National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for targeted drug delivery

  1. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    Hydrophobic drug paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) and pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared in this study to build a colon targeting nanoparticle based drug delivery system for oral administration. Negative charged PAX NPs at the size of 110...

  2. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  3. Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Ying

    2005-01-01

    We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

  4. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

  5. One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting the specific site (or area) that it is intended to reach. Therefore, drugs candidates for more focused drug delivery systems is magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles

  6. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heidegger; S. Niedermayer; A. Schmidt; D. Gößl; C. Argyo; S. Endres; T. Bein; C. Bourquin

    2015-09-03

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.

  7. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidegger, S; Schmidt, A; Gößl, D; Argyo, C; Endres, S; Bein, T; Bourquin, C

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-funct...

  8. Targeted Delivery of Drugs to Brain Tumors (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Forte, Trudy

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Trudy Forte of Berkeley Lab's Life Sciences Division will discuss her work developing nano-sized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that can be used as a safe and effective means of delivering anticancer drugs to brain tumors, particularly glioblastoma multiforme. This is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Her research team found that the synthetic LDL particles can target and kill such tumors cells in vitro. The nanoparticles are composed of a lipid core surrounded by a peptide. The peptide contains an amino acid sequence that recognizes the LDL receptor, and the lipid core has the ability to accumulate anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Mechanical loading impacts intramuscular drug transport : impact on local drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter I-Kung

    2008-01-01

    Controlled-release drug-delivery systems enable efficient and defined administration of therapeutic agents to target tissues. However, ultimate drug distribution and pharmacologic effect are determined by target tissue ...

  10. An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs has recently been described of the cancer drug doxorubicin targeted to hepatocytes in a mouse liver tumour model. Known as the LEAPT step involves administering the rhamnose-capped pro-drug; the drug is activated in the target cell once

  11. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Campbell, Heather L. (Baltimore, MD); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  12. Packaging for a drug delivery microelectromechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Local drug delivery is a fast expanding field, and has been a center of attention for researchers in medicine in the last decade. Its advantages over systemic drug delivery are clear in cancer therapy, with localized tumors. ...

  13. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  14. Drug delivery Sustained Drug Release from Non-eroding Nanoporous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Drug delivery Sustained Drug Release from Non-eroding Nanoporous Templates** Evin Gultepe, Dattatri drug, doxorubicin (Dox), from different non-eroding nanopor- ous coatings. Detailed studies of drug phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), which is commonly employed to simulate in vivo conditions for drug release

  15. An implantable device for localized drug delivery and sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Karen D

    2009-01-01

    There are many potential clinical applications for localized drug delivery and sensing systems, such as cancer, vaccinations, pain management, and hormone therapy. Localized drug delivery systems reduce the amount of drug ...

  16. Section 21: Drug Discovery/Delivery Pharmacokinetic Considerations of Local Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    1 Section 21: Drug Discovery/Delivery Pharmacokinetic Considerations of Local Drug Delivery.Plontke@uni-tuebingen.de Although there is increasing interest in the local delivery of drugs to the inner ear by applying them to the round window (RW) membrane, most drug application protocols have been empirically- based. As a result

  17. Drug-Target Interaction Predicates Combining Similarities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    Drug-Target Interaction Predicates DataSet Combining Similarities Collective Inference Collective Inference and Multi-Relational Learning for Drug­Target Interaction Prediction Shobeir Fakhraei1, Bert Huang1 and Lise Getoor1,2 Poly-pharmacology Drug Repurposing Drug-Target Interaction Network Studies

  18. Microneedle delivery for improved efficacy of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stauber, Zachary Jason

    2012-01-01

    Two classes of drugs, antiretrovirals and antibiotics, could benefit greatly from delivery through microneedles. Microneedles (MN) offer an increase in efficacy for these drugs by providing delivery to the lymphatic system ...

  19. Functionalized Zirconium Phosphate Nano Platelets - From Surface Design to Drug Delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Atashi

    2014-05-30

    the intended target or compartment. This dissertation will focus on the analytical characterization of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) in both alpha and theta phases as a drug delivery matrix utilizing multiple unique and novel analytical techniques. In the first...

  20. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    ARTICLES Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs Michael J. Keiser1,2 *, Vincent Setola3 drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiological targets, explaining side effects and efficacy. Because many drug­target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible

  1. Discovering the Targets of Drugs Via Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discovering the Targets of Drugs Via Computational Systems Biology* Published, JBC Papers in Press is empowering the study of drug action. Studies on biological effects of chemical com- pounds have increased of drugs, with the collective potential to change the nature of drug discovery and pharmacological therapy

  2. Experimental strategies for investigating passive and ultrasound-enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers many advantages over traditional drug delivery methods. However, the natural resistance of the skin to drug permeation represents a major challenge that transdermal drug delivery needs to ...

  3. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  4. Amphiphilic linear-dendritic block copolymers for drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Phuong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric drug delivery systems have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. Such systems can solubilize and sequester hydrophobic drugs from degradation, thereby increasing circulation half-life and efficacy. ...

  5. Enhanced drug delivery capabilities from stents coated with absorbable polymer and crystalline drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, Wenda C.

    Current drug eluting stent (DES) technology is not optimized with regard to the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery. A novel, absorbable-coating sirolimus-eluting stent (AC-SES) was evaluated for its capacity to deliver drug ...

  6. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  7. Use of physical enhancers for gastrointestinal and transdermal drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoelihammer, Carl M. (Carl Magnus)

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis represents a significant advance in the field of transdermal- and gastrointestinal (GI)-based drug delivery. With regards to the former, previous work has led to a thorough mechanistic ...

  8. Needle-free drug delivery using shock wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlov, Atanas (Atanas Ivanov)

    2006-01-01

    A recent advancement in the area of needle-free injection systems has been the development of devices capable of epidermal delivery of powder medications. These devices use high-pressure compressed gas to accelerate drug ...

  9. A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

  10. Photoswitchable Nanoparticles for Triggered Tissue Penetration and Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Rong

    We report a novel nanoparticulate drug delivery system that undergoes reversible volume change from 150 to 40 nm upon phototriggering with UV light. The volume change of these monodisperse nanoparticles comprising spiropyran, ...

  11. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandan, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Etching of Bulk Titanium for MEMS Applications. ” Journal ofMeng. 2012. “An Implantable MEMS Micropump System for Drugand Ellis Meng. 2009. “A Passive MEMS Drug Delivery Pump for

  12. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  13. An Implantable MEMS Drug Delivery Device for Rapid Delivery in Ambulatory Emergency Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Noel

    We introduce the first implantable drug delivery system based on MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) technology specifically designed as a platform for treatment in ambulatory emergency care. The device is named ...

  14. Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audus, Kenneth L.

    1999-01-01

    Audus, K.L. (1999) Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary. Eur. J. Pharm. Sci. 8, 161-165. PMID: 10379038. Publisher’s official version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0928-0987(99)00031-7. Open Access version: http... document contains the author’s accepted manuscript. For the publisher’s version, see the link in the header of this document.] Paper citation: Audus, K.L. (1999) Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary. Eur. J. Pharm. Sci. 8...

  15. Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Brinda

    2007-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

  16. Transdermal drug delivery by localized intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, James C.

    Both field-confined skin electroporation and microscissioning offer minimally invasive methods for delivering drugs across skin and nail with minimal sensation. Both methods create high permeability pathways in a pain-free ...

  17. IFE Target Fabrication, Delivery, and Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foam Shell Generation Seal Coat Formation CO2 Drying High-Z Sputter CoatingDT Filling DT Layering" for IFE - Large effort for NIC fosters efficiency (e.g., foam shells) 2. The recent IFE target technology (ZFE) · Foam capsule with overcoat HIF Distributed Radiator SNL Dynamic Hohlraum · Advanced

  18. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, Robert P. (1820 Mountain View Rd., Tiburon, CA 94920)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release said chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65.degree. C. The invention further relates to the use of said liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  19. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, R.P.

    1993-03-02

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release the chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65 C. The invention further relates to the use of the liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  20. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Wednesday, 27 February 2008 00:00 The veil has...

  1. Diffusion-limited binding explains binary dose response for local arterial and tumour drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzafriri, A. R.

    Background:? Local drug delivery has transformed medicine, yet it remains unclear how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. Most therapies seek to prolong release, yet recent studies ...

  2. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  3. Modeling oxaliplatin drug delivery to circadian rhythms in drug metabolism and host tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clairambault, Jean

    period) time-scheduled regimens for cytotoxic drug delivery by intravenous infusion, a pharmacokinetic constant infusion of the same daily dose, when the biological time of peak infusion is correctly chosen. Furthermore, it is well adapted to using mathematical optimization methods of drug infusion flow, choosing

  4. Predicting Drug-Target Interaction for New Drugs Using Enhanced Similarity Measures and Super-Target Clustering1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    Predicting Drug-Target Interaction for New Drugs Using Enhanced Similarity Measures and Super.hku.hk, FYLC: chin@cs.hku.hk * To whom correspondence should be addressed. Abstract--Predicting drug-target interaction using computa- tional approaches is an important step in drug discovery and repositioning

  5. DRUG DELIVERY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ELUTING STENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    DRUG DELIVERY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ELUTING STENT G. Pontrelli1 , F. de Monte2 , M. Prosi3 1. ABSTRACT The drug diffusion process through an arterial eluting stent is studied and a quantitative description for drug transport to evaluate feasibility of new drug delivery strategies

  6. Commercial potential for thermal & magnetic sensitive polymer in drug delivery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward, Jonathan M. (Jonathan Mark)

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and magnetically sensitive polymers are a new class of materials with unique properties suitable for applications in drug delivery. Specifically, these polymers can be combined with a drug reservoir to make a drug ...

  7. Drug-Target Interaction Prediction for Drug Repurposing with Probabilistic Similarity Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    Drug-Target Interaction Prediction for Drug Repurposing with Probabilistic Similarity Logic Shobeir, USA getoor@cs.umd.edu ABSTRACT The high development cost and low success rate of drug dis- covery from appro- ved drugs. Computational methods can be effective in focu- sing efforts for such drug repurposing

  8. Drug Delivery DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802260

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    ,[2] which were genetically engineered to universally express luciferase, provides a rapid readout of the body by using a modified b-actin promoter.[4] As the majority of luciferin is cleared from the body nanoparticle could be engineered to target different cells.[3,6] PLA is an Food and Drug Administration (FDA

  9. In vivo activation and biocompatibility of a MEMS microreservoir drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawgo, Rebecca Scheidt, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Temporal and spatial control over the delivery of therapeutic compounds is an important, fertile, and rapidly advancing field of study in medicine. This work describes the advancement of a new technology of drug delivery ...

  10. Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson in Drug Discovery & Development 2002 5(2): 279-288 PharmaPress Ltd ISSN 1367-6733 The specificity-tuning of active drug delivery through their great ability to undergo site- specific modification

  11. Towards engineering hormone-binding globulins as drug delivery agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J.

    2014-11-26

    (2014) Towards Engineering Hormone-Binding Globulins as Drug Delivery Agents. PLoS ONE 9(11): e113402. doi:10.1371/journal.pone. 0113402 Editor: Ashley M. Buckle, Monash University, Australia Received: June 10, 2014 Accepted: October 24, 2014 Published... stock solution was prepared by dissolving lyophilised cortisol (Sigma Aldrich) in 80% ethanol to make a 500 mM solution, which was then diluted with water to make solutions of 20, 40 and 80 mM, with water being used as a negative control. Aliquots...

  12. Drug disposition and targeting: Transport across the blood-brain barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochat, Bertrand; Audus, Kenneth L.

    1999-01-01

    the BBB. Neutral amino-acid carriers have proven to be capable of transporting many amino acids, drugs and endogenous compounds with similar stuctures. Leucine, cysteine, serine, alanine, phenylalanine, L-dopa, L-tryptophan, the alkylating agent... the carriers for opioids at the BBB have not been resolved. The possibility obviously exists, however, for the design and development of opioid peptide therapeutics that target BBB carriers and achieve improve brain delivery (Thomas et al., 1997). The last...

  13. Computational Method for Drug Target Search and Application in Drug Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuzong

    Ligand-protein inverse docking has recently been introduced as a computer method for identification of potential protein targets of a drug. A protein structure database is searched to find proteins to which a drug can bind ...

  14. The evaluation of melamine dendrimers as potential macromolecular vehicles for anticancer drug delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neerman, Michael Frederick

    2005-08-29

    Often associated with chemotherapy are the dangerous and sometimes lifethreatening side effects towards non-cancerous tissue that can occur while on such drug regimens. The design and utilization of macromolecular drug delivery vehicles is gaining...

  15. Design and Testing of an Impedance-Based Sensor for Monitoring Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    microelectromechanical systems MEMS device has been fabricated and tested. The sensor consists of two electrodesDesign and Testing of an Impedance-Based Sensor for Monitoring Drug Delivery Audrey M. Johnson, Massachusetts 02139, USA A new impedance-based sensor to monitor drug delivery from an implantable

  16. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and...

  17. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Lopez, Aron R; Turei, Denes; Modos, Dezso; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmaros, Tamas; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understan...

  18. Fabrication of Metal/Oxide Nanostructures by Anodization Processes for Biosensor, Drug Delivery and Supercapacitor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po-Chun

    2014-01-13

    This dissertation proposed to initiate the research into the fabrication of metal/oxide nanostructures by anodization process for biosensor, drug delivery and supercapacitor applications by producing different nanostructures ...

  19. Application of microfluidic emulsion technology to biochemistry, drug delivery and Lab-on-a-Chip programmability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urbanski, John Paul

    2005-01-01

    This research applies microfluidic emulsion technology to three diverse problems; biochemistry, drug delivery and lab-on-a-chip programmability. These subjects represent distinct research programs, but the underlying physics ...

  20. Enhancing pharmaceutical formulations to improve efficacy and delivery of drug molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weight, Alisha K. (Alisha Kessel)

    2013-01-01

    Major impediments to the full utility of current and potential drugs include issues of resistance and delivery. To address these challenges, in this thesis two directions of research were pursued: (1) the use of multivalent ...

  1. Thermo-responsive Layer-by-Layer Assemblies for Nanoparticle-based Drug Delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jing

    2013-11-26

    release in response to temperature is still challenging. Here, a thermo-responsive drug delivery system of solid dexamethasone nanoparticles (DXM NPs) encapsulated in a model LbL assembly of strong polyelectrolytes poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride...

  2. Mechanical characterization and in vivo operation of an implantable drug delivery MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yawen, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to advance an implantable drug delivery MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) device developed in our laboratory. This device was designed to locally deliver multiple substances in complex release ...

  3. Exploring Polymer and Liposomal Carriers for Optimized Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    1459–1467. Fox, M. E. Dendritic polymers for the delivery ofiii Chapter 1: Introduction to Polymer and Liposome Drugbioavailability. Conclusions Polymers and liposomes can be

  4. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Luke J.

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery ...

  5. A Nonpolycationic Fully Proteinaceous Multiagent System for Potent Targeted Delivery of siRNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, David V.

    Protein-based methods of targeted short-interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery have the potential to solve some of the problems faced by nanoparticle-based methods, such as poor pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, low tumor ...

  6. BIOENGINEERING, FOOD, AND NATURAL PRODUCTS Advances in Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    BIOENGINEERING, FOOD, AND NATURAL PRODUCTS Advances in Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712 Biomaterials are widely used in numerous medical as biomateri- als, materials and approaches used in drug and protein deli®ery systems, materials used

  7. Specific and general binding in arterial drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Andrew D. (Andrew David), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents have emerged as the most effective method for treating restenosis following percutaneous coronary interventions. This thesis investigates how drugs with similar physiochemical properties but different ...

  8. Toward a drug delivery coating for intraocular lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Renée Chivon

    2010-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly has become a quintessential tool for the creation of versatile, dynamic nanostructured materials able to dictate cellular behavior through exquisite surface functionality and delivery of bioactive ...

  9. Protein engineering for targeted delivery of radionuclides to tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis

    2010-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatment strategies include systemic chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and surgical excision. Chemotherapy is nonspecific, and targets all rapidly dividing cells. External beam radiation and surgery ...

  10. Hydrogels as Biomaterials: Infinite Possibilities in Bionanotechnology, Drug Delivery, Biological Recognition,Tissue Engineering, and Pure Scientific Fun!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    Hydrogels as Biomaterials: Infinite Possibilities in Bionanotechnology, Drug Delivery, Biological Recognition,Tissue Engineering, and Pure Scientific Fun! Nicholas A Peppas Laboratories of Biomaterials,, Drug, hydrogels have been approved as biomaterials in a wide range of biomedical applications and devices

  11. Near-infrared-actuated devices for remotely controlled drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timko, Brian P.

    A reservoir that could be remotely triggered to release a drug would enable the patient or physician to achieve on-demand, reproducible, repeated, and tunable dosing. Such a device would allow precise adjustment of dosage ...

  12. Biocompatibility of an implantable ophthalmic drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Sarah J. (Sarah Jennifer)

    2007-01-01

    Diseases of the posterior eye present clinicians with a treatment challenge mainly due to the region's inaccessible location. Several drugs, including those available for the treatment of exudative age-related macular ...

