Sample records for targeting industrial efficiency

  1. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  2. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  3. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

  5. Benchmarks for industrial energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kumana, J.D. [Linnhoff March, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shah, J.V. [Electric Power Research Inst., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemicals and Petroleum Center

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the standards for improving energy efficiency for industries such as petroleum refining, chemicals, and glass manufacture? How can different industries in emerging markets and developing accelerate the pace of improvements? This paper discusses several case studies and experiences relating to this subject emphasizing the use of energy efficiency benchmarks. Two important benchmarks are discussed. The first is based on a track record of outstanding performers in the related industry segment; the second benchmark is based on site specific factors. Using energy use reduction targets or benchmarks, projects have been implemented in Mexico, Poland, India, Venezuela, Brazil, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Republic of South Africa and Russia. Improvements identified through these projects include a variety of recommendations. The use of oxy-fuel and electric furnaces in the glass industry in Poland; reconfiguration of process heat recovery systems for refineries in China, Malaysia, and Russia; recycling and reuse of process wastewater in Republic of South Africa; cogeneration plant in Venezuela. The paper will discuss three case studies of efforts undertaken in emerging market countries to improve energy efficiency.

  6. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009). In 2008, energy-efficient design, HVAC, refrigerationprocedures for energy- efficient design, monitoring and

  7. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial...

  8. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples include Australia’s Energy Efficiency Best Practiceenergy efficiency projects to procure enough financial benefit for individual companies. Australia’energy efficiency and renewable energy equipment instead of the standard annual rates of between 4% and Energy Futures Australia

  9. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy/GHG Taxes or Regulations Australia Denmark Energy EfficiencyAustralia has two Government programs that encourage businesses to improve their energy efficiencyAustralia has two Government programs that encourage businesses to improve their energy efficiency

  10. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    en/Energy-efficiency/Companies-and- businesses/Programme-of Western Australia, n.d. Energy Smart Business. http://profile of energy efficiency within businesses,” “enabled

  11. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric trains, low emission vehicles, energy-efficient textile manufacturing equipment, solar power systems,

  12. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey of opportunities for energy-efficiency improvement, company energy plans, monitoring and energy management

  13. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey of opportunities for energy-efficiency improvement, company energy plans, monitoring and energy management

  14. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incentives for Business Investments in Energy Conservation and Renewableincentives for adoption of energy efficiency and renewable

  15. Industrial energy efficiency policy in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

  16. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemicals, light industry (iron foundries, cold storage andindustry ? Use of CHP ? Debottlenecking ? Increased production capacity ? Better use of production capacity ? Energy management Cold storage

  17. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry (iron foundries, cold storage and refrigeration,Energy management Cold storage and refrigeration ? Newelectric power; heat/cold storage; heat pumps using ambient

  18. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy monitoring system Paper and Paperboard industry ? Integrated energy management system ?monitoring was handled by “accredited organizations that certify the energy management systems” (

  19. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concluded that the business energy and CO 2 taxes created aIncentives for Business Investments in Energy Conservationia/business/industry/ES_Petroleum_Energy_Guide.pdf Galitsky,

  20. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. London: DEFRA.Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Setting Penaltiesthe European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and a lack of

  1. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20april%202006.pdf ETSU, 1999. Industrial Sector CarbonSee discussion of this report in ETSU, AEA Technology, 2001.a report prepared by ETSU (now AEA Energy & Environment) on

  2. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to provide training and energy audits and to help industrial1997 to end of March - Energy audits have allow to avoidagrees to undertake an energy audit, develop a management

  3. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Affairs (DEFRA), 2005. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. http://targets through the UK Emissions Trading Scheme. 6 Table 1is to be adjusted for emissions trading. The reports must be

  4. Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund incentive is available for companies that create high wage jobs in targeted high value-added industries. The incentive refunds up to $3,000 per new full...

  5. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  6. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to Industrial

  7. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry Ernst

  8. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for200 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”

  9. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,”Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry Ernst

  10. Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to Industrial Energy

  11. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRYBarriers to IndustrialEnergy

  12. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

  13. Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  14. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , Nadel, S. , 2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient IndustrialThorne, J. , 1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies andand Policy Implications of Energy and Material Efficiency

  15. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , Nadel, S. , 2000. “Emerging Energy-Efficient IndustrialThorne, J. , 1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies andand Policy Implications of Energy and Material Efficiency

  16. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorne, J. , 1998. “Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies andand Policy Implications of Energy and Material EfficiencyD. Ed. 1999. “Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies:

  17. Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs These presentations from ATK Aerospace Systems,...

  18. Energy Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dr. Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency LiveChat Wed, 1116, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency VIDEO: Who Was the Better Inventor, Tesla or Edison?...

  19. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs: Development and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.; Elliot, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As more states establish Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS), goals for energy efficiency savings are increasing across the country. Increasingly, states are relying on their industrial energy efficiency programs to find and help implement...

  20. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs: Development and Trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.; Elliot, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As more states establish Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS), goals for energy efficiency savings are increasing across the country. Increasingly, states are relying on their industrial energy efficiency programs ...

  1. Energy Efficiency and Pollution Prevention: Industrial Efficiency Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, M.; Elliott, R. N.

    . Beginning in the late 1980s, some in the industrial energy efficiency arena recognized that significant energy savings could be realized from P2 programs. Notable program examples are EPRI's (Electric Power Research Institute)2 Partnership... for Industrial Competitiveness program, and DOE's Industrial Assessment Center (lAC) program. EPRI's Partnership for Industrial Competitiveness (EPIC) program focuses on maximizing energy efficiency, pollution prevention and industrial competitiveness...

  2. Unitil- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Unitil offers three different programs for its commercial, industrial, and institutional customers in New Hampshire: the Small Business Energy Efficiency Services Program, the Large Business...

  3. Industrial and Process Efficiency Performance Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers the Industrial and Process Efficiency (IPE) Program to provide performance-based incentives to manufacturers and data...

  4. Energy Efficiency Fund (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, rebates are available for commercial, industrial or municipal customers of Connecticut Natural Gas Corporation, Southern Connecticut Gas Company, or...

  5. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  6. Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical “static” design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design...

  7. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

  8. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; Mc Donald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, T. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second volume of a two volume report on energy efficient industrialized housing. Volume II contains support documentation for Volume I. The following items are included: individual trip reports; software bibliography; industry contacts in the US, Denmark, and Japan; Cost comparison of industrialized housing in the US and Denmark; draft of the final report on the systems analysis for Fleetwood Mobile Home Manufacturers. (SM)

  9. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse hybridmembranesystemsfa...

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies

  11. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes three documents: Multiyear Research Plan, Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports, and Volume II Appendices. These documents describe tasks that were undertaken from November 1988 to December 1989, the first year of the project. Those tasks were: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. While this document summarizes information developed in each task area, it doesn't review task by task, as Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports does, but rather treats the subject of energy efficient industrialized housing as a whole to give the reader a more coherent view. 7 figs., 9 refs.

  12. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold Storage Facilities. ? Proceedings of the 2005 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy efficiency in Industry,

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

  14. Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

  15. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorne, Jennifer

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges. We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologies are characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics and environmental performance. This paper provides an overview of the results, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, and neither will we in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costs compared to current technologies.

  16. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  17. ConEd (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate and Commercial and Industrial Custom Efficiency Programs offer incentives to directly metered electric customers in good standing who contribute to...

  18. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six area reported progress in the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program during FY 1991. As part of Industry Guidance, meetings were held with steering and technical committees in computers, housing design and manufacturing. This task area enables the program to benefit from the expertise of industry representatives and communicate research results directly to them. As part of the Design Process performance specifications were being developed for the future housing system designed last year. These house designs coordinate and optimize predicted and desirable advances in computerized design processes, materials, components, and manufacturing automation to achieve energy efficiency at reduced first cost. Energy design software were being developed for CAD systems, stressed skin insulating core panel manufacturers; and a prototype energy sales tool. A prototype design was to be developed to integrate one or more subsystems with the building skin. As part of the Manufacturing Process we are developing a manufacturing process simulation and data base to help current and new entrants to the industrialized housing industry in assessing the impact of implementing new manufacturing techniques. For Evaluation we are developing testing plans for six units of housing on the UO campus and the stressed skin insulating core house to be constructed in Oregon. The DOW Chemical test structure will be retrofitted with a tile roof and retested to compare to the dome and conventional construction structures. Calibration of the wind tunnel will be completed so that laboratory tests can be conducted to simulate the ventilation cooling efficiency of houses in design. Research utilization and program management were either aspects of this program.

  19. Duke Energy- Small Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy encourages its business customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities through the Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program. The equipment rebates...

  20. Laclede Gas Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial and Industrial customers can receive rebates for various energy efficiency measures. Customers implementing specified efficiency measures can receive prescriptive rebates. All other...

  1. Entergy Arkansas- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Entergy Arkansas has several programs to help commercial and industrial customers increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities.

  2. Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projectsof Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power ProjectsOf Industrial Energy-Efficiency And Electric Power Projects

  3. Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliott, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For this study, we identified about 175 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of which we characterized 54 in detail. While many profiles of individual emerging technologies are available, few reports have attempted to impose a standardized approach to the evaluation of the technologies. This study provides a way to review technologies in an independent manner, based on information on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market barriers, likelihood of success, and suggested next steps to accelerate deployment of each of the analyzed technologies. There are many interesting lessons to be learned from further investigation of technologies identified in our preliminary screening analysis. The detailed assessments of the 54 technologies are useful to evaluate claims made by developers, as well as to evaluate market potentials for the United States or specific regions. In this report we show that many new technologies are ready to enter the market place, or are currently under development, demonstrating that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The study shows that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity. Several technologies have reduced capital costs compared to the current technology used by those industries. Non-energy benefits such as these are frequently a motivating factor in bringing technologies such as these to market. Further evaluation of the profiled technologies is still needed. In particular, further quantifying the non-energy benefits based on the experience from technology users in the field is important. Interactive effects and inter-technology competition have not been accounted for and ideally should be included in any type of integrated technology scenario, for it may help to better evaluate market opportunities.

  4. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

  5. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    linkage between energy efficiency and productivity. Energyand increased energy efficiency in integrated paper andand Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1997.

  6. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the linkage between energy efficiency and productivity.and increased energy efficiency in integrated paper andand Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1997.

  7. Empire District Electric- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire District Electric Company offers rebates to certain commercial and industrial customers for the installation of energy efficiency equipment. Prescriptive rebates for lighting, air...

  8. DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and will serve as a roadmap for industrial facilities to help continually improve their efficiency and maintain...

  9. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency- Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these...

  10. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency- Report to Congress, June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome...

  11. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers the Demand and Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to eligible commercial, industrial, and municipal government customers served by OMPA. This...

  12. Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.orgfileadminusermediaPublicationsPubfreeUNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and...

  13. Progress Energy Carolinas- Commercial and Industrial Energy-Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Progress Energy provides rebates for energy efficiency measures in new construction or retrofits, as well as Technical Assistance for feasibility/energy studies to commercial, industrial and...

  14. CEMI Industrial Efficiency (text version) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video. Well Legrand is a small to medium sized manufacturer. We make electronic products for power, light, and data in the...

  15. Industrial Energy Efficiency in Ukraine: The Business Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, M.

    Ukraine is full of profitable opportunities for energy efficiency. Industry accounts for many of these opportunities because of its high level of energy consumption and its ability to pay for energy efficiency measures in hard currency. This paper...

  16. Application of Industrial Heat Improving energy efficiency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    compared with Residential Heat Pumps High energy efficiency = high coefficient of performance (COP) (eApplication of Industrial Heat Pumps Improving energy ­ efficiency of industrial processes . H.J. Laue Information Centre on Heat Pumps and Refrigeration IZW e.V. #12;2 Welcome Achema Congress 2012

  17. Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

    Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce Daniel Trombley Engineering Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director of Research American Council for an Energy-Efficient... of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program...

  18. STATEWIDE ENERGY EFFICIENCY POTENTIAL ESTIMATES AND TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rates of forecasted natural gas consumption, electricity consumption and peak electricity demand potential for electric consumption savings, 85 percent of the economic potential for peak demand savings Energy efficiency, energy savings, demand reduction, electricity consumption, natural gas consumption

  19. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  20. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

  1. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microturbines: What is a Microturbine? ” OIT’s Industrial1999c. Summary of the Microturbine Technology Summit:s Emerging Companies; Microturbine Firm Hopes IPO Generates

  2. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of IndustrialLaboratory. Burlington, MA: Office of Energy Efficiencyand Renewable Energy. (Food-4) (Motorsys-8) (Overview)

  3. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO 9000/14000 quality and environmental management systems,industrial quality and environmental management systems suchISO 9000/14000 quality and environmental management systems,

  4. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  5. Energy Efficiency and Pollution Prevention: Industrial Efficiency Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, M.; Elliott, R. N.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    successfully combined energy efficiency and pollution prevention technologies and strategies to enhance the environment, productivity and the bottom line....

  6. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,WBCSD), Geneva, Switzerland. IEA (1997) Voluntary actions

  7. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recycled glass cullet Black liquor gasification CondebeltBeam Sterilization Black liquor gasification Efficient cellSensors and controls Black liquor gasification Near net

  8. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and energy awareness in Botswana; ESI,awareness and training was the most frequently identified opportunity for improved energy

  9. Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.

    Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were...

  10. Empire District Electric- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers a Commercial/Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program to its non-residential customers in Arkansas who purchase certain high-efficiency equipment for...

  11. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  12. Measuring Energy Efficiency Improvements in Industrial Battery Chargers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matley, R.

    Measuring Energy Efficiency Improvements in Industrial Battery Chargers Ryan Matley, Sr. Program Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, CA ABSTRACT Industrial battery chargers have provided the energy requirements... to 100 GWh per year. There are three areas of energy losses in the battery and charger system: ? Power Conversion Efficiency (energy out of charger vs. energy into charger) ? Charge Return (energy out of battery vs. energy into battery): some...

  13. Energy Efficiency in the Microelectronics Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatti, B.

    is utilized to meet the current and future objectives. In the Microelectronics Industry the use of Electricity far outweighs any other utility usage viz. Water, Natural Gas by at least a three to one ratio on a cost basis. Starting with a typical 100,000 S...

  14. NYSEG (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficiency equipment that pay a natural gas Systems Benefits Charge (SBC). Both prescriptive rebates and custom...

  15. NYSEG (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  16. Automating efficiency-targeted approximations in modelling and simulation tools: dynamic decoupling and mixed-mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    Automating efficiency-targeted approximations in modelling and simulation tools: dynamic decoupling (classical) efficiency-targeted approximation tech- niques, within a unified framework. Some application

  17. Cash Flow Impacts of Industrial Steam Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    of thermal transfer tasks within the majority of manufacturing industries, it is widely perceived as a "support" utility. In other words, steam is considered a power source subordinate to process lines that are the real focus of manufacturing activity... be directed to productive functions, enabling the plant to extend production runs or perhaps even begin new product lines. RETURN ON INVESTMENT Global competition and decentralized corporate structures provide formidable challenges for manufacturing...

  18. External research and energy efficiency in the process industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaarsberg, T.M.; Foust, T.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process industries in the US are under enormous pressure. These industries, even more than US industry on average, face skyrocketing environmental costs, a rapidly changing electricity market, potential climate change policies, aging infrastructure and strong international competition. To be profitable they must reduce their costs and environmental impacts while increasing their product quality, turnaround time, productivity and output. Most of these industries have already cut costs and labor as much as possible. Therefore, to survive, these industries must innovate. History shows that industries that are the most innovative are the most successful. These industries are vital to the US economy. For example, the metals, pulp and paper, chemicals and the petroleum refining industries account for more than $800 billion in products shipped and employ more than three million workers. Although the US has shifted dramatically toward services with 77% of workers and 74% of GDP now in the service sector, what many have missed is that the process industries are important customers for many of these new services. ServOnly the last two years of NSF industrial R and D data provide any breakout of non-manufacturing R and D. This paper discusses the past, current and possible future role of eternal research and development (R and D)--much of which is now in the service sector--in fostering innovation and thus energy efficiency in these industries. The authors suggest that these industries are more innovative than previously thought because of external research.

  19. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  20. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  1. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Brewery Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, E.; Galitsky, C.; Martin, N.

