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1

Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University; Greene, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options » Options » Benefits Benefits Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Current Employees (CRYPTOCard access) Retirees Competitive pay, work-life balance options, comprehensive benefits package We attract and retain exceptional talent with our competitive pay packages that provide fair and equitable compensation. We recognize and reward outstanding contributions through our various employee award programs. We support and nurture a culture focused on a work/life balance for all of our employees. Our benefits package Employees are eligible for a variety of health and retirement benefits. Health & wellness

4

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 What Does the U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy R&D Mean to America's Energy and Economic Future? Methodology for Estimating Research & Development (R&D) Benefits The primary tool used to estimate future R&D benefits is the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) developed by the Energy Information Ad- ministration (EIA). Benefits are based on the differ- ence between certain parameters for NEMS runs made with and without the impacts of FE R&D. For cases with FE R&D, it is assumed that program R&D goals are met and funding is consistent with FY2004 appropriations and program plans. Multiple scenarios are used to examine the impact of se- lected regulatory and fuel energy price assump- tions. Other than inputs reflecting FE R&D goals

5

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power lossin DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

SciTech Connect

With the popularization of household electrical appliances and the rapid development of office automation and networking, a huge number of consumer electronic devices, computers, copiers, and fax machines have been put into use in China over the last two decades. These products almost all use a certain amount of standby power--the power that is consumed when a device is connected but not performing its primary function. The rapid growth of standby energy consumption due to these products--and the consequent environmental problems--has attracted more and more attentions from researchers and from many government and international agencies. Numerous countries have developed policies and measures to restrict and reduce standby energy consumption (US EPA, 2004, IEA, 2001, and GEEA, 2004). However, standby energy consumption is still a new concept for Chinese consumers and the phenomenon of ''unconscious waste of energy'' is still very common in the people's daily life and work. With the goal of reducing China's standby energy consumption, China Certification Center for Energy Conservation Products (CECP) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have, under the sponsorship of the Energy Foundation (EF), entered into a collaboration to develop technical requirements for CECP's labeling program for consumer electronics and office equipment. These technical requirements will be used to qualify products for CECP's energy efficiency endorsement label in China. In the phase I of this collaborative project, CECP and LBNL conducted technical and economic research on televisions and printers in China. Based on the results of this research, CECP developed specifications for, and carried out corresponding energy conservation certifications for these two products. CECP's standby power certification program has made impressive gains in China. Leading manufacturers, such as Haier, Hesons, TCL, Chuangwei, Lenovo, EPSON, Fujitsu, and Brother have participated in CECP's certification activities. Media events organized by CECP have greatly improved the country's awareness of standby power loss. Reducing standby power loss has been formally incorporated into China's energy efficiency policy portfolio and in China's collaboration with the international community on the subject of energy efficiency (IEA, 2001). In phase II of the program, CECP's main task was to assess the market for DVD/VCD (Digital Versatile/Video Disc and Video Compact Disc) players and copiers to analyze the economic and technical benefits of energy conservation potential, and to develop technical specifications for DVD/VCD players and copiers, with technical assistance from LBNL. Having built on the success of Phase I, CECP paid great attention to the appraisal of market conditions and the economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers, and solicited inputs from stakeholders before finalizing the product certification requirements. This paper summarizes the expected energy conservation and environmental benefits due to the implementation of certification programs for DVD/VCD players and copiers in China.

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Naval Reserve Force : cost and benefit analysis of reducing the number of Naval Surface Reserve Force operating budget holders ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Quadrennial Defense Review 1997 recommended reductions of civilian and military personnel associated with infrastructure. The Naval Reserve Force is aggressively pursuing options to reduce (more)

Young, Eric Coy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth of standby energy consumption due to these products ?and reduce standby energy consumption (US EPA, 2004, IEA,However, standby energy consumption is still a new concept

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

BENEFIT HIGHLIGHTS BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No benefit payable under the Plan can be assigned, transferred or subject to any lien, garnishment, pledge

12

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

PESTICIDE BENEFITS PESTICIDE BENEFITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-vectoring mosquitoes) separate from the risks and benefits of other pesticides (such as those used on field crops. Similarly, analysis of other pesticides will focus on the impacts on other user groups and related effects to determine whether the pesticide will remain effective for at least five years. EPA also requires

15

Target  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lifetime measurements in Lifetime measurements in inverse kinematics Coulex Target e.g. C Stopper e.g. Cu Beam X X * C Si-Det. Yale Plunger 120 Te at 300 MeV Plunger foils Si-Detector Compton-suppressed Clover detectors (8) 50% Coulomb- barrier )] ( exp[ 1 ) ( 0 d d d P - - - = λ Probability of emitting gamma-ray while in-flight: From data: ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( d I d I d P total shifted γ γ = where ) ( ) ( γ γ γ γ θ ε W E N I = Lifetime analysis For example: Valence proton symmetry Data from NNDC, WNSL ( 120 Te), NBI group ( 116 Te), Cologne ( 114 Te) B(E2)up [e 2 b 2 ] N A.A. Pasternak et al., EPJA 13, 435 (2002) O. Möller et al., PRC 71, 064324 (2005) Study deviations from (collective) expectations -> needs a fast and easy way to obtain data -> inverse RDDS well suited! Important in inverse kinematics: Deorientation F I J Large v/c => except for relativistic

16

NREL: Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rooms Credit union and banking benefits Flexible schedules Business casual dress Free RTD Eco Pass A Great Location Our main campus in Golden, Colorado, located in the foothills...

17

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target (built-in as part of each target); (4) beam space charge-neutralization during both drift compression and final focus to target. Except for (1) and (2), these critical issues may be explored on existing heavy-ion storage ring accelerator facilities.

Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

State-Level Benefits of Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency. Standard residential and industrial programs typically identify between 20 to 30% energy savings in homes and plants, respectively. Over a 20 year period of time, an average state that aggressively pursues even a limited array of energy efficiency programs can potentially reduce total state energy use by as much as 20%. Benefit-cost ratios of effective energy efficiency programs typically exceed 3 to 1 and are much higher when non-energy and macroeconomic benefits are included. Indeed, energy efficiency and associated programs and investments can create significant numbers of new jobs and enhance state tax revenues. Several states have incorporated energy efficiency into their economic development programs. It should also be noted that increasing amounts of venture capital are being invested in the energy sector in general and in specific technologies like solar power in particular. Well-designed energy efficiency programs can be expected to help overcome numerous barriers to the market penetration of energy efficient technologies and accelerate the market penetration of the technologies.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wind Energy Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy provides many benefits, including economic and environmental. This two-sided fact sheet succinctly outlines the top ten wind energy benefits and is especially well suited for general audiences.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

22

Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Here » Benefits Working Here » Benefits Benefits Enjoy First Rate Federal Career Benefits As a DOE employee, you'll have access to exceptional Federal benefits with a variety of plan options that often exceed those offered in the private sector. In addition, you'll have competitive remuneration, continuous learning opportunities, and paid time off to help you construct an enjoyable work-life balance. You'll benefit from: Great salary Recruitment incentives Personal leave (vacation) Sick leave Student loan repayments Matching 401(k) retirement contribution Career development Possibility of opportunities to see the world Training Work-Life balance Flexible work schedules Retirement plan Health/Vision/Dental plans Flexible spending account Specifically, Federal career benefits for DOE employees include:

23

System Benefits Charge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New York's system benefits charge (SBC), established in 1996 by the New York Public Service Commission (PSC), supports energy efficiency, education and outreach, research and development, and low...

24

A Legacy of Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Over more than three decades, FE research and development has established a legacy of significant achievement and return of value and benefits for the public funds invested.

25

Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for a Job Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media » Benefits With outstanding benefits, competitive pay, wellness programs and a stimulating and attractive work environment, Argonne is a tremendous place to pursue your career. Employee benefits are a key factor when evaluating a career opportunity. At Argonne, you'll find a comprehensive array of benefits to meet a variety of needs. In addition to medical, dental, life and disability coverage, you'll have access to paid time off, a retirement plan with a generous match and a number of other benefits, such as adoption assistance, an on-site child care center and auto and homeowners' insurance. Wellness plays an important role in life at Argonne. We offer a variety of

26

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Title Potential benefits of cool roofs on...

27

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Benefits Solutions Service Center Health Insurance including: Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Services and Pension Plan, Savings and Investment Plan (SIP). Benefits Solutions Service Center 803.725.7772 (locally) or 800.368.7333 Benefit Related Customer Service Numbers 1.866.288.3257, website: www.ibenefitcenter.com Representatives M-F 9:00 - 5:00 EST System available 24 hours a day Monday - Saturday, and Sunday after 1 p.m. 1.800.325.6596 (Prime,Standard, Basic, Dental and Flexible Spending Accounts: Option 5 for COBRA and 3161 Benefits) M-F 8:30 - 4:30 1.800.868.-1032 (Mental Health and Substance Abuse Assistance) 1.800.521.3606, Vision Plan 1.800.581.4222, Westinghouse Corporate Pension 1.800.581.3366, Westinghouse Corporate Savings Plan

28

Definition: Capacity Benefit Margin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefit Margin Benefit Margin Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Benefit Margin The amount of firm transmission transfer capability preserved by the transmission provider for Load- Serving Entities (LSEs), whose loads are located on that Transmission Service Provider's system, to enable access by the LSEs to generation from interconnected systems to meet generation reliability requirements. Preservation of CBM for an LSE allows that entity to reduce its installed generating capacity below that which may otherwise have been necessary without interconnections to meet its generation reliability requirements. The transmission transfer capability preserved as CBM is intended to be used by the LSE only in times of emergency generation deficiencies.[1] Related Terms

29

Environmental Benefits of Smart Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Today, consumers and utility companies can agree that smart meters provide benefits such as time-of-use billing, accurate measurement, and elimination of a meter reader's monthly visit. But do smart meters provide tangible benefits for the environment? Not all agree on this. This article discusses how a smart meter helps a utility to monitor energy usage. That monitoring data then allows the utility to work with consumers to reduce energy usage and integrate various sources of renewable energy. When that happens, the environment wins. A similar version of this article was published in Electronic Products on November 15, 2011. An Awakening "I don't understand the environmental benefits of the smart grid, " my cousin Chris said after I told him about my involvement in the smart grid effort at Maxim. "I think it is just a ploy by the utilities to raise rates, " he added. Ordinarily, I would have interrupted him with comments about intelligent management of energy and resources, but my cousin worked for the northern California utility for 15 years. He was not speaking from an uninformed standpoint, so I listened further. "Electricity flows like water, " he continued. "It flows from the source to all points of consumption. Installing a smart meter does not save energy, it just counts when you are consuming it. " These are all valid points. Here I was, convinced that smart meters were a good thing, something that could benefit both the economy and the environment, something that brought a better technical solution to an old problem. But in fact, I did not really know how the smart grid could

David Andeen; Segment Manager

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

31

Eligibility for Retiree Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment for Retiree Benefits Age + years of service determines eligibility for retiree healthcare benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Healthcare insurance eligibility upon retirement To be eligible for retiree healthcare insurance, TCP1 and TCP2 employees must: be at least age 50 with at least 10 years of applicable service credits; or have at least 5 years of applicable service credits and meet the "Rule of 75" (age + service credits equal at least 75). LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees (pdf) - see additional eligiblity requirements Note: TCP1 and TCP2 employees with less than 20 years of service are subject to graduated eligibilty. Transitioning employees who were hired in a career position with UC before January 1, 1990 receive 100% of the LANS

32

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Forms Medical Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-340 Medical Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 -- Pharmacy Claim Form Caremark Prescription Drug Claim Processing Center, P.O. Box 52059, Phoenix, AZ 85072-2059 Dental Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-342 Dental Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 Life Insurance Return completed forms to: 5-171 Contributory Group Life Application and Deduction Authorization Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808

33

Benefits and Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Challenges Benefits and Challenges Benefits Photo: Fuel cell exhaust emits no harmful pollutants Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), that contribute to global climate change. Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) powered by pure hydrogen emit no GHGs from their tailpipe, only heat and water. Producing the hydrogen to power FCVs can generate GHGs, depending on the production method, but much less than that emitted by conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles. more... The chart below shows the GHGs generated by various vehicle types and considers all steps of the energy chain from fuel extraction or production to fuel use by the vehicle, not just tailpipe emissions. Even when accounting for the GHGs emitted during hydrogen production, conventional

34

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Choices Improving Reliability, Resilency, Survivability of an Aging Infrastructure Annual Benefit ( millions) Custom er Utility Society Annual Benefit of Achieved...

35

Reduced power consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a potential energy savings of over $30 Billion/year. This new approach is demanded by the exponentiallyBenefits Reduced power consumption in IC devices; hence potential energy savings of 300 Billion KWh://www.sia- online.org) CuRIE Interconnect Technology for Improved Energy Efficiency in IC Chips ARPA-E Technology

36

Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

38

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

39

Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

Hadley, S.W.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Economic Development Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: info.ornl.gov/sites/publications/files/Pub5501.pdf References: http://info.ornl.gov/sites/publications/files/Pub5501.pdf Logo: State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement or environmental assessment). I believe that this information will help program and field offices prepare their annual NEPA planning summaries and their overall NEPA compliance strategies. Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and the public, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review More Documents & Publications Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)

43

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

44

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

45

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Community Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Benefits Essential to the lab's sustainability efforts is helping sustain the community by supporting economic development and sharing knowledge and resources with the...

46

Cyclotrons to Make Neutrons & Radioactive Targets for SBSS at...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

to Make Neutrons & Radioactive Targets for SBSS at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

47

Beam heating of target foils  

SciTech Connect

A target rotator, built to reduce the effects of beam spot heating, is fully adjustable, holds three targets, is chamber independent, and takes up limited space. The expected temperature rise in the target is calculated from the Stefan--Boltzmann law. (PMA)

Corwin, W.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Benefit Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms Benefit Forms The employment and benefits forms that you will be asked to complete as part of this orientation program can be numerous. Each, however, serves an important purpose in ensuring proper recording of your employment and benefit elections. This online program is designed to make the task a little easier. Each set of forms that you will work with has been compiled to ensure that you are only completing the essential documentation for your individual employment circumstance. Also, each set begins with an Employee Information Form that, upon completion, will auto-populate applicable data throughout the entire package. All of the forms are in PDF format and require Acrobat Reader to view and fill-in. When you open the form "Packages," it will load in a separate

49

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Title Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Issue 3 Pagination 357-367 Keywords dampness and mold, health, ieq improvement, offices, temperature, ventilation Abstract This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 °C, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set of non-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

50

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Benefits and Considerations Compressed and liquefied natural gas are clean, domestically produced alternative fuels. Using these fuels in natural gas vehicles increases

52

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design Benefits of Sustainable Building Design Benefits of Sustainable Building Design October 4, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis Photo of an air-intake structure outside a Federal facility. An air-intake structure outside of this Federal facility lowers energy costs by taking in chilly night air to cool the building's data center. The application of sustainable building design not only helps Federal facilities meet laws and regulations, it also provides them with many other benefits. These benefits include: Lower energy costs Reduction in operating and maintenance costs Increase in productivity of building occupants Improvement health and psychological well-being of building occupants Reduction in pollutants Opportunity to foster a positive public image. Sustainable building design can reduce annual energy costs anywhere from

53

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Reliability U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 2007 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Joe Paladino October 29, 2007 Approach for Calculating OE Benefits Challenges * Established benefits methodologies (e.g., NEMS and MARKAL) do not address some of the major benefits that OE's program will provide (e.g. reliability). * Much of OE's program is about transforming the way the T&D infrastructure operates rather than replacing components: - Some technologies need a high penetration or must be deployed as an entire system to yield benefits (e.g. PMUs or Distribution Automation). - Some programs within OE are not developing "widgets" that can be easily counted. - OE is developing tools/methodologies or funding demonstrations that

54

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Title International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Christopher J., Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn K. Price, and Grace Wu Date Published 11/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords co-benefits, energy efficiency, ghg emissions, quantification Abstract Improving the efficiency of energy production and consumption and switching to lower carbon energy sources can significantly decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and reduce climate change impacts. A growing body of research has found that these measures can also directly mitigate many non-climate change related human health hazards and environmental damage. Positive impacts of policies and programs that occur in addition to the intended primary policy goal are called co-benefits. Policy analysis relies on forecasting and comparing the costs of policy and program implementation and the benefits that accrue to society from implementation. GHG reduction and energy efficiency policies and programs face political resistance in part because of the difficulty of quantifying their benefits. On the one hand, climate change mitigation policy benefits are often global, long-term, and subject to large uncertainties, and subsidized energy pricing can reduce the direct monetary benefits of energy efficiency policies to below their cost. On the other hand, the co-benefits that accrue from these efforts' resultant reductions in conventional air pollution (such as improved health, agricultural productivity, reduced damage to infrastructure, and local ecosystem improvements) are generally near term, local, and more certain than climate change mitigation benefits and larger than the monetary value of energy savings. The incorporation of co-benefits into energy efficiency and climate mitigation policy and program analysis therefore might significantly increase the uptake of these policies. Faster policy uptake is especially important in developing countries because ongoing development efforts that do not consider co-benefits may lock in suboptimal technologies and infrastructure and result in high costs in future years.

55

SNS Target Systems Operational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scheduling conflict with other remote handling work planned for the next shutdown. · The target and PBW integrated monolith and hot cell structures #12;32 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy based on testing at Riken to 1.8 x 105 Gy · Improved neutronic performance and reduced remote handling

McDonald, Kirk

56

Multiple shell fusion targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

TUTORIAL 5144 Environmental Benefits of Smart Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Today, consumers and utility companies can agree that smart meters provide benefits such as time-of-use billing, accurate measurement, and elimination of a meter reader's monthly visit. But do smart meters provide tangible benefits for the environment? Not all agree on this. This article discusses how a smart meter helps a utility to monitor energy usage. That monitoring data then allows the utility to work with consumers to reduce energy usage and integrate various sources of renewable energy. When that happens, the environment wins. A similar version of this article was published in Electronic Products on November 15, 2011. An Awakening "I don't understand the environmental benefits of the smart grid, " my cousin Chris said after I told him about my involvement in the smart grid effort at Maxim. "I think it is just a ploy by the utilities to raise rates, " he added. Ordinarily, I would have interrupted him with comments about intelligent management of energy and resources, but my cousin worked for the northern California utility for 15 years. He was not speaking from an uninformed standpoint, so I listened further. "Electricity flows like water, " he continued. "It flows from the source to all points of consumption. Installing a smart meter does not save energy, it just counts when you are consuming it. " These are all valid points. Here I was, convinced that smart meters were a good thing, something that could benefit both the economy and the environment, something that brought a better technical solution to an old problem. But in fact, I did not really know how the smart grid could

David Andeen; Segment Manager

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reduce Stress!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stress! Stress! x Take a break every hour. Do some relaxation or stretching exercises or talk with someone about topics unrelated to work. Give your body and mind a rest. x Massage your hands and forearms several times a day with a vitamin E lotion. The massage will improve circulation and break up adhesions. Since you can't touch a keyboard until the lotion is absorbed, it also enforces a good break. x Massage the muscles in your neck working your way down from the skull to the shoulders, applying more force to the larger muscles as you go down. x Periodically evaluate your environment for ways to reduce stress. Try to keep your desk uncluttered so you can always find things. Make sure programs are set up correctly on the computer, and see if you can use a macro program to reduce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SRS - Active Employee Benefits News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17/2013 17/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Active Employee Benefits News and Communications 01/16/13 NEW SIP IRS Determination Letter 06/09/11 Building Trades National Medical Screening Program 01/16/13 NEW Pension IRS Determination Letter 04/29/11 Pension Funding Letter & Notices 09/20/12 Income Levelling Communication 03/15/11 Potential Benefit Plan Considerations 05/14/12 2013 Benefits Changes 12/28/10 2011 FICA Reduction 05/02/12 EveMed Vision Insurance Introduces Paperless EOB's 12/15/10 Annual Notices: CHIP-ERRP-Life SARS 05/01/12 New Investment Options - SRNS Defined Contribution Plan 11/30/10 SMM - Life Insurance Revisions 04/10/12 Slides From 2012 Retiree Association Meetinq 11/04/10 Mental Health, Cadillac Plans, Grandfathered Plans

62

NEET Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEET NEET Benefits NEET Benefits The R&D activities under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Program will address revolutionary improvements in safety, performance, reliability, economics, and proliferation risk reduction and promote creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges related to reactor and fuel cycle development. The activities undertaken in this program complement those within the Reactor Concepts Research Development & Demonstration and Fuel Cycle R&D programs. The knowledge generated through these activities will allow Nuclear Energy (NE) to address key challenges affecting nuclear reactor and fuel cycle deployment (e.g., capital cost, technology risks, and proliferation concerns). Further, these activities will enable nuclear power to continue

63

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Title Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48258 Year of...