  13. DRUG-TARGET INTERACTION PREDICTION BY INTEGRATING CHEMICAL, GENOMIC, FUNCTIONAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Jianyang "Michael"

    DRUG-TARGET INTERACTION PREDICTION BY INTEGRATING CHEMICAL, GENOMIC, FUNCTIONAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL.edu.cn Corresponding author In silico prediction of unknown drug-target interactions (DTIs) has become a popular tool for drug repositioning and drug development. A key challenge in DTI prediction lies in integrating multiple

  14. Multiple-robot drug delivery strategy through coordinated teams of microswimmers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kei Cheang, U; Kim, Min Jun; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Julius, Anak Agung

    2014-08-25

    Untethered robotic microswimmers are very promising to significantly improve various types of minimally invasive surgeries by offering high accuracy at extremely small scales. A prime example is drug delivery, for which a large number of microswimmers is required to deliver sufficient dosages to target sites. For this reason, the controllability of groups of microswimmers is essential. In this paper, we demonstrate simultaneous control of multiple geometrically similar but magnetically different microswimmers using a single global rotating magnetic field. By exploiting the differences in their magnetic properties, we triggered different swimming behaviors from the microswimmers by controlling the frequency and the strength of the global field, for example, one swim and the other does not while exposed to the same control input. Our results show that the balance between the applied magnetic torque and the hydrodynamic torque can be exploited for simultaneous control of two microswimmers to swim in opposite directions, with different velocities, and with similar velocities. This work will serve to establish important concepts for future developments of control systems to manipulate multiple magnetically actuated microswimmers and a step towards using swarms of microswimmers as viable workforces for complex operations.

  15. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery VLSI Design and CAD Laboratory (VDCL), University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA. 2 Electrical many side effects, such as reduction in battery life time, increase in operating tempera- ture

  16. IN-PLANE BANDPASS REGULATION CHECK VALVE IN HEAT-SHRINK PACKAGING FOR DRUG DELIVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    IN-PLANE BANDPASS REGULATION CHECK VALVE IN HEAT-SHRINK PACKAGING FOR DRUG DELIVERY R. Lo and E. Meng University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA ABSTRACT The first check valve valve design and these results were confirmed experimentally. The valve regulates flow between 150

  17. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  18. Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    Summary Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient powders variation in the drug release profile of the tablet. While fabrication of experimental tablets

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF MYCOSIN FAMILY PROTEASES, NOVEL DRUG TARGETS OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Hilary

    2007-09-17

    Mycosin-1 a novel drug target. This study aims to clone and characterize Mycosin-1 for further investigation as a drug target. The mycosin-1 and mycosin-2 genes were successfully cloned for later use in expression studies. Mycosin-2 has been included...

  20. Overcoming Drug Resistance by Co-Targeting Marzieh Ayati1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    , Statistics and Computer Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran Abstract Removal or suppression of key to the drug. Communica- tion to the resistance machinery---e.g., efflux pumps and drug-modifying enzymes

  1. Small Molecule Target Identification using Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lomenick, Brett Eugene

    2013-01-01

    FIGURE 2.8: Resveratrol does not inhibitFIGURE 2.9: Resveratrol target analysis withFIGURE 2.10: Resveratrol target analysis with

  2. Hepatic Stellate Cell–Targeted Delivery of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Transgene via Bile Duct Infusion Enhances Its Expression at Fibrotic Foci to Regress Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani

    Liver fibrosis generates fibrotic foci with abundant activated hepatic stellate cells and excessive collagen deposition juxtaposed with healthy regions. Targeted delivery of antifibrotic therapeutics to hepatic stellate ...

  3. Nanoparticle Agglomeration via Ionic Colloidal Destabilization as a Novel Approach to Dry Powder Formulations for Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumley, Carl Joseph

    2008-08-05

    suspension of stable charged nanoparticles (NP). Stearic acid allowed for stabilization of the resulting colloid, and facilitated destabilization with the addition of electrolytes. The resulting nanoparticle agglomerates demonstrated excellent aerosol... the controlled agglomeration of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension for the fabrication of pure drug porous microparticles for pulmonary delivery. A model drug, nifedipine, was used in the study due to its current lack of attention in pulmonary formulations...

  4. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:FebruaryEIA's Today8Topo II: An Enzyme Target

  5. Encapsulation of Pt(IV) prodrugs within a Pt(II) cage for drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    This report presents a novel strategy that facilitates delivery of multiple, specific payloads of Pt(IV) prodrugs using a well-defined supramolecular system. This delivery system comprises a hexanuclear Pt(II) cage that ...

  6. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    polymer scaffolds, Biomaterials, 28 (2007) 1862-1870. [16]for siRNA delivery, Biomaterials, 35 (2014) [47] E. Deu,for protein delivery, Biomaterials, 33 (2012) 9157-9164. [

  7. Mathematical modeling and simulation of intravascular drug delivery from drug-eluting stents with biodegradable PLGA coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaoxiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) are commonly used in coronary angioplasty procedures. A DES elutes drug compounds from a thin polymeric coating into the surrounding coronary artery tissue to reduce in-stent restenosis (a significant ...

  8. Neurosteroid vitamin D system as a nontraditional drug target in neuropsychopharmacology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Neurosteroid vitamin D system as a nontraditional drug target in neuropsychopharmacology Adam , Anna Minasyanb , Pentti Tuohimaab and Allan V. Kalueffa Vitamin D is becoming increasingly recognized metabolism, vitamin D and its receptor have been linked to several brain disorders, including cognitive

  9. Long Chain Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase as Novel Drug Targets in Cryptosporidium parvum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Fengguang

    2014-07-07

    screening hundreds of compounds in vitro and in vivo, fully effective therapeutic agents are still unavailable. The major goal of this study is to explore three long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (CpACSs) of the parasite as novel drug targets...

  10. Drugs against parasitic diseases: R&D methodologies and issues SECTION III A. H. FAIRLAMB 107 Target discovery and validation with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Drugs against parasitic diseases: R&D methodologies and issues · SECTION III · A. H. FAIRLAMB 107 target for drug discovery and drug development. This article considers the various approaches to target of target validation by chemical and genetic methods. Particular reference is made to the prospects of drug

  11. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

  12. Engineering translational multi-therapeutic targeted delivery vehicles for disease management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Stephen Winford

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of growth, survival, and death signaling pathways in cancer continues to motivate extensive investigations using systems biology approaches to better inform treatments. Many of these drugs and drug combinations, ...

  13. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical mechanisms of light- triggered release fromNanospheres for Near-Infrared Light-Triggered Drug Release,products by phenothiazine dyes and light, Photochemistry and

  14. Biopolymer-Connected Liposome Networks as Injectable Biomaterials Capable of Sustained Local Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Biopolymer-Connected Liposome Networks as Injectable Biomaterials Capable of Sustained Local Drug-20 Such hybrid gels could be used in applications that require implantable biomaterials; however, most

  15. Surface Charge-Switching Polymeric Nanoparticles for Bacterial Cell Wall-Targeted Delivery of Antibiotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.

    Bacteria have shown a remarkable ability to overcome drug therapy if there is a failure to achieve sustained bactericidal concentration or if there is a reduction in activity in situ. The latter can be caused by localized ...

  16. Genome-Free Viral Capsids for Targeted Drug Delivery to Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    phage as determined by UV measurements at 260 nm (OD 260 /synthesizer. UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements were

  17. 14:125:445 -Engineering Principles of Drug Delivery Spring 2012 -Course Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    of amphiphilic molecules 2. comprehend within the framework of the biological milieu, the role of intermolecular) Engineering Principles for Drug Therapy, W. Mark Saltzman, Oxford University Press (2001), (2) Random Walks

  18. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    C.M. Ofner, Crosslinked gelatin matrices: release of aof model drugs from 10% (w/v) gelatin reservoirs over 7 daysfrom 10% and 20 % (w/v) gelatin reservoirs over 7 days

  19. Fabrication of complex oral drug delivery forms by Three Dimensional Printing (tm)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katstra, Wendy E. (Wendy Ellen), 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Three Dimensional Printing 3DPTM is a novel solid freeform fabrication technology that has been applied to the fabrication of complex pharmaceutical drug devices. Limitations of the technology as relating to pharmaceuticals ...

  20. Multiwaveguide implantable probe for light delivery to sets of distributed brain targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zorzos, Anthony Nicholas

    Optical fibers are commonly inserted into living tissues such as the brain in order to deliver light to deep targets for neuroscientific and neuroengineering applications such as optogenetics, in which light is used to ...

  1. A Model pH Induced Drug-Delivery System Based on Poly(methacrylic acid) and its Interpolymer complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murugan, K Durai; Natarajan, P

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics and structural aspects of polymethacrylic acid bound rhodamine-123 (PMAA-R123) and its interpolymer complex with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) were investigated and the results show that these complexes have potential for use as drug-delivery system under physiological conditions. The time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of PMAA-R123 at different pH exhibits an associated anisotropy decay behavior characteristic of two different environments experienced by the fluorophore and decays with one shorter and another longer lifetime components. The anisotropy decay retains normal bi-exponential behavior under neutral pH. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic investigation reveals that the attached fluorophore undergoes hydrolysis under basic condition which results in the release of the fluorophore from the polymer backbone. Shrinkage in the hydrodynamic radius of PMAA is observed on addition of the complementary polymer PVP which is attributed to the formation compact solubilised nanoparticle like ag...

  2. Computational Modeling of an MRI Guided Drug Delivery System Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Aggregations for the Navigation of Paramagnetic Nanocapsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. K. Lampropoulos; E. G. Karvelas; I. E. Sarris

    2015-04-14

    A computational method for magnetically guided drug delivery is presented and the results are compared for the aggregation process of magnetic particles within a fluid environment. The model is developed for the simulation of the aggregation patterns of magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of MRI magnetic coils. A novel approach for the calculation of the drag coefficient of aggregates is presented. The comparison against experimental and numerical results from the literature is showed that the proposed method predicts well the aggregations in respect to their size and pattern dependance, on the concentration and the strength of the magnetic field, as well as their velocity when particles are driven through the fluid by magnetic gradients.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Combinatorial Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavropoulos, Kathy

    2011-08-31

    that has versatile functionality, good serum stability, circulates in the body long enough to reach the targeting tissues, and is biocompatible. A promising formulation platform that embodies these features is the lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles...

  4. Current Drug Targets, 2007, 8, 15-30 15 1389-4501/07 $50.00+.00 2007 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    Current Drug Targets, 2007, 8, 15-30 15 1389-4501/07 $50.00+.00 © 2007 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis as a Drug Target in Apicomplexan Parasites C.D. Goodman* and G.I. Mc impacts on much of the world's population. The increasing prevalence of drug resistant parasites

  5. Structure-based drug mechanism study and inhibitor design targeting tuberculosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Feng

    2009-05-15

    crystallographic and mass spectroscopic approaches (21). 4 N O N H NH 2 N S NH 2 N N O NH 2 O OH NH 2 OH N H O O NH 2 N O O OH N NH F OO NH 2 NH 2 OH OO OH OH OH NH 2 OH OH NH 2 OH H O O O O O NH O OH OH OH N N N OH OH MeO NH OH N H OH Isoniazid... the drug target - proton ATP synthase, which is a key enzyme for ATP synthesis (38). N Br OH OH N N O O OH F N N H ON N O CF 3 O 2 N O O O O O NH O OH OH OH OH MeO N O OH N N Rifalazil Niroimidazolepyran Diarylquinoline Moxifloxacin Figure 2...

  6. Development and Testing of Simulation (Game) to Illustrate Basic Principles of Integrated Project Delivery and Target Value Design: A First Run Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munankami, Manish 1972-

    2012-12-07

    Integrated Project Delivery LCI Lean Construction Institute LPS Last Planner TM System P2SL Project Production Systems Laboratory PPC Percent Planned Complete PPC Project Partnering Contract ROI Return on Investment TC Target Costing TVD Target Value... among similar projects; he found that the projects were chaotic but still claimed to be completed within budget and on time. However, an analysis of Percent Planned Complete (PPC) showed that the average PPC was only 62%, and the main reason...

  7. Development of lymphatic drug delivery platforms for the treatment of carcinomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Shuang

    2011-05-31

    remains controversial due to the mixed clinical results of its efficacy in treating liver cancers [52-54]. Although TACE is an independent procedure, it can be performed in combination with other procedures, such as a percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI... the most widely route used for delivering lymphatic-targeted chemotherapeutic agents in preclinical trials. The fate of subcutaneously injected materials depends on a variety of factors, including the size, charge, and immunogenicity. The optimal size...

  8. Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management Strategies, and Novel Drug Targets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management submissions for the 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium, titled "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/diabetescare. When submitting your manuscript, please mention the 3rd

  9. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  10. Strategies to Target Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells using Natural Killer Cells and Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzon, Caitlin Jean

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical drug and nutritional supplement used primarily as a mucolytic agent and in the management

  11. Example 1: Bioenergetic analysis of combining mitochondria-targeted drugs with 2-deoxyglucose in breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Example 1: Bioenergetic analysis of combining mitochondria-targeted drugs with 2- deoxyglucose in breast cancer cells OVERVIEW The MCW Cancer Center Bioenergetics Shared Resource opened in January 2012 in MFRC 2013. The purpose of the Bioenergetics Shared Resource is four- fold: investigate cancer cell

  12. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M. . E-mail: meike.mevissen@vpi.unibe.ch

    2006-11-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 {mu}g/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  13. A microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis and optimization of targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valencia, Pedro M. (Pedro Miguel)

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology to engineer drug delivery vehicles comprised of controlled release polymers with targeting molecules has the potential to revolutionize cancer therapy, among other diseases. Although a myriad of ...

  14. 1. (a) Why are DNA-targeted drugs largely used as anticancer agents and not as, say, antibacterial or antifungal agents?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    CHEM 4170 Homework 4 1. (a) Why are DNA-targeted drugs largely used as anticancer agents and not as, say, antibacterial or antifungal agents? (b) Provide an explanation for how anticancer drugs can-damaging drugs mentioned in Question 1). (b) However, some medicinal chemists believe that these compounds

  15. Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for gaseous delivery of hydrogen through hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  16. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  17. seminar abstract Intradermal Delivery of Nanoparticle Vaccine Formulation via Microneedle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    and other strategies such as iontophoresis were developed to increase drug delivery efficiency.(Prausnitz

  18. Drug deposition and distribution in healthy and atherosclerotic arteries and in models of atherosclerosis following bulk or stent-based drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vukmirovic, Neda

    2007-01-01

    Drug eluting stents have revolutionized the practice of medicine and the landscape of medical devices. Yet, more than four years after introduction clinical trial data and clinical use have still not fully clarified what ...

  19. Structure of pyrR (Rv1379) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A persistence gene and protein drug target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantardjieff, K A; Vasquez, C; Castro, P; Warfel, N M; Rho, B; Lekin, T; Kim, C; Segelke, B W; Terwilliger, T C; Rupp, B

    2004-09-24

    The 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of pyrimidine biosynthesis regulatory protein encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) is reported. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) encodes a protein that regulates expression of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (pyr) genes in a UMP-dependent manner. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, the gene product pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of Mtb pyrR determined by the TB Structural Genomics Consortium facilities (PDB entry 1W30) in trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with cell dimensions at 120K of a = 66.64 {angstrom}, c = 154.72 {angstrom}, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The 3D structure and residual uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity point to a common PRTase ancestor for pyrR. However, while PRPP and UMP binding sites have been retained in Mtb pyrR, a novel dimer interaction among subunits creates a deep, positively charged cleft capable of binding pyr mRNA. In silico screening of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs has revealed a number of potential leads compounds that, if bound to Mtb pyrR, could facilitate transcriptional attenuation, particularly cyclopentenyl nucleosides.

  20. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brüning, Ansgar, E-mail: ansgar.bruening@med.uni-muenchen.de; Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-? super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin ?E subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin ?E in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin ?E overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin ?E. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin ?E subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin ?E re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin ?E expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin ?E as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin ?E subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ? Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ? Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ? Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  1. Targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable User Guide Nuclear ScienceTargets

  2. Utilization of I-domain of LFA-1 to Target Drug and Marker Molecules to Leukocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikwar, Prakash; Tejo, Bimo A.; Shinogle, Heather; Moore, David S.; Zimmerman, Tahl; Blanco, Francisco; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2010-05-10

    to deliver drugs to cells with upregulated ICAM-1. Anti-ICAM-1-coated nanopar- ticles successfully delivered lysosomal enzyme into cells obtained from patients suffering from lysosomal storage disorder [34]. These nanoparticles are endo- cytosed via a non... blocks the I-domain binding site to ICAM-1 (Fig. 4). A similar effect of the mAb was observed in the binding of a GST-tagged I-domain (I-GST) to a surface-coated ICAM-1Fc using a solid-phase ELISA assay [29]. The antibody blocking studies indicate...

  3. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AhYoung, AP; Koehl, A; Cascio, D; Egea, PF

    2015-01-01

    falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion forfalciparum: targeting protein folding and secretion for

  4. Highly efficient intracellular chromobody delivery by mesoporous silica nanoparticles for antigen targeting and visualization in real time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsin-Yi Chiu; Wen Deng; Hanna Engelke; Jonas Helma; Heinrich Leonhardt; Thomas Bein

    2015-10-18

    Chromobodies have recently drawn great attention as bioimaging nanotools. They offer antigen binding specificity and affinity comparable to conventional antibodies, but much smaller size and higher stability. Importantly, chromobodies can be used in live cell imaging for highly specific spatio-temporal visualization of cellular processes. To date, functional application of chromobodies requires lengthy genetic manipulation of the target cell. Here, we developed multifunctional large-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as nanocarriers to directly transport chromobodies into living cells for antigen-visualization in real time. The multifunctional large-pore MSNs feature high loading capacity for chromobodies, and are efficiently taken up by cells. By functionalizing the internal MSN surface with nitrilotriacetic acid-metal ion complexes, we could control the release of His6-tagged chromobodies from MSNs in acidified endosomes. When chromobodies escape from the endosomes through the proton sponge effect generated by their built-in His6-tags, co-localization of signals from fluorescent endogenous antigen and organic dye-labeled chromobodies can be detected. Hence, by combining the two nanotools, chromobodies and MSNs, we established a new powerful approach for chromobody applications in living cells.