    Breweries in the United States spend annually over $200 Million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 3-8% of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy...

  2. U.S. Energy Department, Pay-Television Industry and Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - developed through a non-regulatory agreement between the pay-TV industry, the consumer electronics industry and energy efficiency advocates - will improve set-top box efficiency...

  3. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, E.; Martin, N.; Price, L.; Ruth, M.; Elliott, N.; Shipley, A.; Thorn, J.

    Efficient cell retrofit designs Alum-2 aluminum 46 Process Integration (pinch analysis) Other-4 cross-cuning 38 Autothermal reforming-Ammonia Chem-7 chemicals 37 Condebelt drying Paper-2 pulp and paper 34 Electron Beam Sterilization Food-l food... processing 34 Inert AnodeslWetted Cathodes Alum-4 aluminum 34 Electricity is a unique energy source, with a large infrastructure supporting its generation and delivery and significant emissions. Many, including electric utilities, will fmd it important...

  4. Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHome Energy ScoreITIndustrial Energy Efficiency

  5. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  6. Industrial Energy Auditing: An Opportunity for Improving Energy Efficiency and Industrial Competitiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, C.

    /Process Changes Buildings and Grounds Non-Energy Related Cost Savings Alternate Fuels The University City Science Center examines and critiques every audit report generated by the EADCs to ensure high quality work. They also periodically accompany the EADC...INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AUDITING: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPETITIVENESS CHARLES GLASER, PROGRAM MANAGER, IMPLEMENTATION AND DEPLOYMENT DIVISION OFFICE OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  7. Con Edison Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pospisil, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Con Edison Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Discussion Overview ? Benefits, Eligibility & Team Members ? Program Components ? Project Incentives & Energy Studies ? Additional Program Attributes, Tools & Resources... and Sub-metering ? PlaNYC - Green House Gas Emissions 4 5 Customer Eligibility ? Con Edison directly metered Commercial or Industrial customer in an existing building who pays the applicable gas or electric System Benefits Charge The Program Team...

  8. Promoting Energy Efficiency in Industry: Utility Roles and Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, D. R.; Davis, T. D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    successful utility marketing puget Sound Power and Light programs related to commercial/industrial end (Puget Power) -- The most flex use efficiency are: ible rebate program offered. Commercial/industrial customers ? Customer Education may submit... proposals and engineering designs for a rebate Pacific Gas and Electric Company up to $100,000. Utility (PG&E) -- Technical briefs of engineers also help with drawing new, emerging technologies. up bid specifications. Energy consumption monitoring...

  9. Foundations for Efficiency: Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Structures in the U.S. and Canada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Taylor, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial energy efficiency programs at the state and provincial level in the U.S. and Canada have years of experience developing and supervising energy savings delivery systems under contract or regulatory frameworks using a variety of different...

  10. Foundations for Efficiency: Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Structures in the U.S. and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Taylor, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial energy efficiency programs at the state and provincial level in the U.S. and Canada have years of experience developing and supervising energy savings delivery systems under contract or regulatory frameworks using a variety of different...

  11. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance:to improve their energy efficiency- as evidenced by the 98%the renewed interest in energy efficiency worldwide and the

  12. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. “Potentials for Energy Efficiency Improvement in theOpportunities to Improve Energy Efficiency in the U.S. PulpBenefits of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Energy

  13. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Industry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Savings. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

  14. Energy Matters: An invitation to Chat About Industrial Efficiency

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Do you have questions or ideas about how the U.S. Department of Energy can contribute to global competitiveness through industrial efficiency? Dr. Kathleen Hogan would like to hear them. Submit your questions via: Email ( newmedia@hq.doe.gov ) Twitter ( @Energy ) Facebook ( Facebook.com/Energygov ) **LIVE CHAT IS EXPIRED**

  15. Energy Matters: An invitation to Chat About Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do you have questions or ideas about how the U.S. Department of Energy can contribute to global competitiveness through industrial efficiency? Dr. Kathleen Hogan would like to hear them. Submit your questions via: Email ( newmedia@hq.doe.gov ) Twitter ( @Energy ) Facebook ( Facebook.com/Energygov ) **LIVE CHAT IS EXPIRED**

  16. Gas Turbines Increase the Energy Efficiency of Industrial Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banchik, I. N.; Bohannan, W. R.; Stork, K.; McGovern, L. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a well known fact that the gas turbine in a combined cycle has a higher inherent Carnot efficiency than the steam cycle which has been more generally accepted by industry. Unlike steam turbines, gas turbines do not require large boiler feed...

  17. Industrial Attitudes to Petroleum Prices: Policies and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Langer, T.; Black, S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contracts. When it became apparent that gas prices were no longer going to be in the vicinity of $2/Mbtu for the foreseeable future, industry began to seriously invest once again in energy efficiency. A 2003 study by ACEEE found that a modest 5% decrease...

  18. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  19. Occupational safety regulation and economic efficiency: the railroad industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, M.T.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a cost-benefit model for the railroad industry to estimate the efficient level of disabling injuries across class 1 carriers. The neoclassical cost function and the hedonic wage function serve as the estimating equations for the cost and benefit estimation, respectively. The cost function is fitted to a sample of thirty-five class 1 railroads in 1980. The hedonic wage function is fitted to a sample of 481 railroad industry employees for the same year. The efficient level of 1980 disabling injuries for each railroad is determined by setting the marginal cost (MC) of injury reduction equal to its marginal benefit (MB). In addition, the cost savings accruing to efficient regulatory reform are calculated for each firm as well as the entire industry. A second-best cost-minimizing regulatory policy is also introduced. The cost-minimizing level of injuries and resulting cost savings for individual firms and the total industry are estimated. The results support the prior hypothesis that MC exceeds MB for the vast majority of firms. Substantial cost savings are possible under reformed regulatory policy.

  20. Design for energy efficiency: Energy efficient industrialized housing research program. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellett, R.; Berg, R.; Paz, A.; Brown, G.Z.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy has sponsored the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing research program (EEIH) to improve the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers share responsibility for this program: The Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. Additional funding is provided through the participation of private industry, state governments and utilities. The program is guided by a steering committee comprised of industry and government representatives. This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 activities and progress, and proposed activities for FY 1991 in Task 2.1 Design for Energy Efficiency. This task establishes a vision of energy conservation opportunities in critical regions, market segments, climate zones and manufacturing strategies significant to industrialized housing in the 21st Century. In early FY 1990, four problem statements were developed to define future housing demand scenarios inclusive of issues of energy efficiency, housing design and manufacturing. Literature surveys were completed to assess seven areas of influence for industrialized housing and energy conservation in the future. Fifty-five future trends were identified in computing and design process; manufacturing process; construction materials, components and systems; energy and environment; demographic context; economic context; and planning policy and regulatory context.

  1. Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Company (AOG)- Commerial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AOG programs are available to all commercial and industrial AOG customers in Arkansas. The Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive program offers rebates for the installation of energy efficie...

  2. Energy efficiency opportunities in China. Industrial equipment and small cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick glance at comparative statistics on energy consumption per unit of industrial output reveals that China is one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. Energy waste not only impedes economic growth, but also creates pollution that threatens human health, regional ecosystems, and the global climate. China`s decision to pursue economic reform and encourage technology transfer from developed countries has created a window of opportunity for significant advances in energy efficiency. Policy changes, technical training, public education, and financing can help China realize its energy conservation potential.

  3. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector consumes nearly 40% of annual global primary energy use and is responsible for a similar share of global energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Many studies and actual experience indicate that there is considerable potential to reduce the amount of energy used to manufacture most commodities, concurrently reducing CO2 emissions. With the support of strong policies and programs, energy-efficient technologies and measures can be implemented that will reduce global CO2 emissions. A number of countries, including the Netherlands, the UK, and China, have experience implementing aggressive programs to improve energy efficiency and reduce related CO2 emissions from industry. Even so, there is no silver bullet and all options must be pursued if greenhouse gas emissions are to be constrained to the level required to avoid significant negative impacts from global climate change.

  4. Haiti: energy efficiency in the sugar and manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streicher, A.

    1985-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of energy use in Haiti, aimed at identifying possible projects to complement current A.I.D. support for institution building and energy planning within the Ministry of Mines and Energy Resources (MMRE), is presented. Key findings are that: (1) the sugar and manufacturing industries rely heavily on biomass fuels - wood, charcoal, and bagasse (sugar cane residue); and (2) demand for commercial energy and for electricity is growing rapidly despite supply constraints. The report calls for A.I.D. to: initiate a program to reduce biomass consumption (which is causing severe soil erosion and deforestation), especially in the small distilleries called guildives; collaborate with MMRE and the World Bank to develop a detailed workplan to promote energy efficiency in the guildives, focusing on technology development; help MMRE and the private sector to project Haiti's industrial energy and electricity needs through the year 2000; and sponsor a program of energy audits and efficiency improvements in the manufacturing sector.

  5. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program. Annual report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six area reported progress in the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program during FY 1991. As part of Industry Guidance, meetings were held with steering and technical committees in computers, housing design and manufacturing. This task area enables the program to benefit from the expertise of industry representatives and communicate research results directly to them. As part of the Design Process performance specifications were being developed for the future housing system designed last year. These house designs coordinate and optimize predicted and desirable advances in computerized design processes, materials, components, and manufacturing automation to achieve energy efficiency at reduced first cost. Energy design software were being developed for CAD systems, stressed skin insulating core panel manufacturers; and a prototype energy sales tool. A prototype design was to be developed to integrate one or more subsystems with the building skin. As part of the Manufacturing Process we are developing a manufacturing process simulation and data base to help current and new entrants to the industrialized housing industry in assessing the impact of implementing new manufacturing techniques. For Evaluation we are developing testing plans for six units of housing on the UO campus and the stressed skin insulating core house to be constructed in Oregon. The DOW Chemical test structure will be retrofitted with a tile roof and retested to compare to the dome and conventional construction structures. Calibration of the wind tunnel will be completed so that laboratory tests can be conducted to simulate the ventilation cooling efficiency of houses in design. Research utilization and program management were either aspects of this program.

  6. Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"DepartmentToward Targets of EfficientModel

  7. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Improve Motor System Efficiency with MotorMaster+, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program MotorMaster+ software tool aids industrial plants with finding energy-efficient motor replacement options and managing motor systems.

  9. AMO Industry Day Workshop, February 25th, Targets Smart Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis AMO will host an Industry Day workshop to explain the concept, vision, and technology needs associated with support for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute...

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry is for process cooling, freezing, and cold storage.Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings of the 2005 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry,industry. Unit processes such as pasteurization, homogenization, and cold storage

  11. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  12. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  13. Cross-Sector Impact Analysis of Industrial Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); CreskoEngineering, Joe [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern University, Evanston] [Northwestern University, Evanston; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial or manufacturing sector is a foundational component to all economic activity. In addition to being a large direct consumer of energy, the manufacturing sector also produces materials, products, and technologies that influence the energy use of other economic sectors. For example, the manufacturing of a lighter-weight vehicle component affects the energy required to ship that component as well as the fuel efficiency of the assembled vehicle. Many energy efficiency opportunities exist to improve manufacturing energy consumption, however comparisons of manufacturing sector energy efficiency investment opportunities tend to exclude any impacts that occur once the product leaves the factory. Expanding the scope of analysis to include energy impacts across different stages of product life-cycle can highlight less obvious opportunities and inform actions that create the greatest economy-wide benefits. We present a methodology and associated analysis tool (LIGHTEnUP Lifecycle Industry GHgas, Technology and Energy through the Use Phase) that aims to capture both the manufacturing sector energy consumption and product life-cycle energy consumption implications of manufacturing innovation measures. The tool architecture incorporates U.S. national energy use data associated with manufacturing, building operations, and transportation. Inputs for technology assessment, both direct energy saving to the manufacturing sector, and indirect energy impacts to additional sectors are estimated through extensive literature review and engineering methods. The result is a transparent and uniform system of comparing manufacturing and use-phase impacts of technologies.

  14. Nanocoatings for High-Efficiency Industrial Hydraulic and Tooling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton B. Higdon III

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial manufacturing in the U.S. accounts for roughly one third of the 98 quadrillion Btu total energy consumption. Motor system losses amount to 1.3 quadrillion Btu, which represents the largest proportional loss of any end-use category, while pumps alone represent over 574 trillion BTU (TBTU) of energy loss each year. The efficiency of machines with moving components is a function of the amount of energy lost to heat because of friction between contacting surfaces. The friction between these interfaces also contributes to downtime and the loss of productivity through component wear and subsequent repair. The production of new replacement parts requires additional energy. Among efforts to reduce energy losses, wear-resistant, low-friction coatings on rotating and sliding components offer a promising approach that is fully compatible with existing equipment and processes. In addition to lubrication, one of the most desirable solutions is to apply a protective coating or surface treatment to rotating or sliding components to reduce their friction coefficients, thereby leading to reduced wear. Historically, a number of materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), titanium nitride (TiN), titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), and tungsten carbide (WC) have been examined as tribological coatings. The primary objective of this project was the development of a variety of thin film nanocoatings, derived from the AlMgB14 system, with a focus on reducing wear and friction in both industrial hydraulics and cutting tool applications. Proof-of-concept studies leading up to this project had shown that the constituent phases, AlMgB14 and TiB2, were capable of producing low-friction coatings by pulsed laser deposition. These coatings combine high hardness with a low friction coefficient, and were shown to substantially reduce wear in laboratory tribology tests. Selection of the two applications was based largely on the concept of improved mechanical interface efficiencies for energy conservation. In mobile hydraulic systems, efficiency gains through low friction would translate into improved fuel economy and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Stationary hydraulic systems, accordingly, would consume less electrical power. Reduced tooling wear in machining operations would translate to greater operating yields, while lowering the energy consumed during processing. The AlMgB14 nanocoatings technology progressed beyond baseline laboratory tests into measurable energy savings and enhancements to product durability. Three key hydraulic markets were identified over the course of the project that will benefit from implementation: industrial vane pumps, orbiting valve-in-star hydraulic motors, and variable displacement piston pumps. In the vane pump application, the overall product efficiency was improved by as much as 11%. Similar results were observed with the hydraulic motors tested, where efficiency gains of over 10% were noted. For variable displacement piston pumps, overall efficiency was improved by 5%. For cutting tools, the most significant gains in productivity (and, accordingly, the efficiency of the machining process as a whole) were associated with the roughing and finishing of titanium components for aerospace systems. Use of the AlMgB14 nanocoating in customer field tests has shown that the coated tools were able to withstand machining rates as high as 500sfm (limited only by the substrate material), with relatively low flank wear when compared to other industrial offerings. AlMgB14 coated tools exhibited a 60% improvement over similarly applied TiAlN thin films. Furthermore, AlMgB14-based coatings in these particular tests lasted twice as long than their TiAlN counterparts at the 500sfm feed rates. Full implementation of the technology into the industrial hydraulic and cutting tool markets equates to a worldwide energy savings of 46 trillion BTU/year by 2030. U.S.-based GHG emissions associated with the markets identified would fall accordingly, dropping by as much as 50,000 tonnes annually.

  15. India's pulp and paper industry: Productivity and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's pulp and paper sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both statistical and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that productivity declined over the observed period from 1973-74 to 1993-94 by 1.1% p.a. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's pulp and paper sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protection afforded by high tariffs on imported paper products and other policies, which allowed inefficient, small plants to enter the market and flourish. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with liberalization of the sector, and tighter environmental controls, the industry is moving towards higher efficiency and productivity. However, the analysis also shows that because these improvements are being hampered by significant financial and other barriers the industry might have a long way to go.