64

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

65

Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

Coughlin, J.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy Efficiency Upgrades: Benefiting Homeowners and the Environment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upgrades: Benefiting Homeowners and the Upgrades: Benefiting Homeowners and the Environment Energy Efficiency Upgrades: Benefiting Homeowners and the Environment May 10, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Energy efficient upgrades helped Margie Garmey save money while reducing her impact on the planet. | Photo courtesy of Margie Garmey. Energy efficient upgrades helped Margie Garmey save money while reducing her impact on the planet. | Photo courtesy of Margie Garmey. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Looking for ways to save energy? Learn how to do a DIY home energy audit to help you identify and prioritize some energy efficiency upgrades. Check out Energy Saver for tips and advice on ways to save energy and money. When Margie Garmey and her partner bought their newly constructed two-story

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

69

Cascading Failures in Smart Grid -Benefits of Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cascading Failures in Smart Grid - Benefits of Distributed Generation Xian Chen, Hieu Dinh, Bing reliability and reducing the risk of cascading blackouts is a critical issue. Smart grid is envisioned Wang Computer Science & Engineering Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 Abstract--Smart

Wang, Bing

70

Post-Closure Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits The Legacy Management Post-Closure Benefits (PCB) Program includes the development, implementation, and oversight of the Department's policy concerning the continuation of contractor pension and medical benefits after the closure of applicable DOE sites/facilities. This includes oversight of the administration and management of legacy contractor benefits in a fiscally responsible and effective manner. The primary program objective is to ensure a seamless transition of benefits administration after closure. The Benefit Continuity Team (BCT) within Legacy Management is responsible for this program. Legacy PCBs are benefits earned and accrued by contractor employees while in active employment at DOE facilities and are payable after their

71

Methodologies for Determining Persistence of Commissioning Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on the persistence of commissioning benefits to date have used a variety of methods to evaluate this persistence. This paper proposes a consistent framework for describing and evaluating the persistence of commissioning benefits. It begins by splitting commissioning benefits into two broad categories: 1) benefits that inherently persist; and 2) benefits that may not persist. The study of persistence then considers only the benefits that may not persist. These benefits are critical, since the top five reasons cited for performing commissioning in both new buildings and existing buildings are benefits that may not persist. These benefits are then further divided into benefits that may be quantified and benefits that are generally difficult to quantify. This paper proposes that benefits that may be quantified should generally be evaluated for persistence using approaches that are already widely accepted and used for other purposes, with adaptations where needed. Specifically, it proposes that energy and water savings be evaluated using methods consistent with the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (adapted with additional weather normalization), that comfort and indoor air quality improvements be evaluated using relevant standards, specifically ASHRAE Standard 55 and ASHRAE Standard 62, but goes further and proposes a methodology for economic quantification of these benefits as well. Finally, it is proposed that the persistence of measures whose benefit is difficult to quantify be evaluated simply by determining whether the measure is still in place or performing.

Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Accelerator target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Accelerator target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collection and Reporting for Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Joe Paladino November 19, 2009 Investments Transformation Results * Equipment Manufacturing * Customer Systems * Advanced Metering Infrastructure * Electric Distribution Systems * Electric Transmission Systems * Integrated and/or Crosscutting Systems Customer Empowerment * Job Creation and Marketplace Innovation * Reduced Peak Load and Consumption * Operational Efficiency * Grid Reliability and Resilience * More Distributed and Renewable Energy * Lower Carbon Dioxide Emissions Advanced Grid Functionality An Opportunity for Transformation Primary Intent Is to Determine SGIG Program Impact Secondary Intent Is to Learn (to Address Uncertainty) Project-Based Cost/Benefit Analysis SGIG Program - Building the

75

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characterizing and Quantifying the Societal Benefits Attributable to Smart Metering Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart Metering can reduce labor requirements and other costs inherent in non-automated processes, but it can also produce benefits that accrue directly or indirectly to electricity consumers and societal in general, which is why they are referred to as societal benefits. Because they accrue to consumers, rather than show up as cost savings on the utility ledger, identifying and monetizing these benefits in a business case can be a challenging task. This report reviews how utilities have estimated societa...

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

79

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emergence of Hybrid Vehicles: Ending oils strangleholdthe benefits of hybrid vehicles Dr. Thomas Turrentine Dr.the benefits of hybrid vehicles Report prepared for CSAA Dr.

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Renewable Energy Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Benefits Renewable Energy Benefits October 16, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis Photo of a row of PV panels on the roof of a building surrounded by skyscrapers. The General...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano-LEDs'. ... Optical microscope image of nano LEDs emitting light. ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geothermal exploration and resource assessment: R and D program benefit/cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Exploration and Resource and Reservoir Assessment (GERRA) Research and Development (R and D) Program of the Department of Energy was analyzed to evaluate its cost effectiveness and relevance to the needs of the geothermal exploration industry. This analysis was conducted in three phases. The first phase involved a review of the state-of-the-art and an identification of major R and D needs, followed by a quantitative assessment of the benefits expected from the achievement of some realistic targets for reducing the proportion of unsuccessful (non-productive) wells drilled in the course of exploration for a reservoir. In the second phase, questionnaires concerning the utility, effectiveness and need for improvement of certain commonly used exploration techniques were mailed to a set of 72 individuals active in geothermal exploration. The third phase consisted of in-person interviews with well recognized experts in geothermal exploration. The results of the quantitative analysis suggest that a benefit/cost ratio exceeding ten can be realized for the R and D expenditure by achieving a relatively modest target of improving the current weighted average exploratory drilling success ratio by 3 percentage points (i.e., from 0.24 to 0.27). The responses to the mailed questionnaires indicated that the emphasis of R and D should be on improving the data interpretation capability rather than the data collection (measurement) capability.Liquid geochemistry, seismic methods and thermal methods were identified as the techniques deserving most attention. The in-person interviews revealed that the industry is more concerned about finding buyers (utilities) for the discovered resources than about finding new resources in the near term.

Dhillon, H.; El-Sawy, A.; Goldstein, S.; Meidav, T.; Pfundstein, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act April 1, 2010 - 6:58pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? LED lights emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings. Rudd Lighting has seen a boost from cities tapping Recovery Act funds and seeking energy efficient lighting that will reduce costs. The BetalLED facility, which produced hundreds of thousands of LED products last year, employs about 600 people, and for every job in the plant, eight to 10 more are created outside the company. Workers at a Racine, Wis., manufacturing company are busy filling orders for American cities seeking to brighten their communities with energy

84

Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages In June 2011, President Obama released A Policy Framework for the 21st Century Grid which set out a four-pillared strategy for modernizing the electric grid. The initiative directed billions of dollars toward investments in 21st century smart grid technologies focused at increasing the grid's efficiency, reliability, and resilience, and making it less vulnerable to weather-related outages and reducing the time it takes to restore power after an outage occurs. Grid resilience is increasingly important as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of severe weather. Greenhouse gas emissions are elevating air and water temperatures around the world. Scientific research

85

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy December 18, 2009 - 3:06pm Addthis Joshua DeLung When it comes to energy-efficient homes, Carol Bintz's Ohio house is a gleaming model of sustainability. She first was inspired by her own energy efficiency and renewable energy research done as part of her job to reduce operating costs at the Toledo Museum of Art. There she saw how quickly the savings could stack up. Carol took a leap toward her energy-efficiency goals for her new home by choosing a homebuilder with expertise in residential efficiency and renewable energy technologies and strategies, many of which were developed through the Energy Department's Building America program. Today, she's thrilled with her high-performance home, she says, and she's passionate

86

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act April 1, 2010 - 6:58pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? LED lights emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings. Rudd Lighting has seen a boost from cities tapping Recovery Act funds and seeking energy efficient lighting that will reduce costs. The BetalLED facility, which produced hundreds of thousands of LED products last year, employs about 600 people, and for every job in the plant, eight to 10 more are created outside the company. Workers at a Racine, Wis., manufacturing company are busy filling orders for American cities seeking to brighten their communities with energy

87

Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Benefits Long-Term Benefits Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages A cermet waste package may improve the long-term performance of the YM repository by two mechanisms: reducing (1) the potential for nuclear criticality in the repository and (2) the long-term release rate of radionuclides from the waste package. In the natural environment, the centers of uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long time periods while the outer edges of the ore deposit have degraded. A cermet waste package may operate in the same way. The sacrificial, slow degradation of the waste package and the DU oxide protects the SNF uranium dioxide in the interior of the package long after the package has failed. Page 2 of 4 Follow the link below to learn more about Cermets:

88

Universal System Benefits Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Montana Public Service Commission Montana established the Universal System Benefits Program (USBP) in 1997 as part of its restructuring legislation. The USBP supports cost-effective energy conservation, low-income customer weatherization, renewable-energy projects and applications, research and development programs related to energy conservation and renewables, market transformation designed to encourage competitive markets for public purpose programs, and low-income

89

Societal Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Jersey's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation created a "societal benefits charge" (SBC) to support investments in energy efficiency and "Class I" renewable energy. The SBC funds New Jersey's Clean Energy Program (NJCEP), a statewide initiative administered by the

90

Definition: Reduced Electricity Losses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Losses Losses Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Losses Functions that provide this benefit could help manage peak feeder loads, reduced electricity throughput, locate electricity production closer to the load and ensure that voltages remain within service tolerances, while minimizing the amount of reactive power provided. These actions can reduce electricity losses by making the system more efficient for a given load served or by actually reducing the overall load on the system.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, reactive power, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Electricity_Losses&oldid=502644

91

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Health Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits > Health Benefits Health Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play

92

Health Benefits and Quality of Texas Red Wines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing techniques for red wines and their potential health benefits have intensively been investigated, however, information relevant to the grape and wine industry in Texas is less frequently available. The overall objective of this work was to investigate the reduction of 3-alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines that can affect the quality of Texas wines and to study the health benefits of Texas wines. The methods used include SPME-GC-MS and molecular bioassays. The first objective was to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory potential effect of red wine polyphenols from Black Spanish wine (Vitis aestivalis hybrid) in colonic human fibroblast cells. Results show that an extract prepared from Black Spanish wine decreased gene expression and activation of NF-kB transcription factor and target proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules. Induction of microRNA-126 (miR- 126) by wine extract was found to be one of the underlying molecular mechanism by which wine extract decreased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and inflammation in colon cells. These mechanisms may be relevant to the prevention of iv inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that may increase the risk for colon cancer. The second objective was to investigate the role of the green june beetle (GJB ) as exogenous source of MPs other than the multicolored Asian Lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis). Over the last decade, the green june beetle has been suspected to be a source of MPs based on intermittent reports from Texas growers of an atypical aroma and flavor reminiscent of crushed green June beetles (GJB). Specifically the North region of Texas seems affected. Results demonstrated GJB as source of 3-isopropyl-2- methoxypyrazine, where one GJB could elevate MPs above sensory perceptible levels in 4.3 gallons of wine. The incorporation of GJB to the winemaking process may contribute negatively to the sensory properties of Texas wines and therefore should be strictly controlled. The third objective was to explore the potential effect of micro-oxygenation treatment and accelerated aging techniques relevant for the state of Texas in the reduction of 3-Isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) levels as determined by SPME-GC-MS. Results show that MPs were not affected by MOX or oak interaction. Although the data suggest that MOX and oak exposure do not directly affect MPs concentration. The fourth research objective was to explore the potential effect of three commercial available yeast strains, BM45, K1, and D80, on MPs levels in Black Spanish wines. Black Spanish wines were fermented with MB45 strain resulted in the highest amount of MPs. Conversely K1 and D80 yeast strains reduced IBMP levels in comparison with the control. An increase in IBMP was not expected. However it has been demonstrated that amino acids valine and leucine are MPs precursors. If Vitis v aestivalis hybrid grapes contained a similar methyltransferase enzyme found in Vitis vinifera grapes and S. cerevisiae contained similar IPMP biosynthesis pathway found in Pseudomonas perolens BM45 may have led to the increased IBMP observed in the fermentation. In addition we evaluated MPs levels of wines fermented over 20 days with a chemical defined grape juice medium containing a concentration of yeast available nitrogen of 200 mg N/L. Data suggest that wines fermented with BM45 and D80 yeast strains reduced IBMP but K1 yeast did not show any effect in comparison with the control. In addition MPs were evaluated in the yeast mannoproteins fraction. Results show the presence of IBMP in low concentration below the method detection limit. This data demonstrate for the first time that yeast mannoproteins binds IBMP. to evidence for interactions between mannoproteins secreted by the D80 yeast strain and IBMP. This work will provide valuab

Angel Morales, Gabriela Del Carmen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY Benefits under the CHEIBA Trust Plan are available to Eligible Employees and Dependents of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to any lien, garnishment, pledge or bankruptcy. However, a Participant may assign benefits payable under

94

Benefits of explosive cutting for nuclear-facility applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study discussed in this report was a cost/benefit analysis to determine: (1) whether explosive cutting is cost effective in comparison with alternative metal sectioning methods and (2) whether explosive cutting would reduce radiation exposure or provide other benefits. Two separate approaches were pursued. The first was to qualitatively assess cutting methods and factors involved in typical sectioning cases and then compare the results for the cutting methods. The second was to prepare estimates of work schedules and potential radiation exposures for candidate sectioning methods for two hypothetical, but typical, sectioning tasks. The analysis shows that explosive cutting would be cost effective and would also reduce radiation exposure when used for typical nuclear facility sectioning tasks. These results indicate that explosive cutting should be one of the principal cutting methods considered whenever steel or similar metal structures or equipment in a nuclear facility are to be sectioned for repair or decommissioning. 13 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.; Allen, R.P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

National Benefits of a Closed-Cycle Cooling Retrofit Requirement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has investigated the implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking if it establishes closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling as best technology available (BTA) for fish protection. This report provides the results of a study to estimate the benefits of reducing impingement and entrainment mortality that would be achieved should EPA designate closed-cycle cooling as BTA.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Public Benefit Funds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefit Funds Public Benefit Funds Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Contents 1 Public Benefits Fund Incentives 2 References Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

97

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits Community College Internships (CCI) CCI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits...

98

Public Benefits Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Other Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission '''''Note: Currently, the four funds are not collecting revenue. The funds are transitioning toward a revolving loan and investment fund model in order to sustain their capital. ''''' Although Pennsylvania's December 1996 electricity restructuring law did not establish a clean-energy fund, four renewable and sustainable-energy

99

Office of Human Resources Services - Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BENEFITS BENEFITS Federal employees enjoy a very comprehensive benefits package and access to programs that encourage work life balance: Sick leave - up to 13 days earned annually Annual (vacation) leave Holidays - 10 days each year Flexible work schedules and telecommuting Family and medical leave for special circumstances Leave donation program Training and development opportunities Student loan repayment (as funds are available) Tuition assistance (as funds are available) Payment of professional credentials (as funds are available) Choice of several health benefit plans Supplemental dental and vision coverage Life insurance (including additional self and family options) Employee Assistance Program Flexible Spending Accounts Traditional pension plans and the Thrift Savings Plan (similar to a 401(k))

100

On the benefits and costs of microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the benefits that Microgrids can provide to a variety of stakeholders and considers their costs. A flexible framework is proposed in which (more)

Weyrich Morris, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

102

UNLV HUMAN RESOURCES Benefit Provider Listing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 464-6832 TIAA-CREF (RPA & Supplemental 403B) www.tiaa-cref.org (800) 842-2776 SUPPLEMENTAL BENEFIT

Hemmers, Oliver

103

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Flats Benefits Center P.O Box 9735 Providence, RI 02940 (866) 296-5036 Medical and Life Insurance Administration Pension Administration Death Reporting Address Changes General...

104

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of costs and benefits of industrial energy efficiencyof the annual costs of an energy efficiency measure, therebyof cost- effectiveness of energy- efficiency improvement

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 99 5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring The restructuring of the natural gas ...

106

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Benefits and Perks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perks Bioscience Working at Sandia has its benefits From health and compensation to diversity programs, flexible career tracks, community outreach, and more, Sandians receive...

107

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory often work with Chinese colleagues...

108

Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Definition: Reduced Wide-Scale Blackouts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

will reduce the probability of wide-scale regional blackouts.1 Related Terms bes emergency, smart grid References SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An i LikeLike...

110

System Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Schools Utility Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire's 1996 electric-industry restructuring legislation authorized the creation of a system benefits charge (SBC) to support energy-efficiency programs and energy-assistance programs for low-income residents. The efficiency fund, which took effect in 2002, is funded by a non-bypassable surcharge of 1.8 mills per kilowatt-hour ($0.0018/kWh) on electric bills. A separate surcharge of 1.5 mills per kWh ($0.0015/kWh) supports low-income energy assistance programs. Approximately $19 million is collected annually to support the efficiency fund, although the annual sum collected has

111

Public Benefits Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefits Fund Public Benefits Fund Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

112

Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concrete Industry Benefits from Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 Cement production - the mainstay of the modern concrete industry - is one of the primary sources of carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. Making cement essentially requires burning rock, an extremely energy-intensive process that releases a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere. In an effort to reduce its carbon footprint, the industry has begun to move toward new concrete "recipes" that incorporate environmentally friendly supplemental cementitious materials (SCMs), which partially replace Portland cement and reduce its use. The challenge is to maintain, or even increase, the end product's strength and durability while becoming more environmentally sustainable. Ancient Rome, without the impetus of modern environmental concerns, had a lot of this figured out. New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures now emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal.

113

Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concrete Industry Benefits from Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 Cement production - the mainstay of the modern concrete industry - is one of the primary sources of carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. Making cement essentially requires burning rock, an extremely energy-intensive process that releases a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere. In an effort to reduce its carbon footprint, the industry has begun to move toward new concrete "recipes" that incorporate environmentally friendly supplemental cementitious materials (SCMs), which partially replace Portland cement and reduce its use. The challenge is to maintain, or even increase, the end product's strength and durability while becoming more environmentally sustainable. Ancient Rome, without the impetus of modern environmental concerns, had a lot of this figured out. New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures now emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal.