  5. Vaccine delivery with microneedle skin patches in nonhuman primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Adrienne V

    Transcutaneous drug delivery from planar skin patches is effective for small-molecule drugs and skin-permeable vaccine adjuvants. However, to achieve efficient delivery of vaccines and other macromolecular therapeutics ...

  6. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release is controlled by polymer degradation

  7. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    1 Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable The biodegradable polymer such as poly(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release

  8. Multi-functional Bio-synthetic Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Cellular Uptake, Endosomal Escape and Targeted Delivery Toward Diagnostics and Therapeutics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Ritu 1984-

    2012-09-26

    -like nanoparticles (SCKs) that are self assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers into polymeric micelles followed by crosslinking selectively throughout the shell domain have been investigated as theranostic agents for the delivery of nucleic acids...

  9. Systems Theory for Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil Jayanti

    2010-01-01

    model to identify multiple drug targets which can be candidates for the traditional process of drug discovery.

  10. A Study of Telomeres-Targeting Anticancer Drugs' Effectiveness through Comparative Cancer Mortality and Incidence Rates Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urio, Richard O.

    2015-07-30

    of Human Genome Project (HGP) in 2003 will be discussed. The HGP had among its main three future goals the designing of more robust and efficient drugs, vaccines and therapies for cancer prevention or elimination. Analyzing the success of the anticancer.... Completion of the human genome project (HGP) on April 14, 2003 was an exciting moment for people in medical research, as it culminated in successful mapping of the entire human body building blocks, or genes. With completion of this project...

  11. Self-assembled pentablock copolymers for selective and sustained gene delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingqi

    2011-05-15

    The poly(diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM) - Pluronic F127 - PDEAEM pentablock copolymer (PB) gene delivery vector system has been found to possess an inherent selectivity in transfecting cancer cells over non-cancer cells in vitro, without attaching any targeting ligands. In order to understand the mechanism of this selective transfection, three possible intracellular barriers to transfection were investigated in both cancer and non-cancer cells. We concluded that escape from the endocytic pathway served as the primary intracellular barrier for PB-mediated transfection. Most likely, PB vectors were entrapped and rendered non-functional in acidic lysosomes of non-cancer cells, but survived in less acidic lysosomes of cancer cells. The work highlights the importance of identifying intracellular barriers for different gene delivery systems and provides a new paradigm for designing targeting vectors based on intracellular differences between cell types, rather than through the use of targeting ligands. The PB vector was further developed to simultaneously deliver anticancer drugs and genes, which showed a synergistic effect demonstrated by significantly enhanced gene expression in vitro. Due to the thermosensitive gelation behavior, the PB vector packaging both drug and gene was also investigated for its in vitro sustained release properties by using polyethylene glycol diacrylate as a barrier gel to mimic the tumor matrix in vivo. Overall, this work resulted in the development of a gene delivery vector for sustained and selective gene delivery to tumor cells for cancer therapy.

  12. Measured Laboratory and In-Use Fuel Economy Observed over Targeted Drive Cycles for Comparable Hybrid and Conventional Package Delivery Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Walkowicz, K.; Duran, A.; Sindler, P.

    2012-10-01

    In-use and laboratory-derived fuel economies were analyzed for a medium-duty hybrid electric drivetrain with 'engine off at idle' capability and a conventional drivetrain in a typical commercial package delivery application. Vehicles studied included eleven 2010 Freightliner P100H hybrids in service at a United Parcel Service facility in Minneapolis during the first half of 2010. The hybrids were evaluated for 18 months against eleven 2010 Freightliner P100D diesels at the same facility. Both vehicle groups use the same 2009 Cummins ISB 200-HP engine. In-use fuel economy was evaluated using UPS's fueling and mileage records, periodic ECM image downloads, and J1939 CAN bus recordings during the periods of duty cycle study. Analysis of the in-use fuel economy showed 13%-29% hybrid advantage depending on measurement method, and a delivery route assignment analysis showed 13%-26% hybrid advantage on the less kinetically intense original diesel route assignments and 20%-33% hybrid advantage on the more kinetically intense original hybrid route assignments. Three standardized laboratory drive cycles were selected that encompassed the range of real-world in-use data. The hybrid vehicle demonstrated improvements in ton-mi./gal fuel economy of 39%, 45%, and 21% on the NYC Comp, HTUF Class 4, and CARB HHDDT test cycles, respectively.

  13. Drug-Initiated Ring-Opening Polymerization of OCarboxyanhydrides for the Preparation of Anticancer Drug-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Drug-Initiated Ring-Opening Polymerization of OCarboxyanhydrides for the Preparation of Anticancer Drug- Poly(Ocarboxyanhydride) Nanoconjugates Qian Yin, Rong Tong,, Yunxiang Xu, Kwanghyun Baek of polymer-drug conjugates for nanoparticulate drug delivery: hydroxyl-containing drug (e.g., camptothecin

  14. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the effects of low-frequency sonophoresis on transdermal drug transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hua, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers many advantages over traditional drug administration methods such as injections and oral delivery, including increased patient compliance, and avoiding first-pass effects. However, due to ...

  15. Magnetically Triggered Nanocomposite Membranes: A Versatile Platform for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoare, Todd

    Drug delivery devices based on nanocomposite membranes containing thermoresponsive nanogels and superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to provide reversible, on?off drug release upon application (and removal) ...

  16. PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders -2015 Spring Course Co-Directors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, Jonathan

    1 PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders - 2015 Spring Course Co to antimicrobial chemotherapy Jan. 26: 2. Principles of antibacterial drugs I: Drug targets and cytotoxicity Jan. 28: 3. Principles of antibacterial drugs II: Drug resistance Feb. 2: 4. Antibacterial drugs

  17. Multistage nanoparticle delivery system for deep penetration into solid tumor and electrically controlled catalytic nanowire growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Cliff R. (Cliff Richard)

    2011-01-01

    Assembly of functional nanocomponents offers promising applications in drug delivery to solid tumors and bottom-up synthesis and integration of nanodevices. This thesis presents a novel multistage nanoparticle delivery ...

  18. Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative Loading Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative LoadingChampaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education-molecule drugs in hydrophobic polymers or amphiphilic copolymers has been extensively used for preparing

  19. Experimenting with Drugs (and Topic Models): Multi-Dimensional Exploration of Recreational Drug Discussions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dredze, Mark

    Experimenting with Drugs (and Topic Models): Multi-Dimensional Exploration of Recreational Drug of new recreational drugs and trends re- quires mining current information from non-traditional text components. The resulting model learns factors that correspond to drug type, delivery method (smoking

  20. New Directions for Cancer Drug Research of Ruthenium and Rhodium Compounds: Investigation of Cytotoxicities, Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Death, and Cellular Targets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena Maceda, Bruno

    2014-07-02

    The discovery of the antitumor properties of cisplatin revolutionized the field of medicinal inorganic chemistry and fostered the development of metal-based anticancer drugs, a topic that continues to play a prominent role ...

  1. Skeletal muscle biomechanics drives intramuscular transport of locally delivered drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter I-Kung

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Effective local drug delivery to contractile tissues such as skeletal muscle requires a thorough understanding of the impact of mechanical loads on intramuscular pharmacokinetics. Current preparations for ...

  2. Physicochemical investigations of a drug delivery oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, A. S.; Siegel, R. A.

    2006-10-27

    .8 5.3 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 Volume of 0.009 N HCl added (mL) p H 0.178 0.704 1.146 1.77 2.158 2.77 3.69 4.04 4.68 5.69 6.77 0 Days Buffer capacity increases with time Fit 4.3 4.5 4.7 4.9 5.1 5.3 5.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Time (Hours) p H...-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) Hydrophobic at 370 C 90 mol % or 95 mol % Ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA) Crosslinker Methacrylic acid (MAA) pKa =4.66 Hydrophilic in basic form 10 mol % or 5 mol% COO - COO - COO --COO - ? Gluconic acid/gluconate buffer build up...

  3. Nanodisk: a versatile drug delivery platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Mistuni

    2012-01-01

    of curcumin and resveratrol in combination reduces prostateof curcumin and resveratrol in combination reduces prostate

  4. Genetically designed biomolecular capping system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles enables receptor-mediated cell uptake and controlled drug release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Datz; Christian Argyo; Michael Gattner; Veronika Weiss; Korbinian Brunner; Johanna Bretzler; Constantin von Schirnding; Fabio Spada; Hanna Engelke; Milan Vrabel; Christoph Bräuchle; Thomas Carell; Thomas Bein

    2015-10-13

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release and targeting abilities have received enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel enzyme-based cap system for mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that is directly combined with a targeting ligand via bio-orthogonal click chemistry. The capping system is based on the pH-responsive binding of an aryl-sulfonamide-functionalized MSN and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). An unnatural amino acid (UAA) containing a norbornene moiety was genetically incorporated into CA. This UAA allowed for the site-specific bio-orthogonal attachment of even very sensitive targeting ligands such as folic acid and anandamide. This leads to specific receptor-mediated cell and stem cell uptake. We demonstrate the successful delivery and release of the chemotherapeutic agent Actinomycin D to KB cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of precisely controllable and highly modular theranostic systems.

  5. Lipidoid-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Efficient DNA and siRNA delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Shan

    The safe, targeted and effective delivery of gene therapeutics remains a significant barrier to their broad clinical application. Here we develop a magnetic nucleic acid delivery system composed of iron oxide nanoparticles ...

  6. Hydrogen delivery technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-15

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  7. Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, GW; Levi, R

    2012-01-01

    of beta blockers: from antianginal drugs to ligand-directedmechanisms of gating and drug block of sodium channels.Roden DM. Antiarrhythmic drugs: past, present and future. J

  8. Antigen-specific blocking of immunological synapse formation using bifunctional peptide, Utilization of I-domain of LFA-1 to Target Drug and Marker Molecules to Leukocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikwar, Prakash; Tejo, Bimo A.; Shinogle, Heather; Moore, David S.; Zimmerman, Tahl; Blanco, Francisco; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2011-05-01

    to deliver drugs to cells with upregulated ICAM-1. Anti-ICAM-1-coated nanopar- ticles successfully delivered lysosomal enzyme into cells obtained from patients suffering from lysosomal storage disorder [34]. These nanoparticles are endo- cytosed via a non... blocks the I-domain binding site to ICAM-1 (Fig. 4). A similar effect of the mAb was observed in the binding of a GST-tagged I-domain (I-GST) to a surface-coated ICAM-1Fc using a solid-phase ELISA assay [29]. The antibody blocking studies indicate...

  9. Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug targeting Benjamin Shapiro,1,2 Sandip Kulkarni,1 Aleksander Nacev,3 Silvia Muro,1,4 Pavel Y. Stepanov3 and Irving N. Weinberg3 The principle of magnetic drug is that highlight- ing these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept

  10. Cascade search for HSV-1 combinatorial drugs with high antiviral efficacy and low toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    blood pressure lowering drugs: analysis of 354 randomisedKSHV) with combinatory drugs. Integr Biol (Camb). 2009;1(1):matrix metalloproteinases as drug targets and anti-targets

  11. Evaluation of Retrofit Delivery Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2013-07-01

    Residential energy retrofit activities are a critical component of efforts to increase energy efficiency in the U.S. building stock; however, retrofits account for a small percentage of aggregate energy savings at relatively high per unit costs. This report by Building America research team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), describes barriers to widespread retrofits and evaluates opportunities to improve delivery of home retrofit measures by identifying economies of scale in marketing, energy assessments, and bulk purchasing through pilot programs in portions of Sonoma, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties, CA. These targeted communities show potential and have revealed key strategies for program design, as outlined in the report.

  12. Mercury Intense Target (MERIT) Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    requirement for the system to deliver a 20 m/s jet - Two hydraulic cylinders drive a Hg cylinder - Stainless with Airline Hydraulics Co. today!) (2) Target Delivery System - Consists of primary and secondary containments, unconstrained jet of Hg in 1-atmosphere of air, into 15 Tesla field (Vacuum Is Under Review) #12;8 OAK RIDGE

  13. Helical tomotherapy with dynamic running-start-stop delivery compared to conventional tomotherapy delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Yi, E-mail: yi.rong@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Yu; Lu, Weiguo [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States)] [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States); Shang, Lu [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China)] [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China); Zuo, Li [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Quan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Despite superior target dose uniformity, helical tomotherapy{sup ®} (HT) may involve a trade-off between longitudinal dose conformity and beam-on time (BOT), due to the limitation of only three available jaw sizes with the conventional HT (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). The recently introduced dynamic running-start-stop (RSS) delivery allows smaller jaw opening at the superior and inferior ends of the target when a sharp penumbra is needed. This study compared the dosimetric performance of RSS delivery with the fixed jaw HT delivery. Methods: Twenty patient cases were selected and deidentified prior to treatment planning, including 16 common clinical cases (brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate) and four special cases of whole brain with hippocampus avoidance (WBHA) that require a high degree of dose modulation. HT plans were generated for common clinical cases using the fixed 2.5 cm jaw width (HT2.5) and WBHA cases using 1.0 cm (HT1.0). The jaw widths for RSS were preset with a larger size (RSS5.0 vs HT2.5 and RSS2.5 vs HT1.0). Both delivery techniques were planned based on identical contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared using dose-volume histograms, BOT, and monitor units. Results: The average BOT was reduced from 4.8 min with HT2.5 to 2.5 min with RSS5.0. Target dose homogeneity with RSS5.0 was shown comparable to HT2.5 for common clinical sites. Superior normal tissue sparing was observed in RSS5.0 for optic nerves and optic chiasm in brain and HN cases. RSS5.0 demonstrated improved dose sparing for cord and esophagus in lung cases, as well as penile bulb in prostate cases. The mean body dose was comparable for both techniques. For the WBHA cases, the target homogeneity was significantly degraded in RSS2.5 without distinct dose sparing for hippocampus, compared to HT1.0. Conclusions: Compared to the fixed jaw HT delivery, RSS combined with a larger jaw width provides faster treatment delivery and improved cranial-caudal target dose conformity. The target coverage achieved by RSS with a large jaw width is comparable to the fixed jaw HT delivery for common cancer sites, but may deteriorate for cases where complex geometry is present in the middle part of the target.

  14. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intracellular Drug Delivery 2. Oral Drug Delivery Maren Roman Untargeted Targeted Cellular Uptake of Cellulose Nanocrystals Pristine Labeled Chitosan Cellulose nanocrystal Drug...

  15. Stimuli Responsive Polymers for Enhanced Drug Release Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Michael K. C.

    This talk will focus on the development of polymeric nano-structured systems for drug and gene delivery applications. Two major classes of polymer systems will be considered; namely poly(ethylene-oxide-b-propylene-oxide- ...

  16. Normalization of tumour blood vessels improves the delivery of nanomedicines in a size-dependent manner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Vikash P.

    The blood vessels of cancerous tumours are leaky and poorly organized. This can increase the interstitial fluid pressure inside tumours and reduce blood supply to them, which impairs drug delivery. Anti-angiogenic ...

  17. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-11-06

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  18. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  19. Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lab ­ Building Kit S 20 2Summer 2012 Integrated Systems ­ Programming Surfaces a) Exterior -Water production with integrated digital fabrication." Automation in Construction, Vol. 16, No. 3, 298­310, 2007Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery through Kitsthrough Kits Lawrence Sass Associate Professor

  20. MFRC Training Development & Delivery Program - Bloodstain & Toxicology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MFRC Training Development & Delivery Program - Bloodstain & Toxicology DESCRIPTION: The Midwest Forensics Resource Center (MFRC) Training Development and Delivery Program increases...

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Categorical Exclusion...

  2. Apatite-Polymer Composites for the Controlled Dual Delivery of BMP-2 and BMP-6 for Bone Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Tseh-Hwan

    The release of growth factors from tissue engineering scaffolds provides signals that influence the migration, differentiation, and proliferation of cells. The incorporation of a drug delivery platform that is capable of ...

  3. Office of Electricity Delivery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh SpatialElectricity Delivery and Energy

  4. DNA Self-Assembly of Targeted Near-Infrared-Responsive Gold Nanoparticles for Cancer Thermo-Chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Zeyu

    Targeted cancer therapy: Inspired by the ability of DNA hybridization, a targeted near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive delivery system has been developed through simple DNA self-assembly (see picture; PEG=polyethylene ...

  5. Interfacial kinetics effects on transdermal drug delivery: a computer modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    agents, which may not function well in the gastrointestinal tract or liver due to presystemic metabolism of the diffusion coefficient and the concentration gradient; here it is J ¼ ÀDij dCi dx ð1Þ where Dij is the binary

  6. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandan, Omid

    2015-01-01

    working in the UCSB cleanroom; it was challenging, but yourprocessing substrates in a cleanroom facility with micron-was conducted at the cleanroom solvent bench with exhaust

  7. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandan, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologyof microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology hasMEMS technology have emerged, and include biomedical microelectromechanical

  8. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandan, Omid

    2015-01-01

    and D Tryk. 2008. “TiO2 Photocatalysis and Related SurfaceGünter Kreisel. 2004. “Photocatalysis in Microreactors. ”microfluidic devices for photocatalysis applications. As for

  9. Active scaffolds for on-demand drug and cell delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    Porous biomaterials have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. The release of biological agents from conventional porous scaffolds is typically governed by molecular diffusion, ...

