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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A spatial autocorrelative model for targeting stream restoration to benefit sensitive nongame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spatial autocorrelative model for targeting stream restoration to benefit sensitive nongame autoregressive habitat models to simulate the effect of water- shed-scale stream restoration on the distributions.2%­2.8% of Wisconsin streams. Streams with high restoration potential for one or more species generally have high

Vander Zanden, Jake

2

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel Use and Emissions from On policy harmonized Tax credits Anti-idling Low Carbon Fuel Standard #12;Lifecycle Emissions Modeled in TOP-HDV 5 Fuel production, refining, and distribution Material acquisition, processing, and vehicle assembly

California at Davis, University of

3

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

4

Examination of the benefits of the reduced planting alternatives of the 1985 farm bill for crop producers in the Blacklands land resource area of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXAMINATION OF THE BENEFITS OF THE REDUCED PLANTING ALTERNATIVES OF THE 1985 FARM BILL FOR CROP PRODUCERS IN THE BLACKLANDS LAND RESOURCE AREA OF TEXAS A Thesis by TROY MEAL THOMPSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Atk.... Padber (Head of Departm t) December 1989 kB STRICT Examination of the Benefits of the Reduced Planting Alternatives of the 1985 Farm Bill for Crop Producers in the Blackiands Land Resource Area of Texas. (December 1989) Troy Neal Thompson, B. S...

Thompson, Troy Neal

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nonspecific transcription factor binding reduces variability in transcription factor and target protein expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

Mohammad Soltani; Pavol Bokes; Zachary Fox; Abhyudai Singh

2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turns into a Flood: Standby Power Loss in China, Sinosphere,of Reducing Standby Power Loss in DVD/VCD Players ands awareness of standby power loss. Reducing standby power

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reduced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 RevisionDivisionReduced intermittency in

8

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

USE OF DRUG ELUTING STENTS AS A FUNCTION OF PREDICTED BENEFIT: CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF CURRENT PRACTICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Benefits of drug-eluting stents (DES) in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are greatest in those at the highest risk of target vessel revascularization (TVR). While DES reduce restenosis, they cost more than bare metal stents (BMS...

Amin, Amit P.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially reduce the energy used in buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 KTA@Bath Challenge The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially research and lead the education of highly skilled low carbon designers. These Centres will have strong

Burton, Geoffrey R.

12

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Retiree Benefits  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearchRetiree Benefits

14

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

15

State-Level Benefits of Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency. Standard residential and industrial programs typically identify between 20 to 30% energy savings in homes and plants, respectively. Over a 20 year period of time, an average state that aggressively pursues even a limited array of energy efficiency programs can potentially reduce total state energy use by as much as 20%. Benefit-cost ratios of effective energy efficiency programs typically exceed 3 to 1 and are much higher when non-energy and macroeconomic benefits are included. Indeed, energy efficiency and associated programs and investments can create significant numbers of new jobs and enhance state tax revenues. Several states have incorporated energy efficiency into their economic development programs. It should also be noted that increasing amounts of venture capital are being invested in the energy sector in general and in specific technologies like solar power in particular. Well-designed energy efficiency programs can be expected to help overcome numerous barriers to the market penetration of energy efficient technologies and accelerate the market penetration of the technologies.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancillary benefit modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . Palmer, A. Paul, M. Toma, C. Bloyd. "Ancillary Benefits of Reduced Air Pollution in the US from Moderate... . "Ancillary Benefits of Reduced Air Pollution in the...

17

Trapped Between Two Tails: Trading Off Scientific Uncertainties via Climate Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change policies must trade off uncertainties about future warming, about the social and ecological impacts of warming, and about the cost of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We show that laxer carbon targets produce broader distributions for climate damages, skewed towards severe outcomes. However, if potential low-carbon technologies fill overlapping niches, then more stringent carbon targets produce broader distributions for the cost of reducing emissions, skewed towards high-cost outcomes. We use the technology- rich GCAM integrated assessment model to assess the robustness of 450 ppm and 500 ppm carbon targets to each uncertain factor. The 500 ppm target provides net benefits across a broad range of futures. The 450 ppm target provides net benefits only when impacts are greater than conventionally assumed, when multiple technological breakthroughs lower the cost of abatement, or when evaluated with a low discount rate. Policy evaluations are more sensitive to uncertainty about abatement technology and impacts than to uncertainty about warming.