114

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives & Targets Rev. 7/17/13 Objectives & Targets Rev. 7/17/13 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS 2012 PROGRESS REPORT for SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION Activity Legal Requirement Aspect Objective Target** see important note Target Achieved Details Real Estate Management DOE O 436.1 E.O. 13423 & 13514 EPAct 1992 and 2005 EISA 2007 NECPA 1978 Natural resource depletion and GHG emissions from resource intensive facilities Increase sustainability of facility resources, reduce energy and water consumption, reduce impacts to natural resources from facility usage 1) Meter 90% of electricity by September 2012 2) Meter 90% of gas, steam, and water by September 2015 3) 30% energy intensity reduction by 2015 from baseline 2003 4) Reduce water consumption intensity 2%

115

Definition: Reduced Momentary Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Momentary Outages Momentary Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Momentary Outages By locating faults more accurately or adding electricity storage, momentary outages could be reduced or eliminated. Moreover, fewer customers on the same or adjacent distribution feeders would experience the momentary interruptions associated with reclosing. Momentary outages last <5 min in duration. The benefit to consumers is based on the value of service.[1] Related Terms electricity storage technologies, electricity generation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Momentary_Outages&oldid=493094

116

Definition: Reduced Sustained Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sustained Outages A sustained outage is one lasting >5 minutes, excluding major outages and wide-scale outages. The monetary benefit of reducing sustained outages is based on the value of service (VOS) of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, administrative costs, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can reduce the likelihood that there will be an outage, allow the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage

117

Achieving the Benefits of Safeguards by Design  

SciTech Connect

The overarching driver for developing a formalized process to achieve safeguards by design is to support the global growth of nuclear power while reducing nuclear security risks. This paper discusses an institutional approach to the design process for a nuclear facility, for designing proliferation resistance, international safeguards and U.S. national safeguards and security into new nuclear facilities. In the United States, the need exists to develop a simple, concise, formalized, and integrated approach for incorporating international safeguards and other non-proliferation considerations into the facility design process. An effective and efficient design process is one which clearly defines the functional requirements at the beginning of the project and provides for the execution of the project to achieve a reasonable balance among competing objectives in a cost effective manner. Safeguards by Design is defined as the integration of international and national safeguards, physical security and non-proliferation features as full and equal partners in the design process of a nuclear energy system or facility, with the objective to achieve facilities that are intrinsically more robust while being less expensive to safeguard and protect. This Safeguards by Design process has been developed such that it: Provides improved safeguards, security, and stronger proliferation barriers, while reducing the life cycle costs to the operator and regulatory agencies, Can be translated to any international context as a model for nuclear facility design, Fosters a culture change to ensure the treatment of nuclear security considerations as full and equal partners in the design process, Provides a useful tool for the project manager responsible for the design, construction, and start-up of nuclear facilities, and Addresses the key integration activities necessary to efficiently incorporate International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards into the design of nuclear facilities. This paper describes the work that has been completed in the development of a Safeguards by Design process for a project, illustrated by flow diagrams based upon the project phases described in U.S. Department of Energy Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The institutionalization of the Safeguards by Design process directly supports the goals of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and also aligns with goals and objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Other benefits from institutionalizing this Safeguards by Design process are discussed within this paper.

Trond Bjornard; Robert Bean; David Hebditch; Jim Morgan; Bruce Meppen; Scott DeMuth; Michael Ehinger; John Hockert

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic resources with the potential

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Benefits and Considerations Ethanol is a renewable, domestically produced transportation fuel. Whether

120

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

122

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Projected Benefits - GPRA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projected Benefits - GPRA Projected Benefits - GPRA Project Summary Full Title: Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs Project ID: 208 Principal Investigator: Michael Leifman Keywords: Energy efficiency; energy use; energy savings; renewable Purpose Assess the past and future contributions of the programs conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to DOE's goals of providing affordable, clean and reliable energy. The program benefits are reported in EERE's annual Congressional Budget Request. This analysis fulfills the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. Performer Principal Investigator: Michael Leifman Organization: U.S. Department of Energy Address: 1000 Independence Ave., SW

123

Benefits Forms and Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Employee Orientation » Benefits Forms and New Employee Orientation » Benefits Forms and Information Benefits Forms and Information As a Federal employee, you may have the opportunity to participate in a number of employee benefit and family-friendly programs. If your appointment to Federal employment confers eligibility, you may elect to participate in health, dental, and life insurance programs; retirement savings plans; flexible spending accounts; long-term care insurance; and vacation and sick leave. In addition, there are a number of family-friendly programs that the Department of Energy (DOE) offers its employees, such as alternative work schedules, flexiplace/telecommuting, transit subsidy, child development centers, and exercise and wellness facilities. The employment forms found in this section collect important and necessary

124

Benefits of Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Research Benefits of Research Benefits of Research Return on Investment Since its creation in 1977, FE has established a legacy of achievement, return-of-value, and tangible benefits for the taxpayer dollars invested. Read more Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas technically recoverable. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D FE has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. Read more Carbon Capture & Storage Through FE R&D, the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and technology. Read more Research and development activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's

125

Regulation, Unemployment, and Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf (A stand-alone analysis of jobs is not included in aWachter, Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Usingnew jobs are rounding errors in cost-benefit analyses that

Posner, Eric; Masur, Jonathan S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wind Energy Benefits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wind Energy Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Todd Spink, NREL 14821 U.S....

127

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policy Impacts Website: eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-3833e.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/benefits-and-costs-aggressive-energy- Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs This analysis, based on the Massachusetts Green Communities Act, looks at the impact of energy efficiency targets mandated by the Act on rates and

128

Higher Education: Who Benefits? WHAT IS THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little argument exists about the societal and personal value of education. The more complicated question is who benefits from, and therefore who pays for, higher education. Both the community and the individual benefit from education; this complicates the funding equation as to how much society and the individual should pay. If students had to pay the full price of education, too few would be able or willing to pay because the immediate personal

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

Paumier, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.paumier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beaudre, Anne [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Unequal Taxes on Equal Benefits: The Taxation of Domestic Partner Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equal benefits, the Internal Revenue Code treats the valuePanel Sur- vey, and Internal Revenue Service data. Equals dependent under Internal Revenue Code Section 152. In

Badgett, M.V. Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Definition: Reduced Major Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Major Outages A major outage is defined using the beta method, per IEEE Std 1366-2003 (IEEE Power Engineering Society 2004). The monetary benefit of reducing major outages is based on the VOS of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can mitigate major outages by allowing the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage through islanding or alternative power supply.[1]

137

Magnetically attached sputter targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fernald Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio > Fernald Benefits Ohio > Fernald Benefits Fernald Preserve, Ohio Former Fernald Workers' Employment Verification and Benefits Information Employment Verification Fernald employment verification requests will only be accepted in writing and require the signature of the former employee authorizing the release of the requested information. Please direct your requests to Fluor Government Group, Employment Verification, P.O. Box 1050, Richland, WA 99352, fax (509) 376-7018. Worker and Community Transition Program (Section 3161) All education, training, preference in hiring, relocation, and outplacement inquiries should be directed to Professional Services of America, Inc., 601 Avery Street, Suite 500, Parkersburg, WV 26101, (866) 562-7482, ext. 1028, e-mail: bgraham@psa-inc.com.

139

Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 of 11 4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted November/December) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

140

Strategic cost-benefit analysis of energy policies: detailed projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward restructuring the energy system in order to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy forms. However, recent events have led to renewed concern over the direction of current energy policy. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. In the first, no additional programs or policies are initiated beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is directed toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third promotes increased domestic supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. Results indicate that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, involves substantial environmental costs and slows the rate of economic growth. These relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation are less than anticipated, or if the costs of synthetic fuels can be significantly lowered. Given these uncertainties, both conservation and RD and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy. However, between these policy alternatives, conservation appears to be the preferred strategy. The results of this study are presented in three reports (see also BNL--51105 and BNL--51128). 11 references, 3 figures, 61 tables.

Davitian, H.; Groncki, P.J.; Kleeman, P.; Lukachinski, J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets  

SciTech Connect

The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fossil Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Research Benefits Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery EOR helps increase domestic oil supplies while also providing a way to safely and permanently store CO 2 underground. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a way to squeeze out additional, hard- to-recover barrels of oil remaining in older fields following conventional production operations. It can also be used to permanently store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) underground. Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past 30 years, the United States is a world leader in the number of EOR projects (200) and volume of oil production (over

143

Discussion for Metrics and Benefits Data Collection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs Joe Paladino Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy OE Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting March 10, 2011 140 ARRA-Funded Smart Grid Projects 1 Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems SGIG/SGDP/RDSI Areas of Smart Grid Technology Deployment Customer Systems Advance Metering Infrastructure Electric Distribution Systems Electric Transmission Systems * Displays * Portals * Energy management * Direct load controls * Smart meters * Data management * Back office integration * Switches * Feeder optimization * Equipment monitoring * Energy Storage * Wide area monitoring and visualization * Synchrophasor Technology * Energy Storage Customer Systems Equipment Manufacturing

144

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits: Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Presentation...

145

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles

146

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits...

147

Enjoy The Benefits of Joint ASM/TMS Chapter Membership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enjoy The Benefits of Joint ASM/TMS Chapter Membership. There are many benefits of being a part of the Joint ASM/TMS Student Programscholarships,...

148

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

149

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Title A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Publication...

150

Business Case Slide 9: High-Volume: Repository - Potential Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repository - Potential Benefits Potential benefits EM Any of the four applications could use most or all of the DU inventory which could avoid transportation and disposal cost No...

151

Federal Energy Management Program: Benefits of Sustainable Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Benefits of Sustainable Building Design on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

152

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Title Benefits and Costs of Aggressive...

153

Comments on Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments on Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Challenge Comments on Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Challenge Comments on Contractor Employee...

154

Energy's Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Challenge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy's Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Challenge Energy's Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Challenge Summary of Comments on the March 27, 2007,...

155

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number...

156

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's...

157

Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency Title Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

158

The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive Summary for The Lancet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate...

159

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits Connected to Smart Grids M. Stadler 1,2,a , C.Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Michael Stadler , Chris

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Targets for Precision Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general properties needed in targets (sources) for high precision, high accuracy measurements are reviewed. The application of these principles to the problem of developing targets for the Fission TPC is described. Longer term issues, such as the availability of actinide materials, improved knowledge of energy losses and straggling and the stability of targets during irradiation are also discussed.

W. Loveland; L. Yao; David M. Asner; R. G. Baker; J. Bundgaard; E. Burgett; M. Cunningham; J. Deaven; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; S. Grimes; M. Heffer; T. Hill; D. Isenhower; J. L. Klay; V. Kleinrath; N. Kornilov; A. B. Laptev; T. N. Massey; R. Meharchand; H. Qu; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Selhan; L. Snyder; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; R. T. Thornton; F. Tovesson; D. Towell; R. S. Towell; S. Watson; B. Wendt; L. Wood

2013-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

results and benefits... The Bittern Line Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results and benefits... The Bittern Line Carbon Neutral Stations Transport Regeneration Ltd. June 2008 c a s e s t u d yCRed carbon reduction Project Summary Our client, Transport Regeneration Ltd., aims to make nine stations on the Bittern Line between Norwich and Sheringham carbon neutral

Everest, Graham R

162

Medical research: assessing the benefits to society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 2006 Medical research: assessing the benefits to society A report by the UK Evaluation Forum, supported by the Academy of Medical Sciences, Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust. #12;The independent Academy of Medical Sciences promotes advances in medical science and campaigns to ensure

Maizels, Rick

163

Comprehensive Evaluation of Rail Transit Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates rail transit benefits based on a comprehensive analysis of urban transportation system performance in major U.S. cities. It discusses best practices for evaluating transit benefits. It finds that cities with larger, well-established rail systems have significantly higher per capita transit ridership, lower average per capita vehicle ownership and mileage, less traffic congestion, lower traffic death rates and lower consumer transportation expenditures than otherwise comparable cities. This indicates that rail transit systems can provide a variety of economic, social and environmental benefits, and benefits tend to increase as a system expands and matures. This analysis indicates that rail investments can be a cost effective way to improve urban transport. Parking, vehicle and congestion cost savings from rail transit are estimated to exceed total U.S. public transit subsidies. It critiques Great Rail Disasters (OToole, 2004), a report which argued that rail transit systems fail to achieve their objectives and are not cost effective. It finds that many claims in Great Rail Disasters are inaccurate, based on

Todd Litman; Todd Alexander Litman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the following homes per month: 10,343 286 tons of plastic 95 tons of aluminum 0 KW-Hrs of Electricity from Waste-to-Energy: This provides enough energy to heat and cool at a Waste-to-Energy (WTE) the following homes per month: 10Rutgers Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits Through WM's Recycling Program, our company

Delgado, Mauricio

165

Societal Benefits of smart metering investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implementing smart metering involves complex interactions that may generate many new sources of benefits. It is a potentially powerful enabler, one with considerable - but still speculative - potential that is highly dependent on how the technology is utilized by utilities and supported by their regulators. (author)

Neenan, Bernard; Hemphill, Ross C.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

167

Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program The Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D)/Facility Engineering (FE) is charged with reducing the technical risk and uncertainty of D&D activities across the Environmental Management (EM) Complex through the identification, development and demonstration of alternative technologies as well as through the provision of technical assistance activities such as Lessons Learned Workshops and External Technical Review Teams. Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot

168

Bringing Benefits of Digital Mammography and Radiography ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Reduced radiation exposure; Simplified record retrieval and record management of past ... Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) / No Fear Act Policy ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

NREL: Continuum Magazine - Maximizing the Benefits of Plug-in Electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing the Benefits of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Maximizing the Benefits of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Issue 4 Print Version Share this resource Maximizing the Benefits of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Advancing electric vehicle charging options and grid readiness reduces oil consumption and vehicle emissions. A photo of two electric vehicles in a research facility. Enlarge image Electric vehicle charging stations in NREL's parking garage. Photo by Dennis Schroder, NREL Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)-including all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles-offer the opportunity to reduce oil consumption and vehicle emissions by drawing on power from the utility grid. When the grid uses electricity generated from clean, domestic energy sources, the emerging PEV infrastructure will increasingly maximize

170

CHEIBA Trust Employee Benefit Plan 2013 PlanYear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to any lien, garnishment, pledge or bankruptcy. However, a Participant may assign benefits payable under

171

Reassessment of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) Transmission System Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reassesses the benefits of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for enhancing transmission system performance.

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

173

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

175

STUDENT INTERN RELOCATION BENEFIT REQUEST FORM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01-RBR (8-2013) 01-RBR (8-2013) UCI (When Completed) UCI (When Completed) STUDENT INTERN RELOCATION BENEFIT REQUEST FORM Instructions for New Hire, Re-hire or Year-round Intern returning to Sandia work site from remote location: Review eligibility criteria below. If you believe that you may be eligible to receive relocation benefits from Sandia, complete and sign this form, then return to the CA or NM Student Intern Programs office. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA Name: Phone: Email: School/Academic Residence Address Permanent Address Address 1 Address 2 City State Zip Code Student Acknowledgement: I certify that the information stated on this form is correct and complete to best of my knowledge. I

176

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

177

Benefits for SES Positions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Resources » Senior Executive Service (SES) Executive Resources » Senior Executive Service (SES) » Benefits for SES Positions Benefits for SES Positions Leave SES members are entitled to accrue annual leave at the rate of 8 hours per biweekly pay period and can accumulate a total of up to 90 days of annual leave per pay calendar year. All Federal employees including SES members earn 13 days of sick leave per pay calendar year. There is no ceiling on the amount of sick leave that may be carried over from year to year. Home Leave SES members who have completed 24 months of continuous service outside the United States may be granted leave of absence at a rate not to exceed 1 week for each 4 months of service. The leave is for use in the United States or if the employee's residence is outside the are of employment,

178

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis W. F. Feltz, D. D. Turner, R. O. Knuteson, and R. G. Dedecker Space Science and Engineering Center Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has funded the development of the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI). This has led to a hardened, autonomous system that measures downwelling infrared (IR) radiance at high-spectral resolution. Seven AERI systems have been deployed around the world as part of the ARM Program. The initial goal of these instruments was to characterize the clear-sky IR emission from the atmosphere,

179

Employee Book of Benefits | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Book of Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Print version "Your Book of Benefits" is now available for active employees. Review specific sections of the book (linked below). You may also view a PDF file of the entire book, with its table of contents linked to its various sections. The "Retiree Book of Benefits" is now available. About Your Benefits Administrative Information Contact Information Dental Plan Disability Coverage Employee Assistance Program Flexible Spending Accounts Glossary Life and Accident Coverage Long Term Care Medical Plan Pension Plan Prescription Drugs Savings Plan Severance Plan Vision Care About Your Benefits › Print version Employees & Retirees Benefits Employee Book of Benefits About Your Benefits Administrative Information

180

Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Consideringthe Strategic Benefits of Transmission  

SciTech Connect

Current methods of evaluating the economic impacts of new electricity transmission projects fail to capture the many strategic benefits of these projects, such as those resulting from their long life, dynamic changes to the system, access to diverse fuels, and advancement of public policy goals to integrate renewable-energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Budhraja, Vikram; Mobasheri, Fred; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Silverstein, Alison; Eto, Joseph

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost-Benefit Assessment of Cycle Alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this technical update report represents an in-depth study to evaluate the different methods used to improve cycle alignment. The study outlines the cost and benefits of using these different methods and describes their application. The collection and assemblage of this information will provide a reference for plant engineering and management personnel in their attempts to improve steam plant efficiency by implementing a systematic cycle alignment program. Through the use of t...

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

UCF Benefits Section 407-823-2771  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.hr.ucf.edu Retirement Plans RETIREMENT ENROLLMENT ELIGIBILITY: ORP: A&P, Faculty FRS Pension: USPS, A&P, Faculty FRS Investment: USPS, A&P, Faculty DEADLINE: ORP: 90 days from date of hire FRS Pension: last day of 5th month&P, FACULTY: ORP: 1. ORP 16/SUSORP Retirement Plan Enrollment Form http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/forms/benefits/ORP

Foroosh, Hassan

183

California Renewable Technology Market and Benefits Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewable-energy market in California is substantial, with large numbers of companies providing a wide variety of goods and services to the market. This report characterizes the status and prospects of each renewable-energy resource in the state and estimates the current and potential economic and environmental benefits they provide. The overall objective is to provide information useful in formulating renewable-energy research strategies that can make California's electricity more reliable, affordab...

2001-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Target Database | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Engineering Applications Target Database The Target database and analytical pipeline provides bioinformatics support and selection of protein targets of biomedical...

185

YIELD BENEFIT OF CORN EVENT MON 863  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provide that this Data from field experiments are used to estimate the yield benefit of corn hybrids containing event MON 863 relative to nontransgenic corn hybrids without corn rootworm control and with a soil insecticide for corn rootworm control. Over typical ranges for corn rootworm population pressure, event MON 863 provides a yield benefit of 9-28% relative to no control and of 1.5-4.5 % relative to control with a soil insecticide. For a reasonable range of prices and yields, the value of the event MON 863 yield benefit is $25-$75/ac relative to no control and $4-$12/ac relative to control with a soil insecticide, depending on corn rootworm pressure. Because of the low correlation between yield loss and the root rating difference, a common empirical finding when estimating yield loss with root ratings, the 95% confidence intervals around these averages are quite wide. Though on average, event MON 863 has substantial value, the wide confidence intervals imply that farmers will see a wide variety of actual performance levels in their fields. This uncertainty in the

Paul D. Mitchell; Paul D. Mitchell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Guidelines for Wireless Technology in Power Plants, Volume 1: Benefits and Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the first volume of a two-volume guidelines document prepared for the benefit of energy company personnel who are considering or undertaking the deployment of wireless technology in a nuclear plant setting. This volume, directed especially at business managers and other non-IT personnel, provides information to support decision making, planning, and the preparation of business cases. Volume 2 of the guidelines contains information targeted mainly towards individuals who will perform the ac...

2002-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Project Number: FE0012066 Project Description The project will assess the potential for integrated advanced technologies to substantially reduce capital and production costs for hydrogen-rich syngas with near-zero emissions from coal gasification for power production with carbon capture and for coal-to-liquids (specifically methanol) with carbon capture. These integrated technologies include those already tested successfully at pilot-scale with a new and innovative water-gas-shift technology, to show how multiple advanced technologies will leverage each other for significant cost and efficiency gains.