  10. Applications of triazine chemistry: education, remediation, and drug delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Susan Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    (S N Ar). It may be used as an analogous acid chloride equivalent in many organic transformations, including chlorination, dehydration, and coupling reactions. 9-12 Table 1 summarizes some of the reactions in which trichlorotriazine may be used.... Table 1. Reactions using cyanuric chloride as a reagent Reactant Product R?CO?OH R?CO?Cl R 1 R 2 ?CH?OH R 1 R 2 ?CH?Cl R?CH=N?OH R?C?N HO?(CH 2 ) n ?COOH 7 Cyanuric chloride can also be used as an oxidizing agent using Swern oxidation...

  11. Functionalization of nanocarriers for efficient combination drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack

    2011-01-01

    pentanedione (Alfa Aesar Co. , Ward Hill, MA) were used as~330 Da; Alfa Aesar, Ward Hill, MA), carboxyl-terminated

  12. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks for drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orellana-Tavra, Claudia; Baxter, Emma F.; Tian, Tian; Bennett, Thomas D.; Slater, Nigel K. H.; Cheetham, Anthony K.; Fairen-Jimenez, David

    2015-07-21

    , and a decrease in toxic side effects. Finding an effective DDS for therapeutic agents has been an ongoing challenge in bioengineering. In this context, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as potential candidates owing to their distinctive...

  13. Artificial Cells for Advanced Drug Delivery - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like

  14. Molecule Nanoweaver Improves Drug Delivery and Treatment Efficacy - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress MolecularMolecular-Frame AngularCapsules

  15. Non-destructively shattered mesoporous silica for protein drug delivery

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for|Connect Non-Large Hadron Collider(Journal

  16. Hydrogen Production & Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Conversion Price of H 2 kg delivered furanone Cost of Hydrogen From Bio-oil Conversion (Relative to 2012 Target of 3.80kg H 2 ) Ongoing Focus: * Acetic acid in...

  17. Target assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard A. (Falls Church, VA)

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  18. Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High HydrogenInvitedDelivery

  19. NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease genes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease an increase in drugs that target the genes asso- ciated with disease. Networkbiologymayalsoplayaroleindrug- target identification. Is it possible to identify drug targets from their position in a biological

  20. Drug discovery, design and development is an overarching theme for much of the research taking place through the University's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Drug discovery, design and development is an overarching theme for much of the research taking and central nervous system disorders such as epilepsy, depression, anxiety and drug abuse. The following. University of Bath Drug discovery and development at Bath #12;Tumour-selective delivery of potent drugs

  1. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  2. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  3. Target Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:TakeSeptember 13,TaraTarget Chamber

  4. Delivery of neuroactive peptide drugs to the brain via intranasal delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cros, C. D.; Toth, I.; Blanchfield, J.

    2006-10-27

    presents a human plasma stability assay on a racemic lipoamino acid Leu-enkephalin derivative. Methods Caco-2 Permeability assay: Caco-2 cells form tight monolayer structures when seeded on to polycarbonate filters. To assess permeability, a 200 ?M... is the initial concentration in the donor chamber. Plasma stability assay: This assay was performed by mixing 300?L of a solution of C8Laa- Enkephalin (1mg/mL) with 300?L of plasma prewarmed at 37.5????C. At chosen time points, 50?L of the plasma mixture...

  5. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challenges to delivering hydrogen for use as a widespread energy carrier, and the research goals for hydrogen delivery.

  6. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  7. Methodology for the production and delivery of generative music for the personal listener : systems for realtime generative music production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michael J.

    2013-11-27

    This thesis will describe a system for the production of generative music through specific methodology, and provide an approach for the delivery of this material. The system and body of work will be targeted specifically ...

  8. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, David M. (Oviedo, FL); Cai, Weidong (Oviedo, FL); Garan, Daniel W. (Orlando, FL); Harris, Arthur J. (Orlando, FL)

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  9. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen is most commonly transported and delivered as a liquid when high-volume transport is needed in the absence of pipelines....

  10. Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Gaseous hydrogen is most commonly delivered either by trucks or through pipelines. Because gaseous hydrogen is typically...

  11. Building a Multifunctional Aptamer-Based DNA Nanoassembly for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Building a Multifunctional Aptamer-Based DNA Nanoassembly for Targeted Cancer Therapy Cuichen Wu-dimensional DNA building blocks into two- and three-dimensional nanostructures via DNA/RNA nanotechnology has led delivery. However, the cellular uptake of most nucleic acid nanostructures is dependent on passive delivery

  12. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challen

  13. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

  14. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-04-26

    , two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were...

  15. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommars, Mark F. (Sparland, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  16. Best antibiotics for buccal delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Manijeh Nazari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to identify the clinical and commercial benefits of switching from intravenous (IV) to buccal delivery of antibiotics. then, the research continued to select 3-5 antibiotics that best met ...

  17. Hydrogen Delivery Technology Roadmap, November 2005

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  18. Noninvasive Monitoring of Local Drug Release Using X-ray Computed Tomography: Optimization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    profiles of drug-loaded biodegradable implants were noninvasively monitored and characterized using X yielded a sensitivity of 0.21 mg/mL (or 95 mg iodine/mL) for this agent. In vitro validation of the method samples, and/or removed implants.1 The release profile of a particular drug delivery method

  19. Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Combating Viruses by Targeting Host Proteins #12;Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Proteins #12;Motivation HDFs Algorithms Cross Validation Predictions Pathogens are Becoming Drug

  20. Target-guided synthesis approach to the discovery of novel bivalent inhibitors of Glutathione Transferases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clipson, Alexandra Jayne

    2012-06-22

    Target-guided synthesis is an approach to drug discovery that uses the biological target as a template to direct synthesis of its own best inhibitors from small molecule fragments. The process bridges the gap between ...

  1. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  3. College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability College of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Vision OE recognizes that...

  4. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage...

  5. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Target Vessel;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Starting Point

  6. ARM - Data Gathering and Delivery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae2Gathering and Delivery Data Gathering and Delivery

  7. Project #09R: Ying Luo and Niren Murthy: Multifunctional ProflavineHyaluronic Acid Conjugate (PHC): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    ): A new siRNA delivery vehicle for treating lung cancer siRNA is emerging as the next generation of targeted therapies for lung cancer treatment. In advancing siRNA into clinical trials, safe and effective delivery vehicle, termed ProflavineHyaluronic Acid Conjugate (PHC), which can deliver siRNA to lung cancer

  8. Development of Polyphosphoester-Based Polymeric Nanoparticles as Delivery Carriers for Silver-Based Antimicrobial Agents for Treatment of Infectious Diseases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Young

    2015-07-16

    The development of well-defined polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) as delivery carriers for antimicrobials targeting human infectious diseases requires rational design of the polymer template, an efficient synthetic approach ...

  9. Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Proceedings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proceedings from the Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop held May 7-8, 2003 in Washington, DC. Author: Energetics

  10. Delivery and Hedging Delivery ties the futures price to the spot price.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Delivery and Hedging · Delivery ties the futures price to the spot price. · On the delivery date, the settlement price of the futures contract is determined by the spot price. · Hence, when the delivery period is reached, the futures price should be very close to the spot price. · Changes in futures prices usually

  11. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations - Secure Communications Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations -...

  12. Multirate delivery of multiple therapeutic agents from metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McKinlay, Alistair C.; Allan, Phoebe K.; Renouf, Catherine L.; Duncan, Morven J.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Warrender, Stewart J.; Dawson, Daniel; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Gil, Barbara; Marszalek, Bartosz; et al

    2014-12-01

    The highly porous nature of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers great potential for the delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we show that highly porous metal-organic frameworks can be used to deliver multiple therapeutic agents—a biologically active gas, an antibiotic drug molecule, and an active metal ion—simultaneously but at different rates. The possibilities offered by delivery of multiple agents with different mechanisms of action and, in particular, variable timescales may allow new therapy approaches. Here, we show that the loaded MOFs are highly active against various strains of bacteria.

  13. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  14. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves T. Lessard Target Studies EVO June 26, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Review - Mercury Module Extraction #12;4 Managed by UT

  15. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves Target Studies EVO June 12, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Review ­ IPAC #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Inner

  16. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concepts Updated 4/16/12 V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 16 Apr 2012 Target Vessel Requirements · Accurate jet placement · Jet/beam dump pool · Double containment of mercury

  17. Effects of ultrasound and sodium lauryl sulfate on the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic permeants: Comparative in vitro studies with full-thickness and split-thickness pig and human skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Jennifer E.

    The simultaneous application of ultrasound and the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (referred to as US/SLS) to skin enhances transdermal drug delivery (TDD) in a synergistic mechanical and chemical manner. Since full-thickness ...

  18. Exanthematous allergic drug reactions due to four chemically unrelated drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramji; Gupta, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    16. Lachgar T, Touil Y. The drug hypersensitivity syndromeW, Bircher A, Romano A et al. Drug provocation testing inthe diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions: general

  19. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO May 1, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 Review ­ Two Target Vessel Ideas · Solid-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 #12;4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U

  20. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  1. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA); Hunt, Angus L. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  2. Exploring the Limits of Methane Storage and Delivery in Nanoporous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Wilmer, CE; Farha, OK; Hupp, JT; Snurr, RQ

    2014-04-03

    The physical limits for methane storage and delivery in nanoporous materials were investigated, with a focus on whether it is possible to reach a methane deliverable capacity of 315 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) in line with the adsorption target established by the ARPA-E agency. Our efforts focused on how both geometric and chemical properties, such as void fraction (V-f), volumetric surface area (S-v), and heat of adsorption (Q(st)), impact methane deliverable capacity, i.e., the amount of methane adsorbed at some storage pressure minus the amount adsorbed at the delivery pressure. With the aid of grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, we studied methane adsorption and delivery properties in a population of 122 835 hypothetical pcu metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and 39 idealized carbon-based porous materials. From the simulation results, we developed an analytical equation that helped us delimit the necessary material properties to reach specific methane deliverable capacity targets. The maximum deliverable capacity between 65 and 5.8 bar among the hypothetical MOFs was 206 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) at 298 K. We found that artificially increasing the methane MOF interaction strength by increasing the Lennard-Jones e parameters of the MOF atoms by 2- and 4-fold only improved the maximum deliverable capacity up to 223 and 228 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3), respectively. However, the effect on the amount stored at 65 bar was more significant, which suggested another strategy; raising the temperature of the system by 100 K can recover 70% of the methane stranded at the delivery pressure. By increasing the delivery temperature to 398 K, the ARPA-E target was reached by a few hypothetical MOFs with quadrupled e values. This work shows the difficulty in reaching the ARPA-E target but also suggests that a strategy that combines a material with a large volumetric density of sites that interact strongly with methane and raising the delivery temperature can greatly improve the performance of nanoporous materials for methane storage and delivery. The optimal heat of adsorption in an isothermal storage and delivery scenario is approximately 10.5-14.5 kJ/mol, whereas in the nonisothermal storage and delivery scenario the optimal heats of adsorption fell within a range of 11.8-19.8 kEmol.

  3. Gastric H,K-ATPase as a drug target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Jai M; Sachs, G

    2006-01-01

    cations. J Biol Chem Fukushima Y, Nakao M: Changes inChem 1980;255(16):7813-9. Fukushima Y, Post RL: Binding of

  4. A Key Target for Diabetes Drugs | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in endocrine and metabolic disorders. When activated by the hormone glucagon during fasting, the glucagon receptor triggers the release into the bloodstream of stored glucose...

  5. Study reveals structure of tuberculosis enzyme, could offer drug target |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructureStudents today. AtStart

  6. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartment ofTopo II: An Enzyme

  7. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartment ofTopo II: An EnzymeTopo

  8. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartment ofTopo II: An

  9. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 toDepartment ofTopo II: AnTopo II: An

  10. MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design by Coupling to evaluate ligand binding with an obvious utility in structure-based drug discovery and design.7-10 The "SAR to bind a target protein while obtaining structure-related information as part of a struc- ture-based drug

  11. Repurposing Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Request for Proposals (RFP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Repurposing Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Request for Proposals (RFP) Neurodegenerative diseases represent one of the most difficult classes of diseases for which to develop drugs, yet, offering a huge opportunity to target some of these pathways with repurposed drugs approved

  12. Adolescent drug abuse - Awareness & prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shah, Shyam; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    and the risk of illicit drug use: the Adverse Childhoodalcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev Psychiatry.therapy for adolescent drug abuse. J Clin Child Psychol.

  13. An Environment Aware P-System Model of Quorum Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnogor, Natalio

    , and to program them as "nano-bots" for particular tasks such as targeted drug delivery, chemical factories, nano

  14. An Environment Aware P-System Model of Quorum Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gheorghe, Marian

    , actuators, etc, and to program them as "nano-bots" for particular tasks such as targeted drug delivery

  15. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  16. Orphanet Berichtsreihe Orphan Drugs Datenerhebung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Orphanet Berichtsreihe Orphan Drugs Datenerhebung Verzeichnis der in Europa zugelassenen Orphan Drugs Mit europäischer Orphan-Drug-Designation und europäischer Marktzulassung* Mit europäischer Marktzulassung* ohne vorherige Orphan-Drug-Designation *Zentrales Zulassungsverfahren der Europäischen

  17. First SNS Target Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) used to drain the mercury to a shielded storage tank is the only active element. · However, the process · A shielded "Target Service Bay" located downstream of the target-proton beam interaction monolith serves

  18. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  19. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  20. Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity ii Acknowledgements The Energy Sector Control Systems Working Group (ESCSWG) developed this roadmap in support of the Electricity...

  1. Conceptual approach for Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    a guaranteed maximum price. Turnkey Project Delivery: frequently used in power plants, manufacturing facilities team, by simulating to a higher degree project design and construction 2. Lean Construction

  2. Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the country. CEDS program activities fall under five project areas, guided by the Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity. They are: Build a Culture of...

  3. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Presentation on Hydrogen...

  4. Strategic Initiatives for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop included more than 45 researchers and industry experts. The...

  5. Cybersecurity Procurement Language for Energy Delivery Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    delivery system from multiple Suppliers. Maintaining appropriate cybersecurity in such a system may require additional language that ensures the secure integration of components,...

  6. Small Molecule Target Identification using Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lomenick, Brett Eugene

    2013-01-01

    vehicle control, or with celecoxib (Panacea Biotec Ltd. ,mTOR-rapamycin, COX-2–celecoxib, and Smer3-Met30 (8) (Figuredidemnin B with eEF1A, celecoxib with COX-2, and Smer3 with

  7. Tissue-Specific Gene Delivery via Nanoparticle Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Todd J.

    The use of biomaterials for gene delivery can potentially avoid many of the safety concerns with viral gene delivery. However, the efficacy of polymeric gene delivery methods is low, particularly in vivo. One significant ...

  8. "...powered bodies turn to commodities..." -stereolab Drugs and Drug Abuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teissére, Jeremy Alden

    "...powered bodies turn to commodities..." - stereolab BIO 115 Fall, 2008 Drugs and Drug Abuse the current narratives surrounding drug use. In parallel, we will closely examine the putative mechanisms by which drugs act in the central nervous system ­ and also discuss how the action of these drugs has

  9. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  10. Status and EAC Recommendations for Electricity Delivery Workforce...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Status and EAC Recommendations for Electricity Delivery Workforce (September 2014) Status and EAC Recommendations for Electricity Delivery Workforce (September 2014) This memo,...

  11. Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity - 2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity - 2011 Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity - 2011 As part of the Obama Administration's goals to...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a...

  13. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental...

  14. Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Project Objectives: To gain basic understanding of...

  15. Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project...

  16. Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results This presentation by...

  17. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Cyber Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Cyber Security Project Selections Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Cyber Security Project Selections On...

  18. Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget Request Presentation Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget Request Presentation...

  19. Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy Reliability To Hold Technical Conference On The Design Of Future Electric Transmission Office of Electricity Delivery And Energy...

  20. Secretary of Energy Announces New Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Announces New Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Secretary of Energy Announces New Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability June 9, 2005 - 1:45pm...

  1. H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) Presentation by Matthew Hooks of TIAX at the...

  2. Fixed drug eruption caused by the Japanese herbal drug kakkonto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuichi, Megumi; Hara, Hiroshi; Asano, Yukie; Makino, Teruhiko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2010-01-01

    Topical provocation of fixed drug eruption. Br J Dermatol.neglected offender for fixed drug eruptions. Eur J Dermatoloral and non-oral herbal drugs may cause FDE. References 1.

  3. Drug Use and Drug Policy in a Prohibition Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCoun, Robert; Martin, Karin D.

    2008-01-01

    Prisoners (prior to offense), Drug-related Emergency RoomVisits, 2007 DAWN All illicit drugs Marijuana Cocaine Crack2/4/2008 - 41 Other Sentence Drug Sentence Federal Prisoners

  4. REVIEWS Drug Discovery Today Volume 13, Numbers 3/4 February 2008 The application of FAST-NMR for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    REVIEWS Drug Discovery Today Volume 13, Numbers 3/4 February 2008 The application of FAST-NMR for the identification of novel drug discovery targets Robert Powers, Kelly A. Mercier and Jennifer C. Copeland for a drug discovery effort. The completion of the human genome project is spurring tremen- dous progress

  5. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harter, Katherine; Levine, Michael; Henderson, Sean O.