  16. Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of the Chinese economy over the past two decades has led to significant growth in China's energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 1980 and 2000, China's energy consumption more than doubled from 602 million to 1.3 billion tons of coal-equivalent (NBS, 2003). In 2000, China's GHG emissions were about 12% of the global total, ranked second behind only the US. According to the latest national development plan issued by the Chinese government, China's energy demand is likely to double again by 2020 (DRC, 2004), based on a quadrupling of its gross domestic product (GDP). The objectives of the national development plan imply that China needs to significantly raise the energy efficiency of its economy, i.e., cutting the energy intensity of its economy by half. Such goals are extremely ambitious, but not infeasible. China has achieved such reductions in the past, and its current overall level of energy efficiency remains far behind those observed in other developed economies. However, challenges remain whether China can put together an appropriate policy framework and the institutions needed to improve the energy efficiency of its economy under a more market-based economy today. Shanghai, located at the heart of the Yangtze River Delta, is the most dynamic economic and financial center in the booming Chinese economy. With 1% of Chinese population (13 million inhabitants), its GDP in 2000 stood at 455 billion RMB yuan (5% of the national total), with an annual growth rate of 12%--much higher than the national average. It is a major destination for foreign as well as Chinese domestic investment. In 2003, Shanghai absorbed 10% of actual foreign investment in all China (''Economist'', January 17-23, 2004). Construction in Shanghai continues at a breakneck pace, with an annual addition of approximately 200 million square foot of residential property and 100 million square foot of commercial and industrial space over the last 5 years. It is one reason that China consumed over 60% of the world's cement production in 2003 (NBS 2004). Energy consumption in Shanghai has been growing at 6-8% annually, with the growth of electricity demand at over 10% per year. Shanghai, with very limited local energy resources, relies heavily on imported coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. While coal still constitutes over half of Shanghai's energy consumption, oil and natural gas use have been growing in importance. Shanghai is the major market for China's West to East (natural gas) Pipeline (WEP). With the input from WEP and off-shore pipelines, it is expected that natural gas consumption will grow from 250 million cubic meters in 2000 to 3000-3500 million cubic meters in 2005. In order to secure energy supply to power Shanghai's fast-growing economy, the Shanghai government has set three priorities in its energy strategy: (1) diversification of its energy structure, (2) improving its energy efficiency, and (3) developing renewable and other cleaner forms of energy. Efficiency improvements are likely to be most critical, particularly in the near future, in addressing Shanghai's energy security, especially the recent electricity shortage in Shanghai. Commercial buildings and industries consume the majority of Shanghai's, as well as China's, commercial energy. In the building sector, Shanghai has been very active implementing energy efficiency codes for commercial and residential buildings. Following a workshop on building codes implementation held at LBNL for senior Shanghai policy makers in 2001, the Shanghai government recently introduced an implementation guideline on residential building energy code compliance for the downtown area of Shanghai to commence in April, 2004, with other areas of the city to follow in 2005. A draft code for commercial buildings has been developed as well. In the industrial sector, the Shanghai government started an ambitious initiative in 2002 to induce private capital to invest in energy efficiency improvements via energy management/services companies (EMC/ESCOs). In partic

  17. Energy-Efficient Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardei, Mihaela

    successively. Only the sensors from the current active set are responsible for monitoring all targets

  18. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. G. (2005). “Review of US ESCO Industry Market Trends: AnRetrofit Loan Analysis Model ESCO Energy Service Company GSAet al. ’s (2005) study of the ESCO 5 industry, found that

  19. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings to Be Green and Energy-Efficient: Optimizingdevelopment such as green buildings and energy-efficientin making their properties green or energy efficient (mostly

  20. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    22 Definition of Energy Efficiency in Commercialor ENERGY STAR certified. Definition of Energy Efficiency inDefinition 122 Developing Feasible Energy

  1. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and validating energy efficiency business cases, settinginvestment with the energy retrofit business case. It can beby Making American Businesses More Energy Efficient through

  2. Measuring Energy Efficiency Improvements in Industrial Battery Chargers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matley, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial battery chargers have provided the energy requirements for motive power in industrial facilities for decades. Their reliable and durable performance, combined with their low energy consumption relative to other industrial processes, has...

  3. Lewis County PUD- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.lcpud.org/index.html Lewis County PUD] offers rebates for commercial and industrial lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades, on a case-by-case basis. Eligible industrial...

  4. An Efficient Message Passing Algorithm for Multi-Target Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhexu (Michael)

    We propose a new approach for multi-sensor multi-target tracking by constructing statistical models on graphs with continuous-valued nodes for target states and discrete-valued nodes for data association hypotheses. These ...

  5. Efficiency in the international insurance industry: A cross-country comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Efficiency in the international insurance industry: A cross-country comparison Martin Eling und¨AT ULM #12;Efficiency in the international insurance industry: A cross-country comparison Martin Elinga/04/20 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide new empirical evidence on frontier efficiency measurement

  6. Perform, Achieve and Trade (PAT): An Innovative Mechanism for Enhancing Energy Efficiency in India's Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnik, S. P.; Martin, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 31st March 2012, India quietly announced a historic regulation for industrial sector in a bid to ensure energy security of the country. The regulation, with an aim to enhance energy efficiency in energy intensive industrial sectors, is empowered...

  7. Economic and Policy Factors Affecting Energy Efficiency Improvements in the U. S. Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freund, S. H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. pulp, paper and paperboard industry has made significant improvements over the past eleven years in the energy efficiency of its operations. The industry is firmly committed to: increased utilization of important renewable domestic energy...

  8. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Policy Instruments for Energy-Efficiency Improvements inand Graus, W. , 2007. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Costimplementation of energy-efficiency and greenhouse gas

  9. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption. Improving boiler efficiency and capturingrule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased byrecovery. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by

  10. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. and Galitsky, C. , 2004. Energy-efficiency improvementL. , 2008 , Energy-efficiency improvement opportunities forMasanet, E. , 2010. Energy-efficiency Improvement and Cost

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid waste from the chemical industry, some paints, solvents and waste sludge from water treatment (

  12. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. “Potentials for Energy Efficiency Improvement in theBenefits of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” EnergyC. , and Price, L. , 2008. Energy Efficiency Improvement

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M. Kushler. (1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive andSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. AmericanCalifornia Institute of Energy Efficiency ( CIEE). (2000b).

  14. Kansas City Power and Light- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) provides financial incentives for commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for...

  15. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Grants for Conservation Program allows its commercial and industrial customers to submit energy-saving proposals and receive grants for their custom efficiency projects....

  16. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integration of energy management into business practices. ItIndustrial Energy Efficiency The principal business of anIn addition, business metrics such as energy performance

  17. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to commercial and industrial electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment and measures in eligible facilities. Incentives are...

  18. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Utilities offers incentives to its commercial and industrial customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment in eligible facilities. Rebates are available for lighting equipment...

  19. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative (MVEC) offers incentives to encourage commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of facilities. Rebates are offered for the...

  20. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program...

  1. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (CLFP) offers incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers who install energy efficient equipment in existing buildings. Incentives are available for boilers...

  2. Moorhead Public Service Utility- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.mpsutility.com Moorhead Public Service Utility] offers the Bright Energy Solutions Programs for commercial and industrial customers that purchase and install qualifying energy-efficient...

  3. Efficient electric motor systems for industry. Report on roundtable discussions of market problems and ways to overcome them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the efficiency of electric motor systems is one of the best energy-saving opportunities for the United States. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies estimates that by the year 2010 in the industrial sector, the opportunities for savings from improved efficiency in electric motor systems could be roughly as follows: 240 billion kilowatthours per year. $13 billion per year from US industry`s energy bill. Up to 50,000 megawatts in new powerplant capacity avoided. Up to 44 million metric tons of carbon-equivalent emissions mitigated per year, corresponding to 3 percent of present US emissions. Recognizing the benefits of this significant opportunity for energy savings, DOE has targeted improvements in the efficiency of electric motor systems as a key initiative in the effort to promote flexibility and efficiency in the way electricity is produced and used. Efficient electric motor systems will help the United States reach its national goals for energy savings and greenhouse gas emission reductions.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

  5. The Office of Industrial Technologies - enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry through technology partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical component of the Federal Government`s effort to stimulate improved industrial energy efficiency is the DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT). OIT funds research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts and transfers the resulting technology and knowledge to industry. This document describes OIT`s program, including the new Industries of the Future (IOF) initiative and the strategic activities that are part of the IOF process. It also describes the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of the materials and process industries that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by manufacturing in the United States. OIT-supported RD&D activities relating to these industries are described, and quantitative estimates of the potential benefits of many OIT-supported technologies for industry are also provided.

  6. Show Home Targets Energy Efficiency in Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes The New American Home, an annual project that is focused on the future of homebuilding. Industry experts team to design, build, and monitor a demonstration home that has been equipped with the latest marketable technologies and projects.

  7. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. T. de Almeida, 2002. Energy- efficient Motor Systems: Ain the current age, as energy-efficient technologies oftenCouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.

  8. Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program steam software tools can help industrial plants identify steam system improvements to save energy and money.

  9. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    156 Figure B-5: Screenshot 1 of EEM157 Figure B-6: Screenshot 2 of EEMEfficient Commercial Building EEM Energy Efficiency Measure

  10. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Affairs (DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. http://and/or CO2 taxes, emissions trading, agreements and target-targets through the UK Emissions Trading Scheme (DEFRA,

  11. Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document briefly describes the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) program. It profiles the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of OIT`s principal customers--the materials and process industries--that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by industry in the US. OIT-supported research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities relating to these industries are described as well as OIT`s crosscutting technology programs that target the needs of multiple US industries. Quantitative estimates of the potential benefits (or metrics) to US industry of many current OIT-supported technologies are also discussed.

  12. Improving IEEE 802.15.4 for Low-latency Energy-efficient Industrial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breu, Ruth

    &D" of Siemens AG is currently evaluating wireless technology in the field of industrial automation.1 An Industrial Case Study The typical application scenario for automation environments to be studiedImproving IEEE 802.15.4 for Low-latency Energy-efficient Industrial Applications Feng Chen Computer

  13. Industrial DSM: Beyond High Efficiency Lights and Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelbaum, B.

    on behalf of electric utilities. These represent real-world solutions to problems in actual industrial plants in many different types of industries. DSM IN LOW TEMPERATURE REFRIGERAnON SYST M APPLICAnONS Industrial refrigeration equipment is highly... energy-intensive. In many dairy procl::."ing plants in particular, refrigeration systems are the largest electricity consumers, repre enting as much as 75 percent of plant peak demand. The availability of the refrigeration system is critical...

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities, recommend energy efficiency actions, developSummer Study on Energy efficiency in Industry. AmericanACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, ACEEE,

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Kushler. (c. 1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive andSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Americanof Industrial Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable

  16. Global Energy Efficient IT Equipment Industry 2015 Market Research...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the world's main region market conditions,...

  17. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Project Objective Develop and demonstrate advanced hybrid industrial water treatment system that will... Cost-effectively enable at least 50% water reuse...

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Support Unit (ETSU). 1988. High Level Control ofCircle Industries and SIRA (ETSU, 1988). The first systemreduction of nearly 8% (ETSU, 1988). The LINKman system has

  19. PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers rebates for lighting, heat pumps, refrigeration...

  20. Wells Public Utilities- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SMMPA develops innovative products and services to help them deliver value to customers. With help from SMMPA, Wells Public Utilities provides incentives for its commercial and industrial custome...

  1. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Develo Project Objecve Current StateChallenges Heavy industrial water utilization footprint Freshwater Withdrawals in the U.S. by Sector (2005) Domestic...

  2. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzing business operating costs (including energy costs)s business case for an energy retrofit project, the costBusiness Case for Enhancing Energy Efficiency .24 Reducing Energy Costs .

  3. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.3 and 3.3 of “Energy Risk Management in Commercialin EE loan underwriting, energy risk evaluation in currentQuality and Risk Reduction through Energy Efficiency. ”

  4. Development of a New Extended Motor Product Label for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, E.; Boteler, R.; Elliot, R. N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities ESL-IE-14-05-11 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Prescriptive Rebate Programs Provides a rebate for specific products that have been determined to be more efficient... of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Example: Prescriptive Rebates Example: NEMA Premium ® • Label identifies highest efficiency motors • Label is acceptable documentation for efficiency programs...

  5. Industrial Energy Efficiency in Ukraine: The Business Outlook 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insulation, steam traps, variable speed drives, and boiler controls. While the management at Krivorozhstal has not done much in the past to improve the plant's energy efficiency, it is now interested in efficiency. This is primarily because...

  6. Industrial Energy Efficiency as a Risk Management Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumoff, C.; Shipley, A. M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of acting before government regulations are implemented. In this manner, regulations are a surprise element in doing business. Finally, energy efficiency as a corporate goal, will lead to an overall reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This sole... can be effective as a corporate strategy as well. Plant level interactions with energy efficiency yield immediate gains, while energy efficiency as part of the corporate agenda delivers long term benefits. Energy efficiency employed...

  7. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projects in Brazil, China, and India, Energy-efficiency caseLabor Energy Auxiliary material Capital Total Brazil China

  8. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  9. Electric & Gas Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sermakekian, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Electric & Gas Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers Presented by: CL&P?s Conservation and Load Management Department 2 ? Connecticut Energy Efficiency... Fund (CEEF) was created in 1998 by CT State Legislature ? Energy efficiency is a valuable resource for Connecticut, it: ? Reduces air pollutants and greenhouse gases ? Creates monetary savings for customers ? Reduces need for more energy...

  10. High-Efficiency Retrofit Lessons for Retail from a SuperTarget: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Hirsch, A.; Williams, S.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Target under the Commercial Building Program to design and implement a retrofit of a SuperTarget in Thornton, CO. The result was a retrofit design that predicted 37% energy savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 29% compared to existing (pre-retrofit) store consumption. The largest savings came from energy efficient lighting, energy efficient cooling systems, improved refrigeration, and better control of plug loads.

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from the Global Cement Industry, Annual Review ofThe Use of Limestone in Portland Cement: a State- of-the-Review, Skokie, IL: Portland Cement Association. Dolores, R.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from the Global Cement Industry, Annual Review ofBösche, A. , 1993. “Variable Speed Drives in Cement Plants,”World Cement 6 24 pp.2- Buzzi, S. 1997. Die Horomill® - Eine

  13. Emerging Industrial Innovations for New Energy Efficient Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, J. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as integrated photovoltaic systems may play an even larger role in the more productive use of our energy resources. This paper explores recent work on industrial innovation, often involving public-private partnerships, and provides a context to understand...

  14. Emerging Industrial Innovations for New Energy Efficient Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, J. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as integrated photovoltaic systems may play an even larger role in the more productive use of our energy resources. This paper explores recent work on industrial innovation, often involving public-private partnerships, and provides a context to understand...

  15. Industrial Energy Efficiency Technical Review Guidelines and Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Methodology and Scope of Research: 1. Empirical analysis of reported energy savings at the application, reviewed (contracted), measurement and verification (M&V) and evaluation stages for multiple large or industrial incentive programs. a. Assess impact...

  16. Con Edison Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pospisil, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Con Edison C&I Energy Efficiency Team ? Program Management and Account Executives ? Lockheed Martin Team ? Marketing, Operations, Engineering and Administration ? Market Partner Network ? Con Edison Customers 6 C&I Program: Three Major... Components ? Rebates for Equipment Upgrades ? Performance-based Custom Incentives ? Energy Efficiency Technical Studies 7 8 ? Equipment Rebate Program ? Electric: High Efficiency Lighting, HVAC, Heat Pumps, De-lamping, Controls, Motors, VFD...

  17. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program web site for applicability and maximum amounts for certain technologies. Under Minnesota's...

  18. Riverland Energy Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Riverland Energy Cooperative offers a number of rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient lighting fixtures, air conditioners, heat pumps, water heaters, central electric thermal...

  19. Shakopee Public Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shakopee Public Utilities (SPU) offers a wide array of rebates and incentives encouraging its commercial customers to increase the energy efficiency of their facilities. Broadly, rebates exist for...

  20. EPUD- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emerald People's Utility District (EPUD) offers financial incentives for commercial customers to increase the energy efficiency of their facilities. EPUD works with the Bonneville Power...

  1. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions. Paris: IEA. KEMA, withrelated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Many studies andconcurrently reducing CO2 emissions. With the support of

  2. Meaningful Energy Efficiency Performance Metrics for the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumana, J. D.; Sidhwa, N. R.

    industries have developed standard met- rics for their plant performance. A notable example is the Solomon Energy Intensity Index (EII) for Oil Refining, which builds up the overall plant energy index from the energy indices for individual process units.... Energy Intensity, Oil & Gas Industry 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Ce n t s / BO E Oil & Gas prod'n Oil Refining Gas Processing Figure 11. Energy Intensity Trends for Different Business Units The ?standard energy...