192

Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repository Applications Repository Applications Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU) in a Geological Repository The United States is investigating the Yucca Mountain (YM) site in Nevada for the disposal of radioactive spent nuclear fuel (SNF)—the primary waste from nuclear power plants. The SNF would be packaged and then emplaced 200 to 300 m underground in parallel disposal tunnels. The repository isolates the SNF from the biosphere until the radionuclides decay to safe levels. DU may improve the performance of geological repositories for disposal of SNF via three mechanisms: Radiation shielding for waste packages to protect workers Lowering the potential for long-term nuclear criticality in the repository Reducing the potential for releases of radionuclides from the SNF

193

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

194

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) reduce emissionsas plug-in HEVs and full electric vehicles to market. In theon their design, hybrid electric vehicles employ electric

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Magneized target fusion: An overview of the concept  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) seeks to take advantage of the reduction of thermal conductivity through the application of a strong magneticfield and thereby ease the requirements for reaching fusion conditions in a thermonuclear (TN) fusion fuel. A potentially important benefit of the strong field in the partial trapping of energetic charged particles to enhance energy deposition by the TN fusion reaction products. The essential physics is described. MTF appears to lead to fusion targets that require orders of magnitude less power and intensity for fusion ignition than currently proposed (unmagnetized) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets do, making some very energetic pulsed power drivers attractive for realizing controlled fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Topics: Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Publications References: Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP)[1] ACP Rio+20[2] Logo: Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit Overview "The Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) provides publications and information to help mainstream climate and developmental co-benefits into decision-making processes in Asia." The Tookit "offers recent publication from ACP member organizations on themes related to co-benefits and green growth." The most recent Toolkit, from ACP's participation in Rio+20, is available

197

Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to an electric motor winding and, more particularly, to a three phase motor armature winding arrangement designed to reduce motor vibration and improve efficiency. An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor.

Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets October 7, 2013 - 10:24am Addthis Question to Answer What are appropriate GHG emission reduction targets for specific agency programs and sites? Not all administrative units within the agency have the same potential to contribute to agency-level targets. This step aims to help agencies establish what each major administrative unit (e.g. program site) should contribute to the agency goal based on its planned growth trajectory and estimates of its cost and potential to reduce GHG emissions. As illustrated in the figure below, two sites may have equal potential to reduce GHG emissions. But a site expecting significant mission-related growth prior to the 2020 target year may have a lower reduction target

199

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

202

Environmental benefits of adjustable-speed drive applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industrial sector uses 37% or 3.1 quads of the electricity that is produced in the United States. Of this, 70% or 2.2 quads powers electric motors. Adjustable speed drives (ASDs), which have the potential of reducing the power requirement of constant speed motor-driven systems by 20 to 50%, can play a major role in conserving energy and energy-efficiency improvement. While they save energy, ASDs are also widely used for improving process control. This benefit is offsetting some of the incremental costs applied to industrial production. In most of the approaches being developed to tackle the environmental problem, there is a heavy emphasis on energy efficiency because it relates directly to reduced fossil fuel-based power production, which in turn cuts CO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions. To work on improving the environment in the near term, it is necessary to promote energy-efficient equipment and systems. In the longer term, much more environmentally attractive means of power generation, transportation, and industrial production will come into play. By using new technology, such as ASDS, it is possible to maintain a standard of living at home, a rate of production in industry, or a level of comfort in an office building at a reduced level of energy consumption. Noise pollution reduction by speed control of fans by ASDs is also demonstrated. ASDs have been used to reduce fish kill in rivers (12) and are being used for water conservation. As examples of what can be accomplished in industry to improve energy efficiency and for the resulting environmental improvement, a number of uses for ASDs in electric utility power plants, in the mining industry, and the petroleum refining process are discussed. The Los Angeles Basin's plans for electrification of industry to control atmospheric emissions are included to show an example of a possible trend for the rest of the country.

Oliver, J.A. (JARSCO Engineering Corp., Corona, CA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Alternative methods to determine headwater benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) began using a Flow Duration Analysis (FDA) methodology to assess headwater benefits in river basins where use of the Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) model may not result in significant improvements in modeling accuracy. The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy and appropriateness of the FDA method for determining energy gains in less complex basins. This report presents the results of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) validation of the FDA method. The validation is based on a comparison of energy gains using the FDA method with energy gains calculated using the MWBEG model. Comparisons of energy gains are made on a daily and monthly basis for a complex river basin (the Alabama River Basin) and a basin that is considered relatively simple hydrologically (the Stanislaus River Basin). In addition to validating the FDA method, ORNL was asked to suggest refinements and improvements to the FDA method. Refinements and improvements to the FDA method were carried out using the James River Basin as a test case.

Bao, Y.S.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

NREL: News - NREL's Economic Benefit to Colorado totals $814...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

413 NREL's Economic Benefit to Colorado totals 814.8 Million in FY 2012 Energy laboratory is one of Jefferson County's largest employers February 22, 2013 The net economic benefit...

205

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the purposes of this paper, non-energy benefits are definedthat Incorporate Non-energy Benefits This paper identified aPaper presented to American Council for an Energy Efficient

Larsen, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on AddThis.com...

207

Technical benefits and cultural barriers of networked Autonomous Undersea Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research presented in this thesis examines the technical benefits to using a collaborative network of Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUVs) in place of individual vehicles. Benefits could be achieved in the areas of ...

Wineman, Patrick L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon Supply and Co-Benefits Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Co-Benefits Analysis Jump to: navigation, search TODO: find a link to a carbon supplyco-benefits analysis Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbonSupply...

209

Business Case Slide 17: High-Volume: Casks - Potential Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Casks - Potential Benefits Potential benefits EM Use most or all of the DU inventory which could avoid transportation and disposal cost OCRWM Plans to acquire use of a fleet of...

210

Benefits of battery-uItracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the benefits of battery and battery-ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (ESSs) in pulsed-load applications. It investigates and quantifies the benefits of the hybrid ESS over its battery-only ...

Smith, Ian C., S.M. (Ian Charles). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wood-Composites Industry Benefits from ALS Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wood-Composites Industry Benefits from ALS Research Wood-Composites Industry Benefits from ALS Research Print Thursday, 25 October 2012 10:44 paris-wood composites Wood scientist...

212

Microsoft Word - Understanding Smart Grid Benefits_final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Benefits of the Smart Grid June 18, 2010 DOENETL-20101413 NETL Smart Grid Implementation Strategy Understanding the Benefits of the Smart Grid v1.0 Page i...

213

Smart Grid Environmental Benefits ? Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http:www.theclimategroup.orgassetsresourcespublicationsSmart2020Report.pdf 7. McKinsey and Company. "Reducing U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: How Much at What Cost?" U.S....

214

Improved Energy Efficiency and Environmental Benefits for Calcium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Green Engineering and Environmental Stewardship. Presentation Title, Improved Energy Efficiency and Environmental Benefits for Calcium Treatment in Steel.

215

Outline Development of Direct PCR Benefits of Direct PCR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 Direct PCR Amplification of STR Loci: Protocols and Performance ... Benefits of direct PCR Collection media: FTA and 903 paper ...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Target | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Target Target Jump to: navigation, search Name Target Address 1000 Nicollet Mall Place Minneapolis, MN Zip 55440 Website http://www.target.com Coordinates 44.9739366°, -93.2750493° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9739366,"lon":-93.2750493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

217

Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter Fans on Air Cooled Heat Exchangers (A Case Study in the Use of Large Fan Air Cooled Condensers at the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant, Oregon) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter Fans on Air Cooled Heat Exchangers (A Case Study in the Use of Large Fan Air Cooled Condensers at the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant, Oregon) Abstract A significant improvement in air cooler technology was implementedat the Neal Hot Springs geothermal power plant in Vale,Oregon. Large cooling tower fans were used in an induced draftarrangement (fans above the heat exchanger). The total numberof fans was reduced from 270 x 12ft / 3.7m fans

218

Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Title Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Indoor Air 2008 Pagination 17-22 Date Published August 2008 Publisher Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297 Conference Location Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract Indoor air cleaners based on TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation of organic pollutants are a promising technology to improve or maintain indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. We evaluated the performance of a pilot scale UVPCO air cleaner under realistic conditions in single pass and recirculation modes

219

Step 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption Before beginning the code adoption process, states and jurisdictions should understand the benefits realized through energy code adoption. Description The primary goal of an energy code or standard is to conserve energy. Commercial buildings and residential households in the United States consume nearly 50% of the nation's total primary energy, 70% of the nation's electricity, and account for one-third of the nation's greenhouse emissions.1 A report by the McKinsey Global Institute found that America could reduce energy use in new and existing buildings by more than one quarter by 2020 with measures that pay for themselves within 10 years.2 Energy code adoption enables new and renovated residential and commercial

220

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences 5/31/12 Transportation Agency/31/12 Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences Center for Integrated Natural Resources, Mobility, & Transportation Authority Benefits, Farmer Costs, & Carbon Impacts Focus Groups and Surveys

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

Argus target chamber  

SciTech Connect

A target chamber for application in the laser fusion program must satisfy some very basic requirements. (1) Provide a vacuum on the order of 10$sup -6$ torr. (2) Support a microscopically small target in a fixed point in space and verify its location within 5 micrometers. (3) Contain an adjustable beam focusing system capable of delivering a number of laser beams onto the target simultaneously, both in time and space. (4) Provide access for diagnostics to evaluate the results of target irradiation. (5) Have flexibility to allow changes in targets, focusing optics and number of beams. The ARGUS laser which is now under construction at LLL will have a target chamber which meets these requirements in a simple economic manner. The chamber and auxiliary equipment are described, with reference to two double beam focusing systems; namely, lenses and ellipsoidal mirrors. Provision is made for future operation with four beams, using ellipsoidal mirrors for two-sided illumination and lens systems for tetragonal and tetrahedral irradiation. (auth)

Rienecker, F. Jr.; Glaros, S.S.; Kobierecki, M.

1975-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

State approaches to the system benefits charge  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the consideration and implementation of a non-bypassable system benefits charge (SBC) in six states through mid-May 1997. The SBC is being established to sustain important public-policy programs during the electric industry restructuring process. The states covered include Arizona, California, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. This report was prepared for the Office of Energy and Resource Planning, Utah Department of Natural Resources, under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Sustainable Technology Energy Partnerships Initiative, Second Round (STEP-2). The purpose of the report is to provide decision makers in Utah, including the Utah Public Service Commission and the state legislature, with relevant information on the SBC for use in their deliberation on the matter. The issues faced by the six states are the SBC in general; surcharge rate or funding levels; administrative structure and procedures; and actions, guidelines, and principles by program area.

Fang, J.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Potential benefits of distributed PCM thermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the benefits of passive thermal storage by means of phase change material (PCM) distributed throughout the wall and ceiling surfaces of a building, as would occur if the wallboard were impregnated with PCM. Surface heat transfer is expected to be adequate for thermal storage capacity up to 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ of surface area. Sums of daily energy balances during the heating season indicate that use of PCM-impregnated wallboard with a 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ capacity would provide adequate storage for direct gain systems with the largest practical window area in Denver, Boston, and Fort Worth. It is shown that distributed PCM thermal storage offers the opportunity to obtain several ton-hours of ventilative cooling per night throughout much of the US during July. 17 refs., 9 figs.

Neeper, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Battery energy storage: A preliminary assessment of national benefits (the Gateway Benefits Study)  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary estimates of national benefits from electric utility applications of battery energy storage through the year 2010 are presented along with a discussion of the particular applications studied. The estimates in this report were based on planning information reported to DOE by electric utilities across the United States. Future studies are planned to refine these estimates as more application-specific information becomes available.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zaininger, H. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Hurwitch, J.; Badin, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis of the expected costs and benefits of low solar heat gain glazing, and specifically the SHGC requirement in the new Texas Residential Building Energy Code,1 shows that the 0.40 SHGC requirement is ideal for Texas and that the benefits far outweigh the expected costs. For consumers, the requirement will increase comfort and reduce their cost of home ownership. The anticipated public benefits are also substantial - the result of full implementation can be expected to: 1) Reduce cumulative statewide cooling energy use over ten years by 15 billion kWh; 2) Reduce cumulative statewide electric peak demand over ten years by over 1200 MW; 3) Result in cooling cost savings of more than a billion dollars; and 4) Reduce cumulative statewide key air pollutants.

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the assessment recommendations is estimated to be $843,000 with a total implementation cost. Manufacturing at the facility includes both casting and extrusion processes. Process equipment, air compressors productivity. As a result, facility production costs can be reduced and profits can be increased. August 2001

227

Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability  

SciTech Connect

As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Strategic Industrial Energy Efficiency: Reduce Expenses, Build Revenues, and Control Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some manufacturing companies successfully boost their financial performance through optimized energy use. This leads not only to reduced energy consumption and associated environmental benefits, but also to capacity improvements that generate additional

Russell, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Retiree Benefits: Frequently Asked Questions | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits Benefits For Retirees Retiree Benefits FAQs Retiree Benefits: Frequently Asked Questions Medical Benefits Can I keep my Argonne Healthcare Plan when I become eligible for Medicare? Yes, you can be covered under the Comprehensive Medical plan, Dental plan and Prescription Drug plans as long as you are covered under Medicare Parts A and B. When I'm covered under Medicare and BCBS who is the primary payor? Medicare will be the primary payor as long as you are over age 65 and not employed in a benefit eligible position. Will the Argonne Retiree Healthcare Plan be a supplemental plan to Medicare Part A & B? The Argonne Retiree Healthcare Plan will coordinate benefits with Medicare up to the allowed amount. To clarify: if the Argonne Blue Cross Blue Shield

230

DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements April 27, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new policy measures for the reimbursement of contractor pension and medical benefit plan costs that are based on sound business practices and market-based benchmarks for cost management. The Department will continue to reimburse contractors for costs for current and retired contractor employees' defined benefit pension plans and medical benefit plans under existing contract requirements. For new contractor employees, the Department will reimburse contractors for the costs of their market-based defined contribution pension plans (similar to 401(k)) and market-based medical benefit plans.

231

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Author William V. Parker Published EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Citation William V. Parker. Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging [Internet]. 2012. N/A. EIJ Earth Imaging Journal. [updated 2013/09/20;cited 2013/09/20]. Available from: http://eijournal.com/2012/discover-the-benefits-of-radar-imaging GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar imaging Details Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): William V. Parker Published: EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012

232

Public Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits of ASCR » Benefits of ASCR » Public Benefits Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Public Benefits Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory & Experiement (INCITE) SBIR/STTR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of ASCR Public Benefits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Over the past half-century, ASCR-supported researchers from universities, national laboratories, and industry have made significant enduring advances

233

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are scenarios that could threaten our economy, with additional assumptions leading to higher natural gas prices. · Carbon Constraint (CC)--based on a future ("AFFORDABLE") Reduction in Average Delivered Natural Gas Price 1% 0% 3% 5% 2% 5% 10% 16% 12% Energy System

234

Reduce Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Climate Change Reduce Climate Change Highway vehicles release about 1.5 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere each year-mostly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2)-contributing to global climate change. Each gallon of gasoline you burn creates 20 pounds of CO2. That's roughly 5 to 9 tons of CO2 each year for a typical vehicle. more... How can a gallon of gasoline create 20 pounds of carbon dioxide? It seems impossible that a gallon of gasoline, which weighs about 6.3 pounds, could produce 20 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) when burned. However, most of the weight of the CO2 doesn't come from the gasoline itself, but the oxygen in the air. When gasoline burns, the carbon and hydrogen separate. The hydrogen combines with oxygen to form water (H2O), and carbon combines with oxygen

235

Save Energy Now Energy Assessments What Are the Benefits for Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 19, 2009 February 19, 2009 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Don Kasten/Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

236

Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 6, 2008 November 6, 2008 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

237

Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

Clark, Howard L. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Foam encapsulated targets  

SciTech Connect

Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Definition: Reduced Sags And Swells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sags And Swells Sags And Swells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sags And Swells Locating high impedance faults more quickly and precisely and adding electricity storage will reduce the frequency and severity of the voltage fluctuations that they can cause. Installing advanced reclosers that only allow a limited amount of current to flow through them upon reclosing can also reduce voltage fluctuations. Moreover, fewer customers on the same or adjacent distribution feeders would experience the voltage fluctuation caused by the fault. The benefit to consumers is based on the value of service.[1] Related Terms electricity storage technologies, electricity generation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Benefits Valuation Studies Under 316(b) of the Clean Water Act: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report is a Technical Update reflective of work in progress. A final report, revised in accordance to peer-review comments on the information presented herein, will be available on or before February 2006. This report provides an overview of the technical concepts and approaches for assigning economic value to the potential biological benefits of reducing impingement mortality and entrainment of aquatic organisms. The information presented is designed for permit applicants, environmental sta...

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target Agency/Company /Organization: Columbia University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Services/Energy_and_Climate_Change/ Cost: Free Language: English References: Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target[1] "This paper first describes the relevant context, definitions, data, and links to national policies and energy planning. Section 2 reviews relevant development and energy metrics. Several options for measuring energy access are then presented in section 3. Finally, Section 4 offers thoughts on

243

Targeted radionuclide therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Radiology Division, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Internal Medicine, University of California Davis Medical Center, 1508 Alhambra Boulevard, Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95816 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute WTI No. 117, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

First SNS Target Replacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Replacement of the target module was accomplished using only remote handling tooling and procedures (hands operations. Remote Handling Control Room Manipulator Gallery #12;10 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U ­ Interim process fitting leak testing ­ Limitations on remote handling equipment reliability ­ Limitations

McDonald, Kirk

245

Underbalanced drilling benefits now available offshore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore underbalanced drilling (UBD) is a reality. Applications in older, partially depleted fields and new fields are being considered. However, low productivity reservoirs and fields with sub normal pressures causing drilling problems are currently the main targets for offshore UBD. With proper planning and the correct technique, both jointed pipe and coiled tubing UBD drilling operations have been carried out offshore with success. The main concerns for offshore UBD have been altered drilling practices and surface production system operation. These issues have been examined and equipment has been designed and tested to address them. Environmental, safety and health issues are paramount and have been studied carefully. Detailed well planning, engineering, and flow modeling have proven critical for successful offshore UBD operations. Examples are given from oil and gas fields.

Vozniak, J.P.; Cuthbertson, B.; Nessa, D.O.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Save Energy Now: Successful Partnership Benefits Industry's Bottom Line  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the elements and benefits of the U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program's Save Energy Now initiative. Save Energy Now is part of a national campaign, ''Easy Ways to Save Energy'', announced by DOE in 2005. This campaign educates the public about simple but effective energy choices, helps U.S. industry and the government reduce their energy use, and supports national goals for energy security. Through Save Energy Now, DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) helps industrial plants operate more efficiently and profitably by identifying ways to reduce energy use in key industrial process systems.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Policing the Homeless: An Evaluation of Efforts to Reduce Homeless-Related Crime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary Police officials across the United States are increasingly relying on place-based approaches for crime prevention. In this article, we examine the Safer Cities Initiative, a widely publicized place-based policing intervention implemented in Los Angeless Skid Row and focused on crime and disorder associated with homeless encampments. Crime reduction was the goal. The police division in which the program was undertaken provides 8 years of times series data serving as the observations for the treatment condition. Four adjacent police divisions in which the program was not undertaken provide 8 years time series data serving as the observations for the comparison condition. The data are analyzed using a generalized additive model. On balance, we find that this place-based intervention is associated with meaningful reductions in violent, property, and nuisance street crimes. There is no evidence of crime displacement. Policy Implications This study provides further evidence that geographically targeted police interventions can lead to significant crime 1 prevention benefits, with no evidence that crime is simply displaced to other areas. Criminologists and the media have given the Los Angeles Police (LAPD) little credit for major reductions in crime that have occurred over the past five years following a number of major policy reforms. We suggest that researchers should look more closely at the targeted interventions the LAPD has undertaken for evidence-based examples of effective policing. Importantly, this work suggests that crime associated with homeless encampments can meaningfully reduced with targeted police actions. However, law enforcement actions do not address the roots of homelessness nor most of its consequences. Getting tough on the homeless should not be confused with policies or programs that respond fundamentally to the social and personal problems that homelessness presents. 1

Richard Berk; John Macdonald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The real air quality benefits of gaseous-fueled vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a justification for prominent inclusion of currently available gaseous-fueled vehicles (i.e., vehicles powered by propane, sometimes called liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], or natural gas--chiefly, methane--stored onboard the vehicle in gaseous or liquid state but combusted as a gas) in the mix of strategies to (a) reduce public exposure to toxic and fine particulate emissions in the urbanized areas of the developing world and (b) achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. It also presents estimates of associated emission reduction credits into the future. Important considerations discussed are the location of fine particle and toxic emissions in congested urban areas, and the location and timing of ozone precursor emissions, with emphasis on how gaseous-fueled vehicles' role in the relationship among and magnitude of these variables differs from that of their conventionally-fueled counterparts. Efforts to enhance the measurement and quantification of gaseous-fuel benefits are also described.