Lemoine, Derek M.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Plating under reduced pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plating under reduced pressure was evaluated for both electroless nickel and electrodeposited copper systems. The objective was to reduce pitting of these coatings thereby further enhancing their usage for diamond turning applications. Cursory experiments with electroless nickel showed reduced porosity when deposition was done at around 500 torr. Detailed experiments with electrodeposited copper at around 100 torr provided similar results. Scanning tunneling microscopy was effectively used to show the improvement in the copper deposits plated under reduced pressure. Benefits included reduced surface roughness and finer and denser grain structure.

Dini, J.W.; Beat, T.G.; Cowden, W.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Ryan, L.E.; Hewitt, W.B. (TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Universal System Benefits Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana established the Universal System Benefits Program (USBP) in 1997 as part of its restructuring legislation. The USBP supports cost-effective energy conservation, low-income customer...

20

System Benefits Charge  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New York's system benefits charge (SBC), established in 1996 by the New York Public Service Commission (PSC), supports energy efficiency, education and outreach, research and development, and low...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Renewable Portfolio Standards: Costs and Benefits (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes state-level RPS costs to date, and considers how those costs may evolve going forward given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states and discusses key methodological considerations.

Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Weaver, S.; Flores, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Societal Benefits Charge  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Jersey's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation created a "societal benefits charge" (SBC) to support investments in energy efficiency and "Class I" renewable energy. The SBC funds New...

25

Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFApril 2015Commerce | DepartmentBenefits Benefits

26

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The application of sustainable building design not only helps Federal facilities meet laws and regulations, it also provides them with many other benefits. These benefits include:

27

Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi,Benefits Plan ReportsBenefits ofApply

28

Benefits Overview Faculty / Staff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, marital problems, alcohol/drug abuse, and interpersonal and family problems. Emeriti Retirement Health Benefits Bright Horizons Backup Advantage Care Bright Horizons provides backup care for well children and mildly ill or recuperating children and adults. Eighty hours of center-based or in-home care

Lichtarge, Olivier

29

Student Health Benefit Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and programs tailored to the needs of students. The SHBP coordinates care with University Health Services (UHS), UMass Amherst's fully accredited health center. UHS provides comprehensive primary care, walk-in care2 2013-2014 Student Health Benefit Plan (SHBP) Designed for the Students of Policy Period: August 1

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

30

Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

Hadley, S.W.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Austrian refiner benefits from advanced control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OeMV-AG Energy implemented advanced process controls on 27 units at its refinery in Schwechat, Austria. A variety of controls were implemented on the butadiene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) units in January 1993. After more than 1 year of operation, the butadiene/MTBE project has shown a number of benefits, including reduced energy consumption and increased capacity in both units. The paper discusses the process, advanced control, the simple model predictive controller, control objectives, the butadiene unit, the MTBE unit, and benefits of the advanced controllers.

Richard, L.A.; Spencer, M. [Setpoint Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Schuster, R.; Tuppinger, D.M.; Wilmsen, W.F. [OeMV-AG Energy, Schwechat (Austria)

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cyclotrons to Make Neutrons & Radioactive Targets for SBSS at...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Cyclotrons to Make Neutrons & Radioactive Targets for SBSS at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear...

34

Employee Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage of theEMI SIGTrends inSub-UrbanBenefits

35

Advantages of Biofuels B100 biodiesel has many benefits over traditional, petroleum-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advantages of Biofuels B100 biodiesel has many benefits over traditional, petroleum-based diesel fuel. It reduces air pollution, costs less than petroleum diesel, and results in cleaner engines Reduces operating and maintenance costs by 20-40% vs. petroleum-based fuels Human Health Benefits Reduces

36

Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification This document provides information about the benefits of performing...