  3. Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . As indicated earlier, the industrial complex, w~ich uses 44 percent of the total energy, has the langest share in the balancing of energy supply and dem~nd. Because of this, many companies are finding that an organized energy conservation program can reduc... is now expen sive; therefore, the available supply of cheap oil and gas is being rapidly exhausted, and consumption cannot continue to grow at the pace to which we have become accustomed. Changes are taking place, espe cially in the industrial sector...

  4. Overview: EPRI's Program for Process Industry Energy Efficiency and Environmental Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, A.

    , and value in ways that are not possible with other energy forms. This overview presents electrotechnologies selected by EPRI to impact energy efficiency and environment relating to process industry....

  5. New 3E Plus Computer Program- A Tool for Improving Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayman, N. J.

    The task of determining how much insulation is necessary in the US industrial and manufacturing sector to save money, use less energy, reduce plant emissions and improve process efficiency has been greatly simplified thanks to a software program...

  6. Industrial Energy: Counseling the Marriage Between Energy Users and Efficiency Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial energy users and the efficiency programs that serve them enjoy a long and storied partnership. Each partner operates with the best of intentions, but with agendas that are not always reconcilable. At best, this yields a marriage...

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  8. Randolph EMC- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet Randolph EMC's standards are eligible for a prescriptive incentive payment. The cooperative will provide a...

  9. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011- pg 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-risk, high-value research and development focused on energy efficiency that industry would not typically pursue without federal leadership and support by public-private partnership.

  10. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011- pg 7

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-risk, high-value research and development focused on energy efficiency that industry would not typically pursue without federal leadership and support by public-private partnership.

  11. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011- pg 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-risk, high-value research and development focused on energy efficiency that industry would not typically pursue without federal leadership and support by public-private partnership.

  12. A National Resource for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alloys, and metal matrix composite products carbon fibe's manufacturing industries. These industries call upon ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization-efficient manufacturing processes and materials targeting products of the future. The Department of Energy's first

  13. Gas Turbines Increase the Energy Efficiency of Industrial Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banchik, I. N.; Bohannan, W. R.; Stork, K.; McGovern, L. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    clean fuel gas for the gas turbine is produced by gasification of coal, are presented. Waste heat from the gasifier and the gas turbine exhaust is converted to high pressure steam for steam turbines. Gas turbines may find application in other industrial...

  14. ConEd (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Con Edison offers New York Commercial natural gas customers a rebate program for energy efficient equipment in buildings inside the eligible service area. All equipment must be installed by a...

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Worrell, E. andC. Galitsky. 2005. Energy Efficiency Improvement and CostPetroleum Refineries. An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Energy and

  16. RG&E (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficiency equipment that pay a natural gas Systems Benefits Charge (SBC). Both prescriptive rebates and custom...

  17. Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

    The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23...

  18. Industrial Energy Efficiency as a Risk Management Strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumoff, C.; Shipley, A. M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    portfolio. Traditional strategies to combat against unwanted exposure in this market include hedging and long term and futures contracts. However, the following explores the topic of considering energy efficiency as a risk management tool in reducing...

  19. RG&E (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  20. DTE Energy (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any purchaser of a qualifying energy efficiency measure in DTE's service area can participate in the program as long as the measure is installed in a business facility. The DTE Energy program will...

  1. Promoting Energy Efficiency in Industry: Utility Roles and Perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, D. R.; Davis, T. D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer through to $100,000 for 23 energy effic workshops on third party ient projects for small financing and cogeneration. businesses; customized energy management incentives; energy ? Direct Customer Contact efficient motor incentives...

  2. Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainable energy system was begun, further supporting those goals of increased renewable energy sources and energy efficiency. Sweden

  3. Industrial Energy Conservation by New Process Design and Efficiency Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusik, C. L.; Stickles, R. P.; Machacek, R. F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 17-20, 1983 Po'.,.lla4 E"*VY Potential Saving, t Totti To,.1 En., " r_-. C0!'1V?11Ional T-ehnotogy PrC)doK:1 __l~~=~1 l~~r;:~ 11:rr:U?Yr) AlumInum Imptovltd Hli...

  4. Overview of the Duke University Bass Connections Program in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -05-03 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Project Titles ? “Managing Carbon with Renewable Energy and Efficiency in Nissan North American Assembly Plant” • Robinson Ford, Justin Ong, Jake Reeder...Overview of the Duke University Bass Connections Program in Industrial Energy Efficiency Gale Boyd, Duke University Presented to the IETC May 21st, 2014 New Orleans, LA ESL-IE-14-05-03 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology...

  5. Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJune 25,IndustrialDepartment

  6. U.S. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC.DepartmentTexas to CallDepartmentHDV GHG

  7. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014 ||Alaska|Industrial Carbon

  8. The Value Proposition of Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, E.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    therefore have a very difficult task in convincing businesses to participate in their programs. And yet lack of business sector participation in utility sector efficiency programs has been proven to result in higher energy prices for all customer...’ energy waste and thereby reduce monthly energy expenses. (2) Programs reduce customer demand, or load, which lowers wholesale energy prices, particularly in the short and medium term. (3) Programs increase the volume of resources bid...

  9. Efficiency and Environmental Factors in the US Electricity Transmission Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llorca, Manuel; Orea, Luis; Pollitt, Michael

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to implement in incentive regulation schemes. Section 3 describes the theoretical cost function that we estimate as well as the empirical specification of the model. Section 4 presents the data and variables used in the empirical analysis... utilities with incentives to improve their operating and investment efficiency and to ensure that consumers benefit from the gains. The main methods used to achieve these objectives are the incentive regulation mechanisms, which include financial rewards...

  10. Energy Efficiency Programs for Small and Medium Sized Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    markets, though a market failure may exist. Second, traditional business theory on investment behavior may need to be modified. Many analysts have suggested that there may be both economic and engineering explanations for the energy efficiency gap... in two major ways. First to produce heat, mechanical power, and to generate electricity. Second, as a raw material input to the manufacturing process or for some other non fuel use purpose. This does not include what is known as feedstock energy...

  11. Financing of Industrial Energy Efficiency Through State Energy Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; Weidenbaum, A.

    almost 80 percent of the total energy (11). Over the last twenty years, many loan programs have been offered to residential and commercial energy consumers by state energy offices and electric utilities. Notable among the recent programs are those... and veterans' organizations. The interest subsidies work as follows: ? The borrower applies to one of 105 participating commercial lending institutions for a loan to undertake an energy-efficiency improvement project. Some lenders have minimum loan...

  12. Expanding the Pool of Federal Policy Options to Promote Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the energy efficiency of industry is essential for maintaining the viability of domestic manufacturing, especially in a world economy where production is shifting to low-cost, less regulated developing countries. Numerous studies have shown the potential for significant cost-effective energy-savings in U.S. industries, but the realization of this potential is hindered by regulatory, information, workforce, and financial obstacles. This report evaluates seven federal policy options aimed at improving the energy efficiency of industry, grounded in an understanding of industrial decision-making and the barriers to efficiency improvements. Detailed analysis employs the Georgia Institute of Technology's version of the National Energy Modeling System and spreadsheet calculations, generating a series of benefit/cost metrics spanning private and public costs and energy bill savings, as well as air pollution benefits and the social cost of carbon. Two of the policies would address regulatory hurdles (Output-Based Emissions Standards and a federal Energy Portfolio Standard with Combined Heat and Power); three would help to fill information gaps and workforce training needs (the Superior Energy Performance program, Implementation Support Services, and a Small Firm Energy Management program); and two would tackle financial barriers (Tax Lien Financing and Energy-Efficient Industrial Motor Rebates). The social benefit-cost ratios of these policies appear to be highly favorable based on a range of plausible assumptions. Each of the seven policy options has an appropriate federal role, broad applicability across industries, utilizes readily available technologies, and all are administratively feasible.

  13. Taking on a heavyweight. [An energy efficient industrial plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1981, Bennett and Emmott Limited, of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada constructed a new facility to expand their plant operations. Some design opportunities and restrictions for their new plant included: designing an energy efficient building, maintaining a high level of working comfort, maintaining clearance in all plant areas for complete crane travel, and accomodating variable and unscheduled plant exhaust needs. Most of the goals were achieved. A comparison of annual fuel bills between the old plant in its last year of operation and the new plant shows a 55 percent reduction in total energy consumption/unit floor area.

  14. Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen andResiliencyDepartment of Energy Efficiency

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  16. Energy Efficiency Programs for Small and Medium Sized Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

    0.24 0.28 0.24 0.25 Electronic Equipment 0.21 0.22 0.2 0.23 SIC 36 All Manufacturing 13.62 15.49 15.03 16.52 Source: http://www.ela.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/ Table 2. Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector Energy Intensity (Thousand Btu per... Btu per 1992 constant dollars) 3.84 I 3.88 I 3.97 I 4.01 Change in Energy Efficiency (percent) All Manufacturing -4.43 Source:http://www.ela.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/ fluctuations in electricity and fuel pricing. According to the MECS data...

  17. Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement Program. Annual report to the Congress and the President 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial energy efficiency improvement program to accelerate market penetration of new and emerging industrial technologies and practices which will improve energy efficiency; encourage substitution of more plentiful domestic fuels; and enhance recovery of energy and materials from industrial waste streams is described. The role of research, development, and demonstration; technology implementation; the reporting program; and progress are covered. Specific reports from the chemicals and allied products; primary metals; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass, paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metals; transportation equipment; machinery (except electrical); textile mill products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products are discussed. Additional data from voluntary submissions, a summary on progress in the utilization of recovered materials, and an analysis of industrial fuel mix are briefly presented. (MCW)

  18. Nanocoatings for High-Efficiency Industrial and Tooling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P; Qu, J.; Higdon, C. (Eaton Corporation)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This industry-driven project was the result of a successful response by Eaton Corporation to a DOE/ITP Program industry call. It consisted of three phases in which ORNL participated. In addition to Eaton Corporation and ORNL (CRADA), the project team included Ames Laboratory, who developed the underlying concept for aluminum-magnesium-boron based nanocomposite coatings [1], and Greenleaf, a small tooling manufacturer in western Pennsylvania. This report focuses on the portion of this work that was conducted by ORNL in a CRADA with Eaton Corporation. A comprehensive final report for the entire effort, which ended in September 2010, has been prepared by Eaton Corporation. Phase I, “Proof of Concept” ran for one year (September 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) during which the applicability of AlMgB14 single-phase and nanocomposite coatings on hydraulic material coupons and components as well as on tool inserts was demonstrated.. The coating processes used either plasma laser deposition (PLD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD). During Phase I, ORNL conducted laboratory-scale pin-on-disk and reciprocating pin-on-flat tests of coatings produced by PLD and PVD. Non-coated M2 tool steel was used as a baseline for comparison, and the material for the sliding counterface was Type 52100 bearing steel since it simulated the pump materials. Initial tests were run mainly in a commercial hydraulic fluid named Mobil DTE-24, but some tests were later run in a water-glycol mixture as well. A tribosystem analysis was conducted to define the operating conditions of pump components and to help develop simulative tests in Phase II. Phase II, “Coating Process Scale-up” was intended to use scaled-up process to generate prototype parts. This involved both PLD practices at Ames Lab, and a PVD scale-up study at Eaton using its production capable equipment. There was also a limited scale-up study at Greenleaf for the tooling application. ORNL continued to conduct friction and wear tests on process variants and developed tests to better simulate the applications of interest. ORNL also employed existing lubrication models to better understand hydraulic pump frictional behavior and test results. Phase III, “Functional Testing” focused on finalizing the strategy for commercialization of AlMgB14 coatings for both hydraulic and tooling systems. ORNL continued to provide tribology testing and analysis support for hydraulic pump applications. It included both laboratory-scale coupon testing and the analysis of friction and wear data from full component-level tests performed at Eaton Corp. Laboratory-scale tribology test methods are used to characterize the behavior of nanocomposite coatings prior to running them in full-sized hydraulic pumps. This task also includes developing tribosystems analyses, both to provide a better understanding of the performance of coated surfaces in alternate hydraulic fluids, and to help design useful laboratory protocols. Analysis also includes modeling the lubrication conditions and identifying the physical processes by which wear and friction of the contact interface changes over time. This final report summarizes ORNL’s portion of the nanocomposite coatings development effort and presents both generated data and the analyses that were used in the course of this effort.

  19. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. pulp and paper industry consumes over $7 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pulp and paper industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This paper provides a brief overview of the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry energy efficiency guidebook (a.k.a. the"Energy Guide") for pulp and paper manufacturers. The Energy Guide discusses a wide range of energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Also provided is a discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pulp and paper industry along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Many energy efficiency measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in pulp and paper mills and related industries worldwide. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. pulp and paper industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  20. Advanced Nanostructured Molecular Sieves for Energy Efficient Industrial Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunhao Li, Michael Beaver

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the very small relative volatility difference between propane and propylene, current propane/propylene separation by distillation requires very tall distillation towers (150-250 theoretical plates) and large reflux ratios (up to 15), which is considered to be the most energy consuming large-scale separation process. Adsorptive separation processes are widely considered to be more energy-efficient alternatives to distillation. However, slow diffusion kinetics/mass transport rate through the adsorbent bed often limits the performance of such processes, so further improvements are possible if intra-particle mass transfer rates can be improved. Rive Technology, Inc. is developing and commercializing its proprietary mesoporous zeolite technology for catalysis and separation. With well-controlled intracrystalline mesoporosity, diffusion kinetics through such mesoporous zeolite based catalysts is much improved relative to conventional zeolites, leading to significantly better product selectivity. This 'proof-of-principle' project (DE-EE0003470) is intended to demonstrate that Rive mesoporous zeolite technology can be extended and applied in adsorptive propane/propylene separation and lead to significant energy saving compared to the current distillation process. In this project, the mesoporous zeolite Y synthesis technology was successfully extended to X and A zeolites that are more relevant to adsorbent applications. Mesoporosity was introduced to zeolite X and A for the first time while maintaining adequate adsorption capacity. Zeolite adsorbents were tested for liquid phase separation performance using a pulse flow test unit and the test results show that the separation selectivity of the mesoporous zeolite adsorbent is much closer to optimal for a Simulated Moving Bed (SMB) separation process and the enhanced mesoporosity lead to >100% increase of overall mass transport rate for propane and propylene. These improvements will significantly improve the performance of an adsorptive separation unit for propane/propylene separation compared with traditional zeolite adsorbents. The enhanced transport will allow for more efficient utilization of a given adsorbent inventory by reducing process cycle time, allowing a faster production rate with a fixed amount of adsorbent or smaller adsorbent inventory at a fixed production rate. Smaller adsorbent inventory would also lead to significant savings in the capital cost due to smaller footprint of the equipment. Energy consumption calculation, based on the pulse test results for rived NaX zeolite adsorbent, of a hypothetical moderate-scale SMB propane/propylene separation plant that processes 6000 BPSD refinery grade propylene (70% propylene) will consume about 60-80% less energy (both re-boiler and condenser duties) compared to a C3 splitter that process the same amount of feed. This energy saving also translates to a reduction of 30,000-35,000 tons of CO2 emission per year at this moderate processing rate. The enhancement of mass transport achievable by introduction of controlled mesoporosity to the zeolite also opens the door for the technology to be applied to several other adsorption separation processes such as the separation of xylene isomers by SMB, small- and large scale production of O2/N2 from air by pressure swing adsorption, the separation of CO2 from natural gas at natural gas wellheads, and the purification of ultra-high purity H2 from the off gas produced by steam-methane-reforming.

  1. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that it took the automotive industry until 2002 to unifycounterparts in the automotive industry on lessons learned,but predating it, the automotive industry started developing

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings of the 2005 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry,

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. (2001). Optimize energy efficiency of HRSG. HydrocarbonACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, ACEEE,American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy, Berkeley,

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Masanet (2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and CostA.R. Ganji (2005). Energy Efficiency Opportunities in FreshSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, American

  5. “What Efficiency Projects are Being Installed in the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicol, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wisconsin Focus on Energy program has seven years of experience on the actual projects that are being installed in the Pulp and Paper industry. The program has a broad perspective on the types and trends of investments in energy efficiency...

  6. Sustaining Industrial Energy Efficiency in Process Cooling in a Potentially Water-Short Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation: ESL-IE-14-05-18 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 15 eco-ATWE Water Efficient Mode (Combined Evaporative and Dry Mode) Third Mode of Operation: • Two Pumps • Two Water...