Saricks, C. L.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analysis of costs-benefits tradeoffs of complex security systems  

SciTech Connect

Essential to a systems approach to design of security systems is an analysis of the cost effectiveness of alternative designs. While the concept of analysis of costs and benefits is straightforward, implementation can be at the least tedious and, for complex designs and alternatives, can become nearly intractable without the help of structured analysis tools. PACAIT--Performance and Cost Analysis Integrated Tools--is a prototype tool. The performance side of the analysis collates and reduces data from ASSESS, and existing DOE PC-based security systems performance analysis tool. The costs side of the analysis uses ACE, an existing DOD PC-based costs analysis tool. Costs are reported over the full life-cycle of the system, that is, the costs to procure, operate, maintain and retire the system and all of its components. Results are collected in Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel workbooks and are readily available to analysts and decision makers in both tabular and graphical formats and at both the system and path-element levels.

Hicks, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing  

SciTech Connect

Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Resource assessment Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/sites/profor.info/files/Benefit_Sharing_WEB.pdf Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Screenshot References: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing[1] "This study uses an evidence-based approach to provide insights into developing and maintaining collaborative arrangements in the forest sector. It aims to inform discussions and approaches to forest partnership and

252

Transport Co-benefits Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Co-benefits Calculator Transport Co-benefits Calculator Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Co-benefits Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/archive/cp/activity20101108.html Cost: Free Related Tools Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool SimCLIM SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ... further results Characterizes co-benefits in terms of accidents, emissions, travel time, and vehicle operating costs. Approach A co-benefits approach capitalizes on synergies between current local

253

Optimization Studies for ISOL Type High-Powered Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research studied one-step and two-step Isotope Separation on Line (ISOL) targets for future radioactive beam facilities with high driver-beam power through advanced computer simulations. As a target material uranium carbide in the form of foils was used because of increasing demand for actinide targets in rare-isotope beam facilities and because such material was under development in ISAC at TRIUMF when this project started. Simulations of effusion were performed for one-step and two step targets and the effects of target dimensions and foil matrix were studied. Diffusion simulations were limited by availability of diffusion parameters for UCx material at reduced density; however, the viability of the combined diffusion?effusion simulation methodology was demonstrated and could be used to extract physical parameters such as diffusion coefficients and effusion delay times from experimental isotope release curves. Dissipation of the heat from the isotope-producing targets is the limiting factor for high-power beam operation both for the direct and two-step targets. Detailed target models were used to simulate proton beam interactions with the targets to obtain the fission rates and power deposition distributions, which were then applied in the heat transfer calculations to study the performance of the targets. Results indicate that a direct target, with specification matching ISAC TRIUMF target, could operate in 500-MeV proton beam at beam powers up to ~40 kW, producing ~8 1013 fission/s with maximum temperature in UCx below 2200 C. Targets with larger radius allow higher beam powers and fission rates. For the target radius in the range 9-mm to 30-mm the achievable fission rate increases almost linearly with target radius, however, the effusion delay time also increases linearly with target radius.

Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University] [Michigan State University

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently completed the demolition of structures in an electrical switchyard used to help power the Portsmouth Site's uranium enrichment processes for defense and commercial uses for nearly five decades. In the $28 million Recovery Act project completed safely and on schedule, workers demolished 160 towers as tall as 120 feet that were used to operate the X-533 Electrical Switchyard. Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent

255

NIST Solid state light program produces solid benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sales and the earlier realization of energy savings benefits. ... of millions of dollars in the lighting market alone!. For more information, view a pdf of the ...

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits Benefits Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Selected faculty and participating students spend 10 weeks (Summer Term) at a DOE national laboratory engaged in a research project under the guidance of a laboratory scientist. Faculty members build collaborative relationships with DOE research scientists, become familiar with DOE sponsored research programs, scientific user facilities, and potential funding opportunities. Students participate in enrichment activities, including career professional development workshops (e.g. technical and scientific writing skills development, poster, or oral presentation activities, etc.),

257

Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country...

258

Federal Energy Management Program: Benefits of Sustainable Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design The application of sustainable building design not only helps Federal facilities meet laws and regulations, it also provides them with many...

259

Notice of Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Their Expansion: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 40 - Mar. 1, 2007...

260

The potential benefits of distributed deneration and rate-related...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

issues that may impede issues its expansion. June 2007 The potential benefits of distributed deneration and rate-related issues that may impede issues its expansion. A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating Transport Projects Jump to: navigation,...

262

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

264

Manual for Quantitative Evaluation of the Co-Benefits Approach...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Quantitative Evaluation of the Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Quantitative Evaluation of the...

265

Funding Defined Benefit State Pension Plans: An Empirical Evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Defined Benefit (DB) state pension trust funds are an integral component of state finances and play a major role in the countrys labor and capital (more)

Mamaril, Cezar Brian C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (August 2006) Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile...

268

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2013 Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development funds Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013...

270

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy conservation measures State Virginia (2001) New Mexico (types of non-energy benefits. New Mexico (2011) has specificenergy savings contracts by governmental entities, June. New Mexico.

Larsen, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Planning lessens problems, gets benefits of underbalance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A horizontal well planned to be drilled underbalanced required special procedures and countermeasures to prevent formation damage from the mud and downhole tool failures from high temperature. Drilling the well underbalanced helped reduce problems from lost returns and from solids entering and plugging the natural fractures in the Austin chalk. The high bottom hole temperature in the deep Austin chalk in central Louisiana complicates drilling, the mud program, and well design. The first of this two-part series covers the planning, procedures, and well design to alleviate these problems. The next article, which will appear in a future issue, addresses complications during the operation and the equipment used.

Joseph, R.A. [OXY U.S.A. Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reducing Leaking Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Reducing Leaking Electricity Figure 1. Full and standby power draws of some compact audio systems. A surprisingly large number of appliances-from computer peripherals to cable TV boxes to radios-consume electricity even after they have been switched off. Other appliances, such as cordless telephones, remote garage door openers, and battery chargers don't get switched off but draw power even when they are not performing their principal functions. The energy used while the appliance is switched off or not performing its primary purpose is called "standby consumption" or "leaking electricity." This consumption allows TVs, VCRs and garage-door openers to be ready for instant-on with a remote control, microwave ovens to display a digital

274

Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study  

SciTech Connect

If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance  

SciTech Connect

Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Demand-Side Management Funds Collected for Energy Efficiency Programs in 2000 (1) Total Expenditures Per Capita Spending ($2009 million) ($2009/person) Connecticut 82.1 24.08 Massachusetts 122.7 19.29 Rhode Island 17.3 16.48 New Jersey 137.6 16.32 Vermont 7.8 12.74 Maine 15.6 12.21 Wisconsin 60.8 11.32 Hawaii 13.6 11.22 New York 201.3 10.60 California 354.5 10.43 National (2) 1,354 4.80 Note(s): Source(s): 1) This table shows demand side management funds(including Public Benefit Funds) collected in 2000 that were spent of energy efficiency programs. 2) The top ten states in spending per capita represent 74.8% of total U.S. funds collected for energy efficiency programs. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy; Five Years In: An Examination of the First Half Decade of Public Benefit Energy Efficiency Policies, April

278

Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for US buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefited from energy conservation research and development (R D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Concepts for fabrication of inertial fusion energy targets  

SciTech Connect

Future inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will have a Target Fabrication Facility (TFF) that must produce approximately 500,000 targets per day. To achieve a relatively low cost of electricity, the cost to produce these targets will need to be less than approximately $0.25 per target. In this paper the status on the development of concepts for a TFF to produce targets for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) reactor, such as HYLIFE II, and a laser direct drive fusion reactor such as Sombrero, is discussed. The baseline target that is produced in the HIF TFF is similar to the close-coupled indirect drive target designed by Callahan-Miller and Tabak at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This target consists of a cryogenic hohlraum that is made of a metal case and a variety of metal foams and metal-doped organic foams. The target contains a DT-filled CH capsule. The baseline direct drive target is the design developed by Bodner and coworkers at Naval Research Laboratory. HIF targets can be filled with DT before or after assembly of the capsule into the hohlraum. Assembly of targets before filling allows assembly operations to be done at room temperature, but tritium inventories are much larger due to the large volume that the hohlraum occupies in the fill system. Assembly of targets cold after filling allows substantial reduction in tritium inventory, but this requires assembly of targets at cryogenic temperature. A model being developed to evaluate the tritium inventories associated with each of the assembly and fill options indicates that filling targets before assembling the capsule into the hohlraum, filling at temperatures as high as possible, and reducing dead-volumes in the fill system as much as possible offers the potential to reduce tritium inventories to acceptable levels. Use of enhanced DT ice layering techniques, such as infrared layering can reduce tritium inventories significantly by reducing the layering time and therefore the number of capsules being layered. Current processes for fabrication of ICF capsules can most likely be easily scaled up to produce capsules at rates needed for an IFE plant.

Nobile, A. (Arthur), Jr.; Hoffer, J. K. (James K.); Gobby, P. L. (Peter L.); Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr.; Goodin, D. T. (Daniel T.); Besenbruch, G. E. (Gottfried E.); Schultz, K. R. (Kenneth R.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/files/1/817,Transport_sector Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Screenshot References: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport[1] Summary "The large mitigation potential and associated co-benefits of taking action in the land transport sector can be tapped into by a sectoral approach drawing financial resources from a transport window, in the short term

283

Estimating the Economic Benefits of Forward-Engaged Naval Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing for the 1997 quadrennial defense review, US Navy leaders asked us if we could quantify the economic benefits of forward-engaged naval forces and communicate them to policy makers. Until this point, the only evidence of such benefits was ... Keywords: INDUSTRIES--PETROLEUM-NATURAL GAS, MILITARY--COST EFFECTIVENESS

Robert E. Looney; David A. Schrady; Ronald L. Brown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Learning to target: what works for behavioral targeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding what interests and delights users is critical to effective behavioral targeting, especially in information-poor contexts. As users interact with content and advertising, their passive behavior can reveal their interests towards advertising. ... Keywords: advertising, behavioral targeting, user modeling

Sandeep Pandey; Mohamed Aly; Abraham Bagherjeiran; Andrew Hatch; Peter Ciccolo; Adwait Ratnaparkhi; Martin Zinkevich

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

NEPA Success Stories and Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits September 16, 2013 Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA. September 16, 2013 NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government, Environmental Law Institute, 2010. February 27, 2013 NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports

286

Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health Benefits (FEHB) Health Benefits (FEHB) Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program is the largest employer-sponsored health insurance program in the world, covering more than 8 million Federal employees, retirees, former employees, family members, and former spouses. FEHB includes different types of plans: fee-for-service with a preferred provider organization; health maintenance organizations; point-of-service; high deductible health plans; and consumer-driven health plans. How you obtain coverage or services and pay for them differs depending on the plan. However, benefits available under all plans include hospital care, surgical care, inpatient and outpatient care, obstetrical care, mental health and substance abuse care, and prescription drug coverage. There are no waiting

287

Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating Transport Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating Transport Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Focus Area: Multi-sector Impact Evaluation Topics: Best Practices Website: enviroscope.iges.or.jp/modules/envirolib/upload/3209/attach/transport% For the past three years, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) has been conducting research on co-benefits. This research has demonstrated that quantifying co-benefits is essential to mainstreaming climate and development concerns into project appraisals, policymaking processes, and international climate negotiations. IGES research has also

288

Energy Efficiency Public Benefits Funds | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Public Benefits Funds Energy Efficiency Public Benefits Funds Energy Efficiency Public Benefits Funds < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Retail Supplier Utility Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Illinois Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity Illinois's 1997 electric-industry restructuring legislation created separate public benefits funds that support renewable energy and residential energy efficiency. The efficiency fund is known as the Energy Efficiency Trust Fund. Electric utilities and alternative retail electric suppliers contribute annually a pro-rata share of a total amount of $3

289

Notice of Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Their Expansion: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 40 - Mar. 1, 2007 Notice of Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Their Expansion: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 40 - Mar. 1, 2007 Federal Register Notice of availability of a study of the potential benefits of distributed generation and rate-related issues that may impede their expansion, and request for public comment. Study of the Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate- Related Issues That May Impede Their Expansion More Documents & Publications Notice of inquiry and request for Information - Study of the potential

290

Benefits Office, Human Resources, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search Go search Go Brookhaven Benefits Office HR Homepage | Feedback Form Denise DiMeglio (Manager, 631.344.2881) Melissa Bittrolff (Sr. HR Rep., 631.344.2877) Barbara Soeyadi (Sr. HR Rep., 631.344.7516) Monique Armann (HR Rep., 631.344.5126) IMPORTANT UPDATES TO YOUR RETIREMENT PROGRAM Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC knows that benefits are an important and meaningful part of your employment at Brookhaven. Our benefit programs address both the immediate needs of your family, such as insurance coverage, and your long-term needs, such as retirement savings. You'll find this website will provide you with plan information, telephone numbers, claim forms and much more. Benefits Program Other Services at BNL BSA Benefits Program Booklet (2014)* Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance

291

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Home > content > Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system

292

A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

Leiby, P.N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Benefit/cost analysis for research in geothermal log interpretation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well log interpretation, the process of inferring subsurface geology from geophysical measurements made in boreholes, is the most versatile and direct means available of assessing important physical and structural reservoir properties. Historically, well logging has been developed primarily for use in oil and gas wells, and its application in a different environment such as a geothermal reservoir creates complex problems. Present geothermal development is severely hindered by lack of data. Adaptation of well logging techniques holds the promise of reducing development costs, encouraging investment, and assisting regulatory permitting. Such benefits will translate directly into lower power costs and an increased domestic energy supply. A significant acceleration of geothermal power-on-line is possible plus cost reductions through reduction of drilling failure rate, reduction of average well cost, earlier recognition of bad wells, reduced flow testing, and savings due to provision of better data for regulatory decisions. Net undiscounted benefits in 1979 dollars from improving logging and interpretation in geothermal areas can exceed half a billion dollars in slightly more than a decade, about 300 million of this should be regarded as the potential benefit of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Log Interpretation Program or similar research.

Rigby, F.A.; Reardon, P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Connecting Distributed Energy Resources to the Grid: Their Benefits to the DER Owner etc.  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electric capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user peak demand, in turn, may lower a distribution system peak load such that upgrades are deferred or avoided. This could benefit other consumers by providing them with higher reliability and power quality as well as avoiding their cost share of a distribution system upgrade. In this example, the costs of the DER may be born by the end user, but that user reaps only a share of the benefits. This report, the first product of a study to quantify the value of DER, documents initial project efforts to develop an assessment methodology. The focus of currently available site-specific DER assessment techniques are typically limited to two parties, the owner/user and the local utility. Rarely are the impacts on other stakeholders, including interconnected distribution utilities, transmission system operators, generating system operators, other local utility customers, local and regional industry and business, various levels of government, and the environment considered. The goal of this assessment is to quantify benefits and cost savings that accrue broadly across a region, recognizing that DER installations may have local, regional, or national benefits.

Poore, WP

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Using On-Chip Configurable Logic to Reduce Embedded System Software Energy Greg Stitt1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using On-Chip Configurable Logic to Reduce Embedded System Software Energy Greg Stitt1 , Brian We examine the energy savings possible by re-mapping critical software loops from a microprocessor that reduced software energy is an additional benefit, making such chips even more useful. We find critical

Vahid, Frank

296

How America can look within to achieve energy security and reduce global warming.  

SciTech Connect

Making major gains in energy efficiency is one of the most economical and effective ways our nation can wean itself off its dependence on foreign oil and reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. Transportation and buildings, which account for two thirds of American energy usage, consume far more than they need to, but even though there are many affordable energy efficient technologies that can save consumers money, market imperfections inhibit their adoption. To overcome the barriers, the federal government must adopt policies that will transform the investments into economic and societal benefit. And the federal government must invest in research and development programs that target energy efficiency. Energy efficiency is one of America's great hidden energy reserves. We should begin tapping it now. Whether you want the United States to achieve greater energy security by weaning itself off foreign oil, sustain strong economic growth in the face of worldwide competition or reduce global warming by decreasing carbon emissions, energy efficiency is where you need to start. Thirty-five years ago the U.S. adopted national strategies, implemented policies and developed technologies that significantly improved energy efficiency. More than three decades have passed since then, and science and technology have progressed considerably, but U.S. energy policy has not. It is time to revisit the issue. In this report we examine the scientific and technological opportunities and policy actions that can make the United States more energy efficient, increase its security and reduce its impact on global warming. We believe the findings and recommendations will help Congress and the next administration to realize these goals. Our focus is on the transportation and buildings sectors of the economy. The opportunities are huge and the costs are small.

Richter, B.; Goldston, D.; Crabtree, G.; Glicksman, L.; Goldstein, D.; Greene, D.; Kammen, D.; Levin, M.; Lubell, M.; Savitz, M.; Sperling, D.; Schlachter, F.; Scofield, J.; Dawson, J. (Materials Science Division); (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.); (National Resources Defense Council); (Harvard Univ.); (ORNL); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (LBNL); (American Physical Society); (City Coll. of CUNY); (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center); (Stanford Univ.); (The Advisory Group); (Univ. of California at Davis)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Benefit of Lunar Regolith on Reflector Mass Savings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2004 NASA Vision for Space Exploration calls for the return of mankind to the moon by no later than 2020, in preparation for an adventure to Mars and beyond. An envisioned lunar outpost will provide living quarters for initially 5- 10 astronauts for up to 2 weeks, and latter for science experiments, and recovery of mineral and indigenous resources for the day-to-day operation and production of propellant. These activities would require electrical and thermal powers in the order of 10's - 100's of kilowatts 24/7. Potential power options include photovoltaic, requiring massive batteries or fuel cells for energy storage during the long nights on the moon, and nuclear reactor power systems, which are much more compact and operate independent of the sun. This paper examines the benefit of using the lunar regolith as a supplemental neutron reflector on decreasing the launch mass of the Sectored Compact Reactor (SCoRe-S), developed at the Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies. In addition to providing at least $2.00 of hot-clean excess reactivity at the beginning of life, various SCoRe-S concepts investigated in this paper are at least $1.00 sub-critical when shutdown, and when the bare reactor cores are submerged in wet sand and flooded with seawater, following a launch abort accident. Design calculations performed using MCNP5 confirmed that using lunar regolith as supplementary reflector reduces the launch mass of the SCoRe-S cores by {approx} 34% - 35%, or 150 - 200 kg, while satisfying the above reactivity requirements.