    2015-01-01

    et al. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review 15. NishijimaRandomized antiplatelet drugs. In: Goodman & Gilman’s The2008;24:2757-65. Cardiovasc Drugs. 2006;6:265-85. 34. Nordt

  6. Adolescent drug abuse - Awareness & prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shah, Shyam; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    alcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev Psychiatry.therapy for adolescent drug abuse. J Clin Child Psychol.outcomes in an indicated drug prevention program for high-

  7. Non-traditional platinum compounds for improved cellular accumulation and tumor targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Katherine Summer, 1981-

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 1. Introduction to Non-Traditional Platinum Compounds for Improved Uptake, Oral Bioavailability, and Tumor Targeting The path to more potent platinum anticancer drugs with fewer side effects lies in the exploration ...

  8. A systems approach to uncovering the adaptive response of cancer to targeted therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, Adrian Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have significant promise in the fight to develop agents that can target cancer in a tumor-specific manner. A number of drugs have been and are currently in development to inhibit specific kinases ...

  9. Crucial stages of protein folding through a solvable model: Predicting target sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecconi, Fabio

    Crucial stages of protein folding through a solvable model: Predicting target sites for enzyme. Keywords: Protein-folding modeling; prediction of key folding sites; HIV-1 protease; drug resistance One

  10. Understanding and Targeting Lipid Metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhen

    2013-12-09

    ; Fanny Boissier et al., 2006). This, coupled with the distinct biological functions of CMASs, suggests that CMASs are applicable as targets of a single drug. Indeed, we(Daniel Barkan et al., 2009) and Lionel Mourey et al.(Julien Vaubourgei et al., 2009...

  11. Time-Resolved SAXS/WAXS Study of the Phase Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Drug/PEG Solid Dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Qing; Harris, Michael T.; Taylor, Lynne S. (Purdue)

    2013-03-07

    Simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) was employed to elucidate the physical state and location of various small molecule drugs blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as well as the time dependent microstructural evolution of the systems. Samples were prepared by comelting physical mixtures of the drug and PEG, followed by solidification at 25 C. The model drugs selected encompassed a wide variety of physicochemical properties in terms of crystallization tendency and potential for interaction with PEG. It was observed that compounds which crystallized rapidly and had weak interactions with PEG tended to be excluded from the interlamellar region of the PEG matrix. In contrast, drugs which had favorable interactions with PEG were incorporated into the interlamellar regions of the polymer up until the point at which the drug crystallized whereby phase separation occurred. These factors are likely to impact the effectiveness of drug/PEG systems as drug delivery systems.

  12. TIMELY DELIVERY OF LASER INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, A M

    2010-11-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A key goal of the NIF is to demonstrate fusion ignition for the first time in the laboratory. Its flexibility allows multiple target designs (both indirect and direct drive) to be fielded, offering substantial scope for optimization of a robust target design. In this paper we discuss an approach to generating gigawatt levels of electrical power from a laser-driven source of fusion neutrons based on these demonstration experiments. This 'LIFE' concept enables rapid time-to-market for a commercial power plant, assuming success with ignition and a technology demonstration program that links directly to a facility design and construction project. The LIFE design makes use of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology. It adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units utilized on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. A demonstration LIFE plant based on these design principles is described, along with the areas of technology development required prior to plant construction. A goal-oriented, evidence-based approach has been proposed to allow LIFE power plant rollout on a time scale that meets policy imperatives and is consistent with utility planning horizons. The system-level delivery builds from our prior national investment over many decades and makes full use of the distributed capability in laser technology, the ubiquity of semiconductor diodes, high volume manufacturing markets, and U.S. capability in fusion science and nuclear engineering. The LIFE approach is based on the ignition evidence emerging from NIF and adopts a line-replaceable unit approach to ensure high plant availability and to allow evolution from available technologies and materials. Utilization of a proven physics platform for the ignition scheme is an essential component of an acceptably low-risk solution. The degree of coupling seen on NIF between driver and target performance mandates that little deviation be adopted from the NIF geometry and beamline characteristics. Similarly, the strong coupling between subsystems in an operational power plant mandates that a self-consistent solution be established via an integrated facility delivery project. The benefits of separability of the subsystems within an IFE plant (driver, chamber, targets, etc.) emerge in the operational phase of a power plant rather than in its developmental phase. An optimized roadmap for IFE delivery needs to account for this to avoid nugatory effort and inconsistent solutions. For LIFE, a system design has been established that could lead to an operating power plant by the mid-2020s, drawing from an integrated subsystem development program to demonstrate the required technology readiness on a time scale compatible with the construction plan. Much technical development work still remains, as does alignment of key stakeholder groups to this newly emerging development option. If the required timeline is to be met, then preparation of a viable program is required alongside the demonstration of ignition on NIF. This will enable timely analysis of the technical and economic case and establishment of the appropriate delivery partnership.

  13. Improved Audit Implementation Through Programmed Report Delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.; Meffert, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    these barriers, Georgia Tech engineers providing industrial audits have begun a program of delivering audit reports instead of mailing them. Although report delivery does not directly confront barriers relating to organization changes, it can be effective...

  14. Coordinated part delivery using distributed planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, Adrienne (Adrienne M.)

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop a distributed mobile robot platform to deliver parts around a model construction site. The platform's robots, specialized into delivery robots and assembly robots, use a distributed coverage ...

  15. Composite gelatin delivery system for bone regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, Elizabeth A. (Elizabeth Ann)

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical/mechanical properties and biocompatibility of gelatin were investigated to produce a gelatin scaffold for the release of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from composite particles. This delivery ...

  16. Assessment of ion-selective optical nanosensors for drug screening applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels represent an important category of drug targets. They play a significant role in numerous physiological functions, from membrane excitation and signaling to fluid absorption and secretion. An ion-channel assay ...

  17. Drug Information Chart Notes Drug ad (intrinsic bias)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    Drug Information Chart Notes Drug ad (intrinsic bias) Trade name Different for each company Dosage Same or different? A drug in a different dosage can be used for a different therapy. Precautions Check for pregnancy A complete book on drugs in pregnancy and lactation in bibliography. (unbiased

  18. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  19. Lipid Bilayer-Coated Curcumin-based Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles for Cellular Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Datz; Hanna Engelke; Constantin v. Schirnding; Linh Nguyen; Thomas Bein

    2015-09-08

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release abilities and biocompatible properties receive enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel inorganic-organic hybrid material with a strikingly high organic content of almost 50 wt%. The colloidal periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) nanoparticles synthesized in this work consist entirely of curcumin and ethane derivatives serving as constituents that are crosslinked by siloxane bridges, without any added silica. These mesoporous curcumin nanoparticles (MCNs) exhibit very high surface areas (over 1000 m2/g), narrow particle size distribution (around 200 nm) and a strikingly high stability in simulated biological media. Additionally, the MCNs are used as a cargo delivery system in live-cell experiments. A supported lipid bilayer (SLB) efficiently seals the pores and releases Rhodamin B as model cargo in HeLa cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of controllable and highly biocompatible theranostic systems.

  20. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Standley, Stephany M. (Evanston, IL); Jain, Rachna (Milpitas, CA); Lee, Cameron C. (Cambridge, MA)

    2012-03-20

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  1. Lipid Bilayer-Coated Curcumin-based Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles for Cellular Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datz, Stefan; Schirnding, Constantin v; Nguyen, Linh; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Effective and controlled drug delivery systems with on-demand release abilities and biocompatible properties receive enormous attention for biomedical applications. Here, we describe a novel inorganic-organic hybrid material with a strikingly high organic content of almost 50 wt%. The colloidal periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) nanoparticles synthesized in this work consist entirely of curcumin and ethane derivatives serving as constituents that are crosslinked by siloxane bridges, without any added silica. These mesoporous curcumin nanoparticles (MCNs) exhibit very high surface areas (over 1000 m2/g), narrow particle size distribution (around 200 nm) and a strikingly high stability in simulated biological media. Additionally, the MCNs are used as a cargo delivery system in live-cell experiments. A supported lipid bilayer (SLB) efficiently seals the pores and releases Rhodamin B as model cargo in HeLa cells. This novel nanocarrier concept provides a promising platform for the development of controllable ...

  2. DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 2 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 3 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................p. 8 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF DRUG DISCOVERY RESEARCHERS

  3. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  4. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Janse, Daniel M. (Brookline, MA)

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  5. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  6. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen A.

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  7. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, Sylvain [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)]. E-mail: sylvainn@rrsb.nb.ca; Bouchard, Myriam [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Germain, Isabelle [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Raymond, Paul-Emile [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Frederic [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Roy, Rene [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Gingras, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements.

  8. Renewable energy delivery systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2013-12-10

    A system, method and/or apparatus for the delivery of energy at a site, at least a portion of the energy being delivered by at least one or more of a plurality of renewable energy technologies, the system and method including calculating the load required by the site for the period; calculating the amount of renewable energy for the period, including obtaining a capacity and a percentage of the period for the renewable energy to be delivered; comparing the total load to the renewable energy available; and, implementing one or both of additional and alternative renewable energy sources for delivery of energy to the site.

  9. Solvent recovery targeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, B.S.; Barton, P.I.

    1999-02-01

    One of the environmental challenges faced by the pharmaceutical and specialty chemical industries is the widespread use of organic solvents. With a solvent-based chemistry, the solvent necessarily has to be separated from the product. Chemical species in waste-solvent streams typically form multicomponent azeotropic mixtures, and this often complicates separation and, hence, recovery of solvents. A design approach is presented whereby process modifications proposed by the engineer to reduce the formation of waste-solvent streams can be evaluated systematically. This approach, called solvent recovery targeting, exploits a recently developed algorithm for elucidating the separation alternatives achievable when applying batch distillation to homogeneous multicomponent mixtures. The approach places the composition of the waste-solvent mixture correctly in the relevant residue curve map and computes the maximum amount of pure material that can be recovered via batch distillation. Solvent recovery targeting is applied to two case studies derived from real industrial processes.

  10. Target | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformationTaosTarget

  11. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woerner, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  12. LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to National Research Council's review is necessary (but not sufficient) for economic viability Minimumforeconomics Cost and risk to buy additional systems approach is required to develop an economically viable plant design Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29

  13. CSU Mail Production Center 6011 Campus Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CSU Mail Production Center 6011 Campus Delivery Phone: 970-491-6142 Fax: 970-491-5012 E-mail: mail.production@colostate.edu MAIL PRODUCTION SERVICE REQUEST CONTACT & BILLING INFORMATION Contact Person Name Mail Code Department Mail Date ** ** Allow up to 5 to 7 days from date materials are received by Mail Production. Inquiries

  14. PREPARING THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM FOR DISTANCE DELIVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    of humans and their companion domestic animals and livestock. Students learn that there are certain "at riskPREPARING THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM FOR DISTANCE DELIVERY: MEDICAL-VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY CLINICS laboratory," library materials, conventional lectures and the 43 virtual patients in the clinics

  15. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Software Engineering Institute Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations - Software Engineering Institute National lab researchers, industry...

  16. Oral Drug Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-10-26

    Stability 0 20 40 60 80 100 25 10 5 1 0.5 size? r 0 (?m) Fr action absor b ed in hum an (% ) Peff =5.0 Peff =3.0 Peff =1.0 Peff =0.5 Peff =0.1 Solubility? Cs = 1.0 (?g/ml) Effect of micronization on intestinal absorption of poorly soluble drugs Peff... ?? permeability to human intestine? (cm/sec x 10 -4 ) 8 Effect of Solubility on intestinal absorption of poorly soluble drugs Cs (?g/ml) 0 5 10 15 50 Fr action absor b ed in hum an (% ) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Peff =5.0 Peff =3.0 Peff =1.0 Peff =0.5 Peff =0.1 r 0 = 1...

  17. The Targeted Delivery of Doxorubicin with Transferrin-Conjugated Block Copolypeptide Vesicles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, BS; Yip, AT; Thach, AV; Rodriguez, AR; Deming, TJ; Kamei, DT

    2015-01-01

    µL of 2.5% (w/v) aqueous uranyl acetate (UA). After 2 s, themicroscope (TEM) image of a uranyl acetate negativelyµL of 2.5% (w/v) aqueous uranyl acetate (UA). After 2 s, the

  18. Transepithelial transport of nanoparticles targeted to the neonatal Fc receptor for oral delivery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pridgen, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are poised to have a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases, but their broad application is limited because currently they can only be administered by parenteral methods. Oral administration ...

  19. Development of alternating amphiphilic copolymers for targeted delivery applications in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brower, Kevin P. (Kevin Peter)

    2011-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 1,479,000 new cases of cancer were expected to be diagnosed, while 562,340 Americans were expected to die from cancer in 2009 alone. Even though advances in early ...

  20. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieber, Charles M.

    for seamless three-dimensional (3D) integration of electronics within man-made materials and living systems% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh,6-10 the syringe-injectable electronics builds upon a submicron thickness macroporous mesh structure

  1. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein Khalil Hussein Khalil DirectorVehicles andHybrid

  2. ON DEMAND DELIVERY OF MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTS USING DISTRIBUTED OBJECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON DEMAND DELIVERY OF MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTS USING DISTRIBUTED OBJECTS C. BOURAS1,2 V. OUZOUNIS3 P propose an architecture for the on- demand delivery of multimedia documents over broadband networks using and the on-demand delivery of them should be addressed. These policies should support flexible, modular

  3. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL -

  4. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - -

  5. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - -

  6. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - - -

  7. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target 1 Flight Path90L2

  8. Nanostructured gene and drug delivery systems based on molecular self-assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Kris Cameron

    2007-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly describes the assembly of molecular components into complex, supramolecular structures governed by weak, non-covalent interactions. In recent years, molecular self-assembly has been used extensively ...

  9. Charge-based transport and drug delivery into cartilage for localized treatment of degenerative joint diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajpayee, Ambika Goel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic joint injuries significantly increase synovial fluid levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can initiate cartilage degeneration leading to osteoarthritis (OA). Articular cartilage is a highly negatively charged, ...

  10. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglin, Emily Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Curtis, C. L. ; Doan, V. V. ; Credo, G. M. ; Sailor, M. J. ,J. L. ; Curtis, C. L. ; Credo, G. M. ; Kavanagh, K. L. ;Curtis, C. L. ; Doan, V. V. ; Credo, G. M. ; Sailor, M. J. ,

  11. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    polymersomes Fe 3 O 4 /Cu 3 (BTC) 2 nanocomposites SAIO@SiObenzene- 1,3,5-tricarboxylate, BTC; iron oxide/silica core–

  12. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon : applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    2008-01-01

    Sailor, M. J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructureSailor, M. J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructureSailor, M. J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructure

  13. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglin, Emily Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Sailor, M. J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructureSailor, M. J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructureSailor, M.J. , Engineering the chemistry and nanostructure

  14. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglin, Emily Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Sealed Source for Cancer Brachytherapy. Abstracts of Porousnovel approach to brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinomaSealed Source for Cancer Brachytherapy. Abstracts of Porous

  15. Novel Approaches to Breast Cancer Therapy: Evaluation of Next Generation Dendrimers for Drug Delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Merideth

    2010-07-14

    concentrations while dendrimers F4-1 and F2-1 were not. The dendrimer compounds may represent the future of breast cancer therapy....

  16. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglin, Emily Jessica

    2007-01-01

    band at 242 nm. UV absorbance measurements were takenby concurrent measurements involving UV absorbanceUV-visible absorption spectroscopy), and by measurement of

  17. Angiotensin inhibition enhances drug delivery and potentiates chemotherapy by decompressing tumour blood vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Vikash P.

    Cancer and stromal cells actively exert physical forces (solid stress) to compress tumour blood vessels, thus reducing vascular perfusion. Tumour interstitial matrix also contributes to solid stress, with hyaluronan ...

  18. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  19. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon : applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    2008-01-01

    a similarly rapid volume phase transition 9, 26 . 4.4.9to undergo rapid volume phase transition upon heating orrapid compared with the published rates attributed to the volume phase transition

  20. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    blue causes a rapid phase transition in NiPAAm that resultsundergoes a rapid volume phase transition upon heating. Thea rapid, thermodynamically driven phase transition [16]. The

  1. Study of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles' (MSNs) intracellular trafficking and their application as drug delivery vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanes, Rolando Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    E, Ho D. Active nanodiamond hydrogels for chemotherapeuticpolymers, lipids, gold, nanodiamond, silicon and mesoporousand these include gold, nanodiamond, silicon, and mesoporous

  2. pH-sensitive core-shell nanoparticles for intracellular drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuhua, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutics such as proteins, DNA, or siRNA, can only exert their function in the cell cytosol or nucleus. However, most of them are cell membrane impermeable molecules that can only be taken up by cells via endocytosis ...

  3. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon : applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    2008-01-01

    of nanoporous silicon after coating with a polymer. J. Appl.biosensor was constructed by coating the surface of the23 2.3.4 Protein coating……………………………………………………23 2.3.5

  4. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    with dual- VT h technique. The robustness of the design is tested by car- rying out three types of analysis, namely: parametric, load and power. It is observed that the ULC produces a stable output for voltages as low as 0.35V and loads varying from 50fF to 120fF. The average power dissipation of the proposed level

  5. Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filler, Aaron G.; Whiteside, Garth T.; Bacon, Mark; Frederickson, Martyn; Howe, Franklyn A.; Rabinowitz, Miri D.; Sokoloff, Alan J.; Deacon, Terrence W.; Abell, Chris; Munglani, Raj; Griffiths, John R.; Bell, B. Anthony; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2010-01-20

    be large when compared to the amount in the small volume of the nerve. In part, this reflects the fact that WGA adheres to muscle cell membranes [36] as well as being taken up by adsorptive endocytosis at nerve ter- mini. This also explains a depot effect...