  7. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  8. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: AligningManagement, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than fifteen years after the launch of programs in theU.K. and U.S., industry still offers one of the largest opportunities forenergy savings worldwide. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimatesthe savings potential from cost-optimization of industrial motor-drivensystems alone at 7 percent of global electricity use. The U.S. Departmentof Energy (USDOE) Industrial Technologies Program estimates 7 percentsavings potential in total US industrial energy use through theapplication of proven best practice. Simple paybacks for these types ofprojects are frequently two years or less. The technology required toachieve these savings is widely available; the technical skills requiredto identify energy saving opportunities are known and transferable.Although programs like USDOE's Best Practices have been highlysuccessful, most plants, as supported by 2002 MECS data, remain eitherunaware or unmotivated to improve their energy efficiency--as evidencedby the 98 percent of US industrial facilities reporting to MECS say thatthey lack a full-time energy manager. With the renewed interest in energyefficiency worldwide and the emergence of carbon trading and newfinancial instruments such as white certificates1, there is a need tointroduce greater transparency into the way that industrial facilitiesidentify, develop, and document energy efficiency projects. Historically,industrial energy efficiency projects have been developed by plantengineers, frequently with assistance from consultants and/or supplierswith highly specialized technical skills. Under this scenario,implementation of energy efficiency improvements is dependent onindividuals. These individuals typically include "champions" within anindustrial facility or corporation, working in cooperation withconsultants or suppliers who have substantial knowledge based on years ofexperience. This approach is not easily understood by others without thisspecialized technical knowledge, penetrates the market fairly slowly, andhas no assurance of persistence, since champions may leave the company orbe reassigned after project completion.This paper presents an alternatescenario that builds on the body of expert knowledge concerning energymanagement best practices and the experience of industrial champions toengage industry in continuous energy efficiency improvement at thefacility rather than the individual level. Under this scenario,standardized methodologies for applying and validating energy managementbest practices in industrial facilities will be developed through aconsensus process involving both plant personnel and specializedconsultants and suppliers. The resulting protocols will describe aprocess or framework for conducting an energy savings assessment andverifying the results that will be transparent to policymakers, managers,and the financial community, and validated by a third-party organization.Additionally, a global dialogue is being initiated by the United NationsIndustrial Development Organization (UNIDO) concerning the development ofan international industrial energy management standard that would be ISOcompatible. The proposed scenario will combine the resulting standardwith the best practice protocols for specific energy systems (i.e.,steam, process heating, compressed air, pumping systems, etc.) to formthe foundation of a third party, performance-based certification programfor the overall industrial facility that is compatible with existingmanagement systems, including ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004 and 6 Sigma. Thelong term goal of this voluntary, industry designed certification programis to develop a transparent, globally accepted system for validatingenergy efficiency projects and management practices. This system wouldcreate a verified record of energy savings with potential market valuethat could be recognized among sectors and countries.

  9. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  10. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The database provides a single, consistent source of current data for DOE and private-sector energy audit and simulation software tools and the retrofit industry. The database will reduce risk for residential retrofit industry stakeholders by providing a central, publicly vetted source of up-to-date information.

  11. Tax and Fiscal Policies for Promotion of Industrial EnergyEfficiency: A Survey of International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell,Ernst; Graus, Wina

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Foundation's China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) has undertaken a major project investigating fiscal and tax policy options for stimulating energy efficiency and renewable energy development in China. This report, which is part of the sectoral sub-project studies on energy efficiency in industry, surveys international experience with tax and fiscal policies directed toward increasing investments in energy efficiency in the industrial sector. The report begins with an overview of tax and fiscal policies, including descriptions and evaluations of programs that use energy or energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) taxes, pollution levies, public benefit charges, grants or subsidies, subsidized audits, loans, tax relief for specific technologies, and tax relief as part of an energy or greenhouse gas (GHG) emission tax or agreement scheme. Following the discussion of these individual policies, the report reviews experience with integrated programs found in two countries as well as with GHG emissions trading programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the best practices related to international experience with tax and fiscal policies to encourage investment in energy efficiency in industry.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry is refrigeration, which is used for process cooling, cold storage,Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings of the 2005 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry,

  13. Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    companies regularly increase production by adding additional manufacturing equipment, or increasing operating hours. This approach can add large new energy loads to the electrical grid and gas distribution networks. Alternately, increasing production...Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy John Seryak Gary Epstein Mark D’Antonio Engineer jseryak@ers-inc.com President gepstein@ers-inc.com Vice President mdantonio...

  14. Government-University-Industrial Collaborations for Energy Efficiency and a Better Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a technically viable component to efficient boiler operation, a boiler control display was installed at an industrial facility to monitor the effect of the installation of oxygen adjustment as a function of monitoring carbon monoxide Integration... of carbon monoxide sensors with an O 2 boiler control system provides a substantial increase in energy savings and reliability. While this technology is highly effective its impact has been minimized due to the number of small to medium sized boilers...

  15. Ultra-Efficient and Power Dense Electric Motors for U. S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Schiferl, Richard F.; Umans, Stephen D.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this project was to combine the ease-of-installation and ease-of-use attributes of industrial induction motors with the low-loss and small size and weight advantages of PM motors to create an ultra-efficient, high power density industrial motor that can be started across-the-line or operated from a standard, Volts/Hertz drive without the need for a rotor position feedback device. PM motor products that are currently available are largely variable speed motors that require a special adjustable speed drive with rotor position feedback. The reduced size and weight helps to offset the magnet cost in order make these motors commercially viable. The scope of this project covers horsepower ratings from 20 ? 500. Prototypes were built and tested at ratings ranging from 30 to 250 HP. Since fans, pumps and compressors make up a large portion of industrial motor applications, the motor characteristics are tailored to those applications. Also, since there is extensive use of adjustable frequency inverters in these applications, there is the opportunity to design for an optimal pole number and operate at other than 60 Hz frequency when inverters are utilized. Designs with four and eight pole configurations were prototyped as part of this work. Four pole motors are the most commonly used configuration in induction motors today. The results of the prototype design, fabrication, and testing were quite successful. The 50 HP rating met all of the design goals including efficiency and power density. Tested values of motor losses at 50 HP were 30% lower than energy efficient induction motors and the motor weight is 35% lower than the energy efficient induction motor of the same rating. Further, when tested at the 30 HP rating that is normally built in this 286T frame size, the efficiency far exceeds the project design goals with 30 HP efficiency levels indicating a 55% reduction in loss compared to energy efficient motors with a motor weight that is a few percentage points lower than the energy efficient motor. This 30 HP rating full load efficiency corresponds to a 46% reduction in loss compared to a 30 HP NEMA Premium? efficient motor. The cost goals were to provide a two year or shorter efficiency-based payback of a price premium associated with the magnet cost in these motors. That goal is based on 24/7 operation with a cost of electricity of 10 cents per kW-hr. Similarly, the 250 HP prototype efficiency testing was quite successful. In this case, the efficiency was maximized with a slightly less aggressive reduction in active material. The measured full load efficiency of 97.6% represents in excess of a 50% loss reduction compared to the equivalent NEMA Premium Efficiency induction motor. The active material weight reduction was a respectable 14.5% figure. This larger rating demonstrated both the scalability of this technology and also the ability to flexibly trade off power density and efficiency. In terms of starting performance, the 30 ? 50 HP prototypes were very extensively tested. The demonstrated capability included the ability to successfully start a load with an inertia of 25 times the motor?s own inertia while accelerating against a load torque following a fan profile at the motor?s full nameplate power rating. This capability will provide very wide applicability of this motor technology. The 250 HP prototype was also tested for starting characteristics, though without a coupled inertia and load torque. As a result it was not definitively proven that the same 25 times the motor?s own inertia could be started and synchronized successfully at 250 HP. Finite element modeling implies that this load could be successfully started, but it has not yet been confirmed by a test.

  16. Harnessing Smart Sensor Technology for Industrial Energy Efficiency- Making Process-Specific Efficiency Projects Cost Effective with a Broadly Configurable, Network-Enabled Monitoring Tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiczer, J. J.; Wiczer, M. B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve monitoring technology often re-quired by industrial energy efficiency projects, we have developed a set of power and process monitoring tools based on the IEEE 1451.2 smart sensor interface standard. These tools enable a wide...

  17. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J. S., E-mail: james.green@stfc.ac.uk; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dance, R. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, C. D. [SUPA, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30?MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ?10{sup 21} W cm{sup ?2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for ?m-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500?nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  18. 176 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 2, NO. 3, AUGUST 2006 Combustion Efficiency Optimization and Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    --In this paper, a data-mining approach is applied to op- timize combustion efficiency of a coal-fired boiler pressure and air/fuel ratio) to improve boiler's combustion efficiency as well as reduce NOx emissions176 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 2, NO. 3, AUGUST 2006 Combustion Efficiency

  19. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC). (2001a). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency. August.

  20. Steam systems in industry: Energy use and energy efficiency improvement potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einstein, Dan; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    2001-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam systems are a part of almost every major industrial process today. Thirty-seven percent of the fossil fuel burned in US industry is burned to produce steam. In this paper we will establish baseline energy consumption for steam systems. Based on a detailed analysis of boiler energy use we estimate current energy use in boilers in U.S. industry at 6.1 Quads (6.4 EJ), emitting almost 66 MtC in CO{sub 2} emissions. We will discuss fuels used and boiler size distribution. We also describe potential savings measures, and estimate the economic energy savings potential in U.S. industry (i.e. having payback period of 3 years or less). We estimate the nationwide economic potential, based on the evaluation of 16 individual measures in steam generation and distribution. The analysis excludes the efficient use of steam and increased heat recovery. Based on the analysis we estimate the economic potential at 18-20% of total boiler energy use, resulting in energy savings approximately 1120-1190 TBtu ( 1180-1260 PJ). This results in a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions equivalent to 12-13 MtC.

  1. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency in the U.S. pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Anglani, Norma; Einstein, Dan; Krushch, Marta; Price, Lynn

    2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reductions potential of the U.S. pulp and paper industry, one of the largest energy users in the U.S. manufacturing sector. We examined over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures. The measures were characterized, and then ordered on the basis of cost-effectiveness. The report indicates that there still exists significant potential for energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in this industry. The cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement is defined as having a simple pay-back period of three years or less. Not including increased recycling the study identifies a cost-effective savings potential of 16% of the primary energy use in 1994. Including increased recycling leads to a higher potential for energy savings, i.e. a range of cost-effective savings between 16% and 24% of primary energy use. Future work is needed to further elaborate on key energy efficiency measures identified in the report including barriers and opportunities for increased recycling of waste paper.

  2. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

  3. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

  4. Crossing the Valley of Death: Policy Options to Advance the Uptake of Energy-Efficient Emerging Technologies in US Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.; Bostrom, P.; Lung, R. B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and health of American manufacturers. This paper examines the market conditions and policy measures that affect the commercialization and adoption rate of promising, new energy-efficient industrial technologies. Market maturity, macroeconomic health, public...

  5. Compliance by Design: Industry Response to Energy Efficiency By KATE S. WHITEFOOT, MEREDITH FOWLIE, AND STEVEN J. SKERLOS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    1 Compliance by Design: Industry Response to Energy Efficiency Standards* By KATE S. WHITEFOOT, MEREDITH FOWLIE, AND STEVEN J. SKERLOS* Policies designed to improve industrial environmental performance for household appliances, lighting products, light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. How firms respond

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, starch and corn refining, since these can be a source of fuel products. The sugar cane industry

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    saves $200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. Copper2000). Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies.Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC,

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    driven systems; high efficiency boilers and process heaters;aims to develop boilers with an efficiency of 94%. However,much lower. Efficiency measures exist for both boilers and

  9. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and energy awareness in Botswana; ESI,attitudes towards and awareness of energy efficiency; •limited awareness of the availability of energy-saving and

  10. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ways that sustainability and energy efficiency areto incorporating sustainability and energy efficiency, andprovide broader sustainability or energy efficiency services

  11. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directive (2002/96/EC, “WEEE” ) the EU expanded its scope ofe-waste”) regulation like WEEE, decided to take matters intake its cues from RoHS and WEEE. While industry lobbying

  12. Improve Overall Plant Efficiency and Fuel Use, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program combined heat and power (CHP) tool can help identify energy savings in gas turbine-driven systems.

  13. Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy-Efficient, Water-Efficient, and Low-Pollution Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce the environmental impact of textile auxiliariesTextile Industry Ali Hasanbeigi China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental ImpactsTextile Industry Ali Hasanbeigi China Energy Group, Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11) HVAC systems Energy-efficient system design EfficientHVAC Systems Energy-efficient system design. The greatestdesign teams for energy-efficient building design. Financial

  15. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  16. High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lowenstein

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create maintenance problems nor will it significantly increase operating expenses. An energy balance on the boiler showed that heat loss through the insulated jacket was 10%. This value is much higher than the 2% to 5% that is typical of most boilers and indicates a need to better insulate the unit. With insulation that brings jacket losses down to 5%, a 1?-effect regenerator that uses this boiler as its high-temperature stage will have a gas-based COP of 1.05. The estimated cost to manufacture a 300-lb/h, 1?-effect regenerator at 500 units per year is $17,140. Unfortunately, the very high cost for natural gas that now prevails in the U.S. makes it very difficult for a gas-fired LDAC to compete against an electric vapor-compression air conditioner in HVAC applications. However, there are important industrial markets that need very dry air where the high price of natural gas will encourage the sale of a LDAC with the 1?-effect regenerator since in these markets it competes against less efficient gas-fired desiccant technologies. A manufacturer of industrial dehumidification equipment is now negotiating a sales agreement with us that would include the 1?-effect regenerator.

  17. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  18. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficiency investments can be planned and implemented. There are also voluntary agreements covering process emissions in Australia,

  19. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  20. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  1. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

  2. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are significantly less energy efficient than they could be.Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) was formed.Peter Radgen, 2005, Energy Efficient Motor Driven Systems,

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies/water_efficiency.cfm. High pressure low volumefor Compressed Air Efficiency. E-Source Tech Update.Refrigeration Plant Efficiently -- A Cost Saving Guide for

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. Washington D.C. [1997) Feasibility of Energy Efficient Steam Drying of PaperWaste. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

  5. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opportunities for Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in Agricultural/Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Program.    i 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 

  6. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the larger diffusion of green and energy efficient buildingsowners, the costs of green and energy efficient buildings,market. Demand for Green and Energy Efficient Buildings The

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in flue gas oxygen, boiler efficiency is increased by 2.5% (40 Boiler Energy EfficiencyChapter 13. 7.1 Boiler Energy Efficiency Measures The boiler

  8. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    offsites (e.g. , boiler efficiency improvements) have beenEfficiency Measures /  Technologies  Reduce Stand?By Boiler Efficiency Measures /  Technologies  Reduce Stand?By Boiler 

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to between 2.5-3%, boiler efficiency improvements would saveand hog fuel, the efficiencies of boilers that combust theserecovery boiler, which can increase the efficiency of steam

  10. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    words: green building/ energy efficiency/ commercial realThe Diffusion of Energy Efficiency in Building. ” Americanor energy efficiency into commercial buildings, and company,

  11. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNFCCC), 2007 b. Energy efficiency measures at cementUNFCCC), 2007 c. Energy efficiency measures at cement2000. “Potentials for Energy Efficiency Improvement in the

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    London, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 302. Energy Efficiency

  13. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    owners, the costs of green and energy efficient buildings,the larger diffusion of green and energy efficient buildingsmarket. Demand for Green and Energy Efficient Buildings The

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employ an energy-efficient system design. For HVAC systemsHVAC Systems Energy-efficient system design Recommissioningdesign teams for energy-efficient building design. Financial

  15. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decision to adopt energy efficient design, as well as theenergy efficient and sustainable technologies and designs.investing in green design or energy efficient technologies?