Hatton, Steven A.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Opportunities for Health and Climate Co-Benefits in Indian Cities: Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Health and Climate Co-Benefits in Indian Cities: Sources Opportunities for Health and Climate Co-Benefits in Indian Cities: Sources and Strengths Speaker(s): Sarath Guttikunda Date: April 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Joshua Apte Urban air quality is deteriorating in many cities in the developing world as population, motorization, industrialization, urbanization, and other related pressures increase. This increasing air pollution poses a serious threat to human health, including increases in morbidity such as chronic bronchitis, cancer of the respiratory tract, asthma, as well as premature mortality. At the same time, there is an increasing concern about climate change, and rapidly growing urban areas are being viewed as holding opportunities to be able to reduce greenhouse gases to mitigate climate

299

Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3258 3258 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy - memorandum DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: SUBJECT: TO: December 15, 1994 Office of NEPA 0versight:Strickler:202-568-2410 Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Distribution The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement or environmental assessment). I believe that this information will help program and field offices prepare their annual NEPA planning summaries and their overall NEPA compliance strategies. Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and the public, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Background on DOE's at)proachto site-wide

300

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Title Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2012 Authors Larsen, Peter H., Charles A. Goldman, Donald Gilligan, and Terry E. Singer Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 2012 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California Abstract This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry-a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances -- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Non- energy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100% of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings Agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

PDFs for nuclear targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

Karol Kovarik

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

ORION laser target diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Targeting Political Advertising on Television ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the targeting of political advertising by congressional candidates on television. Targeting strategies for television differ from targeting strategies for direct mail advertising or get out the vote efforts because candidates cannot target voters individually. Instead, candidates must target television programs with viewers most similar to the desired target voters. Thus, for targeted advertising to have value, the audiences for television programs must differ in meaningful ways and advertising must be effective. In this project, we develop and estimate a model of targeted advertising for U.S. congressional races. We study whether television shows segment potential voters sufficiently to allow for effective targeting and we consider the effect of television advertising- whether it persuades individuals to vote for a particular candidate or mobilizes them to vote in general. Our results suggest the function of television advertising is primarily to persuade. Moreover, we find that there is sufficient variation in the distribution of viewer characteristics across television programs to allow for effective targeting. The most effective targeting strategies therefore involve both parties adopting similar strategies of advertising primarily on programs with audiences containing many swing voters that are likely to vote. While

Mitchell Lovett; Michael Peress

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

REDUCING ENERGY USE IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2007 Florida Building Code (ICC, 2008) requires building designers and architects to achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating for commercial buildings located throughout Florida. Although the Florida Building Code is strict in the minimum requirements for new construction, several aspects of building construction can be further improved through careful thought and design. This report outlines several energy saving features that can be used to ensure that new buildings meet a new target goal of 85% energy use compared to the 2007 energy code in order to achieve Governor Crists executive order to improve the energy code by 15%. To determine if a target goal of 85% building energy use is attainable, a computer simulation study was performed to determine the energy saving features available which are, in most cases, stricter than the current Florida Building Code. The energy savings features include improvements to building envelop, fenestration, lighting and equipment, and HVAC efficiency. The impacts of reducing outside air requirements and employing solar water heating were also investigated. The purpose of the energy saving features described in this document is intended to provide a simple, prescriptive method for reducing energy consumption using the methodology outlined in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE, 2007). There are two difficulties in trying to achieve savings in non-residential structures. First, there is significant energy use caused by internal loads for people and equipment and it is difficult to use the energy code to achieve savings in this area relative to a baseline. Secondly, the ASHRAE methodology uses some of the same features that are proposed for the new building, so it may be difficult to claim savings for some strategies that will produce savings such as improved ventilation controls, reduced window area, or reduced plug loads simply because the methodology applies those features to the comparison reference building. Several measures to improve the building envelope characteristics were simulated. Simply using the selected envelope measures resulted in savings of less than 10% for all building types. However, if such measures are combined with aggressive lighting reductions and improved efficiency HVAC equipment and controls, a target savings of 15% is easily attainable.

Raustad, R.; Basarkar, M.; Vieira, R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reduce Overhead, Implement Energy Efficiency in Water/Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the Focus on Energy program in the State of Wisconsin we have been able to identify savings for industries in their water/wastewater treatment or distribution systems. Modifications required to realize savings resulted in reduced energy consumption and reduced cost to industry. Reduced cost is a pleasant benefit when the cost of utility bills comes off the bottom line and if the industry is working on a 5 percent margin the actual value of the savings could be considered to be 20 times its actual savings. Modifications can be made in wastewater treatment applications by adjusting dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in treatment process, modifying aeration system blowers, changing diffusers, and considering a DO automatic control system. In water systems, changes in pump operations by not throttling valves for control, adding variable speed drives to constant speed operations, and reducing pressure on systems where it will not adversely impact the process.

Cantwell, J. C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unit energy consumption), electricity tariffs, and pollutantconsultations with experts. Electricity tariff Table 1shows the electricity tariffs for residential households,

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. (2001). Suspecting Standby? Domestic Levels and theMeasurements of Whole-House Standby Power Consumption inQuantification of Residential Standby Power Consumption in

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 2003 to 2020. NOx reduction ? thousand tons ? Carbonlabeling, 2003-2020 NOx reduction ? thousand tons ? Annual

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors. The major outputs include energy and cost saving estimates and avoided pollution (carbon dioxide (

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission factors. The major outputs include energy and cost saving estimates and avoided pollution (carbon dioxide (

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Comparison of Australian and US Cost-Benefit Approaches to MEPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Greenhouse Office contracted with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) for LBNL to compare US and Australian approaches to analyzing costs and benefits of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS). This report compares the approaches for three types of products: household refrigerators and freezers, small electric storage water heaters, and commercial/industrial air conditioners. This report presents the findings of similarities and differences between the approaches of the two countries and suggests changes to consider in the approach taken in Australia. The purpose of the Australian program is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while the US program is intended to increase energy efficiency; each program is thus subject to specific constraints. The market and policy contexts are different, with the USA producing most of its own products and conducting pioneering engineering-economic studies to identify maximum energy efficiency levels that are technologically feasible and economically justified. In contrast, Australia imports a large share of its products and adopts MEPS already in place elsewhere. With these differences in circumstances, Australia's analysis approach could be expected to have less analytical detail and still result in MEPS levels that are appropriate for their policy and market context. In practice, the analysis required to meet these different objectives is quite similar. To date, Australia's cost-benefit analysis has served the goals and philosophies of the program well and been highly effective in successfully identifying MEPS that are significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions while providing economic benefits to consumers. In some cases, however, the experience of the USA--using more extensive data sets and more detailed analysis--suggests possible improvements to Australia's cost-benefit analysis. The principal findings of the comparison are: (1) The Technology and Market Assessments are similar; no changes are recommended. (2) The Australian approach to determining the relationship of price to energy efficiency is based on current market, while the US approach uses prospective estimates. Both approaches may benefit from increased retrospective analysis of impacts of MEPS on appliance and equipment prices. Under some circumstances, Australia may wish to consider analyzing two separate components leading to price impacts: (a) changes in manufacturing costs and (b) markups used to convert from manufacturing costs to consumer price. (3) The Life-Cycle Cost methods are similar, but the USA has statistical surveys that permit a more detailed analysis. Australia uses average values, while the US uses full distributions. If data and resources permit, Australia may benefit from greater depth here as well. If implemented, the changes will provide more information about the benefits and costs of the program, in particular identifying who benefits and who bears net costs so that programs can be designed to offset unintended negative consequences, and may assist the government in convincing affected parties of the justification for some MEPS. However, without a detailed and statistically representative national survey, such an approach may not be practical for Australia at this time. (4) The National Benefits and Costs methods are similar prospective estimates of shipments, costs and energy savings, as well as greenhouse gas emissions. Additional sensitivity studies could further illustrate the ranges in these estimates. Consideration of lower discount rates could lead to more stringent MEPS in some cases. (5) Both the Australian and US analyses of impacts on industry, competition, and trade ultimately depend upon sufficient consultation with industry experts. While the Australian analysis of financial impacts on manufacturers is less detailed than that of the US, the Australian treatment of impacts on market shares imported from different regions of the world is more detailed. No change is recommended. Implementing these changes would increase the depth o

McMahon, James E.

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone This seminar starts by providing a short introduction to the field of Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) through a practical example of packaging. It will then develop the case of the Life Cycle Benefits and Impacts of the Internet; raising the different scientific challenges that LCA faces to provide relevant results for innovative technologies.--The rapid development of the Internet and the related potential impacts on and benefits for the environment deserves attention. The infrastructure that supports a university's use of the Internet has been comprehensively

313

Public Benefits Funds for Renewables and Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Benefits Funds for Renewables and Efficiency Public Benefits Funds for Renewables and Efficiency Public Benefits Funds for Renewables and Efficiency < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State California Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider California Public Utilities Commission California's 1996 electric industry restructuring legislation ([http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/95-96/bill/asm/ab_1851-1900/ab_1890_bill_9... AB 1890]) directed the state's three major investor-owned utilities (Southern California Edison, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, and San Diego Gas and Electric) to collect a "public goods charge" (PGC) on

314

Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently completed the demolition of structures in an electrical switchyard used to help power the Portsmouth Site's uranium enrichment processes for defense and commercial uses for nearly five decades. In the $28 million Recovery Act project completed safely and on schedule, workers demolished 160 towers as tall as 120 feet that were used to operate the X-533 Electrical Switchyard. Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community through Recycling More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2

315

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop November 9, 2012 - 12:29pm Addthis Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop As Alaska Native villages prepared for winter and the intensified energy challenges the season will bring, DOE's Office of Indian Energy (DOE-IE) and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program co-hosted a workshop focused on solutions to those challenges. Held in Anchorage, Alaska, on October 16 and 17, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development workshop was designed to help Alaska tribal leaders and staffs understand the range of

316

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound_Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio > Mound_Benefits Ohio > Mound_Benefits Employment Verification Mercer, Mound Benefits Center (866) 296-5036 Worker and Community Transition Program (Section 3161) Direct all education, training, preference in hiring, relocation, and outplacement inquiries to: Professional Services of America, Inc. 601 Avery Street, Suite 500, Parkersburg, WV 26101 Phone: (866) 562-7482 Fax: (304) 485-1280 E-mail: jsheppard@psa-inc.com Medical and Life Insurance for Former EG&G, BWXTO, and CH2M HILL Employees For questions about health insurance coverage and/or dependent information, life insurance and/or beneficiaries, etc.: Mercer, Mound Benefits Center P.O. Box 9735, Providence, RI 02940 (866) 296-5036 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST, Monday-Friday For questions about insurance claims:

317

Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.vtpi.org/tranben.pdf Web Application Link: www.vtpi.org/tranben.pdf Cost: Free Language: English Related Tools TransportToolkit Prototype Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Where's the Hydrogen Economy? ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This guidebook describes how to create a comprehensive framework for evaluating the full impacts of a particular transit service or improvement.

318

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop November 9, 2012 - 12:29pm Addthis Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop As Alaska Native villages prepared for winter and the intensified energy challenges the season will bring, DOE's Office of Indian Energy (DOE-IE) and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program co-hosted a workshop focused on solutions to those challenges. Held in Anchorage, Alaska, on October 16 and 17, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development workshop was designed to help Alaska tribal leaders and staffs understand the range of

319

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits Benefits Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) SULI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Research interns spend 10 weeks (summer term) or 16 weeks (semester term) at a DOE laboratory engaged in a research project under the guidance of a laboratory scientist or engineer. Host laboratories provide enrichment activities, including career professional development workshops (e.g. technical and scientific writing skills development, poster, or oral presentation activities, etc.), laboratory tours, scientific lectures and seminars. Host laboratories provide all required site specific training. Beginning with the 2013 Summer Term, selected students receive a

320

DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique Management and Operating and other site management contracts, DOE reimburses its contractors for allowable costs incurred in providing contractor employee pension and medical benefits to current employees and retirees. In FY2006, these costs reached approximately $1.1 billion - a more than 226 percent increase since FY2000 - and are expected to grow in future years.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Health Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll until the annual open season (conducted in late Fall) or unless you experience a qualifying life event (see http://www.opm.gov/insure/health/planinfo/qle.asp) that would allow you to enroll. Please note that the SF-2809 should be completed and submitted even if you are declining coverage.

322

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development, Global Environment Facility, United Nations Development Programme Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.forestcarbonportal. Country Cambodia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References REDD Cambodia Case Study[1] Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Screenshot

323

Essays on prescription drug benefits in Medicare managed care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I estimate a structural demand model for prescription drug benefits by Medicare beneficiaries using data from the Medicare HMO program. I then use the utility parameter estimates to explore other questions ...

Hall, Anne Elizabeth, 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Intraorganizational Versus Interorganizational Uses and Benefits of Electronic Mail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of an organization depends on rapid, reliable, and direct communications within the organization and with the outside world. To determine if electronic mail e-mail provides a competitive benefit, a sample of 99 management-level participants ...

Denise J. McManus; Chetan Sankar; Houston H. Carr; F. Nelson Ford

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90...

326

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swedish ESCO Experience. Energy Efficiency, 3(3), 237-256.2001 Session. Chapter 219: Energy and Operational Efficiency2008. NAESCO Analysis of Non-energy Benefits of Efficiency

Larsen, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report NRELTP-670-43532 August 2008 Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs Lori A. Bird and Karlynn S. Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

328

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Definition: Reduced Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Sox, Nox, And Pm-2.5 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in pollutant emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Sox,_Nox,_And_Pm-2.5_Emissions&oldid=502508

330

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled October 7, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy. Table 1. Determining When and How to Promote the Use of Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Strategy When Applicable Best Practices Consolidate trips Applicable to all vehicles, regardless of ownership or vehicle and fuel type Target vehicle operators who take longer trips Seek vehicle operator input and collaboration to identify regular or occasional trips that involve similar routes. Determine whether trips on multiple days or times can be consolidated into a single trip.

331

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Title Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson, Ronnen M., and Hashem Akbari Journal Energy Efficiency Volume 3 Pagination 53-109 Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 1570-646X Keywords cool roof, Heat Island Abstract Cool roofs-roofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emission-lessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in conditioned buildings. Cool roofs may also increase the need for heating energy in cold climates. For a commercial building, the decrease in annual cooling load is typically much greater than the increase in annual heating load. This study combines building energy simulations, local energy prices, local electricity emission factors, and local estimates of building density to characterize local, state average, and national average cooling energy savings, heating energy penalties, energy cost savings, and emission reductions per unit conditioned roof area. The annual heating and cooling energy uses of four commercial building prototypes-new office (1980+), old office (pre-1980), new retail (1980+), and old retail (pre-1980)-were simulated in 236 US cities. Substituting a weathered cool white roof (solar reflectance 0.55) for a weathered conventional gray roof (solar reflectance 0.20) yielded annually a cooling energy saving per unit conditioned roof area ranging from 3.30 kWh/m2 in Alaska to 7.69 kWh/m2 in Arizona (5.02 kWh/m2 nationwide); a heating energy penalty ranging from 0.003 therm/m2 in Hawaii to 0.14 therm/m2 in Wyoming (0.065 therm/m2 nationwide); and an energy cost saving ranging from $0.126/m2 in West Virginia to $1.14/m2 in Arizona ($0.356/m2 nationwide). It also offered annually a CO2 reduction ranging from 1.07 kg/m2 in Alaska to 4.97 kg/m2 in Hawaii (3.02 kg/m2 nationwide); an NOx reduction ranging from 1.70 g/m2 in New York to 11.7 g/m2 in Hawaii (4.81 g/m2 nationwide); an SO2 reduction ranging from 1.79 g/m2 in California to 26.1 g/m2 in Alabama (12.4 g/m2 nationwide); and an Hg reduction ranging from 1.08 μg/m2 in Alaska to 105 μg/m2 in Alabama (61.2 μg/m2 nationwide). Retrofitting 80% of the 2.58 billion square meters of commercial building conditioned roof area in the USA would yield an annual cooling energy saving of 10.4 TWh; an annual heating energy penalty of 133 million therms; and an annual energy cost saving of $735 million. It would also offer an annual CO2 reduction of 6.23 Mt, offsetting the annual CO2 emissions of 1.20 million typical cars or 25.4 typical peak power plants; an annual NOx reduction of 9.93 kt, offsetting the annual NOx emissions of 0.57 million cars or 65.7 peak power plants; an annual SO2 reduction of 25.6 kt, offsetting the annual SO2 emissions of 815 peak power plants; and an annual Hg reduction of 126 kg.

332

Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s{sup 2} if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 {mu}m thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive.

Petzoldt, R.W.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Valuing Good Health in Vermont: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Health Care Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policymakers across the country are increasingly interested in ensuring that workers can earn paid time off to use when they are sick. In addition to concerns about workers ability to respond to their own health needs, there is growing recognition that, with so many dual-earner and single-parent families, family members health needs also sometimes require workers to take time off from their job. Allowing workers with contagious illness to avoid unnecessary contact with co-workers and customers has important public health benefits. Earned health care time also protects workers from being disciplined or fired when they are too sick to work, helps families and communities economically by preventing lost income due to illness, and offers savings to employers by reducing turnover and minimizing absenteeism. Legislators in Vermont are considering Bill H.208, An Act Relating to Absence from Work for Health Care and Safety. Using the parameters of the proposed legislation and publicly available data, the Institute for Womens Policy Research (IWPR) estimates the anticipated costs and some of the anticipated benefits of the law for employers providing new leave, as well as some of the benefits for employees. The briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Why Pressure Reducing Valves (PVR's) are costing you money  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout many manufacturing facilities, colleges, commercial sites or industrial complexes, pressure reducing valves (PRV's) provide a cheap, reliable method to produce low pressure steam from a high pressure source in order to meet a process requirement or heating load. This simple method of expanding steam in a PRV creates no work and supplies the same heat content available in the high pressure steam at a more manageable low pressure. What if you could produce the same low pressure steam while saving hundreds of thousands of dollars on your electric bill and taking only a minimal hit in the available heat content? Why let steam down and get no benefit from it, when putting it through a low pressure steam turbine coupled to a generator would produce the heat you need for process with the byproduct of onsite electrical generation. This paper analyzes the costs, concerns and benefits of replacing a pressure reducing valve with a Steam Turbine Generator set including illustrations of what the marginal fuel increase would be in order to take advantage of the added benefits of clean, cheap and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multiple target laser ablation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Inertial-confinement-fusion targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

Hendricks, C.D.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

SciTech Connect

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. As the study title suggests, the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as 'economic savings potential'. Chinese energy demand has grown dramatically over the last few decades. While heavy industry still plays a dominant role in greenhouse gas emissions, demand from residential and commercial buildings has also seen rapid growth in percentage terms. In the residential sector this growth is driven by internal migration from the countryside to cities. Meanwhile, income in both urban and rural subsectors allows ownership of major appliances. While residences are still relatively small by U.S. or European standards, nearly all households own a refrigerator, a television and an air conditioner. In the future, ownership rates are not expected to grow as much as in other developing countries, because they are already close to saturation. However, the gradual turnover of equipment in the world's largest consumer market provides a huge opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation. In addition to residences, commercial floor space has expanded rapidly in recent years, and construction continues at a rapid pace. Growth in this sector means that commercial lighting and HVAC will play an increasingly important role in energy demand in China. The outlook for efficiency improvement in China is encouraging, since the Chinese national and local governments have implemented significant policies to contain energy intensity and announced their intention to continue and accelerate these. In particular, the Chinese appliance standards program, first established in 1989, was significantly strengthened and modernized after the passage of the Energy Conservation Law of 1997. Since then, the program has expanded to encompass over 30 equipment types (including motor vehicles). The current study suggests that, in spite of these efforts, there is significant savings to be captured through wide adoption of technologies already available on the Chinese market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. 'Short-term' market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while 'long-term' energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. Early in 2011, the Chinese government announced a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions intensity (per unit GDP) by 16% by 2015 as part of the 12th five year plan. These targets are consistent with longer term goals to reduce emissions intensity 40-45% relative to 2005 levels by 2020. The efforts of the 12th FYP focus on short-term gains to meet the four-year targets, and concentrate mainly in industry. Implementation of cost-effective technologies for all new equipment in the buildings sector thus is largely complementary to the 12th FYP goals, and would provide a mechanism to sustain intensity reductions in the medium and long term. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products, in the sense that delay of implementation postpones economic benefits and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponin

McNeil, Michael A.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; Qin, Yining; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Fridley, David; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

339

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing air infiltration in industrial furnaces; tips include repairing leaks and increasing insulation.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Title Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-45618 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Xiaomin Liu, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-45618 Date Published May 4 Abstract Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential water heater energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a water heater and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers are significant. At the efficiency level examined in this paper, 35% of households with electric water heaters experience LCC savings, with an average savings of $106, while 4% show LCC losses, with an average loss of $40 compared to a pre-standard LCC average of $2,565. The remainder of the population (61%) are largely unaffected.