  6. Mechanized Mesoporous Inorganic Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications: Design, Optimization and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Min

    2013-01-01

    crude was purified by column chromatography (SiO 2 , Hexanes/EtOAc 3:1) to yield 6 as a colorless oil (

  7. Intraperitoneal Injection as a Method of Psychotropic Drug Delivery in Adult Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Adam Stewart, Jonathan M. Cachat, Christopher Suciu, Peter C. Hart, Siddharth Gaikwad, Eli Utterback delivered to an individual animal. Here we outline a simple protocol for the intraperitoneal injection (eds.), Zebrafish Neurobehavioral Protocols, Neuromethods 51, DOI 10

  8. Apoferritin-based nanomedicine platform for drug delivery: equilibrium binding study of daunomycin with DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Wu, Hong J.; Wang, Jun; Kang, Xinhuang; Zhang, Youyu; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-11

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2-hr incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 minutes of incubation in a 5 M urea solution. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in catalysis and bioassys/biosensors.

  9. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon : applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    2008-01-01

    hybrid’ s OT returns to its original value, demonstrating the reversibility of the system through heating-system Figure 4.4 Optical thickness changes of a porous SiO 2 /poly(NIPAM) hybrid upon three consecutive heating/

  10. Nanoporous inorganic membranes or coatings for sustained drug delivery in implantable devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    ), titanium oxide (TiO2) and porous silicon are highlighted with illustrative examples. The critical issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 2.2. Titania nanotubes

  11. COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF CONTROLLED NANOPARTICLE AGGLOMERATIONS FOR MRI-GUIDED NANOROBOTIC DRUG-DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    groups have employed magnetized micro/ nanoparticles and have implemented magnetic propulsion techniques implementation is difficult and medically invasive. Finally, magnetic propulsion techniques #12;other thanEastern University Boston, MA 02115 mavro@coe.neu.edu ABSTRACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic

  12. Lymphocyte-mediated drug nanoparticle delivery to disseminated lymphoma tumors in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The dissemination of lymphoma into anatomical compartments that are poorly accessible from circulation, such as lymph nodes, necessitates high doses of systemic chemotherapy. However, the potencies of many chemotherapeutic ...

  13. An intraperitoneal implantable drug delivery device for the treatment of ovarian cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and the deadliest gynecologic cancer. The current standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer includes a minimally invasive cytoreduction ...

  14. Evaluation & design of a novel drug delivery device for treating tumor-related cerebral edema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shair, Kamal A. (Kamal Abdo)

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-related cerebral edema is a debilitating medical condition that afflicts tens of thousands of newly diagnosed brain cancer patients in the U.S. each year, where the standard care of treatment indicates the systemic ...

  15. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of dendrimers based on melamine as drug delivery vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jong Doo

    2009-05-15

    ), 1.44 (s, 18H); 13 C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl 3 ) ? 156.26, 79.13, 47.54, 39.05, 29.86, 28.55; MS (ESI-TOF) calcd for C 16 H 33 N 3 O 4 331.25, found 332.27 (M+H) + . Intermediate 3. A reaction solution of 2 (5.0 g, 15.1 mmol) and DIPEA (8.0 mL, 46....12, 165.77, 164.86, 156.13, 135.69, 133.74, 129.72, 127.75, 79.05, 72.35, 70.26, 63.50, 47.97, 43.32, 42.14, 40.73, 39.74, 37.28, 36.96, 29.85, 28.61, 27.66, 27.04, 26.92, 26.79, 19.28; MS (MALDI-TOF) calcd for C 45 H 73 N 9 O 6 Si 863.55, found 864...

  16. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon : applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    2008-01-01

    S. A. , Polymerized colloidal crystal hydrogel films asS. A. , Polymerized colloidal crystal hydrogel films ashydrogels with silica colloidal crystal templates 9, 14, or

  17. Bioactive and bioresponsive nanoparticle surface modifications for vaccine and systemic drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clawson, Corbin Zean

    2011-01-01

    purchased from Alfa Aesar (Ward Hill, MA). Oleic acid waspurchased from Alfa Aesar (Ward Hill, MA). The bicinchoninic

  18. Nano compartments may aid drug delivery, catalyst design > Archived News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopment of09Sponsor GuidelinesGlennNancy M.NanoStorage

  19. Target: Subpoena (2010-SE-2001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Subpoena for Information and Production of Documents to Target Corporation requesting information regarding the compliance of various torchieres Target has distributed in commerce in the U.S.

  20. Shielded beam delivery apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Montano, Rory Dominick

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus includes a plasma generator aligned with a beam generator for producing a plasma to shield an energized beam. An electrode is coaxially aligned with the plasma generator and followed in turn by a vortex generator coaxially aligned with the electrode. A target is spaced from the vortex generator inside a fluid environment. The electrode is electrically biased relative to the electrically grounded target for driving the plasma toward the target inside a vortex shield.

  1. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  2. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHigh SpatialElectricity Delivery and Energy

  3. Hydrogen Delivery Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement » Human ResourceHydrogen Delivery

  4. Waste feed delivery planning at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Certa, Paul J.; West, Elizha B.; Rodriguez, Juissepp S.; Hohl, Ted M.; Larsen, Douglas C.; Ritari, Jaakob S.; Kelly, James W.

    2013-01-10

    The Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan (IWFDP) describes how waste feed will be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to safely and efficiently accomplish the River Protection Project (RPP) mission. The IWFDP, which is integrated with the Baseline Case operating scenario, is comprised of three volumes. Volume 1 - Process Strategy provides an overview of waste feed delivery (WFD) and describes how the WFD system will be used to prepare and deliver feed to the WTP based on the equipment configuration and functional capabilities of the WFD system. Volume 2 - Campaign Plan describes the plans for the first eight campaigns for delivery to the WTP, evaluates projected feed for systematic issues, projects 242-A Evaporator campaigns, and evaluates double-shell tank (DST) space and availability of contingency feed. Volume 3 - Project Plan identifies the scope and timing of the DST and infrastructure upgrade projects necessary to feed the WTP, and coordinates over 30 projectized projects and operational activities that comprise the needed WFD upgrades.

  5. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  6. PDFs for nuclear targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Kovarik

    2010-06-25

    Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  7. Two-dimensional inverse planning and delivery with a preclinical image guided microirradiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.; Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; The Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in preclinical radiotherapy systems have provided the foundation for scaling many of the elements of clinical radiation therapy practice to the dimensions and energy demanded in small animal studies. Such systems support the technical capabilities to accurately deliver highly complex dose distributions, but methods to optimize and deliver such distributions remain in their infancy. This study developed an optimization method based on empirically measured two-dimensional dose kernel measurements to deliver arbitrary planar dose distributions on a recently developed small animal radiotherapy platform.Methods: A two-dimensional dose kernel was measured with repeated radiochromic film measurements for the circular 1 mm diameter fixed collimator of the small animal radiotherapy system at 1 cm depth in a solid water phantom. This kernel was utilized in a sequential quadratic programming optimization framework to determine optimal beam positions and weights to deliver an arbitrary desired dose distribution. The positions and weights were then translated to a set of stage motions to automatically deliver the optimized dose distribution. End-to-end efficacy of the framework was quantified through five repeated deliveries of two dosimetric challenges: (1) a 5 mm radius bullseye distribution, and (2) a “sock” distribution contained within a 9 × 13 mm bounding box incorporating rectangular, semicircular, and exponentially decaying geometric constructs and a rectangular linear dose gradient region. These two challenges were designed to gauge targeting, geometric, and dosimetric fidelity.Results: Optimization of the bullseye and sock distributions required 2.1 and 5.9 min and utilized 50 and 77 individual beams for delivery, respectively. Automated delivery of the resulting optimized distributions, validated using radiochromic film measurements, revealed an average targeting accuracy of 0.32 mm, and a dosimetric delivery error along four line profiles taken through the sock distribution of 3.9%. Mean absolute delivery error across the 0–1 Gy linear dose gradient over 7.5 mm was 0.01 Gy.Conclusions: The work presented here demonstrates the potential for complex dose distributions to be planned and automatically delivered with millimeter scale heterogeneity at submillimeter accuracy. This capability establishes the technical foundation for preclinical validation of biologically guided radiotherapy investigations and development of unique radiobiological experiments.

  8. Drug metabolizing enzymes activities versus genetic variances for drug of clinical pharmacogenomic relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Alan HB

    2011-01-01

    this article as: Wu: Drug metabolizing enzyme activitiesgenetic variances for drug of clinical pharmacogenomicPROTEOMICS Open Access Drug metabolizing enzyme activities

  9. Synthesis and characterization of pharmaceutical surfactant templated mesoporous silica: Its application to controlled delivery of duloxetine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Ganesh; Pushparaj, Hemalatha; Peng, Mei Mei; Muthiahpillai, Palanichamy [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanseo University, Seosan-si 356 706 (Korea, Republic of); Udhumansha, Ubaidulla [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanseo University, Seosan-si 356 706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pharmaceutics, C.L. Baid Metha College of Pharmacy, Chennai (India); Jang, Hyun Tae, E-mail: htjang@hanseo.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanseo University, Seosan-si 356 706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Usefulness of dual pharmaceutical surfactants in silica synthesis was evaluated. • Effects of concentration of secondary template (Tween-40) were studied. • Effects of fixed solvothermal condition on mesostructure formation were studied. • Duloxetine drug loading capability was studied. • Sustained release of duloxetine was evaluated. - Abstract: A new group of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were synthesized using combination pharmaceutical surfactants, Triton X-100 and Tween-40 as template and loaded with duloxetine hydrochloride (DX), for improving the sustained release of DX and patterns with high drug loading. Agglomerated spherical silica MSNs were synthesized by sol–gel and solvothermal methods. The calcined and drug loaded MSNs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Braunner–Emmett–Teller (BET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible (DRS-UV–vis) spectroscopy. MSNs with high surface area and pore volume were selected and studied for their DX loading and release. The selected MSNs can accommodate a maximum of 34% DX within it. About 90% was released at 200 h and hence, the synthesized MSNs were capable of engulfing DX and sustain its release. Further form the Ritger and Peppas, Higuchi model for mechanism drug release from all the MSN matrices follows anomalous transport or Non-Fickian diffusion with the ‘r’ and ‘n’ value 0.9 and 0.45 < n < 1, respectively. So, from this study it could be concluded that the MSNs synthesized using pharmaceutical templates were better choice of reservoir for the controlled delivery of drug which requires sustained release.

  10. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  11. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  12. Analysis ? Targeting Zero Net Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis - Targeting Zero Net Energy 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Scott Horowitz, scott.horowitz@nrel.gov NREL Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 2010 Planned...

  13. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body.

  14. Real time sensor for therapeutic radiation delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.

    1998-01-06

    The invention is a real time sensor for therapeutic radiation. A probe is placed in or near the patient that senses in real time the dose at the location of the probe. The strength of the dose is determined by either an insertion or an exit probe. The location is determined by a series of vertical and horizontal sensing elements that gives the operator a real time read out dose location relative to placement of the patient. The increased accuracy prevents serious tissue damage to the patient by preventing overdose or delivery of a dose to a wrong location within the body. 14 figs.

  15. Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal natural gasPurchase, Delivery, and Storage of

  16. Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal natural gasPurchase, Delivery, and Storage

  17. Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotal natural gasPurchase, Delivery, and

  18. Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and Removal inPublications&Purchase,

  19. Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and Removal

  20. Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information ResourcesHeat &Department ofDelivery

  1. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Internships Funding Opportunities Information Center Contact Us Energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC...

  2. ,"Maine Natural Gas Exports (No Intransit Deliveries) (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Exports (No Intransit Deliveries) (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2014...

  3. OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harbor (where the island's petroleum terminals are located). U.S. Department of Energy Situation Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  4. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  5. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Analysis Using VCSE Promoting Control System Reliability Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review DOEOE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan...

  6. Vectren Energy Delivery of Indiana (Electric)- Commercial New Construction Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vectren Energy Delivery offers commercial customers in Indiana electric rebates for the installation of certain types of equipment in newly constructed buildings through its Energy Design Assist...

  7. H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An in-depth comparative analysis of promising infrastructure options for hydrogen delivery and distribution to refueling stations from central, semi-central, and distributed...

  8. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG) Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations - Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the...

  9. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review Presentations - Secure Communications Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations - Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG)...

  10. Patch and Update Management Program for Energy Delivery Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a comprehensive solution to meet energy sector patch and update needs. A collaborative web portal aggregates and organizes patch and update information for energy delivery system...

  11. PHEV Parcel Delivery Truck Model - Development and Preliminary Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R

    2009-10-28

    Describes results of a study to determine the impact of drive cycles on the energy- and cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric delivery vans.

  12. BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. - Product Pipeline Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. - Product Pipeline Review - 2014 By Radiant Insights Home > Groups > Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Marketresearchri's...

  13. Target R & D LBNE Collaboration Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    are not planning on having an integrated target / horn 1 · Will of course change if appropriate · The R&D effort Hall utilities) David Hickson (Target Hall utilities) Pat Hurh (Target technical components Tariq (Target pile, remote handling) Karl Williams (Target Hall utilities) Tim Wyman (Target Hall

  14. Targeted Specular Photons Michelle Laprade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montréal, Université de

    Targeted Specular Photons Michelle Laprade Département d'Informatique et de Recherche in the resulting image which are not captured using traditional photon map- ping algorithms. This method uses a separate group of photons ­ targeted specular photons ­ which are shot specifically towards

  15. Analysis of Assembly Bill 310: Prescription Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    pdf. Accessed February 2011. Medco. 2010 Drug Trend Report.www.drugtrend.com/art/drug_trend/pdf/DT_Report_2010.pdf.chronic myeloid leukaemia. Drugs. 2007;67(2): p. 299- April

  16. Prescription Drug List effective January 1, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    1 Your 2015 Prescription Drug List effective January 1, 2015 Student Resources Traditional ThreeZIPcode. ·Lookuppossiblelower-costmedicationalternatives. ·Comparemedicationpricingandoptions. #12;2 Your Prescription Drug List This Prescription Drug List (PDL) outlines the most commonly prescribed medications for certain

  17. Drug-Drug Interaction Detection: A New Approach Based on Maximal Frequent Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    Drug-Drug Interaction Detection: A New Approach Based on Maximal Frequent Sequences Detecci´on de´armacos, extracci´on de relaciones, secuencias frecuentes maximales Abstract: In this paper, a new approach for Drug-Drug that contain Drug-Drug Interactions. Maximal Frequent Sequences define word sequences that are frequent

  18. Health Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Health Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery Tennenbaum Institute Georgia, valuable change. Health Advisor The Tennenbaum Institute is developing, with partial support from IBM, an online game for managing healthcare delivery ­ Health Advisor. Each player manages a set of clients

  19. Nanodiamond as a vector for siRNA delivery to Ewing sarcoma cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhaddad, Anna; Botsoa, Jacques; Dantelle, Géraldine; Perruchas, Sandrine; Gacoin, Thierry; Mansuy, Christelle; Lavielle, Solange; Malvy, Claude; Treussart, François; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the ability of diamond nanoparticles (nanodiamonds, NDs) to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) in Ewing sarcoma cells, in the perspective of in vivo anti-cancer nucleic acid drug delivery. siRNA was adsorbed onto NDs previously coated with cationic polymer. Cell uptake of NDs has been demonstrated by taking advantage of NDs intrinsic fluorescence coming from embedded color center defects. Cell toxicity of these coated NDs was shown to be low. Consistent with the internalization efficacy, we have shown a specific inhibition of EWS/Fli-1 gene expression at the mRNA and protein level by the ND vectorized siRNA in a serum containing medium.

  20. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  1. Evidence for new targets and synergistic effect of metronomic celecoxib/fluvastatin combination in pilocytic astrocytoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercurio, Sandy; Padovani, Laetitia; Colin, Carole; Carré, Manon; Tchoghandjian, Aurélie; Scavarda, Didier; Lambert, Sally; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Fernandez, Carla; Chappé, Céline; André, Nicolas; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2013-05-20

    , and IQGAP1) are targets for available drugs: fluvastatin and/or celecoxib. Results Quantification by RT-Q-PCR of the expression of these genes was performed in a series of 51 pilocytic astrocytomas and 10 glioblastomas: they were all significantly...

  2. SU-E-T-107: Development of a GPU-Based Dose Delivery System for Adaptive Pencil Beam Scanning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordanengo, S; Russo, G; Marchetto, F; Attili, A; Monaco, V; Varasteh, M; Pella, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A description of a GPU-based dose delivery system (G-DDS) to integrate a fast forward planning implementing in real-time the prescribed sequence of pencil beams. The system, which is under development, is designed to evaluate the dose distribution deviations due to range variations and interplay effects affecting mobile tumors treatments. Methods: The Dose Delivery System (DDS) in use at the Italian Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), is the starting point for the presented system. A fast and partial forward planning (FP) tool has been developed to evaluate in few seconds the delivered dose distributions using the DDS data (on-line measurements of spot properties, i.e. number of particles and positions). The computation is performed during the intervals between synchrotron spills and, made available at the end of each spill. In the interval between two spills, the G-DDS will evaluate the delivered dose distributions taking into account the real-time target positions measured by a tracking system. The sequence of prescribed pencil beams for the following spill will be adapted taking into account the variations with respect to the original plan due to the target motion. In order to speed up the computation required to modify pencil beams distribution (up to 400 times has been reached), the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and advanced Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are used. Results: An existing offline forward planning is going to be optimized for the CUDA architecture: the gain in time will be presented. The preliminary performances of the developed GPU-based FP algorithms will be shown. Conclusion: A prototype of a GPU-based dose delivery system is under development and will be presented. The system workflow will be illustrated together with the approach adopted to integrate the three main systems, i.e. CNAO dose delivery system, fast forward planning, and tumor tracking system.

