a collisional DC plasma sheath is calculated using the multidimensional particle in cell code COPTIC. The background ion velocity distribution functions for the ...

  5. Holographic fermions in charged Gauss-Bonnet black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Pin Wu

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of the Green's functions of the fermions in charged Gauss-Bonnet black hole. What we want to do is to investigate how the presence of Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant $\\alpha$ affects the dispersion relation, which is a characteristic of Fermi or non-Fermi liquid, as well as what properties such a system has, for instance, the Particle-hole (a)symmetry. One important result of this research is that we find for $q=1$, the behavior of this system is different from that of the Landau Fermi liquid and so the system can be candidates for holographic dual of generalized non-Fermi liquids. More importantly, the behavior of this system increasingly similar to that of the Landau Fermi liquid when $\\alpha$ is approaching its lower bound. Also we find that this system possesses the Particle-hole asymmetry when $q\

  6. Nuclear Data from the LBNL Particle Data Group (PDG)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Particle Data Group is an international collaboration charged with summarizing Particle Physics, as well as related areas of Cosmology and Astrophysics. The summaries are published in even-numbered years as a book, the Review of Particle Physics, and as an abbreviated version, the Particle Physics Booklet. The Review is also published in a major journal. The Review has been called the bible of particle physics; over the years, it has been cited in tens of thousands of papers. The Review includes a compilation and evaluation of measurements of the properties of the elementary particles. Evaluations of these properties are abstracted in summary tables. Data and data applications found on the PDG website include: 1) PDG Live (Interactive tables of data and reviews from the Review of Particle Physics; 2) Hundreds of pages of summary tables from the Review; 3) Reviews, tables, and data plots grouped by subject area rather than names of particles; 4) Particle listings; and 5) Atomic and Nuclear Properties of Materials for more than 300 substances.

  7. Particle production sources at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Wolschin

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle production sources at RHIC and LHC energies are investigated in pseudorapidity space. A nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM) with three sources is applied to the analysis of charged-hadron distributions in AuAu collisions at RHIC energies, in PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy of 2.76 TeV, in pPb at 5.02 TeV, and in pp. The size of the midrapidity source relative to the fragmentation sources in heavy-ion collisions is investigated as function of the incident energy. At LHC energies, the midrapidity value is mostly determined by particle production from gluon-gluon collisions.

  8. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for non-accelerator physics . . . . . . . . . 328 ParticleColliders, accelerator physics of Coupling between matterdetectors for non-accelerator physics (Figure 29.5) . . .

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Maryland...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to become a part of the Workplace Charging Challenge. "We are delighted to be the first health care institution in Maryland to provide charging stations for our employees, staff...

  10. Methods for reduction of charging emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuecker, F.J.; Schulte, H. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most critical subjects in coking plants are charging emissions. The paper reviews the systems that have been used over the years to reduce charging emissions. The advantages and disadvantages are summarized for the following systems: Double collecting main with aspiration on both oven sides; Single collecting main with/without aspiration via standpipe, and extraction and cleaning of charging gas on charging car; Single collecting main with aspiration via standpipe and pretreatment of charging gas on the charging car as well as additional stationary exhaust and cleaning of charging gas; Single collecting main with aspiration via single standpipe; and Single collecting main with simultaneous aspiration via two standpipes and a U-tube connecting the oven chamber with the neighboring oven. The paper then briefly discusses prerequisites for reduction of charging emissions.

  11. Fast Methods for Bimolecular Charge Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    We report a Hessian-implicit optimization method to quickly solve the charge optimization problem over protein molecules: given a ligand and its complex with a receptor, determine the ligand charge distribution that minimizes ...

  12. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  13. Transport of dust particles in inductively coupled discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.H.; Ventzek, P.L.G.; Hoekstra, R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination by particulates, or ``dust``, in plasma processing reactors decreases the yield of microelectronic components. In low temperature plasmas, such as those used in etching or deposition reactors to fabricate semiconductor devices, the particles can form to appreciable densities. These particles can be trapped or expelled from the reactor, depending on which forces dominate their transport. Quantities that affect dust motion in Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) discharges are the charge of the dust particles (electrostatic forces), momentum transfer with ions (viscous ion-drag forces), temperature gradients from heated electrodes (thermophoretic forces), and gas flow (fluid drag forces). The authors have developed a 2-D Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the trajectories of dust particles in ICP reactors. The model may have an arbitrary number and variety of dust species, and different gas mixtures may be used. The self-consistent electric fields, ion energy distributions, and species densities are imported from a companion Monte Carlo-fluid hybrid model. A semi-analytic model is used to determine the dust charge as well as the momentum transfer cross sections between dust and ions. The electrode topography can also affect the trapping locations of dust. Grooves on the electrodes perturb electrical forces and heated washers can change the thermophoretic forces; hence the spatial dust density varies from the case with a smooth, nonheated electrode. These effects on particle trapping will be presented. Other factors on trapping locations, such as dust particle size and varying power flow with time, will also be discussed.