342

AFDC Benefits and Nonmarital Births to Young Women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on recent work by Rosenzweig (1999), this paper re-examines the effect of AFDC benefits on early non-marital childbearing. Unlike most previous work in this area, Rosenzweig finds a statistically significant and quantitatively large positive effect of AFDC benefits. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we replicate Rosenzweigs analysis and explore the reasons his findings differ from earlier research findings. We are able to reproduce his main finding that AFDC generosity influences non-marital childbearing when state and cohort fixed-effects are included. However, we find that model specification matters a great deal. An alternative specification of state fixed-effects yields no evidence of an AFDC effect, and when we focus on fertility only through age 19 (as in prior work), we also find no AFDC effect. This latter finding implies that the behavior of women in their early 20s may be far more sensitive to welfare In this paper, we replicate and extend recent research by Mark Rosenzweig (1999) on the relationship between AFDC benefits and non-marital childbearing by young women. Most previous work on the effects of AFDC benefit levels on a wide range of demographic behaviors, including non-marital childbearing, has found a relatively weak relationship. In some papers, benefits do have a statistically significant effect that is

Saul D. Hoffman; E. Michael Foster; David Neumark; Robert Moffitt; Rebecca Blank; Greg Duncan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

REACH: Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware: A Low-Cost, Retrofit Approach to Reducing Stack Emissions and Enhancing t he Performance of Oil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved oil combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been developed for retrofit to oil-fired utility boilers. This technology is referred to as Reduced Emissions and Advanced Combustion Hardware, or REACH. REACH is commercially available for retrofit to oil-fired boilers to simultaneously reduce NOx, PM, and opacity, as well as provide operational and performance benefits.

1995-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Video Camera Use at Nuclear Power Plants: Tools for Increasing Productivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure: Tools for Increasing Pr oductivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have increased the use of industrial video cameras as support tools for a variety of plant operations and outage tasks. This survey on utility use of video cameras, the equipment being used, and the benefits derived found that the video camera is an important tool for reducing radiation exposure and improving productivity through more efficient use of personnel.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grids potential contribution to the nations goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grids potential contribution to the nations goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion  

SciTech Connect

In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, ``liner-on-plasma`` compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated MAGO plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented.

Sheehey, P.T.; Guzik, J.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

349

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41 Country Poland Eastern Europe References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41763.pdf This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Polish energy markets have recently been restructured, opening the door to new players with access to new products and instruments. In response to this changed environment, the Government of Poland and the Polish Power Grid Company were interested in analyzing the competitiveness of

350

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

351

New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits April 9, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Some might think that only single-family homes are being weatherized across America, but eligible renters in Newark, N.J., are taking advantage of the increases in savings, safety and comfort that come with weatherization. Sunny Uberio is the owner of Realty Management Systems LLC in Newark, N.J., where he had his three apartment buildings evaluated for their energy efficiency and found that the older heating and cooling systems and other measures were insufficient when it came to saving energy. La Casa de Don Pedro, a local community action agency, was able to help Sunny by weatherizing the buildings.

352

DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes. The successful test, which was managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), could help power plants economically meet criteria for water reuse or discharge established by the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System and the Clean Water Act.

353

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Forum Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/JA08145.PDF UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

354

New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits New Jersey Landlord, Tenants See Benefits of Retrofits April 9, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Some might think that only single-family homes are being weatherized across America, but eligible renters in Newark, N.J., are taking advantage of the increases in savings, safety and comfort that come with weatherization. Sunny Uberio is the owner of Realty Management Systems LLC in Newark, N.J., where he had his three apartment buildings evaluated for their energy efficiency and found that the older heating and cooling systems and other measures were insufficient when it came to saving energy. La Casa de Don Pedro, a local community action agency, was able to help Sunny by weatherizing the buildings. "Through their program, I was able to get new boilers installed, new

355

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

356

Property:AdditionalBenefitPlaces | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AdditionalBenefitPlaces AdditionalBenefitPlaces Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "AdditionalBenefitPlaces" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + Maryland +, District of Columbia + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + Idaho + B Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project + North Dakota +, Minnesota + C Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Smart Grid Project + New Jersey + D Duke Energy Business Services LLC Smart Grid Project + Indiana +, Ohio + E El Paso Electric Smart Grid Project + New Mexico + Electric Power Board of Chattanooga Smart Grid Project + Georgia + F FirstEnergy Service Company Smart Grid Project + Pennsylvania + I ISO New England, Incorporated Smart Grid Project + Connecticut +, Maine +, New Hampshire +, ...

357

Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy February 11, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis The Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. The Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What does this project do? The 154-foot wind turbine produces between 109,00 and 152,000 kWh of energy annually -- more than enough energy to power the Port Administration

358

Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Benefits of President Bush's Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City March 10, 2006 - 11:46am Addthis KANSAS CITY, MO - Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today highlighted America's robust economy and the role the energy sector plays to ensure its continued growth, while speaking to the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. During his remarks, Secretary Bodman discussed the American Competitiveness and Advanced Energy Initiatives, announced by President Bush in the State of the Union address. These initiatives promote America's continued economic vitality through the development and use of alternative energy sources and aim to provide our next generation of

359

Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy Milwaukee Reaps Benefits of Wind Energy February 11, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis The Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. The Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What does this project do? The 154-foot wind turbine produces between 109,00 and 152,000 kWh of energy annually -- more than enough energy to power the Port Administration

360

Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microsoft Word - Understanding Smart Grid Benefits_final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Benefits of Understanding the Benefits of the Smart Grid June 18, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1413 NETL Smart Grid Implementation Strategy Understanding the Benefits of the Smart Grid v1.0 Page i DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

362

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of KeyElectrical Products: The Case of India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These products--refrigerators, room air conditioners, electric motors, and distribution transformers--are important targets for efficiency improvement in India and in other developing countries. India is an interesting subject of study because of it's size and rapid economic growth. Implementation of efficient technologies in India would save billions in energy costs, and avoid hundreds of megatons of greenhouse gas emissions. India also serves as an example of the kinds of improvement opportunities that could be pursued in other developing countries.

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert,Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Definition: Reduced Ancillary Service Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary Service Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Ancillary Service Cost Ancillary services are necessary to ensure the reliable and efficient operation of the grid. The level of ancillary services required at any point in time is determined by the grid operator and/or energy market rules. Ancillary services, including spinning reserve and frequency regulation, could be reduced if generators could more closely follow load; peak load on the system was reduced; power factor, voltage, and VAR control were improved; or information available to grid operators were improved.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms ancillary service, frequency regulation, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in

364

Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

365

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification in East Africa Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid-Tropics (ICRISAT), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

366

Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a review of the multifunctional platform project in Mali Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services: a review of the multifunctional platform project in Mali Agency/Company /Organization: Abeeku Brew-Hammond & Anna Crole-Rees Partner: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.beta.undp.org/undp/en/home/librarypage/environment-energy/sustaina

367

Assessment of National Benefits from Retrofitting Existing Single-Family Homes with Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential national benefits of retrofitting U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GSHP systems at various penetration rates. The benefits considered include energy savings, reduced summer electrical peak demand, consumer utility bill savings, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The assessment relies heavily on energy consumption and other data obtained from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy s Energy Information Administration. It also considers relative differences in energy consumption between a state-of-the-art GSHP system and existing residential space-heating, space-cooling, and water-heating (SH SC WH) systems, which were determined with a well-established energy analysis program for residential SH SC WH systems. The impacts of various climate and geological conditions, as well as the efficiency and market share of existing residential SH SC WH systems, have been taken into account in the assessment.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

OMEGA polar-drive target designs  

SciTech Connect

Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium-tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities ({approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser-plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR {approx} 22 or at lower intensity ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR {approx} 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

EIA's Prediction of the Benefits of R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forecasting the Benefits of DOE Programs Forecasting the Benefits of DOE Programs for Advanced Fossil-Fuel Electricity Generating Technologies: The EIA High Fossil Electricity Technology Case USDOE Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems and Policy Support October 2002 DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory i Frank Shaffer USDOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems and Policy Support Franklin.Shaffer@netl.doe.gov 412-386-5964 Melissa Chan USDOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems and Policy Support Melissa.Chan@netl.doe.gov 412-386-4944 Authors and Contacts ii DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Executive Summary...........................................................................................................

370

Die-target for dynamic powder consolidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A die/target is disclosed for consolidation of a powder, especially an atomized rapidly solidified metal powder, to produce monoliths by the dynamic action of a shock wave, especially a shock wave produced by the detonation of an explosive charge. The die/target comprises a rectangular metal block having a square primary surface with four rectangular mold cavities formed therein to receive the powder. The cavities are located away from the geometrical center of the primary surface and are distributed around such center while also being located away from the geometrical diagonals of the primary surface to reduce the action of reflected waves so as to avoid tensile cracking of the monoliths. The primary surface is covered by a powder retention plate which is engaged by a flyer plate to transmit the shock wave to the primary surface and the powder. Spawl plates are adhesively mounted on other surfaces of the block to act as momentum traps so as to reduce reflected waves in the block. 4 figs.

Flinn, J.E.; Korth, G.E.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Exploiting Data Similarity to Reduce Memory Footprints  

SciTech Connect

Memory size has long limited large-scale applications on high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Since compute nodes frequently do not have swap space, physical memory often limits problem sizes. Increasing core counts per chip and power density constraints, which limit the number of DIMMs per node, have exacerbated this problem. Further, DRAM constitutes a significant portion of overall HPC system cost. Therefore, instead of adding more DRAM to the nodes, mechanisms to manage memory usage more efficiently - preferably transparently - could increase effective DRAM capacity and thus the benefit of multicore nodes for HPC systems. MPI application processes often exhibit significant data similarity. These data regions occupy multiple physical locations across the individual rank processes within a multicore node and thus offer a potential savings in memory capacity. These regions, primarily residing in heap, are dynamic, which makes them difficult to manage statically. Our novel memory allocation library, SBLLmalloc, automatically identifies identical memory blocks and merges them into a single copy. SBLLmalloc does not require application or OS changes since we implement it as a user-level library. Overall, we demonstrate that SBLLmalloc reduces the memory footprint of a range of MPI applications by 32.03% on average and up to 60.87%. Further, SBLLmalloc supports problem sizes for IRS over 21.36% larger than using standard memory management techniques, thus significantly increasing effective system size. Similarly, SBLLmalloc requires 43.75% fewer nodes than standard memory management techniques to solve an AMG problem.

Biswas, S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; Franklin, D; Sherwood, T; Chong, F T

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Benefits of FES | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits of FES Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Fusion Education Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences...

373

Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benefits from the proposed transmission project c. Modifyingover time from the new transmission uses e. Assessing otherthe Strategic Benefits of Transmission Vikram Budhraja, Fred

Budhraja, Vikram

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applications v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applicationsspreadsheet provides estimates for the financial benefits of key Advanced Distribution Automation ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to generate the energy supply mix that would meet given energy demands at lowest cost, assuming strongRegionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets ­ cost effective fuel in the energy system it is less costly to reduce CO2-emissions #12;Global energy system model #12;Global energy

376

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule May 12, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by approximately 90 percent by 2015. Footprint reduction lowers costs associated with site surveillance and maintenance and helps protect the

377

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by

378

A Penalized 4-D Var data assimilation method for reducing forecast M. J. Hossen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Penalized 4-D Var data assimilation method for reducing forecast error M. J. Hossen Department and observations improves the forecast. The targeted observations determined by using a targeting method, for instance adjoint sensitivity, observation sensitivity or singular vector may further improve the forecast

Navon, Michael

379

Public Benefit Charge Funded Performance Contracting Programs - Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Benefit Charge Funded Performance Contracting Programs - Survey Public Benefit Charge Funded Performance Contracting Programs - Survey and Guidelines Title Public Benefit Charge Funded Performance Contracting Programs - Survey and Guidelines Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2000 Authors Schiller, Steven R., Charles A. Goldman, and Brian Henderson Pagination 20 Date Published 08/2000 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper discusses the evolution of performance contracting programs that are included in energy efficiency activities supported by Public Benefit Charge (PBC) funds. Between 1998 and 2002, on the order of $400 million of ratepayer funds are or expected to be committed for these programs in California, Colorado, New York, Texas, and Wisconsin. We summarize several programs that encourage performance-based contracting either through standard performance contracting (e.g., California, New York and Texas), demandside bidding (Colorado) or contractor support programs (Wisconsin). The programs are selected in part to illustrate differing program objectives as well as the relationship between goals and program design. Our major findings and recommendations are:

380

Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to operate fans cost 0.10 per kWh, the daily energy costdata, and energy costs of 0.04 per kWh for heat and 0.1 0.05 and 0.15 per kWh, the benefit-cost ratios are 80 and

Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk ·This event will be held in recognition of Alex who is living already love him so much!" ­Alex Keefover Fus-ion: The process or result of joining two or more things

Mohaghegh, Shahab

382

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Ratnesh Sharma, Gonçalo Mendes, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Olivier Mégel, and Afzal S. Siddiqui Conference Name 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Chicago, IL Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

383

The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California & the Consequences of Changes to the Program-Metering In California Net Metering is a policy that allows commercial and residential electricity customers to receive and to meeting the clean energy mandates under California's Global Warming Solutions Act, AB32. Under

Kammen, Daniel M.

384

Energy and the environment cost-benefit analysis  

SciTech Connect

Papers were presented covering the following topics: energy resources and projection; nuclear fission reactors and the environment; fossil fuel and the environment, with emphasis on coal; fusion power and the environment; cost benefit scales; experience of utilities in financing nuclear power plant; and ecosystem tolerance limits of power plant effluents. Each article was abstracted and indexed separately. (PCS)

Karam, R.A.; Morgan, K.Z. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DYNASTORE - A Computer Model for Quantifying Dynamic Energy Storage Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now in development, the DYNASTORE computer model is the first production cost model designed to accurately represent changes in the utility daily load. By quantifying the dynamic benefits of energy storage, it highlights the significant cost savings linked with this technology.

1987-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Michael Stadler1,2 , Chris Marnay1 to be presented at the 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Chicago, IL, Sept 6-9 2011 http, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement

387

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 http://www.managenergy.net/conference/ren0702/gierulski.pdf #12;Biomass DHP of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n Technical assistance (,,Feasibility

388

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 #12;Biomass DHP/ CHP in Poland n Plan of the presentation n Promotion and dissemination of best practices (,,Promotion of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n

389

Utility Benefits of SMES in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology expected to have wide-spread asset value in the electric utility industry. This project updates an earlier assessment of SMES benefits in the Pacific Northwest by estimating net present values of several system-specific application scenarios with the SMES cost model developed by EPRI.

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT OF USING FORECASTS Mohamed Zied Ch^atenay-Malabry Cedex, France Abstract: In this paper, we analyze forecast based inventory control policies for a non-stationary demand. We assume that forecasts and the associated uncertainties are given

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Costs and benefits of Daphnia defense against Chaoborus in nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs and benefits of Daphnia defense against Chaoborus in nature Wiebke J. Boeing, Björn Wissel] Boeing et al. 1294 Introduction Our concept of the processes that shape food webs is typi- cally focused, Daphnia populations suffer heavy losses to predation by the invertebrate predator Chaoborus (Kajak

392

Reduced shedding regenerator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

Qiu, Songgang (Richland, WA); Augenblick, John E. (Richland, WA); Erbeznik, Raymond M. (Kennewick, WA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Countdown to Fixed Target INSIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17, 1996 17, 1996 Number 10 Countdown to Fixed Target INSIDE 2 University Close-Up: The University of Illinois 4 Tollestrup Elected to National Academy 5 Bardeen Receives Sakurai Prize 6 Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day "At this moment," Fermilab Director John Peoples told the House Subcommittee on Energy and Environment in testimony deliv- ered in Washington on May 8, "Fermilab is in the midst of the transition from collider opera- tions to fixed-target operations. In June, we will begin extracting a beam of protons from the Tevatron, the highest-energy external beam in the world. By directing this beam onto eight targets we will create eight distinct particle beams that will in turn support 10 unique experiments. Although fixed-target experi- ments cannot explore the high-energy frontier

395

Multiple agents moving target search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional single-agent search algorithms usually make simplifying assumptions (single search agent, stationary target, complete knowledge of the state, and sufficient time). There are algorithms for relaxing one or two of these constraints; in this ...

Mark Goldenberg; Alexander Kovarsky; Xiaomeng Wu; Jonathan Schaeffer

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Targeted Advertising ... And Privacy Too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Web presents a rich and powerful tool for aggregation of consumer information. A flurry of recent articles in the popular press has documented aggressive manipulation of such information by some companies for the purposes of targeted advertising. ...

Ari Juels

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Improving translation via targeted paraphrasing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted paraphrasing is a new approach to the problem of obtaining cost-effective, reasonable quality translation that makes use of simple and inexpensive human computations by monolingual speakers in combination with machine translation. The key insight ...

Philip Resnik; Olivia Buzek; Chang Hu; Yakov Kronrod; Alex Quinn; Benjamin B. Bederson

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electric Vehicles Could Benefit from 50% Improvements in Packaging...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface. These results have significant implications for reducing the overall thermal resistance in power electronics packagesmodules. Immersion boiling combined with...

400

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Microbial methods of reducing technetium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

Wildung, Raymond E. (Richland, WA); Garland, Thomas R. (Greybull, WY); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Hess, Nancy J. (Benton City, WA); Li, Shu-Mei W. (Richland, WA); Plymale, Andrew E. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Demonstration of Security Benefits of Renewable Generation at FE Warren Air Force Base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report detailing field demonstration of security benefits of renewable generation at FE Warren Air Force Base.

Warwick, William M.; Myers, Kurt; Seifert, Gary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Instrument for Measuring the Business Benefits of E-Commerce Retailing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument that assesses the benefits of electronic commerce would be very useful to researchers and managers. The benefits of such an instrument for e-commerce businesses were identified by a literature review, and the extent to which the benefits ... Keywords: E-Commerce Benefits, Instrument Development

Youlong Zhuang; Albert L. Lederer

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits Innovations and Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits, Innovations, and Options Bethany Speer Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51644 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Residential Solar Photovoltaics: Comparison of Financing Benefits, Innovations, and Options Bethany Speer Prepared under Task Nos. SM10.2442, SM12.3010 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51644 October 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

406

Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies for the Federal Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies for the Federal Sector Steve Bossart Senior Energy Analyst U.S. DOE NETL IATF Technology Deployment Working Group March 15, 2012 Topics * Background of Federal Smart Grid Task Force * Microgrids and Smart Grid * Task Review of Federal authorizations, financial tools, and building codes relative to their impact on using smart grid to assist in meeting Federal facility energy goals * Case studies from Federal agencies ‹#› Federal Smart Grid Task Force ‹#› Federal Smart Grid Task Force Created Under EISA Title XIII, Section 1303 To ensure awareness, coordination, and integration of the diverse smart grid activities in the Federal Government Functions �Serves as Federal focal point on all things "smart grid"

407

Microsoft Word - Benefits Guidance 3-5-10Murray  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty In Support of Contingency Operations (Updated 3-10) Benefit Options What Action HR Needs To Take Additional Guidance or Policy Employee on Military Furlough Employee Using Intermittent Leave Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Employee may retain coverage for up to 24 months; DOE pays for employee's share of the FEHB premium. Employee needs to notify HR of continued coverage or cancellation. If continued coverage, HR sends a memo to DFAS imaging to stop FEHB deductions giving effective date and stating the employee is on active duty in support of contingency operations. No CHRIS action required. HR will process a termination if employee reaches 24 months while on miltary furlogh (Absent-Uniformed Service;

408

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO WEATHER OUTAGES Executive Office of the President August 2013 2 This report was prepared by the President's Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, with assistance from the White House Office of Science and Technology 3 Executive Summary Severe weather is the leading cause of power outages in the United States. Between 2003 and 2012, an estimated 679 widespread power outages occurred due to severe weather. Power outages close schools, shut down businesses and impede emergency services, costing the economy billions of dollars and disrupting the lives of millions of Americans. The resilience of

409

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage in the United States. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions over the life of buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP or the Program), supports the improvement of energy efficiency in buildings. BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the

410

110101BenefitsNuclearFission.ppt [Read-Only]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Nuclear Fission to Benefits of Nuclear Fission to the Civilian Space Program Gary Langford Fission Project Manager NASA MSFC NERAC Nov. 6, 2001 2 * Outer solar system exploration. * Planetary or lunar surface missions (robotic or human). * High-performance propulsion for human missions. * Advanced applications. Uses of Nuclear Fission in the Civilian Space Program Highly advanced propulsion, extremely high power surface applications. 3 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Phase 1 * 10-500 kW NEP * 10-500 kW spacecraft & surface powerplants Phase 3 * 10-1000 MW, 0.1-1 kg/kW NEP * >2000 s Isp gas/plasma-based NTR Phase 2 * 1-100 MW, 1-10 kg/kW NEP * 900-1000 s Isp solid- core NTR * Multi-MW space & surface powerplants Kuiper Belt Exploration Triton Lander Europa Ocean Science Station Pluto Orbiter Large Asteroids Io Volcanic Observer

411

Stony Brook On-campus Benefits for BNL Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stony Brook On-campus Benefits for BNL Employees Stony Brook On-campus Benefits for BNL Employees Stony Brook Charles B. Wang Center The Charles B. Wang Center at SUNY Stony Brook offers BNL badge holders a 20% discount off special event tickets at the Wang Center. Email: wangcenter@stonybrook.edu to reserve your tickets. On the day of performance, show your badge, pay for your discounted tickets & enjoy. NOTE: Payment is CASH only. Not available with on-line ticket purchases. Staller Center for the Arts Staller Center for the Arts offers a wide variety of world class performances from September through May and presents the Stony Brook Film Festival every July. Over 50 professional performances, as well as approximately 450 events generated by the departments of Art, Theater Arts , and Music, are part of the Staller Center season and are supplemented by those outside presenters such as the Long Island Philharmonic and the Seiskaya Ballet, which presents The Nutcracker.