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdCommunications Awareness of energy efficiency createdbasis Raise awareness No promotion of energy efficiency

  17. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  18. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process residual like bagasse are now available (Cornland etsugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industrySection 7.4.7. ). The use of bagasse for energy is likely to

  19. A Review of Energy Use and Energy Efficiency Technologies for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential in Turkish textile industry: Case study for city of Bursa. ” Renewable and Sustainable Energy

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  1. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  2. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids the redundant work generally done in the near-well regions. We improved the accuracy of the streamline simulator with a higher order mapping from pressure grid to streamlines that significantly reduces smoothing errors, and a Kriging algorithm is used to map from the streamlines to the background grid. The higher accuracy of the Kriging mapping means that it is not essential for grid blocks to be crossed by one or more streamlines. The higher accuracy comes at the price of increased computational costs, but allows coarser coverage and so does not generally increase the overall costs of the computations. To reduce errors associated with fixing the pressure field between pressure updates, we developed a higher order global time-stepping method that allows the use of larger global time steps. Third-order ENO schemes are suggested to propagate components along streamlines. Both in the two-phase and three-phase experiments these ENO schemes outperform other (higher order) upwind schemes. Application of the third order ENO scheme leads to overall computational savings because the computational grid used can be coarsened. Grid adaptivity along streamlines is implemented to allow sharp but efficient resolution of solution fronts at reduced computational costs when displacement fronts are sufficiently separated. A correction for Volume Change On Mixing (VCOM) is implemented that is very effective at handling this effect. Finally, a specialized gravity operator splitting method is proposed for use in compositional streamline methods that gives an effective correction of gravity segregation. A significant part of our effort went into the development of a parallelization strategy for streamline solvers on the next generation shared memory machines. We found in this work that the built-in dynamic scheduling strategies of OpenMP lead to parallel efficiencies that are comparable to optimal schedules obtained with customized explicit load balancing strategies as long as the ratio of number of streamlines to number of threads is sufficiently high, which is the case in real-fie

  3. Putting renewables and energy efficiency to work: How many jobs can the clean energy industry generate in the US?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    clean energy supply can provide greater energy independence and security, has notable environmentalPutting renewables and energy efficiency to work: How many jobs can the clean energy industry generate in the US? Max Wei a,Ã, Shana Patadia b , Daniel M. Kammen a a Energy and Resources Group, 310

  4. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

  5. Targeted Energy Efficiency Expert Evaluation (E4) Report: Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, James K.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report summarizing the efficiency measures identified, implemented and the analysis of energy savings after implementation.

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006: Supply-side energy efficiency and fossil fuel switch.use, from non-energy uses of fossil fuels and from non-emissions from non-energy uses of fossil fuels and from non-

  7. Industrial Energy: Counseling the Marriage Between Energy Users and Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce utility bills can become a strategic partnership for boosting industry competitiveness and economic growth. This approach necessarily involves capital investment choices. Aside from the usual technical analyses, industry managers and program...

  8. High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing a crisis due to doubling of fertilizer, grain, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing for adaptation, water· use efficiency, pest resistance, and forage nutritive value. New, efficient beef) and high plant nutrient efficiency grasses. Develop improved management systems to incorporate the new

  9. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knowledge concerning energy management best practices andapplying and validating energy management best practices inan international industrial energy management standard that

  10. Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. BCCouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inc. (1997). Guide to Energy Efficiency Opportunities in theE. Masanet (2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and CostA.R. Ganji (2005). Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Fresh

  13. Combined effects of prepulsing and target geometry on efficient extreme ultraviolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    and the deposition of EUV and out of band radiation can fur- ther cause surface erosion and damage at the required targets geometries with special grooves as developed previously by the authors. C 2011 Society of Photo-Optical. Damage of multilayer Mo/Si mirrors by the de- bris products of laser beam interaction with target

  14. The Agilent HaloPlex Target Enrichment System enables fast, simple, and efficient analysis of genomic regions of interest for a large number of samples, covering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary The Agilent HaloPlex Target Enrichment System enables fast, simple, and efficient analysis · Expanded capture size ­ enrich thousands of targets, all in a single tube · Intuitive Design Wizard ENRICHMENT SYSTEM What a Difference a Day Makes Complete Target Enrichment in Less Than a Day Design Size

  15. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30?MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5??m-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ?1 ps.

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are realized when the boiler efficiency is improved, and the43 5.6.1 Boiler energy efficiencysystems. 5.6.1 Boiler energy efficiency measures The boiler

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  18. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency measures Energy Management Programs and Systems Energy management programs Energy teams Energy monitoring

  19. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for defrosting/compressor cooling or in frigid climates withthermosiphon compressor cooling, premium-efficiency motors,

  20. Targeted Energy Efficiency Expert Evaluation Report: Neal Smith Federal Building, Des Moines, IA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Goddard, James K.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the energy efficiency measures identified and implemented, and an analysis of the energy savings realized using low-cost/no-cost control system measures identified.

  1. Software Tools and Training Program: For the Efficient Design and Operation of Industrial Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soucy, E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 3 Three Scientific Laboratories Across Canada ? Oil sands & heavy oil Devon ? Buildings & communities ? Industrial processes ? Clean electricity ? Bioenergy ? Renewables..., 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-28 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2 CanmetENERGY ? The largest energy science and technology organization in Canada working on clean energy research...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial sectors. Modern control systems are often notmay already have modern process control systems in place togrowing rapidly. Modern process control systems exist for

  3. Barron Electric Cooperative- Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Barron Electric Cooperative (BEC) offers the Customized Energy Incentive Program for their commercial, industrial, and agricultural members to save energy by replacing old equipment with more...

  4. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of National Energy Management Standards, prepared2007, Industrial Energy Management: Issues Paper, preparedMeeting: Using Energy Management Standards to stimulate

  5. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy company Potomac Edison offers rebates to eligible commercial, industrial, governmental, and institutional customers in Maryland service territory who are interested in upgrading to...

  6. Cape Light Compact- Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through a multi-member partnership, Cape Light Compact (CLC) and Masssave offer a variety of financial incentives for commercial, industrial, and municipal facilities. Custom rebate options are...

  7. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and MAIN, 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement Industrialof Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), Internationaland MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement Industrial

  8. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), Internationaland MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialAugust 19, 2009. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

  9. Efficient plasma production by intense laser irradiation of low density foam targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, S.; Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J. [Laser and Neutron Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Nataliya, B. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental investigations conducted on low density structured materials, such as foams have been presented in this paper. These low density foam targets having a density greater than the critical density of the laser produced plasma ({rho}{sub cr{approx_equal}}3 mg{center_dot}cm{sup -3} at laser wavelength 1.06 {mu}m) have been envisaged to have enhanced laser absorption. Experiments were done with an indigenously developed, focused 15 Joule/500 ps Nd: Glass laser at {lambda} = 1064 nm. The focused laser intensity on the target was in the range of I{approx_equal}10{sup 13}-2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser absorption was determined by energy balance experiments. Laser energy absorption was observed to be higher than 85%. In another set of experiments, low density carbon foam targets of density 150 mg/cc were compared with the solid carbon targets. The x-ray emission in the soft x-ray region was observed to increase in foam target by about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt doped foam as compared to solid carbon. Further, investigations were also carried out to measure the energy transmitted through the sub-critical density TAC foam targets having a density less than 3 mg/cc. Such targets have been proposed to be used for smoothening of intensity ripples in a high power laser beam profile. Transmission exceeding 1.87% has been observed and consistent with results from other laboratories.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement by Measurement and Control: A Case Study of Reheating Furnaces in the Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martensson, A.

    , April 22-23, 1992 Table I. Furnace energy use in Sweden, 1989. Source: Jemkontoret, Stockholm, Sweden. Fuel Energy use a [GWh) ([10 9 Btu)) aI 1680 (5732) Propane 1272 (4340) Natural gas 48 (164) Coke oven gas 400 (1365) Electricity (induction...ENERGY EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT BY MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL A case study of reheating furnaces in the steel industry Anders Mlirtensson Department of Environmental and Energy Systems Studies Lund University S-22362 Lund Sweden ABSTRACT...

  11. Utility and State Industrial Efficient Motors Systems Incentives Programs: Experience and Success Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roop, J. M.; Stucky, D. J.

    . The Washington Slate Energy Office provides technology transfer and efficiency information. WSEO also developed and maintains the MotorMaster energy-efficient motor database, which is distributed nationally. The Wisconsin Energy Bureau will provide...

  12. Potential impacts of energy efficiency policies in the U.S. industry: Results from the clean energy futures study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) studied the role that efficient clean energy technologies can play in meeting the economic and environmental challenges for our future energy supply. The study describes a portfolio of policies that would motivate energy users and businesses to invest in innovative energy efficient technologies. On the basis of the portfolios, two policy scenarios have been developed, i.e. a moderate scenario and an advanced scenario. We focus on the industrial part of the CEF-study. The studied policies include a wide scope of activities, which are organized under the umbrella of voluntary industrial sector agreements. The policies for the policy scenarios have been modeled using the National Energy Modeling System (CEF-NEMS). Under the reference scenario industrial energy use would grow to 41 Quads in 2020, compared to 34.8 Quads in 1997, with an average improvement of the energy intensity by 1.1% per year. In the Moderate scenario the annual improvement is a bout 1.5%/year, leading to primary energy use of 37.8 Quads in 2020, resulting in 10% lower CO2 emissions by 2020 compared to the reference scenario. In the Advanced scenario the annual improvement increases to 1.8% per year, leading to primary energy use of 34.3 Quads in 2020, and 29% lower CO2 emissions. We report on the policies, assumptions and results for industry.

  13. Energy Smart- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Franklin Energy Services has partnered with the Michigan Public Power Agency (MPPA), which is made up of 20 municipal utilities, to offer the Energy Smart Commercial and Industrial Energy...

  14. Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information Energy Guide for Cement Making, please contact:Saving Opportunities for the Cement Industry: An ENERGY STARindex.cfm? c=in_focus.bus_cement_manuf_focus Based on data

  15. Comprehensive Approaches to Industrial Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Climate Wise Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.; Asrael, J.

    manufacturing companies. Since its inception in 1994, more than 400, companies representing approximately 11 percent of U.S. industrial energy use have joined the program. In doing so, these companies agreed to develop a portfolio of cost...

  16. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     MER also provides rebates to commercial and industrial customers for an energy audit which provides a walk-through of the premise and a report on energy saving opportunities, and estimated costs...

  17. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Support Unit (ETSU). 1988. High Level Control ofCircle Industries and SIRA (ETSU, 1988). Other developersvary between 2.5% and 10% (ETSU, 1988), and the typical

  18. Comprehensive Approaches to Industrial Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Climate Wise Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.; Asrael, J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Climate Wise Program is a partnership initiative sponsored by the U.S. EPA, with technical support from the U.S. DOE, with industry. It is designed to stimulate the voluntary reduction of greenhouse gas emissions among participating...

  19. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

  20. Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies and its private sector partnerships is presented. Commercial success stories and real-world benefits of the technology partnerships are discussed.

  1. California’s Industrial Energy Efficiency Best Practices Technical Outreach and Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazama, D. B.; Wong, T.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the California Energy Commission’s (Commission) energy policies and programs that save energy and money for California’s manufacturing and food processing industries to help retain businesses in-state and reduce greenhouse gases...

  2. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    separator. Material falls down and is transferred to another cyclone,separators for raw mill High Efficiency roller mill for raw materials grinding Low pressure drop cyclones

  3. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Demonstrated Energy Technologies, Newsletter No. 3.over 160 new, energy efficient technologies (42). Many oftargeted towards energy saving technologies and practices

  4. Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities provides incentives for business customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are offered for a variety of improvements...

  5. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiently utilize black liquor and other waste biomass forbiomass is used and black liquor is converted intoRecovery Falling film black liquor evaporation Black liquor

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization: Steam Turbines. Arlington, Virginia.scale CHP systems use steam turbines. Switching to naturalsystem efficiency of a steam turbine-based CHP system (80%

  7. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding energy efficiency; • Limited awareness of theof awareness and the corresponding failure to manage energyawareness within the corporate management culture of the potential for energy

  8. Loveland Water and Power- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water and Power, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses incentives for new construction projects and existing building retrofits. The Electric Efficiency...

  9. Public/private sector cooperation to promote industrial energy efficiency: Allied partners and the US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Cockrill, Chris; Tutterow, Vestal; Radspieler, Anthony

    2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, the US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (USDOE) has been involved in a unique voluntary collaboration with industry called the Allied Partner program. Initially developed under the Motor Challenge program, the partnership concept continues as a central element of USDOE's BestPractices, which in 2001 integrated all of USDOE's near-term industrial program offerings including those in motors, compressed air, pump, fan, process heating and steam systems. Partnerships are sought with end use industrial companies as well as equipment suppliers and manufacturers, utilities, consultants, and state agencies that have extensive existing relationships with industrial customers. Partners are neither paid nor charged a fee for participation. Since the inception of Allied Partners, the assumption has been that these relationships could serve as the foundation for conveying a system energy-efficiency message to many more industrial facilities than could be reached through a typical government-to-end-user program model. An independent evaluation of the Motor Challenge program, reported at the last EEMODS conference, attributed US $16.9 million or nearly 67 percent of the total annual program energy savings to the efforts of Allied Partners in the first three years of operation. A recent evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenger, which grew out of the former Motor Challenger program, attribute additional energy savings from compressed air training alone at US $12.1 million per year. Since the reorganization under BestPractices, the Allied Partner program has been reshaped to extend the impact of all BestPractices program activities. This new model is more ambitious than the former Motor Challenge program concerning the level of collaborative activities negotiated with Allied Partners. This paper describes in detail two new types of program initiatives involving Allied Partners: Qualified Specialist Training and Energy Events. The Qualified Specialist activity was conceived as a way of engaging the supply side of industry, consultants, and utilities to greatly increase use of decision making software developed by USDOE to assist industrial facilities in assessing the energy efficiency of their energy-using systems. To date, USDOE has launched Qualified Specialist training with member companies of the Hydraulic Institute (HI) and with distributors and consultants associated with the Compressed Air Challenge. These activities train and qualify industry professionals to use and to train customers to use USDOE's Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) and AIRMaster + software programs, respectively. The industry experts provide a public benefit by greatly increasing customer access to the software and assessment techniques. Participating Specialists anticipate a business benefit by providing a valuable service to key customers that is associated with USDOE. The Energy Event concept was developed in 2001 in cooperation with the California Energy Commission in response to the state's energy crisis and has been extended to other geographic areas during 2002. The three California events, named ''Energy Solutions for California Industry,'' relied on Allied Partners to provide system-based solutions to industrial companies as both speakers and exhibitors. These one-day events developed a model for a serious solutions-oriented format that avoids the typical trade show atmosphere through strict exhibitor guidelines, careful screening of speaker topics, and reliance on case studies to illustrate cost- and energy-saving opportunities from applying a systems approach. Future plans to use this activity model are discussed as well as lessons learned from the California series.

  10. Federal Support for Energy Efficiency in U.S. Industry: Collaboratively Addressing Energy Management in Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostrom, P.; Lung, R. B.; Harris, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to its clear links to the creation and retention of quality jobs, U.S. economic competitiveness, domestic energy security and global climate change. This paper explores successful industrial energy efficiency programs established by various...

  11. Industrial Strategic Planning - A New Approach to Developing Energy Efficient Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, R. M.; Mitchell, G. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's energy environment is a precarious one. Industry is well aware of the situation. Some have developed plans to cope with it, others are taking a 'wait and see' posture. To help in decision making, strategic planning has begun to emerge...

  12. Improving the Contribution of Economic Models in Evaluating Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, J. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for energy policy assessments compared to those which more properly reflect a trade-off between new capital investment and end-use energy savings – as both capital and energy are used to satisfy a specific industrial service demand. The paper builds on a...

  13. Overview of the Duke University Bass Connections Program in Industrial Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools for Toyota’s Motors Manufacturing North American” • Jason Chen, Robert Collins, Gary Gao, Daniel Schaffer, and Jill Wu ESL-IE-14-05-03 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 AY14...

  14. FirstEnergy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to help meet the goals established in Pennsylvania's Act 129, FirstEnergy's Pennsylvania companies (MetEdison, Penelec, and Penn Power) are providing energy efficiency incentives for a...

  15. Ontario’s Protocols for Evaluating the Energy and Bill Savings from Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messenger, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This paper focuses on how the protocols will help provide more transparent information to building owners about the net savings achieved by a particular energy efficiency investment and reviews the best methods available to estimate both gross and net energy...