  14. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective Binding of

  15. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective Binding of2 DOE Review of

  16. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective Binding of2 DOE Review

  17. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating Wall Machine by David A.1

  18. Quarks with Integer Electric Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of the Standard Model, quarks are placed in a $(\\mathbf{3},\\mathbf{2})\\oplus (\\mathbf{3},\\bar{\\mathbf{2}})$ matter field representation of $U_{EW}(2)$. Although the quarks carry unit intrinsic electric charge in this construction, anomaly cancellation constrains the Lagrangian in such a way that the quarks' associated currents couple to the photon with the usual 2/3 and 1/3 fractional electric charge associated with conventional quarks. The resulting model is identical to the Standard Model in the $SU_C(3)$ sector: However, in the $U_{EW}(2)$ sector it is similar but not necessarily equivalent. Off hand, the model appears to be phenomenologically equivalent to the conventional quark model in the electroweak sector for experimental conditions that preclude observation of individual constituent currents. On the other hand, it is conceivable that detailed analyses for electroweak reactions may reveal discrepancies with the Standard Model in high energy and/or large momentum transfer reactions. The possibility of quarks with integer electric charge strongly suggests the notion that leptons and quarks are merely different manifestations of the same underlying field. A speculative model is proposed in which a phase transition is assumed to occur between $SU_C(3)\\otimes U_{EM}(1)$ and $U_{EM}(1)$ regimes. This immediately; explains the equality of lepton/quark generations and lepton/hadron electric charge, relates neutrino oscillations to quark flavor mixing, reduces the free parameters of the Standard Model, and renders the issue of quark confinement moot.

  19. Charging Graphene for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2004, graphene, including single atomic layer graphite sheet, and chemically derived graphene sheets, has captured the imagination of researchers for energy storage because of the extremely high surface area (2630 m2/g) compared to traditional activated carbon (typically below 1500 m2/g), excellent electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and potential for low cost manufacturing. These properties are very desirable for achieving high activity, high capacity and energy density, and fast charge and discharge. Chemically derived graphene sheets are prepared by oxidation and reduction of graphite1 and are more suitable for energy storage because they can be made in large quantities. They still contain multiply stacked graphene sheets, structural defects such as vacancies, and oxygen containing functional groups. In the literature they are also called reduced graphene oxide, or functionalized graphene sheets, but in this article they are all referred to as graphene for easy of discussion. Two important applications, batteries and electrochemical capacitors, have been widely investigated. In a battery material, the redox reaction occurs at a constant potential (voltage) and the energy is stored in the bulk. Therefore, the energy density is high (more than 100 Wh/kg), but it is difficult to rapidly charge or discharge (low power, less than 1 kW/kg)2. In an electrochemical capacitor (also called supercapacitors or ultracapacitor in the literature), the energy is stored as absorbed ionic species at the interface between the high surface area carbon and the electrolyte, and the potential is a continuous function of the state-of-charge. The charge and discharge can happen rapidly (high power, up to 10 kW/kg) but the energy density is low, less than 10 Wh/kg2. A device that can have both high energy and high power would be ideal.

  20. tt Charge asymmetry at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapelain, Antoine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status for the measurements of the ttbar charge asymmetry at the Tevatron and LHC colliders.

  1. Electrochemically controlled charging circuit for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Onstott, E.I.

    1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemically controlled charging circuit for charging storage batteries is disclosed. The embodiments disclosed utilize dc amplification of battery control current to minimize total energy expended for charging storage batteries to a preset voltage level. The circuits allow for selection of Zener diodes having a wide range of reference voltage levels. Also, the preset voltage level to which the storage batteries are charged can be varied over a wide range.

  2. INL Testing of Wireless Charging Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    investments and FOAs (Funding Opportunity Announcements) * Provide the charging, automotive, and electric utility industries with independent testing assessments and...