412

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8254 8254 Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Stephen Meyers, Virginie Letschert, James E. McMahon Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA December 2005 This work was supported by the International Copper Association through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 2 ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These

413

NETL: News Release - DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources Flue gas desulfurization water was treated in a constructed wetlands system consisting of five reactors planted with vegetation found in natural wetlands. The water to be treated was received from an operating coal-fired power plant in the south-eastern United States. Flue gas desulfurization water was treated in a constructed wetlands system consisting of five "reactors" planted with vegetation found in natural wetlands. The water to be treated was received from an operating coal-fired power plant in the south-eastern United States. Washington, DC - In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers

414

Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies for the Federal Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies Benefits of Smart Grid Technologies for the Federal Sector Steve Bossart Senior Energy Analyst U.S. DOE NETL IATF Technology Deployment Working Group March 15, 2012 Topics * Background of Federal Smart Grid Task Force * Microgrids and Smart Grid * Task Review of Federal authorizations, financial tools, and building codes relative to their impact on using smart grid to assist in meeting Federal facility energy goals * Case studies from Federal agencies ‹#› Federal Smart Grid Task Force ‹#› Federal Smart Grid Task Force Created Under EISA Title XIII, Section 1303 To ensure awareness, coordination, and integration of the diverse smart grid activities in the Federal Government Functions �Serves as Federal focal point on all things "smart grid"

415

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

416

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) recently deployed a new version of the Transportation Tracking and Communication System (TRANSCOM) that is compatible with mobile devices, including smartphones. The recent enhancement, TRANSCOM version 3.0, improves the user interface

417

Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment  

SciTech Connect

For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major difference was that LBNL started working with the AEO 2004NEMS code and EIA was using AEO 2005 NEMS code. Unlike the High Price Scenario the Carbon Cap scenario gives a radically different forecast than the Reference Scenario. NEMS-LBNL proved that it can handle these alternative scenarios. However, results are price inelastic (for both oil and natural gas prices) within the price range evaluated. Perhaps even higher price paths would lead to a distinctly different forecast than the Reference Scenario. On the other hand, the Carbon Cap Scenario behaves more like an alternative future. The future in the Carbon Cap Scenario has higher electricity prices, reduced driving, more renewable capacity, and reduced energy consumption. The next step for this work is to evaluate the EE benefits under each of the three scenarios. Comparing those three sets of predicted benefits will indicate how much uncertainty is inherent within this sort of deterministic forecasting.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

HEALTH FEE/STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFIT SUMMARY University policy requires all students registered for six or more credit hours (three hours for each  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fee. The health fee supports all services at Redfern Health Center and includes: Professional services of primary health care providers, psychologists, and health educators; Reduced costs on over the counter pharmaceuticals, laboratory, and X-ray services; $500 urgent care EXCESS benefit for after

Stuart, Steven J.

419

Benefits of the IEA Wind Co-operation Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy is changing the generation mix 1. Wind energy development brings national benefits 2. IEA Wind activities support national programs by sharing information and joint research resultsWind energy is part of the global economy 1. Worldwide, new wind energy installations in 2010 represented an investment of 47.3 billion (65 billion USD) 2. More than 500,000 people are currently employed in the wind industry Source: GWEC1995

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cost Benefit Evaluation of HP Turbine Admission Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scheme used to position the control valves that admit steam to high-pressure turbines has a direct effect on the turbines performance. This report describes the two most common admission schemes, partial and full arc, and discusses their effects on heat rate, reliability, and cost versus benefit under different loading conditions and modes of operation.BackgroundHistorically, most steam turbines in coal-fired power plants operated in a ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

422

Reducing waste generation and radiation exposure by analytical method modification  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of an analytical support laboratory has traditionally been to provide accurate data in a timely and cost effective fashion. Added to this goal is now the need to provide the same high quality data while generating as little waste as possible. At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have modified and reengineered several methods to decrease generated waste and hence reduce radiation exposure. These method changes involved improving detection limits (which decreased the amount of sample required for analysis), decreasing reaction and analysis time, decreasing the size of experimental set-ups, recycling spent solvent and reagents, and replacing some methods. These changes had the additional benefits of reducing employee radiation exposure and exposure to hazardous chemicals. In all cases, the precision, accuracy, and detection limits were equal to or better than the replaced method. Most of the changes required little or no expenditure of funds. This paper describes these changes and discusses some of their applications.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

High temperature superconductivity: The products and their benefits  

SciTech Connect

Numerous qualitative studies have discussed, in detail, the benefits projected from the commercialization of HTS systems; however, few are available with quantitative predictions of market penetration and resultant benefits. This report attempts to quantify those benefits, as a function of time, by examining five key classes of candidate HTS electrical equipment, and projecting market entry and capture based on historical market entry o technologies considered analogous to HTS. Any such projection is a judgment, based on experience and available data, and the analyses in this report fall into that category. The five classes of equipment examined are electric motors, transformers, generators, underground cable, and fault current limiters. In each of these classes, major international programs are now underway to develop and commercialize HTS equipment in a time frame from the present to the year 2020. Based on technology status and perceived market advantages as determined from the references, market entry dates were projected followed by market penetration predictions. The earliest equipment to achieve commercialization is predicted to be fault current limiters, predicted for market entry in the 2003--2004 time period. Transformers and cable are projected for entry in 2005 followed by electric motors in 2006. The final market entry will be by generators, predicted for commercialization in 2011.

Lawrence, L.R. Jr.; Cox, C.; Broman, D. [Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Methodological Approach for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions...

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Rheological measurements in reduced gravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rheology of fluidized beds and settling suspensions were studied experimentally in a series of reduced gravity parabolic flights aboard NASAs KC?135 aircraft. Silica sands of two different size distributions were fluidized by air. The slurries were made using silica sand and Glycerol solution. The experimental set up incorporated instrumentation to measure the air flow rate

Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov; Ruel A. Overfelt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

Johns, I.B.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Reduces a processor's energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Clearly, this is energy inefficient and wasteful of energy. 2 More precisely, the faster that a processor decide that energy is being wasted and will decrease the frequency/voltage level. Translation: LowerReduces a processor's energy consumption by up to 70% Diminishes greenhouse gas emissions Improves

428

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6259E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte Journal Indoor Air Keywords carbon dioxide, Illness absence, indoor environmental quality, schools, ventilation Abstract Limited evidence associates inadequate classroom ventilation rates (VRs) with increased illness absence (IA). We investigated relationships between VRs and IA in Californiaelementary schools over two school years in 162 3rd-5th grade classrooms in 28 schools in three school districts: South Coast (SC), Bay Area (BA), and Central Valley (CV). We estimated relationships between daily IA and VR (estimated from real-time carbon dioxide) in zero-inflated negative binomial models. We also compared IA benefits and energy costs of increased VRs. All school districts had median VRs below the 7.1 L/sec-person California standard. For each additional 1 L/sec-person of VR, IA was reduced significantly (p<0.05) in models for combined districts (-1.6%) and for SC (-1.2%), and non-significantly for districts providing less data: BA (-1.5%) and CV (-1.0%). Assuming associations were causal and generalizable, increasing classroom VRs from the California average (4 L/sec-person) to the State standard would decrease IA by 3.4%, increase attendance-linked funding to schools by $33 million annually, and increase costs only $4 million. Further increasing VRs would provide additional benefits. These findings, while requiring confirmation, suggest that increasing classroom VRs above the State

429

Yale University committed to reducing its primary greenhouse gas emissions 43% below 2005 levels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale University committed to reducing its primary greenhouse gas emissions 43% below 2005 levels. Beginning in 2013, emissions from the University fleet are included in the reduction target. Greenhouse Gas. 2005 2013 In 2005,Yale University pledged to reduce its primary greenhouse gas emissions forty

430

Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion  

SciTech Connect

Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

431

Materials considerations in accelerator targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Materials Technology Section

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Office level Program Planning Process development Page 1 of 2 Environmental Management Corporate HQ DOE - Complex Wide Maximizing the Benefit from the D&D Technology Development Program Challenge The Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D)/Facility Engineering (FE) is charged with reducing the technical risk and uncertainty of D&D activities across the Environmental Management (EM) Complex through the identification, development and demonstration of alternative technologies as well as through the provision of technical assistance activities such as Lessons Learned Workshops and External Technical Review Teams. There is a need to ensure an optimum balance between these different types of projects as well as to ensure that the projects funded are focused on the

433

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

434

Method for producing laser targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25.mu. to 75.mu. diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection.

Jarboe, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Baker, William R. (Orinda, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tracking highly maneuverable targets with unknown behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for maneuvering target tracking, IEEE Trans. Aerosp.converted measurements for tracking, IEEE Trans. Aerosp.particle filters for tracking a maneuvering target, in

Schell, C; Linder, S P; Zeidler, J R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EPA's Target Finder calculator | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sample in the nation, plus have it normalized for size, operating characteristics, and weather. Target Finder Access ENERGY STAR Target Finder When to use Portfolio Manager instead...

437

Energy Efficiency Targets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Targets Energy Efficiency Targets Eligibility Utility Program Information Maine Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard In June 2009, Maine enacted the ''Act Regarding...

438

Multi-target tracking - linking identities using Bayesian network inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-target tracking requires locating the targets and labeling their identities. The latter is a challenge when many targets, with indistinct appearances, frequently occlude one another, as in football and surveillance tracking. We present an approach to solving this labeling problem. When isolated, a target can be tracked and its identity maintained. While, if targets interact this is not always the case. This paper assumes a track graph exists, denoting when targets are isolated and describing how they interact. Measures of similarity between isolated tracks are defined. The goal is to associate the identities of the isolated tracks, by exploiting the graph constraints and similarity measures. We formulate this as a Bayesian network inference problem, allowing us to use standard message propagation to find the most probable set of paths in an efficient way. The high complexity inevitable in large problems is gracefully reduced by removing dependency links between tracks. We apply the method to a 10 min sequence of an international football game and compare results to ground truth. 1.

Peter Nillius; Josephine Sullivan; Stefan Carlsson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Additional appliance standards could significantly reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... their aggregated consumption is significant, making them a target for efficiency standards. In the Reference scenario, ...

440

Foam shell cryogenic ICF target  

SciTech Connect

A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

Darling, Dale H. (Pleasanton, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA); Corey, Garth P. (KTech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Potential benefits of geothermal electrical production from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential national benefits of geothermal electric energy development from the hydrothermal resources in the West are estimated for several different scenarios. The U.S. electrical economy is simulated by computer using a linear programming optimization technique. Under most of the scenarios, benefits are estimated at $2 to $4 billion over the next 50 years on a discounted present value basis. The electricity production from hydrothermal plants reaches 2 to 4 percent of the national total, which will represent 10 to 20 percent of the installed capacity in the West. Installed geothermal capacity in 1990 is estimated to be 9,000 to 17,000 Mw(e). The geothermal capacity should reach 28,000 to 65,000 Mw(e) by year 2015. The ''most likely'' scenario yields the lower values in the above ranges. Under this scenario geothermal development would save the utility industry $11 billion in capital costs (undiscounted); 32 million separative work units; 64,000 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; and 700 million barrels of oil. The most favorable scenario for geothermal energy occurs when fossil fuel prices are projected to increase at 5 percent/year. The benefits of geothermal energy then exceed $8 billion on a discounted present value basis. Supply curves were developed for hydrothermal resources based on the recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment, resource characteristics, and projected power conversion technology and costs. Geothermal plants were selected by the optimizing technique to fill a need for ''light load'' plants. This infers that geothermal plants may be used in the future primarily for load-following purposes.

Bloomster, C.H.; Engel, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Economic Costs and Benefits of Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this technical update is to provide an objective quantitative analysis of the current costs and benefits of DER, and thereby identify the factors that have the greatest impact on DER's cost-effectiveness. For the purposes of this analysis, DER as defined herein, are small generation units (1kW to 50MW), typically sited on the local T&D system and operated in parallel with the utility system. Energy storage technologies are not included in this technical update but may be considered in future ...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Finding Benefits by Modeling and Optimizing Steam and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site-wide steam modeling and optimization program (Visual MESA) was implemented at the INEOS Chocolate Bayou site. This program optimizes steam production, compressor turbine extraction, pump operation (turbine/motor) operation, as well as the monitoring of the entire steam system. This is used for both day-to-day site optimization as well as long-term site planning. In this presentation, we will discuss who the main users of the program are and how they and the plant derive benefits from its use.

Jones, B.; Nelson, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Dollars from sense: The economic benefits of renewable energy  

SciTech Connect

This document illustrates direct economic benefits, including job creation, of renewable energy technologies. Examples of electricity generation from biomass, wind power, photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, and geothermal energy are given, with emphasis on the impact of individual projects on the state and local community. Employment numbers at existing facilities are provided, including total national employment for each renewable industry where available. Renewable energy technologies offer economic advantages because they are more labor-intensive than conventional generation technologies, and they use primarily indigenous resources.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Definition: Reduced Equipment Failures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

limits based on real-time equipment or environmental factors.1 Related Terms sustainability References SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You...

448

Reducing Energy Consumption on Process Ovens & Oxidation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the uncertain cost of energy, optimizing the use of air in process dryers, ovens and air pollution control systems is critical to your bottom line. The revived emphasis on air management through the entire process, from plant make-up air heating systems to pollution control system exhaust, provides many opportunities to save energy and cut operating costs. This presentation includes an overview of good air management practices used to optimize energy use in your process and plant. One of the most important benefits of the more stringent air pollution control regulations throughout the world is the focus on better use and conservation of our natural resources. Through the efforts of many of the world's finest engineers and scientists the world is now realizing the benefits of an environmentally friendly approach to manufacturing. These benefits, which include more efficient process operation, less waste generation and reduced emissions, have produced the unforeseen benefit of reduced production costs and higher quality products. Process dryers and ovens are used in the manufacture of a wide variety of products produced by the companies represented at the Industrial Energy Technology Conference. This equipment is installed and operating in facilities that produce printed materials, packaging materials, adhesive tapes, pharmaceutical diagnostic materials, coated papers & films, foil laminations, electronic media, and photographic & x-ray films. They are also used extensively in the food industry. The products manufactured include baked goods, cereals, pet food, tobacco, and many other products. Ovens are used to bake and cure surface coated materials. Such as building siding, window frames, window blinds, automotive parts, wood products, and miscellaneous metal parts. More stringent environmental regulations are also impacting the design and operation of coating and food processes. Today air pollution control devices are used on many of the above applications to control the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and odors. As emission limits have decreased, the use of permanent total enclosures PTE's are becoming a standard part of the process line design. These enclosures are used to obtain 100% capture of the solvents used in the process. In addition, concerns over solvent concentrations in ovens along with concerns over exposure limits to employees have combined to drive process exhaust flows ever higher. Increasing process exhaust flows has been the common approach to addressing process and environmental issues. This increase in exhaust flows has resulted in significant increases in energy use and operating costs.

Worachek, C.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

FY 2012 Highlighted Sustainable Targets and Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) GoalsFY 2012 Highlighted Sustainable Targets and Initiatives

450

Efficient search algorithms for RNAi target detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RNA interference (RNAi) is a posttranscriptional gene silencing mechanism used to study gene functions, inhibit viral activities, and treat diseases therapeutically. However, RNAi has off-target effects--non-target genes can be unintentionally silenced. ... Keywords: Off-target, RNAi target detection, Reverse string search, String inexact matching, String kernels, siRNA seed region

Shibin Qiu; Terran Lane; Cundong Yang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

452

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

453

Benefits of fish passage and protection measures at hydroelectric projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program is engaged in a multi-year study of the costs and benefits of environmental mitigation measures at nonfederal hydroelectric power plants. An initial report (Volume 1) reviewed and surveyed the status of mitigation methods for fish passage, instream flows, and water quality; this paper focuses on the fish passage/protection aspects of the study. Fish ladders were found to be the most common means of passing fish upstream; elevators/lifts were less common, but their use appears to be increasing. A variety of mitigative measures is employed to prevent fish from being drawn into turbine intakes, including spill flows, narrow-mesh intake screens, angled bar racks, and lightor sound-based guidance measures. Performance monitoring and detailed, quantifiable performance criteria were frequently lacking at non-federal hydroelectric projects. Volume 2 considers the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection measures, as illustrated by case studies for which performance monitoring has been conducted. The report estimates the effectiveness of particular measures, the consequent impacts on the fish populations that are being maintained or restored, and the resulting use and non-use values of the maintained or restored fish populations.

Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

What Scientific Applications can Benefit from Hardware Transactional Memory?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving efficient and correct synchronization of multiple threads is a difficult and error-prone task at small scale and, as we march towards extreme scale computing, will be even more challenging when the resulting application is supposed to utilize millions of cores efficiently. Transactional Memory (TM) is a promising technique to ease the burden on the programmer, but only recently has become available on commercial hardware in the new Blue Gene/Q system and hence the real benefit for realistic applications has not been studied, yet. This paper presents the first performance results of TM embedded into OpenMP on a prototype system of BG/Q and characterizes code properties that will likely lead to benefits when augmented with TM primitives. We first, study the influence of thread count, environment variables and memory layout on TM performance and identify code properties that will yield performance gains with TM. Second, we evaluate the combination of OpenMP with multiple synchronization primitives on top of MPI to determine suitable task to thread ratios per node. Finally, we condense our findings into a set of best practices. These are applied to a Monte Carlo Benchmark and a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. In both cases an optimized TM version, executed with 64 threads on one node, outperforms a simple TM implementation. MCB with optimized TM yields a speedup of 27.45 over baseline.

Schindewolf, M; Bihari, B; Gyllenhaal, J; Schulz, M; Wang, A; Karl, W

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

457

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Target preparations and thickness measurements  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of isotope target preparative methods have been used, including rolling of metals, vapor deposition, electrodeposition, chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering, to obtain thin and thick films of most elements or compounds of elements in the Periodic Table. Most thin films prepared for use in self-supported form as well as those deposited on substrates require thickness measurement (atom count and distribution) and/or thickness uniformity determination before being used in nuclear research. Preparative methods are described together with thickness and uniformity determination procedures applicable to samples being prepared (in situ) and to completed samples. Only nondestructive methods are considered applicable to target samples prepared by the ORNL Solid State Division, Isotope Research Materials Laboratory. Thickness or areal density measurements of sufficient sophistication to yield errors of less than +-1 percent have been achieved with regularity. A statistical analysis procedure is applied which avoids error caused by balance zero-point drift in direct weight measurement methods. (auth)

Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z