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization: Gas Turbines. Arlington, Virginia.is higher than that of a gas turbine-based CHP system (74%electrical efficiency of a gas turbine-based CHP system is

  17. Quality of Service, Efficiency and Scale in Network Industries: An analysis of European electricity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growitsch, Christian; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    quality. We also show that incorporating quality of service does not alter scale economy measures. Quality of service should be an integrated part of efficiency analysis and incentive regulation regimes, as well as in the economic review of market...

  18. Energy Efficiency: Marketing and Service Potential for Energy Utilities' Industrial Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russel, C.; Tate, R.; Tubiolo, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of manufacturers as well as utilities, the failing is often a function of priorities. These differences are not insurmountable, however, as an array of public energy efficiency resources, already developed and freely available, can be tapped by utilities to better...

  19. Federal Support for Energy Efficiency in U.S. Industry: Collaboratively Addressing Energy Management in Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostrom, P.; Lung, R. B.; Harris, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. industrial sector consumes about one-third of energy in the United States each year. Improving energy efficiency in an industrial environment may come with a host of benefits to the facility owner, including a reduction in annual energy...

  20. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  1. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

  2. Patterns of energy use in the Brazilian economy: Can the profile of Brazilian exports determine the future energy efficiency of its industry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machado, G.V.; Schaeffer, R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the integration of the Brazilian economy in the global economy as a determining factor for the energy efficiency of its industry. Depending upon the profile of a country's exports (i.e., depending upon the share of energy-intensive exports out of total exports), different quantities of energy are required to produce the country's exported goods, which may counterbalance efforts made elsewhere to improve the overall energy efficiency of the country's industry. Different scenarios for the energy embodied in the industrial exports of Brazil are considered for the period 1995--2015. These scenarios are a combination of different shares of energy-intensive goods in the total exports of the country with different assumptions for gains obtained in industrial energy efficiency over time. For all scenarios the same fundamental hypothesis of liberalization of commerce and economic growth are assumed. Results for the year 2015 show that the total energy embodied in industrial exports varies from 1,413 PJ to 2,491 PJ, and the total industrial use of energy varies from 3,858 PJ to 6,153 PJ, depending upon the assumptions made. This is equivalent to an average industrial energy intensity variation ranging from 13.8 MJ to 22.0 MJ per US$-1985. The authors conclude that any policy aimed at improving Brazil's overall industrial energy efficiency should concentrate not only on the reduction of the energy intensity of particular industrial sectors, but also (and, perhaps, more importantly) on rethinking the very strategy for the integration of the country's economy in the global market in the future, with respect to the share of energy-intensive goods out of total exports. The focus is not incidental, for the ongoing structural changes in Brazilian exports alone may come to offset any efficiency improvements achieved by the national industry as a whole.

  3. Impact of New Federal Efficiency Performance Standards on the Industrial Motor Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.

    Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 12-15, 2009 percent increase over the previous two years. Rising electric rates, growing concerns about global warming, changes in the motor marketplace, and a new political environment in Washington create... of industry. This class of motors also accounts for a significant portion of the motor electricity consumption in the commercial sector (Nadel et al. 2002). Because of the large share of electricity consumption accounted for by this class of product...

  4. LiveChat Wed, 11/16, 2 pm ET: Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, November 16, at 2:00 PM ET, join Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, for a live discussion about the Energy Department programs how businesses are lowering their energy consumption, and how that energy savings benefits the American economy.

  5. Improving the Contribution of Economic Models in Evaluating Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, J. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional representation of improved end-use efficiency in the manufacturing sector has tended to assume “a net cost” perspective. In other words, the assumption for many models is that any change within the energy end-use patterns must imply a...

  6. The Use of Electricity in Industry and Energy Saving - The Gamma Co-Efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, R.; Froehlich, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simple factors : the gamma factor. It is, when using energy, the number of thermies which are replaced by one kWh. Gamma is not a factor for measuring the oil saving but the using efficiency. For measuring the oil saving, the author uses 'the net gain...

  7. Tuesday Webcast for Industry: Tax Rebates/Credits Available for Energy Efficiency Actions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarch 4; RSVP by Feb.DepartmentWorking with theTax

  8. Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process, and Materials R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRY ENERGYEnergyIndustrial

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EEBPP) (1996b). Monitoring and Targeting in the Glasssetting up a monitoring and targeting program of energyproduction budgeting. Monitoring and targeting systems can

  10. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    line Automated monitoring and targeting  systems   as % of and automated monitoring and targeting systems in coldAutomated monitoring and targeting systems Cogeneration for

  11. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    line Automated monitoring and targeting systems No.Automated monitoring and targeting systems Cogeneration formeasures are automated monitoring and targeting systems and

  12. How managing more efficiently substances in the design process of industrial products? An example from the aeronautics sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemagnen, Maud; Brissaud, Daniel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowering environmental impacts of products, i.e. ecodesign, is considered today as a new and promising approach environment protection. This article focuses on ecodesign in the aeronautical sector through the analysis of the practices of a company that designs and produces engine equipments. Noise, gas emissions, fuel consumptions are the main environmental aspects which are targeted by aeronautics. From now on, chemical risk linked to the use of materials and production processes has to be traced, not only because of regulation pressure (e.g. REACh) but also because of customers requirements. So far, the aeronautical sector hasn't been focusing much on managing chemical risks at the design stage. However, new substances regulations notably require that chemical risk management should be by industries used as early as possible in their product development process. The aeronautics sector has therefore to elaborate new chemical risk management. The aim of this paper is to present a new method hat should be adap...

  13. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  14. Revitalize the US silicon/ferrosilicon industry through energy-efficient technology. Part 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, H.R.; Welborn, J.H.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is concluded that silicon metal and ferrosilicon can be very effectively produced in a DC submerged arc furnace. Specific energy consumption factors measured were favorable to the technology. Significant energy savings over conventional AC practice are likely. Hollow electrode feeding of the furnace does not appear feasible. Electrode consumption was 0.144 lbs/lb so silicon while making metal, much of which occurred above the burden pile. Silicon loss to fume averaged 19.5% of the silicon charge. In this furnace, 50% FeSi was more difficult to produce than silicon metal, and the furnace could not be run with full burden; it was operated successfully about 3/4 full. In the silicon metal portion, the furnace was operated in a fully submerged mode for several 3-day test campaigns. The industry must seriously consider the identified benefits of DC plasma arc technology for retrofit or new added silicon capacity.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  16. The DOE s In-Plant Training (INPLT) Model to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; De Fontaine, Mr. Andre [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program; Schoeneborn, Fred C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-Plant Training (INPLT) is a new model for developing energy efficiency expertise within the US manufacturing companies participating in the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program-a nationwide initiative to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity in 10 years. INPLTs are designed to fill a market niche by providing hands on training in a real world manufacturing plant environment. Through INPLTs, participants from multiple manufacturing plants, supply chains, utilities, and other external stakeholders learn how to conduct energy assessments, use energy analysis tools to analyze energy saving opportunities, develop energy management systems, and implement energy savings projects. Typical INPLT events are led by DOE-certified Energy Experts and range from 2-4 days. Topics discussed include: identification of cross-cutting or system specific opportunities; introduction to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems; and energy project implementation and replication. This model is flexible, and can be tailored to suit the needs of specific industries. The INPLTs are a significant departure from the traditional single plant energy assessment model previously employed by DOE. INPLTs shift the focus from the concept of a single-plant s energy profile to a broader focus on training and capacity building among multiple industrial participants. The objective is to enable trainees to identify, quantify, implement and replicate future energy saving projects without continued external assistance. This paper discusses the INPLT model and highlights some of the initial outcomes from the successfully delivered INPLTs and the overall impact in terms of numbers of plants/participants trained, impacted energy footprints, and potential replication of identified opportunities.

  17. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potentials in the Iron and steel Industry in China. Reportfor the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guidebusiness/industry/Iron_Steel_Guide.pdf Worrell, E. Ramesohl,

  18. Energy Efficiency Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December of 2010, the Arkansas Public Service Commission announced a [http://www.apscservices.info/pdf/08/08-144-U_153_1.pdf Sustainable Energy Resource Action Plan] for Arkansas. Along with...

  19. Energy Efficiency Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Triennial plans must be approved by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (MPUC). The first triennial plan was approved by the Commission in July 2010, and expired at the end of 2013. The overall...

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.American Council for Energy Efficient Economy, WashingtonAmerican Council for an Energy Efficient Economy Proceedings

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    perpetuate less energy efficient designs. When a companytips for the energy efficient design of new labs andEnergy Guide. Energy efficient system design. The greatest

  2. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration, 2009c. EIA-906/920 Database: Monthly UtilityEIA), 2009. Form EIA-906/920 Database: Monthly Utility andEIA power sector annual database (EIA, 2009) and converting

  3. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See discussion of this report in ETSU, AEA Technology, 2001.environment/ccl/pdf/etsu- analysis.pdf Price, L. , Blok,a report prepared by ETSU (now AEA Energy & Environment) on

  4. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    example, the chemical and petrochemical sectors use largeoil (US EIA, 2009a), petrochemical fuel use (US EIA, 2009b)Metallic Minerals Chemical and Petrochemical Primary Metals

  5. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market assessments for steam, process heating,markets with experience from the commercial sector and tend to concentrate on measures such as lighting and heating,

  6. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    less than six years. The energy audits were carried out byyears, as identified in an energy audit or through internalthe following: 86 1. Energy audit and analysis. The company

  7. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agreements, to undertake energy audits, develop energyplatforms, provided energy audits, and provided financialmembers to undertake an energy audit and set energy or

  8. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuels used in the refinery sector were also collected fromof the emissions from the refinery sector are included incommitment of 44% and the refinery and food sectors

  9. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEM), as a part of the EKO Energi Agreements, provides aU. and Avasoo, D. , 2001. “EKO-Energi – Successful Voluntary

  10. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    update to the California Energy Balance (LBNL, forthcoming). The comparison shows that Denmark’s manufacturing sector

  11. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities; an Energy Awareness Workshop to demonstrateof technologies and measures. Energy awareness campaigns andof energy consumption, technical information and awareness

  12. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while 20% integrated with ISO 9001 and OHSAS 18001; ? Mostquality management system (ISO 9001). This explained in part

  13. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quality management program (ISO 9001:2000) and environmentalquality management system (ISO 9001). It was also found that

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing Industries. Good Practice Guide 131. Unitedand their Controls. Good Practice Guide 252. United Kingdom.

  15. Efficiency Exchange Conference Highlights Energy Efficiency Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Exchange Conference Highlights Energy Efficiency Innovations and Trends Northwest electric power industry connects on the latest energy efficiency programs and...

  16. Efficiency Exchange highlights energy efficiency innovations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Exchange highlights energy efficiency innovations and trends Northwest electric power industry connects on the latest energy efficiency programs and strategies Portland,...

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  18. Assess the key physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in NDCX-II experiments and high-gain heavy ion direct drive target designs using proven hydro codes like HYDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J. J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    physics that underpins high-hydro coupling-efficiency in N Dtarget designs using proven hydro codes like H Y D R A . byF E targets, we have studied hydro and implosion efficiency

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  20. Save Energy Now (SEN) Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries: Flooring Company Saves $872,000 Annually by Improving Steam System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study describes how the Shaw Industries plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, achieved annual savings of $872,000 and 93,000 MMBtu after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  1. Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inlet materials for these aggressive environments. For example, Ni-base superalloys are used to fabricate blades

  2. Presented at the 2001 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, July 24-27, 2001, Tarrytown, New York, and published in the Proceedings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    24-27, 2001, Tarrytown, New York, and published in the Proceedings. The research reported here for design of new systems. Simple comparisons of energy per square foot are of little value since processLBNL-47729 HT-428 Presented at the 2001 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, July

  3. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  4. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Support Unit (ETSU), 1988. “High Level Control ofCircle Industries and SIRA (ETSU, 1988). The LINKman system

  5. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Satcher, J. H. Jr.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Sorce, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm{sup 3}) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 {mu}m). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%). The aerogel targets produced T{sub e}=2 to 3 keV, n{sub e}=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%-60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%-3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced T{sub e}{approx} 2 keV, n{sub e}{approx} 0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%-75% conversion efficiency (1.6%-2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  6. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O&M Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings. PreparedGenentech, Vacaville: New Energy Efficient Site. Oakland,200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. New York, New

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    often used is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1%gas by 1% increases boiler efficiency by 2.5%, although this2001a). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    often used is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1%gas by 1% increases boiler efficiency by 2.5% (CIPEC 2001).Conservation and Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements. 22 nd

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency createdout energy audits, improving motivation and awareness in all

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency. August. Carrier Aeroseal, LLC. (2002). Cases HVAC system (Carrier Aeroseal 2002). Discharge air

  12. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Wang, Hong-Yu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China) [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Output in Chinese Cement Kilns,” Proceedings of thereduction of China’s cement industry. Energy Policy 45 (751. Kong, Xiangzhong (China Cement Association, CCA), 2009.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and38. Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre2005a). Guidelines for Energy Management. United States

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005). Guidelines for Energy Management. Washington, D.C.Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forfor improving your energy management practices. Resources

  16. Industrial Development Fund (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Industrial Development Fund provides financing grants and loans through designated municipalities and counties to assist in infrastructure improvements for targeted industrial projects. The...

  17. Title: Designing Energy-Efficient Information Processing Systems Abstract: The semiconductor industry is facing some extraordinary challenges, including process and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Designing Energy-Efficient Information Processing Systems Abstract: The semiconductor. It is against this backdrop that I provide examples of some techniques used to improve the energy efficiency's research focuses on energy-efficient computing, energy storage systems, low power electronics and design

  18. Predicting the potential for energy efficiency retrofits in single-family homes : an exploration of data targeting mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Kaitlin Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the lack of data on the United States' housing stock has been one of the primary barriers to market penetration of residential energy efficiency retrofits. Without knowledge of the homes and customers to ...

  19. Energy Efficiency in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Simulation of Steam Challenge and CHP Incentives with ITEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roop, J. M.

    in manufacturing as reported in the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) (6). For simulation of the model, the major drivers are industry output and fuel prices (the latter may be taken from any of a number of publications; the simulations... for this paper use [7]). Output forecasts are derived from the technical appendix to the same source. The MECS data are used to calibrate the end uses for each industry and the fuel types for each industry. This is done with varying success. Food processing...

  20. Harnessing Smart Sensor Technology for Industrial Energy Efficiency- Making Process-Specific Efficiency Projects Cost Effective with a Broadly Configurable, Network-Enabled Monitoring Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiczer, J. J.; Wiczer, M. B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Renewable Energy Best Practices. 5. International Society of Information Fusion. http://isif.org/ 6. Shipley, A.M. and R.N. Elliott. 2006. Ripe for the Picking: Have We Exhausted the Low-Hanging Fruit in the Industrial Sector? ACEEE Report IE061...

  1. Crossing the Valley of Death: Policy Options to Advance the Uptake of Energy-Efficient Emerging Technologies in US Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.; Bostrom, P.; Lung, R. B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating practices. In the United States the industrial sector is impacted by many policies-fiscal and monetary, economic development, energy pricing, climate legislation, tax code, and direct subsidies, among others-all of which help shape the strategy...

  2. Bonneville Power Administration and the Industrial Technologies Program Leverage Support to Overcome Energy Efficiency Barriers in the Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study explores how Bonneville Power Administration, a Northwest regional wholesale power provider, rethought how to encourage and promote energy efficiency projects through its utilities.

  3. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficiency technology costs and improvementon behavioral responses, technology costs, energy savings,is to characterize technology costs and potentials for

  4. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 3, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2007 73 Constraint-Based Control of Boiler Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    -Based Control of Boiler Efficiency: A Data-Mining Approach Zhe Song and Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, a data-mining approach is used to de- velop a model for optimizing the efficiency of an electric-utility boiler subject to operating constraints. Selection of process vari- ables to optimize combustion

  6. Presentation 3.1: Report on energy efficient technologies and CO2 reduction potentials in the pulp and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presentation 3.1: Report on energy efficient technologies and CO2 reduction potentials in the pulp INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE Report on Energy Efficient Technologies and CO2 Reduction Potentials in the Pulp Technologies and Systems IETS and International Coordination Workshop Conclusions 253 #12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY

  7. Common Excess Air Trends in Industrial Boilers with Single-Point Positioning Control and Strategies to Optimize Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    Common Excess Air Trends in Industrial Boilers with Single-Point Positioning Control and Strategies mechanically linking the fuel valve and combustion air damper. To match combustion air flow with fuel input, inlet dampers are typically calibrated at high fire. At part-load, combustion air generally decreases

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization: Gas Turbines. Arlington, VA. February.is higher than that of a gas turbine-based CHP system (74%,electrical efficiency of a gas turbine-based CHP system is

  9. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentialsand Its Impact on CO2 Emission," Iron & Steel, 2010, 45(5):Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (

  10. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModel Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel (

  11. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 22nd NREL Industry Growth Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 22nd NREL Industry Growth ForumNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency;National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future The 22nd NREL Industry Growth Forum

  12. 2015-01-16 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Notice of Information Collection Extension

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of information collection extension regarding consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 16, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  14. Definition of Energy Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from energy-intensive industries. See "Energy-Efficiency Measurement: Discussion". bluenext.gif (2052 bytes) Energy-Efficiency Measurement line divider For specific questions...