  3. Electrostatic charging of lunar dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walch, Bob [Department of Physics, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colorado 80639 (United States); Horanyi, Mihaly [LASP, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0392 (United States); Robertson, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391 (United States)

    1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient dust clouds suspended above the lunar surface were indicated by the horizon glow observed by the Surveyor spacecrafts and the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite Experiment (Apollo 17), for example. The theoretical models cannot fully explain these observations, but they all suggest that electrostatic charging of the lunar surface due to exposure to the solar wind plasma and UV radiation could result in levitation, transport and ejection of small grains. We report on our experimental studies of the electrostatic charging properties of an Apollo-17 soil sample and two lunar simulants MLS-1 and JSC-1. We have measured their charge after exposing individual grains to a beam of fast electrons with energies in the range of 20{<=}E{<=}90 eV. Our measurements indicate that the secondary electron emission yield of the Apollo-17 sample is intermediate between MLS-1 and JSC-1, closer to that of MLS-1. We will also discuss our plans to develop a laboratory lunar surface model, where time dependent illumination and plasma bombardment will closely emulate the conditions on the surface of the Moon.

  4. Electric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy technologies, electric vehicles and the appurtenant charging infrastructure, is explored in detail to determine regarding system load profiles, vehicle charging strategies, electric vehicle adoption rates, and storage

  5. Optimal Decentralized Protocols for Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    into the electric power grid. EV charging increases the electricity demand, and potentially amplifies the peak1 Optimal Decentralized Protocols for Electric Vehicle Charging Lingwen Gan Ufuk Topcu Steven Low Abstract--We propose decentralized algorithms for optimally scheduling electric vehicle (EV) charging

  6. A User Programmable Battery Charging System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanor-Boadu, Judy M

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    to provide the convenience of rare battery replacement and extend the periods between charges. This thesis proposes a user programmable charging system that can charge a Lithium ion battery from three different input sources, i.e. a wall outlet, a universal...

  7. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  8. Non linear particle acceleration at non-relativistic shock waves in the presence of self-generated turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Amato; Pasquale Blasi

    2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks may be very efficient if magnetic scattering is self-generated by the same particles. This nonlinear process adds to the nonlinear modification of the shock due to the dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock. Building on a previous general solution of the problem of particle acceleration with arbitrary diffusion coefficients (Amato & Blasi, 2005), we present here the first semi-analytical calculation of particle acceleration with both effects taken into account at the same time: charged particles are accelerated in the background of Alfven waves that they generate due to the streaming instability, and modify the dynamics of the plasma in the shock vicinity.

  9. Space Charge and Equilibrium Emittances in Damping Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu; Wolski, Andy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPACE CHARGE AND EQUILIBRIUM EMITTANCES IN DAMPING RINGS ?for the pos- sible impact of space charge on the equilibriumrings. INTRODUCTION Direct space charge effects have the

  10. Test particle acceleration by rotating jet magnetospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. M. Rieger; K. Mannheim

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Centrifugal acceleration of charged test particles at the base of a rotating jet magnetosphere is considered. Based on an analysis of forces we derive the equation for the radial accelerated motion and present an analytical solution. It is shown that for particles moving outwards along rotating magnetic field lines, the energy gain is in particular limited by the breakdown of the bead-on-the-wire approximation which occurs in the vicinity of the light cylinder $r_{L}$. The corresponding upper limit for the maximum Lorentz factor $\\gamma_{max}$ for electrons scales $\\propto B^{2/3} r_{L}^{2/3}$, with $B$ the magnetic field strength at $r_{L}$, and is at most of the order of a $10^2-10^3$ for the conditions regarded to be typical for BL Lac objects. Such values suggest that this mechanism may provide pre-accelerated seed particles which are required for efficient Fermi-type particle acceleration at larger scales in radio jets.