  3. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen.Solid and liquid hydrogen carriers for use in hydrogen storage and delivery.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability: Transmission Reliability Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  5. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  6. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J; Hoover, D; MacFarlane, M; Wong, E

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  7. High Power Target Design and Operational Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update Target R&D Program Has Addressed Key Design and Operational-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update Mercury target development activities.S. Department of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update · Peak energy deposition in Hg for a single pulse

  8. Targets for Multimegawatt Proton Beams %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&'())0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , 2003 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Sketches of a 4-MW Target Station Kirk T. Mc and granular targets. · Liquid target studies. · Continuing R&D (including targets for linear colliders). Kirk accelerator neutrino beams, where targetry is a major challenge. Kirk T. McDonald Fermilab Long Range Planning

  9. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as would be enabled by real-time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Conclusions: Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

  10. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA); Anex, Deon S. (Livermore, CA); Yan, Chao (Pleasanton, CA); Dadoo, Rajeev (Stanford, CA); Zare, Richard N. (Stanford, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-.mu.L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-.mu.L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column.

  11. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rakestraw, D.J.; Anex, D.S.; Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1999-08-24

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-{micro}L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-{micro}L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column. 4 figs.

  12. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-09-30

    A method for treatment and amelioration of breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial, squamous cells, prostate cancer and melanoma in a patient comprising targeting Id-1 or Id-2 gene expression with a delivery vehicle comprising a product which modulates Id-1 or Id-2 expression.

  13. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  14. Drug-Initiated, Controlled Ring-Opening Polymerization for the Synthesis of Polymer-Drug Conjugates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Drug-Initiated, Controlled Ring-Opening Polymerization for the Synthesis of Polymer-Drug Conjugates to paclitaxel and the subsequent ring-opening polymerization of lactide. The drug-initiated, controlled(-caprolactone)) was also achieved through drug/(BDI-II)ZnN(TMS)2-mediated controlled polymerization. These drug

  15. Alcohol and Other Drugs -1 -Approved: 05/09/2014 Alcohol and Other Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Alcohol and Other Drugs - 1 - Approved: 05/09/2014 Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy Type: Board with the federal Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, and the Commonwealth of Virginia's Policy on Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD), it is the policy of Virginia Commonwealth

  16. Monotonic Target Assignment for Robotic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen L; Bullo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Target assignment for robotic networks: Worst-case andTARGET ASSIGNMENT FOR ROBOTIC NETWORKS [6] H. W. Kuhn, “TheTarget Assignment for Robotic Networks Stephen L. Smith,

  17. Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion Initial target: preheated & magnetized Subsequent for the FRC. Abstract Block Diagram theta coil transmission line Bias cap. bank maincapacitor inductor PI cap

  18. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 November 2014 Review of the...

  19. A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production Print Thursday, 02 February 2012 13:34 The sesquiterpene bisabolene was...

  20. Water delivery in the Early Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Süli, Áron; Sándor, Zsolt; Galiazzo, Mattia; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    As part of the national scientific network 'Pathways to Habitable Worlds' the delivery of water onto terrestrial planets is a key question since water is essential for the development of life as we know it. After summarizing the state of the art we show some first results of the transport of water in the early Solar System for scattered main belt objects. Hereby we investigate the questions whether planetesimals and planetesimal fragments which have gained considerable inclination due to the strong dynamical interactions in the main belt region around 2 AU can be efficient water transporting vessels. The Hungaria asteroid group is the best example that such scenarios are realistic. Assuming that the gas giants and the terrestrial planets are already formed, we monitor the collisions of scattered small bodies containing water (in the order of a few percent) with the terrestrial planets. Thus we are able to give a first estimate concerning the respective contribution of such bodies to the actual water content i...

  1. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Qingbo (State College, PA); Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Kane, Thomas E. (State College, PA); Kernan, John R. (Loganton, PA); Sonnenschein, Bernard (Brooklyn, NY); Sharer, Michael V. (Tyrone, PA)

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  2. Designing nanoparticles for highly efficient endothelial siRNA delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlman, James E

    2015-01-01

    RNA potently regulates gene expression. However, the utility of RNA has been limited by the ability to efficiently deliver it to specific cells in vivo. In vivo RNA delivery is challenging; vehicles must avoid phagocytosis ...

  3. Intelligent Matchmaking for Polar Ice Sheet Data Collection and Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    for the dynamic configuration of sensors and the motion of the rovers that carry them. The PRISM intelligent intelligent sensor and roveIntelligent Matchmaking for Polar Ice Sheet Data Collection and Delivery Costas Tsatsoulis, Sudha

  4. OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Saipan via barge to assist with restoration efforts. Severe damage U.S. Department of Energy Situation Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  5. Design of an underwater vertical glider for subsea equipment delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambler, Charles Kirby

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of subsea equipment and sensors is generally accomplished with unguided sinking platforms or powered autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). An alternative would be to augment existing platforms with navigation and ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: All Electric Delivery Trucks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of reports (part of the medium and heavy-duty truck data) describes data collected from Smith Newton all-electric delivery trucks in a variety of fleets. This research was...

  7. DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 8-9, 2005, the Department of Energy held the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of...

  8. Joint Architecture Standard (JAS) Reliable Data Delivery Protocol (RDDP) specification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderle, Justin Wayne; Daniels, James W.; Gardner, Michael T.; Eldridge, John M.; Hunt, Richard D.; Gallegos, Daniel E.

    2011-05-01

    The Joint Architecture Standard (JAS) program at Sandia National Laboratories requires the use of a reliable data delivery protocol over SpaceWire. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Goddard Spaceflight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, developed and specified a reliable protocol for its Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite known as GOES-R Reliable Data Delivery Protocol (GRDDP). The JAS program implemented and tested GRDDP and then suggested a number of modifications to the original specification to meet its program specific requirements. This document details the full RDDP specification as modified for JAS. The JAS Reliable Data Delivery Protocol uses the lower-level SpaceWire data link layer to provide reliable packet delivery services to one or more higher-level host application processes. This document specifies the functional requirements for JRDDP but does not specify the interfaces to the lower- or higher-level processes, which may be implementation-dependent.

  9. Optimal Multi-Temperature delivery frequency for small format stores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barooah, Mayurpankhi

    2015-01-01

    Retailers are exploring more efficient ways to deliver to small format stores that demand frequent and small volume deliveries from Distribution Centers. The need to deliver products at different temperatures, viz. Ambient, ...

  10. Vacancy Announcements Posted for Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office has posted two vacancy announcements for a position to serve as Program Manager for the Hydrogen Production and Delivery Program in the DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office. The closing date is October 28, 2014.

  11. Polyelectrolyte multilayer growth factor delivery : mediating tissue/device interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Mara Lee

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of ultrathin therapeutic protein delivery films to control host tissue/medical device implant interactions, thereby reducing complications that lead to implant failure. The Layer by Layer ...

  12. Drug Trafficking Organizations and Counter-Drug Strategies in the U.S.-Mexican Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astorga, Luis; Shirk, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic Assessment of U.S. Drug Policy. Washington, D.C. ,K. (2008). Mexico Faces New Drug Challenge: Mini-Submarines.Mayors on Front Line of the Drug War. Los Angeles Times Los

  13. Managing Faults in the Service Delivery Process of Service Provider Coalitions Patricia Marcu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes of ITSM are critical for successful delivery as stressed by the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL

  14. Technoeconomic Analysis of Biomethane Production from Biogas and Pipeline Delivery (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

    2010-10-18

    This presentation summarizes "A Technoeconomic Analysis of Biomethane Production from Biogas and Pipeline Delivery".

  15. Hydraulic Hybrid Parcel Delivery Truck Deployment, Testing & Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallo, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-03-07

    Although hydraulic hybrid systems have shown promise over the last few years, commercial deployment of these systems has primarily been limited to Class 8 refuse trucks. In 2005, the Hybrid Truck Users Forum initiated the Parcel Delivery Working Group including the largest parcel delivery fleets in North America. The goal of the working group was to evaluate and accelerate commercialization of hydraulic hybrid technology for parcel delivery vehicles. FedEx Ground, Purolator and United Parcel Service (UPS) took delivery of the world’s first commercially available hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery trucks in early 2012. The vehicle chassis includes a Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid drive system, integrated and assembled by Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., with a body installed by Morgan Olson. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, CALSTART and its project partners assessed the performance, reliability, maintainability and fleet acceptance of three pre-production Class 6 hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery vehicles using information and data from in-use data collection and on-road testing. This document reports on the deployment of these vehicles operated by FedEx Ground, Purolator and UPS. The results presented provide a comprehensive overview of the performance of commercial hydraulic hybrid vehicles in parcel delivery applications. This project also informs fleets and manufacturers on the overall performance of hydraulic hybrid vehicles, provides insights on how the technology can be both improved and more effectively used. The key findings and recommendations of this project fall into four major categories: -Performance, -Fleet deployment, -Maintenance, -Business case. Hydraulic hybrid technology is relatively new to the market, as commercial vehicles have been introduced only in the past few years in refuse and parcel delivery applications. Successful demonstration could pave the way for additional purchases of hydraulic hybrid vehicles throughout the trucking industry. By providing unbiased, third-party assessment of this “hybrid without batteries” technology, this report offers relevant, timely and valuable information to the industry.

  16. Computer controlled feed delivery system for feed trucks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Gregory Alan

    1989-01-01

    COMPUTER CONTROLLED FEED DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR FEED TRUCKS A Thesis by GREGORY ALAN HOLT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering COMPIJIER CONTROLLED FEED DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR FEED TRUCKS A Thesis by GREGORY ALAN HOLT Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parnell (Chair of Committee) ayne LePori (Member) Charlie G...

  17. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Office of Electricity Delivery and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget ||DepartmentReadoutReview ofDeliveryDeliveryEnergy

  18. Target

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:TakeSeptember 13,Tara

  19. Brain science, addiction and drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiesner, Karoline

    Designing your future Page 7 Theme: Nanoscience and Quantum Information Exchanging keys in the Canaries Page:searchUniversity of Bristol · Research Review · Issue 10 · October 2005 research themes issue #12;Research themes 2005 Establishedresearchthemes Theme: Neuroscience Brain science, addiction and drugs Other established research themes

  20. Financing drug discovery for orphan diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagnan, David Erik

    Recently proposed ‘megafund’ financing methods for funding translational medicine and drug development require billions of dollars in capital per megafund to de-risk the drug discovery process enough to issue long-term ...

  1. Genomic analysis identifies targets of convergent positive selection in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhat, Maha R.

    M. tuberculosis is evolving antibiotic resistance, threatening attempts at tuberculosis epidemic control. Mechanisms of resistance, including genetic changes favored by selection in resistant isolates, are incompletely ...

  2. A battle with superbugs : New compounds and targets against drug-resistant pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haste, Nina M.

    2012-01-01

    of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Am J Med 119, S3-the intrinsic resistance properties of the bacteria andresistance seen to classical antibiotics. Many virulence factor inhibitors act to render the bacteria

  3. Applications and method development in the simulation of ligands binding to drug targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinko, William

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and Virtual Screening .23   Abstract: repeat Chemical and Protein Virtual Screening Abstract: PH

  4. Confidence from uncertainty - A multi-target drug screening method from robust control theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luni, Camilla; Shoemaker, Jason E; Sanft, Kevin R; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    method from robust control theory. BMC Systems Biology 2010method from robust control theory Camilla Luni 1 , Jason Eof a method from robust control theory, Structured Singular

  5. Ultrasound radiation force enables targeted deposition of model drug carriers loaded on microbubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Scott I.

    is short (on the order of 10 min) [14,15]. Lipids grafted to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or other hydrophilic polymers have been shown to create so-called ``stealth'' particles that are shielded from the immune system

  6. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-03

    myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome. N Engl J Med 344, 1038-1042 (2001). 37. M. Eilers, R. N. Eisenman, Myc's broad reach. Genes Dev 22, 2755-2766 (2008). 38. B. P. Eliceiri, R. Paul, P. L. Schwartzberg, J... . Gewirtz, B. Perussia, B. Calabretta, Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase activity is regulated by BCR/ABL and is required for the growth of Philadelphia chromosome- positive cells. Blood 86, 726-736 (1995). 137. D. D. Spyropoulos, P. N. Pharr, K. R. Lavenburg...

  7. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase: crucial metabolic enzyme and attractive target for drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Liang

    is used as a building block to ex- tend the chain length of fatty acids in two carbon incre- ments). ACC is a CMLS, Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 62 (2005) 1784­1803 1420-682X/05/161784-20 DOI 10.1007/s00018-005-5121-4 © Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 2005 CMLS Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences multi-subunit enzyme in most

  8. The pipeline and future of drug development in schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, J A; Roth, B L

    2007-01-01

    The Pipeline and Future of Drug Development in SchizophreniaThe Drug Discovery Pipeline in Schizophrenia Keywords:discuss the current pipeline of drugs for schizophrenia,

  9. Drug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardridge, William M

    2011-01-01

    diffusion. Drug transport into cerebrospinal fluid vs. brainDrug transport from blood to interstitial fluid (ISF) isDrug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid William

  10. CMVO Drug Testing Program Reasonable Suspicion Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    CMVO Drug Testing Program Reasonable Suspicion Testing CMVO Revised Suspicion Form (Revised 6/08) Guidelines for Reasonable Suspicion Drug and Alcohol Testing: A supervisor, trained in accordance with 49 CFR involved in an incident that requires drug/alcohol testing as set forth in 382.307. Remember: Reasonable

  11. Drugs and Behavior (Psychology 320 Sec. 001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    1 Drugs and Behavior (Psychology 320 Sec. 001) Syllabus Example Text: Maisto, Galizio and Conners. Drug Use and Abuse. Harcourt Brace College Publishers. 2008, Fifth Edition. Prerequisites: This course of drugs of abuse. An overview of basic pharmacology and behavioral pharmacology will be provided followed

  12. Process management applications in biopharmaceutical drug production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    Genzyme's manufacturing and supply chain organization is responsible for the production and delivery of medically necessary medicines for patients with rare diseases around the world. Because of the nature of the products ...

  13. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  14. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  15. Proctors' Memorandum on Drugs Misuse Guidelines from Proctors' Office on Dealing with Drugs Misuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Proctors' Memorandum on Drugs Misuse Guidelines from Proctors' Office on Dealing with Drugs Misuse The use of specified drugs is illegal within the UK, and is inimical to the University's primary objectives of the pursuit of academic study and research. The presence of drugs within the University

  16. Automatic Drug Side Effect Discovery from Online Patient-Submitted Reviews: Focus on Statin Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Drug Side Effect Discovery from Online Patient-Submitted Reviews: Focus on Statin Drugs become empowered to share personal experiences regarding prescription drugs via Web page discussion from patient-provided drug reviews on health-related web sites. We focus on the statin class

  17. HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC AND OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS (5/3/2013) Introduction Drugs have a successful history of use in treating diseases and are responsible for many medical advances over the past century. However, virtually every drug has side effects

  18. Policy on Drug-Free Workplace Policy on Drug-Free Workplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Drug-Free Workplace 10/26/2014 Policy on Drug-Free Workplace I. Purpose and Scope responsible decision- making regarding the use of alcohol and other drugs. Northeastern strives to maintain drug use can create. Additionally, the University is committed to enforcing policies and laws relating

  19. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)] [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)] [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  20. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  1. Drugs in Cinema: Separating the Myths from Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iannicelli, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Drugs in Cinema: Separating the Myths from Reality PaulSUMMARY 7 (2000). DRUGS IN CINEMA policy has a significantviolence in film. DRUGS IN CINEMA III. HISTORY OF DRUG USE

  2. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-06-01

    Widely used chemotherapeutic breast cancer drugs such as Tamoxifen citrate (TC), Capecitabine (CP) and Epirubicin (EP) are known to cause various cardiovascular side-effects among long term cancer survivors. Vascular modulation warrants nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction, which targets the vascular endothelium. We hypothesize that TC, CP and EP interference with the nitric oxide downstream signaling specifically, could lead to cardiovascular dysfunctions. The results demonstrate that while all three drugs attenuate NO and cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) production in endothelial cells, they caused elevated levels of NO in the plasma and RBC. However, PBMC and platelets did not show any significant changes under treatment. This implies that the drug effects are specific to the endothelium. Altered eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) localization patterns in endothelial cells were observed following drug treatments. Similarly, the expression of phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) protein was decreased under the treatment of drugs. Altered actin polymerization was also observed following drug treatment, while addition of SpNO and 8Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Incubation with the drugs decreased endothelial cell migration whereas addition of YC-1, SC and 8Br-cGMP recovered the effect. Additionally molecular docking studies showed that all three drugs exhibited a strong binding affinity with the catalytic domain of human sGC. In conclusion, results indicate that TC, CP and EP cause endothelial dysfunctions via the NO–sGC–cGMP pathway and these effects could be recovered using pharmaceutical agonists of NO signaling pathway. Further, the study proposes a combination therapy of chemotherapeutic drugs and cGMP analogs, which would confer protection against chemotherapy mediated vascular dysfunctions in cancer patients. - Highlights: • NO production is reduced in endothelial cells under breast cancer drug treatment. • Cellular cGMP level is decreased under the treatments of breast cancer drugs. • Breast cancer drugs induce vasoconstriction by interfering with NO pathway. • NO donors, cGMP analogs rescue breast cancer drug induced endothelial dysfunctions.