  15. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking Industrial Eneergy Efficiency and Co2 Emissions”.2000 NRCAN, 2006. Energy Efficiency Trends in Canada 1990 toCanada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, Ottawa. NRCAN, 2009.

  16. Electrotechnologies in Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, K. R.

    The Industrial Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) promotes the efficient use of electricity to improve the competitive position of the American industry. Electrotechnologies that improve productivity, improve quality...

  17. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the US pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the US (US EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the US This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

  18. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the U.S. (U.S. EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the U.S. This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer-based Monitoring and Targeting on a Rolling Mill,”line Automated monitoring and targeting systems ReducedAutomated Monitoring and Targeting System. Installing an

  20. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, Industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Massachusetts Univ. (United States)

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, activities included completing the ``Task 3 Topical Report.`` The report is being reviewed internally by the ABB CE project team. Overall, all the program goals were met except carbon conversion efficiency. Based on all the results obtained to date the ABB CE/Penn State team believes that conducting the 1000 hr demonstration (Task 5) is warranted. Since, Penn State has planned to conduct long term combustion tests on micronized coal and coal-water fuels for other DOE-funded Projects during the first quarter of 1995, the demonstration phase (Task 5) of the subject program is tentatively scheduled to begin in June 1995, pending DOE approval. Work continued under Task 4.0 to complete the ``Commercialization Plan`` with ABB CE`s cognizant Business Unit. To address the lower combustion efficiency than the original project goal (95% vs 98%) during Task 3, the data were evaluated in-detail to understand which of the key parameters might be adjusted to achieve the desired burnout. To identify reasons for this lower combustion efficiency, and to evaluate which of the key parameters (i.e, coal fineness, residence time, coal reactivities etc.) are important for maximizing the combustion efficiency, ABB CE`s proprietary mathematical model known as the Lower Furnace Program-Slice Kinetic Model (LFP-SKM) was used for simulating the combustion process in the Penn State boiler (at full load firing rate). Fuel kinetic information for this study was selected on a surrogate basis from ABB CE`s extensive in-house data base.

  1. High-Tech Means High-Efficiency: The Business Case for EnergyManagement in High-Tech Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshoian, Gary; Blazek, Michele; Naughton, Phil; Seese, RobertS.; Mills, Evan; Tschudi, William

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the race to apply new technologies in ''high-tech'' facilities such as data centers, laboratories, and clean rooms, much emphasis has been placed on improving service, building capacity, and increasing speed. These facilities are socially and economically important, as part of the critical infrastructure for pharmaceuticals,electronics, communications, and many other sectors. With a singular focus on throughput, some important design issues can be overlooked, such as the energy efficiency of individual equipment (e.g., lasers, routers and switches) as well as the integration of high-tech equipment into the power distribution system and the building envelope. Among technology-based businesses, improving energy efficiency presents an often untapped opportunity to increase profits, enhance process control,maximize asset value, improve the work place environment, and manage a variety of business risks. Oddly enough, the adoption of energy efficiency improvements in this sector lags behind many others. As a result, millions of dollars are left on the table with each year ofoperation.

  2. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase III, Industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Windsor, CT (United States). U.S. Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Massachusetts Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the fourteenth quarter (January `95 through March `95) of the program. The ABB project team met with cognizant DOE-PETC and Penn State personnel on February 15, 1995 at Penn State to discuss our ideas for a new burner (RSFC-based) to replace the HEACC burner prior to the long term ({approximately}1000 hrs) demonstration phase of this project. The main reasons for the proposed new burner were to improve combustion efficiencies and NO{sub x} reduction. Recent, experience at MIT with 5 million Btu/hr coal firing experiments on RSFC burner have shown remarkable performance. Results indicate that RSFC-based burner has the potential to produce lower NO{sub x} and higher carbon conversion efficiencies than the HEACC burner. M.I.T. developed the RSFC burner and obtained a patent for the concept. A decision was made to go with the new, RSFC-based burner during 1000 hr demonstration. ABB-CE will fund the costs ({approximately}$50K) for design/fabrication of the proposed new burner. Penn State plans to improve coal handling by installation of a gravimetric feeder and redesign/installation of a mass flow bottom on the surge bin.

  3. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschudi, Bill

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 15, 1999, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hosted a workshop focused on energy efficiency in Cleanroom facilities. The workshop was held as part of a multiyear effort sponsored by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the California Energy Commission. It is part of a project that concentrates on improving energy efficiency in Laboratory type facilities including cleanrooms. The project targets the broad market of laboratory and cleanroom facilities, and thus cross-cuts many different industries and institutions. This workshop was intended to raise awareness by sharing case study success stories, providing a forum for industry networking on energy issues, contributing LBNL expertise in research to date, determining barriers to implementation and possible solutions, and soliciting input for further research.

  4. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  5. Characterizing emerging industrial technologies in energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, John A. Skip; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Hanson, Donald A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies, 2000. Scenarios ofEmerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,” Lawrenceinformation about energy efficiency technologies, their

  6. White Paper on Energy Efficiency Status of Energy-Using Products in China (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. 16. Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE).Report on Industrial Energy Efficiency in China: Achievementof Industrial Energy Efficiency in “11th Five- Year Plan”

  7. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Efficiency for Heavy Industry in China, 1996-and energy efficiency for heavy industry (defined as ferrousand Energy Efficiency for Heavy Industry in China, 1996-2007

  8. White Paper on Energy Efficiency Status of Energy-Using Products in China (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. 16. Center for Industrial Energy Efficiency (CIEE).Report on Industrial Energy Efficiency in China: AchievementReview of Industrial Energy Efficiency in “11th Five- Year

  9. Nonlinear increase in the interaction efficiency of a second pulse with a target upon excitation of a plasma by a train of pulses from a Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pershin, Sergei M [Wave Research Centre, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of hole drilling in an aluminium plate was studied experimentally upon excitation of a plasma on its surface in air by a train of pulses from a Nd:YAG laser, the interval between pulses being 15-20 {mu}s. It was found that the crater depth increases nonmonotonically with each successive pulse of the train. A nonlinear, more than by a factor of six, increase in the depth was detected upon interaction of the second pulse with the target. The mechanism explaining this increase in the interaction efficiency of the second pulse in the train with the target is proposed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Graphene oxide based CdSe photocatalysts: Synthesis, characterization and comparative photocatalytic efficiency of rhodamine B and industrial dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Trisha [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Ho [Dasan Linc Educational Development Institute, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam, 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Meng, Ze-Da; Ullah, Kefayat; Park, Chong-Yeon; Nikam, Vikram [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Won-Chun, E-mail: wc_oh@hanseo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? CdSe–graphene is synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? Three molar solutions of CdSe were used making three different composites. ? RhB and Texbrite MST-L were used as sample dye solutions. ? Texbrite MST-L is photo degraded in visible light. ? UV-spectroscopic analysis was done to measure degradation. - Abstract: CdSe–graphene composites were prepared using simple “hydrothermal method” where the graphene surface was modified using different molar solutions of cadmium selenide (CdSe) in aqueous media. The characterization of CdSe–graphene composites were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and with transmission electron microscope (TEM). The catalytic activities of CdSe-composites were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and commercial industrial dye “Texbrite MST-L (TXT-MST)” with fixed concentration. The degradation was observed by the decrease in the absorbance peak studied by UV spectrophotometer. The decrease in the dye concentration indicated catalytic degradation effect by CdSe–graphene composites.

  11. Target 4 Flight Path 90L (FIRE House) Target 4 Flight Path...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and industrial research. LANSCE has two spallation neutron sources: the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Target-1) and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (Target-4)....

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities, recommend energy efficiency actions, developand sequence them more efficiently. In addition, the systemCouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. (2001). Optimize energy efficiency of HRSG. Hydrocarbonper Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. Copper Developmentto Promote Energy-Efficient Motor Systems in North America’s

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. (2001). Optimize energy efficiency of HRSG. HydrocarbonCEC (2001). 2001 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential2002. Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE), 2007. Motor

  15. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased bytemperature, and boiler efficiency. They are a recommendedresult is improved boiler efficiency. Turbulator installers

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7.1 summarizes the boiler efficiency measures, while Tablerule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased by2001). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    London, England. Good Practice Guide 149. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy Efficiency

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    London, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 302. Energy Efficiency

  20. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1994) at $2.8/t. Automated monitoring and targeting system.an automated monitoring and targeting system at a cold stripComputer-based Monitoring and Targeting on a Rolling Mill,”

  1. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  2. Targeted Energy Efficiency Expert Evaluation (E4) Report: Iowa City Federal Building and U.S. Post Office, Iowa City, IA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, James K.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report summarizing Targeted E4 measures and energy savings analysis for the Iowa City Federal Building and Post Office.

  3. Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and...

  4. Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    building industry in sustainability, energy- efficiency, andneeds such as sustainability, energy-efficiency, optimized

  5. Impact of surface roughness on the electrical parameters of industrial high efficiency NaOH-NaOCl textured multicrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, P.K. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Pujahari, R.M. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Kaur, Harpreet [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Advanced Institute of Technology and Management, Palwal 121105, Haryana (India); Singh, Devi [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Varandani, D.; Mehta, B.R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution (1:1 ratio by volume) based texturization process at 80-82 C is an easy, low cost and comparatively new and convenient option for fabrication of any multicrystalline silicon (mC-Si) solar cell. In the present study atomic force microscope is used to observe the intragrain surface in a miniscule area (3 {mu}m x 3 {mu}m) of NaOH-NaOCl textured surface by two and three dimensional analysis, roughness analysis and section analysis. The r.m.s value of the surface parameter of 7.0 nm ascertains the smoothness of the textured surface and further the surface reflectivity is minimized to 4-6% in the 500-1000 nm wavelength range by a proper silicon nitride anti-reflection coating. Comparing with the standard HF-HNO{sub 3}-CH{sub 3}COOH acid textured cell, the NaOH-NaOCl textured cell shows a comparatively lower value of series resistance of 7.17 m{omega}, higher value of shunt resistance of 18.4 {omega} to yield a fill factor of 0.766 leading to more than 15% cell efficiency in the industrial cell processing line. This AFM study yields different surface roughness parameters for the NaOH-NaOCl textured wafers which can be used as a reference standard for optimized texturing. (author)

  6. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor, Phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G.; McGowan, J.G.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to retrofit a burner capable of firing microfine coal to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the fifteenth quarter (April `95 through June `95) of the program. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1.0) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components. (2.0) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC (High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor) burner. (3.0) Installation and testing of a prototype HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application. (4.0) Economics evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. (5.0) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions. Task 1 through Task 4 were previously completed. Based on all the results obtained to date the ABB/Penn State team and DOE/PETC have decided to conduct a 1000 hr demonstration test (Task 5). Importantly, a decision was made to employ a new burner for the demonstration. The new burner is based on the concept called {open_quotes}Radially Stratified Flame Core (RSFC){close_quotes}, developed by MIT and licensed by ABB. Work under Task 5 of this program was started during this reporting period.

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  8. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE). ReportS. Nadel. 2002. Energy-Efficient Motor Systems: A HandbookCouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy. Washington, D.C.

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.EEBPP) (2000b). Energy Efficient Refrigeration Technology –

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, WashingtonCashes in on Energy Efficient Inverter Technology. National$200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. Case Study

  11. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE).and S. Nadel. 2002. Energy-Efficient Motor Systems: ACouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy. Washington, D.C.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    often used is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1%flue gas by 1% increases boiler efficiency by 2.5%. Boiler -Conservation and Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements. In:

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design teams for energy-efficient building design. FinancialHVAC Systems Energy-efficient system design Fan modificationHVAC Systems Energy-efficient system design. The greatest

  14. Non-PGM Target Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    targets that need to be met are cost, efficiency, and durability. A secondary target is heat rejection at rated power. (ANL) * Given that for current Pt systems catalyst cost is ...

  15. Energy Efficient Industrial Building Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holness, G. V. R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " or precooled air concept of ventilation, with a high temperature hot-water/chilled-water changeover piping system. Extensive energy recovery systems would be provided for production equipment and oil mist control would be by local captive systems, rather...

  16. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG:Background:Bagdad Plant1Department

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in flue gas oxygen, boiler efficiency is increased by 2.5% (50 Boiler Energy Efficiencyin Chapter 13. Boiler Energy Efficiency Measures The boiler

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency createdimprove the awareness of personnel with regard to energy use

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency createdimprove the awareness of personnel with regard to energy use

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency created1996). Energy Saved by Raising Employees’ Awareness. Case

  1. Innovative New Industrial Technologies: An Industry/DOE Joint Endeavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, T. J.

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Industrial Programs supports research and development leading to improved energy efficiency and greater overall productivity in the industrial sector. Its basic strategy is a program of cost-shared R...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australia. Heat was recovered at relatively high efficiencies, although it is not specified how much energy

  3. Energy Efficiency Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to research, develop, and use advanced energy efficiency, renewable energy, pollution prevention technologies for industrial customers. The site includes information on...

  4. Efficiency Maine Trust

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's public benefits fund for energy efficiency was authorized originally in 1997 by the state's electric-industry restructuring legislation. Under the initial arrangement, the administration of...

  5. Energy Efficiency Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut's original electric-industry restructuring legislation (Public Act 98-28), enacted in April 1998, created separate funds to support energy efficiency and renewable energy.* The...

  6. Kenergy- Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy offers commercial and industrial customers rebates for energy-efficient lighting and other energy efficient improvements. Customers can receive rebates of $350 per kilowatt of energy...

  7. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, VolumeBNL). 2001. The Energy Technology Systems AnalysisKramer Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programme (1994). Good Practice Guide 141: Waste heatProgramme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999a). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry Series, Petrochemical Manufacturing: 2002. U.SProcess blocks for the production of petrochemical buildingCO 2 reduction for petrochemical products, 12/13 December,

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing Resin, synthetic rubber, and artificialwith the resin and synthetic rubber manufacturing industry.Others 3252 Resins, synthetic rubber 3256 Soaps, cleaning

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing (2005a). Petrochemical processes 2005. More info:in boilers and petrochemical process units have shownalmost every process in the petrochemical industry, whereas

  12. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Navigating Energy Management: A Roadmap for Business.Characteristics and Energy Management Opportunities. BurtonCaffal, C. 1995. Energy Management in Industry. Centre for

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forPollution Prevention/Energy Management. General Motorsactions, develop an energy management plan for business; and

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andCaffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forEquipment. Federal Energy Management Program, Washington,

  15. Animal Industries Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant managers around the world are interested in improving the energy efficiency of their facilities while both growing and modernizing their manufacturing capabilities. Emerging industrial technologies, both at the ...

  16. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. defining the performance indicator(s) to use to measureand targets; 6. performance indicators; 7. appropriateManager/Energy Performance Indicators. Extensive regular

  17. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

  18. Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ploeger, L. K.

    .8%! ! ! ! OTHER 8.4%! l4.9%! l4.0%! ! ! ! TOTAL 100.0%! 100.0%! 100.0%! ! PROGRAM STRATEGY Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program was designed to: lead industrial energy consumers to the realization that increased energy efficiency generates... ONTARIO'S INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVICES PROGRAM LINDA K. PLOEGER, GENERAL MANAGER, INDUSTRY PROGRAMS ONTARIO MINISTRY OF ENERGY TORONTO, ONTARIO, ABSTRACT The Ontario Ministry of Energy began offering its new Industrial Energy Services Program...

  19. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forU.S. DOE-OIT (2003a). Energy Management Program Benefits.actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and