  11. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy] [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  12. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 116 (2012) Printed 29 November 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Helical Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .2) Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Helical Turbulence in Solar Flares Gregory D. Fleishman1,2,3 and Igor N, a nonzero turbulence helicity has a potentially strong effect on the particle acceleration because- rectly accelerating the charged particles in addition to the commonly considered stochastic turbulent

  13. Stationary bound states of spin-half particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Gorbatenko; V. P. Neznamov

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the possibility of existence of stationary bound states of spin-half particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem gravitational field using a self-conjugate Hamiltonian with a flat scalar product of wave functions. Bound states of Dirac particles with a real discrete energy spectrum can exist both for particles above the external "event horizon", and for particles under the internal "event horizon", or the Cauchy horizon. The Hilbert condition g_{00}>0 leads to a boundary condition such that components of the vector of current density of Dirac particles are zero near the "event horizons". Based on the results of this study, we can assume that there exists a new type of charged collapsars, for which the Hawking radiation is not present. The results of this study can lead to a revision of some concepts of the standard cosmological model related to the evolution of the universe and interaction of charged collapsars with surrounding matter.

  14. Vacuum charge fractionlization re-examined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Nogami

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of a quantized fermion field that is based on the Dirac equation in one dimensional space and re-examine how the fermion number of the vacuum, or the vacuum charge, varies when an external potential is switched on. With this model, fractionization of the vacuum charge has been illustrated in the literature by showing that the external potential can change the vacuum charge from zero to a fractional number. Charge conservation then appears violated in this process. This is because the charge that has been examined in this context is only a part of the total charge of the vacuum. The total charge is conserved. It is not fractionalized unless the Dirac equation has a zero mode. Two other confusing aspects are discussed. One is concerned with the usage of the continuum limit and the other with the regularization of the current operator. Implications of these aspects of the vacuum problem are explored.

  15. High Energy Particle Measurement using Compact Neutral Particle Energy Analyzer in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Matsubara, A.; Sato, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kalinina, D. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa, 240-0193 (Japan)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pellet charge exchange technique, which can enhance the charge exchange reaction in plasma core, is utilized. Although there is no fusion reaction in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the simulation experiment can be expected by using the ion cyclotron resonance heated plasma. We newly install CNPA (0.8-168keV, 40 channels) to obtain the high-energy particle spectra in LHD. In pellet experiments, the time resolution of 0.1 ms is equal to 5 cm spatial resolution at the pellet speed of 500 m/s. Pellet penetration depth determines the possible observable area of the energy spectra. In our experiment, the penetration depth (up to {rho}=0.2) can be obtained at 1 mm diameter pellet. The spectra in three different plasmas can be compared.

  16. Localized enhancements of energetic particles at oblique collisionless shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraschetti, Federico

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the spatial distribution of charged particles accelerated by non-relativistic oblique fast collisionless shocks using three-dimensional test-particle simulations. We find that the density of low-energy particles exhibit a localised enhancement at the shock, resembling the "spike" measured at interplanetary shocks. In contrast to previous results based on numerical solutions to the focused transport equation, we find a shock spike for any magnetic obliquity, from quasi-perpendicular to parallel. We compare the pitch-angle distribution with respect to the local magnetic field and the momentum distribution far downstream and very near the shock within the spike; our findings are compatible with predictions from the scatter-free shock drift acceleration (SDA) limit in these regions. The enhancement of low-energy particles measured by Voyager 1 at solar termination shock is comparable with our profiles. Our simulations allow for predictions of supra-thermal protons at interplanetary shocks within te...

  17. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D. [Institution PROJECT CENTER ITER, 1, Akademik Kurchatov Sq., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  18. The Emission of Electromagnetic Radiation from Charges Accelerated by Gravitational Waves and its Astrophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell Revalski; Will Rhodes; Thulsi Wickramasinghe

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide calculations and theoretical arguments supporting the emission of electromagnetic radiation from charged particles accelerated by gravitational waves (GWs). These waves have significant indirect evidence to support their existence, yet they interact weakly with ordinary matter. We show that the induced oscillations of charged particles interacting with a GW, which lead to the emission of electromagnetic radiation, will also result in wave attenuation. These ideas are supported by a small body of literature, as well as additional arguments for particle acceleration based on GW memory effects. We derive order of magnitude power calculations for various initial charge distributions accelerated by GWs. The resulting power emission is extremely small for all but very strong GWs interacting with large quantities of charge. If the results here are confirmed and supplemented, significant consequences such as attenuation of early universe GWs could result. Additionally, this effect could extend GW detection techniques into the electromagnetic regime. These explorations are worthy of study to determine the presence of such radiation, as it is extremely important to refine our theoretical framework in an era of active GW astrophysics.

  19. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, J.S. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)); Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Crandall, K.R. (AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.

  20. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connell, J.S. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crandall, K.R. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.