  3. Vaginal mesh grafts and the Food and Drug Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostergard, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    and the Food and Drug Administration Donald R. Ostergardthe food and drug administration's (FDA) 510(k) process of

  4. Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery - 12507

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Our discussion of the Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery will cover progress made to date with Base and Recovery Act funding in reducing the risk posed by tank waste and in preparing for the initiation of waste treatment at Hanford. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The underground storage tanks range in capacity from 55,000 gallons to more than 1 million gallons. The tanks were constructed with carbon steel and reinforced concrete. There are eighteen groups of tanks, called 'tank farms', some having as few as two tanks and others up to sixteen tanks. Between 1943 and 1964, 149 single-shell tanks were built at Hanford in the 200 West and East Areas. Heat generated by the waste and the composition of the waste caused an estimated 67 of these single-shell tanks to leak into the ground. Washington River Protection Solutions is the prime contractor responsible for the safe management of this waste. WRPS' mission is to reduce the risk to the environment that is posed by the waste. All of the pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks and transferred to the double-shell tanks. What remains in the single-shell tanks are solid and semi-solid wastes. Known as salt-cakes, they have the consistency of wet beach sand. Some of the waste resembles small broken ice, or whitish crystals. Because the original pumps inside the tanks were designed to remove only liquid waste, other methods have been developed to reach the remaining waste. Access to the tank waste is through long, typically skinny pipes, called risers, extending out of the tanks. It is through these pipes that crews are forced to send machines and devices into the tanks that are used to break up the waste or push it toward a pump. These pipes range in size from just a few inches to just over a foot in diameter because they were never intended to be used in this manner. As part of the agreement regulating Hanford cleanup, crews must remove at least 99% of the material in every tank on the site, or at least as much waste that can be removed based on available technology. To date, seven single-shell tanks have been emptied, and work is underway in another 10 tanks in preparation for additional retrieval activities. Two barriers have been installed over single-shell tanks to prevent the intrusion of surface water down to the tanks, with additional barriers planned for the future. Single and double-shell tank integrity analyses are ongoing. Because the volume of the waste generated through plutonium production exceeded the capacity of the single-shell tanks, between 1968 and 1986 Hanford engineers built 28 double-shell tanks. These tanks were studied and made with a second shell to surround the carbon steel and reinforced concrete. The double-shell tanks have not leaked any of their waste. (authors)

  5. Testing Drugs Versus Testing For Drug Use: Private Risk Management in the Shadow of the Criminal Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCoun, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Preface: The Varieties of Drug Control at the Dawn of thetbl.1.1. Id. See Peter Reuter, Drug Use Measures: What AreBetween Student Illicit Drug Use and School Drug-Testing

  6. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  7. Cellular delivery and site-specific targeting of organic fluorophores for super-resolution imaging in living cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have pushed the spatial resolution of biological imaging down to a few nanometers. The key element to the development of such imaging modality is synthetic organic ...

  8. Review of the Renewable Energy Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Review of the Renewable Energy Target Response to Expert Panel's Call for Submissions Paper #12;NSW Government Submission to the Review of the Renewable Energy Target, May 2014 2/20 Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY IN NSW

  9. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowna, Thomas; Malekos, Steven; Korgan, Grant; Adams, Jesse; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; LeGalloudec, Nathalie

    2014-06-10

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  10. Nanoparticles for targeting the infarcted heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir, Tal

    We report a nanoparticulate system capable of targeting the heart after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting is based on overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in the infarcted heart. Liposomes 142 nm in ...

  11. Solid Target Studies for NF Rob Edgecock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    . Proposed lubricant (coating): WS2 Demonstrated to work to ~1300oC in vacuum. #12;Target Change #12;Target Calculations and Optimisation. John 4. Chain Design Optimisation ­ roller chain or alternative. David Consult

  12. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Thomas (Dresden, DE); Malekos, Steven (Reno, NV); Korgan, Grant (Reno, NV); Adams, Jesse (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Fuchs, Julien (Paris, FR)

    2012-07-24

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  13. Enterprise Assessments, Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - November 2013 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project - December...

  14. Implementation of a Project Management System for Improvement to City, State's Design and Construction Capital Project Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chad C.

    2007-05-18

    than 400 projects with budgets of over a half billion dollars. It has shifted the capital improvement project delivery from a “multi-departmental” style of delivery to a “project management” style of delivery through the infusion of private consultants...

  15. Automatic Target Word Disambiguation Using Syntactic Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Target Word Disambiguation Using Syntactic Relationships Ebony Domingo1 and Rachel Edita. Multiple target translations are due to several meanings of source words, and various target word equivalents depending on the context of the source word. Thus, an automated approach is presented

  16. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a user of that drug (e.g. it produces a positive result with probability .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non

  17. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non it is known that 10% of the entire population uses this drug. You test someone and the test is positive. What

  18. Multiparametric approach for the evaluation of lipid nanoparticles for siRNA delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabi, Christopher A.

    Nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery is a complex process that requires transport across numerous extracellular and intracellular barriers. As such, the development of nanoparticles for efficient delivery would benefit ...

  19. Cell squeezing : a vector-free microfluidic platform for intracellular delivery of macromolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharei, Armon R. (Armon Reza)

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of material is a long-standing challenge for both therapeutic and research applications. Existing technologies rely on a variety of mechanisms to facilitate delivery. Vector-based methods, such as ...

  20. Delivery of proteins in live cells with viral peptides: principles and mechanisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ya-Jung

    2012-07-16

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the delivery of macromolecules across the plasma membrane of live cells. These peptides are therefore important due to the potential of making the delivery of protein probes or therapeutics a routine...

  1. Using Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) to Resolve the Major Construction Project Delay Causes in Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhalid, Khalid Abdullah

    2011-12-16

    Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) has gained attention in the United States and Europe as an effective delivery method for construction projects. The aim of this research paper is to determine the major causes of delay in projects in Saudi Arabia...

  2. DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage...

  3. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of...

  4. Apatite-Polymer Composite Particles for Controlled Delivery of BMP-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Tseh-Hwan

    We have developed a versatile delivery platform comprising a novel composite of two biomaterials with proven track records: apatite and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). These composites have been tested in the delivery ...

  5. Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery: A Quantitative Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact caused by the interplay between intrafraction prostate motion and the intermittent delivery of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 10 prostate patients was treated with PBS using a bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. Bilateral intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for comparison. Because beam-on time in PBS was intermittent, the actual beam-on time was determined from treatment logs. Prostate motion was generalized according to real-time Calypso tracking data from our previously reported prospective photon trial. We investigated potential dose deviations by considering the interplay effect resulting from the worst-case scenario motion and the PBS delivery sequence. Results: For both bilateral-field SFUD and IMPT plans, clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 99}% coverage was degraded <2% owing to prostate intrafraction motion when averaged over the course of treatment, but was >10% for the worst fraction. The standard deviation of CTV D{sub 99}% distribution was approximately 1.2%. The CTV coverage of individual fields in SFUD plans degraded as time elapsed after the initial alignment, owing to prostate drift. Intensity-modulated proton therapy and SFUD demonstrated comparable results when bilateral opposed fields were used. Single-field SFUD plans that were repainted twice, which could reduce half of the treatment time, resulted in similar CTV coverage as bilateral-field plans. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion affects the actual delivered dose to CTV; however, when averaged over the course of treatment, CTV D{sub 99}% coverage degraded only approximately 2% even for the worst-case scenario. The IMPT plan results are comparable to those of the SFUD plan, and similar coverage can be achieved if treated by SFUD 1 lateral field per day when rescanning the field twice to shorten the treatment time and mitigate intrafraction motion.

  6. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of alternating copolymers for use as drug delivery vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Michelle Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the collective group of diseases distinguished by uninhibited growth and spread of abnormal cells. It often results in death if the spread is not controlled. Most cancers are treated by surgery, radiation, ...

  7. Mathematical modelling of the use of macrophages as vehicles for drug-delivery to hypoxic tumour sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    angiogenesis. In this paper we outline a modelling approach to characterise macrophage infiltration into early avascular solid tumours, and extensions to study the interaction of these cells with macrophages already of macrophage infiltration and tumour size. Although increased infiltration should be beneficical from the point

  8. Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems Selc¸uk K¨ose Department are needed to determine the location of these on-chip power supplies and decoupling capacitors. In this paper, the optimal location of the power supplies and decoupling capacitors is determined for different size

  9. Remarks Prepared for Delivery by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the enormous amount of work you have been doing on behalf of the world's energy future. And let me recognize be one of those technologies that allows the world to leapfrog the enormous acceleration in future energyRemarks Prepared for Delivery by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham ITER Ministerial December 20

  10. SOUTH CAMPUS APARTMENT RESIDENTS Package and Mail Delivery Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    SOUTH CAMPUS APARTMENT RESIDENTS Package and Mail Delivery Information Upon check-in you mailbox will be labeled with your building number and apartment number. Example: 311 Chinook Dr Apt 4 will be labeled 311-4. Mail is delivered and handled by the United States Postal Service, USPS, for all

  11. The Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) Model for Energy Service Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    95 The Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) Model for Energy Service Delivery Jason Houck San Francisco to finance, market, and deliver sustainable energy services to energy end-users. This study outlines the concept of a new third-party administrative model, a sustainable energy utility (SEU), with the potential

  12. Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense Yi Xu and Wenye Wang in large-scale multihop wireless networks because of the limited energy supplies from batteries. We and strategies that reduce energy consumption in wireless net- works to extend network lifetimes. Examples

  13. Delivery Vehicles for Zerovalent Metal Nanoparticles in Soil and Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Vehicles for Zerovalent Metal Nanoparticles in Soil and Groundwater Bettina Schrick hydrocarbons in groundwater and soils. The transport of Fe/C nanoparticles was studied by elution through and the groundwater level, in some cases reaching the underlying saturated zone. As hydrophobic sparingly soluble

  14. Slowing the Flow at Pickering PROGRAMME DELIVERY GROUP MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slowing the Flow at Pickering PROGRAMME DELIVERY GROUP MEETING The Mill Suite, Memorial Hall the group on construction of debris dams in Cropton East (Pickering Beck catchment). A team of National Park/River Seven ­ TN confirmed that the Seven modelling report including the results of the cross

  15. United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet Test and Evaluation team evaluated the 12-month, in-service performance of six Class 4 hybrid electric delivery vans - fueled by regular diesel - and six comparable conventional diesel vans operated by the United Parcel Service.

  16. Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    2000-01-18

    This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches.

  17. Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Presentation prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    must directly address the end-user requirement for commercial power 3 Plant Primary Criteria (partialAmerican Energy Company · Wisconsin Energy · Nuclear Management Company · Constellation Energy · Dominion plant design · Delivery soon enough to make a difference to global energy imperatives. · Design based

  18. Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01

    Fact sheet describing the project startup for evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 hybrid-electric delivery trucks.

  19. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Christopher J [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Hobbs, Randall W [ORNL; Owens, R Steven [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  20. Terahertz-based target typing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.; Barrick, Todd A.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to create a THz component set and understanding to aid in the rapid analysis of transient events. This includes the development of fast, tunable, THz detectors, along with filter components for use with standard detectors and accompanying models to simulate detonation signatures. The signature effort was crucial in order to know the spectral range to target for detection. Our approach for frequency agile detection was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays.

  1. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathore, Dharmendar (Blacksburg, VA); Jani, Dewal (Blacksburg, VA); Nagarkatti, Rana (Blacksburg, VA)

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  2. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  3. Target Fabrication: A View from the Users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Christensen, Cindy R.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2004-03-15

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  4. TARGET FABRICATION: A VIEW FROM THE USERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, Cris W.; Christensen, Cindy; Cobble, James; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael S.; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2003-07-18

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in time to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  5. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  6. Hollow-waveguide delivery systems for high-power, industrial CO2 lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollow-waveguide delivery systems for high-power, industrial CO2 lasers Ricky K. Nubling and James to deliver CO2 laser power for industrial laser applications. The transmission, bending loss, and output, beam delivery, industrial lasers, power delivery, CO2 lasers. r 1996 Optical Society of America 1

  7. Use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition for Damage Location of Water Delivery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition for Damage Location of Water Delivery Systems Masanobu Shinozuka1 ; Jianwen Liang2 ; and Maria Q. Feng3 Abstract: Urban water delivery systems can, this paper develops a methodology to detect and locate the damage in a water delivery system by monitoring

  8. Energy Storage & Delivery The goal of this project is to deliver measurement methods specific to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Storage & Delivery Materials The goal of this project is to deliver measurement methods specific to polymeric and organic materials needed in next generation energy storage and delivery. · The NIST team is works closely with leaders in the energy storage and delivery field, including General

  9. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  10. Analysis of Assembly Bill 310: Prescription Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    drugs related to infertility treatment (for those plans thatloss treatments; infertility treatments; smoking cessationfor the treatment of sexual dysfunction and infertility). In

  11. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  12. Cobalt-60 tomotherapy: Clinical treatment planning and phantom dose delivery studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Darko, Johnson; Joshi, Chandra P.; Kerr, Andrew; John Schreiner, L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Investigations have shown that a Cobalt-60 (Co-60) radioactive source has the potential to play a role in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this paper, Co-60 tomotherapy's conformal dose delivery potential is evaluated by delivering conformal dose plans on a cylindrical homogeneous phantom containing clinical structures similar to those found in a typical head and neck (H and N) cancer. Also, the clinical potential of Co-60 tomotherapy is investigated by generating 2D clinical treatment plans for H and N and prostate anatomical regions. These plans are compared with the 6 MV based treatment plans for modalities such as linear accelerator-based tomotherapy and broad beam IMRT, and 15 MV based 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT).Methods: For experimental validation studies, clinical and nonclinical conformal dose patterns were delivered on circular, homogeneous phantoms containing GafChromic film. For clinical planning study, dose calculations were performed with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo program, where a Theratronics 780C Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator were modeled with a MIMiC binary multileaf collimator. An inhouse inverse treatment planning system was used to optimize tomotherapy plans using the same optimization parameters for both Co-60 and 6 MV beams. The IMRT and 3DCRT plans for the clinical cases were generated entirely in the Eclipse treatment planning system based on inhouse IMRT and 3DCRT site specific protocols.Results: The doses delivered to the homogeneous phantoms agreed with the calculations, indicating that it is possible to deliver highly conformal doses with the Co-60 unit. The dose distributions for Co-60 tomotherapy clinical plans for both clinical cases were similar to those obtained with 6 MV based tomotherapy and IMRT, and much more conformal compared to 3DCRT plans. The dose area histograms showed that the Co-60 plans achieve the dose objectives for the targets and organs at risk.Conclusions: These results confirm that Co-60 tomotherapy is capable of providing state-of-the-art conformal dose delivery and could be used for the treatment of targets in both small and larger separation anatomical regions.

  13. Large-scale prediction of adverse drug reactions using chemical, biological, and phenotypic properties of drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mei; Wu, Yonghui; Chen, Yukun; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming; Chen, Xue-wen; Matheny, Michael Edwin; Xu, Hua

    2012-06-19

    Abstract Objective Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is one of the major causes of failure in drug development. Severe ADRs that go undetected until the post-marketing phase of a drug often lead to patient morbidity. Accurate prediction of potential ADRs...

  14. Drug Testing Notification Form RV 2 May 22, 2013 DRUG TESTING NOTIFICATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drug Testing Notification Form RV 2 May 22, 2013 DRUG TESTING NOTIFICATION FORM Section 1: Employer testing collector. You are required to undergo urine drug testing as a condition of hiring. You must have of Collection: ___________________________ Date and time of Test* * For testing out side of Louisiana testing

  15. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell...

  16. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

  17. POLICY STATEMENT ON DRUG-FREE CAMPUS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    11 POLICY STATEMENT ON DRUG-FREE CAMPUS* It is the policy of ETSU that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession, use of alcohol and illicit drugs on the ETSU campus, in the workplace (on or off campus), on property owned or controlled by ETSU, or as part of any activity of ETSU is strictly

  18. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.haage@helios-kliniken.de [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  19. Pricing in the Market for Anticancer Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, David H.

    In 2011, Bristol-Myers Squibb set the price of its newly approved melanoma drug ipilimumab— brand name Yervoy—at $120,000 for a course of therapy. The drug was associated with an incremental increase in life expectancy of ...

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Target for the COMPASS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer, J; Duday-Chanat, L; Geyer, R; Mallot, G K; Pirotte, O; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    A liquid hydrogen target has been developed for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The target has a diameter of 40 mm and a length of 2.5 meter, creating an active volume of about 3 liter of liquid hydrogen. The cylindrical part of the target wall is formed by a Kapton® foil strip, wound and glued to a thickness of 0.125 mm. The Kapton® foil is used to minimize the energy loss of the particles, scattered or created within the target volume, crossing the target boundary. The two end-caps enclosing the target volume have been fabricated from Mylar®. The system is cooled with a 30 W at 20 K cryocooler, delivering the cooling capacity for the cool-down as well as for the continuous operation of the system.