37

Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

BENEFIT Funding Opportunity- Webinar 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is webinar 1 for the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number: DE-FOA-0001166.

39

BENEFIT Funding Opportunity- Webinar 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is webinar 2 for the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number: DE-FOA-0001166.

40

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Economy: Clean Energy and the Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiativessuch as goals, standards, codes, funds, and programsgenerate many benefits including: Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. Increased economic prosperity. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on economic benefits. What are the economic benefits of clean energy? Clean energy initiatives, including those that advance energy efficiency, renewable energy and clean distributed generation can: ?Lower ? energy costs. ?Increase ? personal disposable income. ?Increase ? revenue for businesses. ?Increase ? income, employment, and output. ?Reduce ? fuel costs and new electric power plant construction costs. ?Reduce ? health care costs as a result of better air quality and public health. How do clean energy initiatives benefit the economy? ?Direct ? Economic Benefits: Companies that provide the equipment, technologies, and services needed to implement an initiative benefit from increased demand, which increases their revenue and their ability to hire more people. In the case of energy efficiency, consumers and companies both benefit by spending less money on electricity. ?Indirect ? Economic Benefits: Suppliers to clean energy equipment and service providers benefit as demand for their inputs and revenues increase. With higher demand, these suppliers may also hire more workers. ?Induced ? Economic Benefits: Income generated from the direct and indirect effects is spent in the regional economy, such as when employees use their paychecks to buy groceries, eat out, and entertain themselves, all of which support jobs in those sectors. Whats Inside: Why assess the economic benefits of clean energy? How can policy makers estimate the macroeconomic benefits of clean energy? A Benefits Flash with quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in economic, air quality, and public health benefits. Where to go for more information. Direct economic benefits of a wind initiative could increase: Sales of wind turbines. Revenue of local turbine manufacturers.

unknown authors

42

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The OLYMPUS Internal Hydrogen Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An internal hydrogen target system was developed for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, in Hamburg, Germany. The target consisted of a long, thin-walled, tubular cell within an aluminum scattering chamber. Hydrogen entered at the center of the cell and exited through the ends, where it was removed from the beamline by a multistage pumping system. A cryogenic coldhead cooled the target cell to counteract heating from the beam and increase the density of hydrogen in the target. A fixed collimator protected the cell from synchrotron radiation and the beam halo. A series of wakefield suppressors reduced heating from beam wakefields. The target system was installed within the DORIS storage ring and was successfully operated during the course of the OLYMPUS experiment in 2012. Information on the design, fabrication, and performance of the target system is reported.

J. C. Bernauer; V. Carassiti; G. Ciullo; B. S. Henderson; E. Ihloff; J. Kelsey; P. Lenisa; R. Milner; A. Schmidt; M. Statera

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Accelerator target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Accelerator target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett...

47

Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering Alan Robock,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering Alan Robock,1 Allison Marquardt,1 Ben as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering

Robock, Alan

48

BENEFITS BULLETIN August 21, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accessible on the public internet? This means that you can access and utilize the great content at any time included are: Contact Us Spreadsheets ­ click on the link to see a listing of all Pacific & Atlantic://www.usgs.gov/humancapital/hr/askhro.html and click on the "Benefits & Retirement Servicing Assignments" pdf document link. A complete listing

49

Duke University Benefits Overview: Exempt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Affordable Care Act (otherwise known as National Health Care Reform). You have the benefit of paying premiums is an open access Health Maintenance Organization, or HMO. If you choose this plan you must receive care from if you choose a provider outside of the network. Blue Care is an open access Health Maintenance

Reif, John H.

50

Can Big Pharma Behavior Change to Benefit Patients?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Professors Rosenberg and Chu will discuss how the behavior of large pharmaceutical companies can sometimes compromise the needs of patients. The behavior includes strategies for lobbying Congress, exploiting patent law, targeting large consumer markets, creating demand from patients, and influencing physicians. In some cases, this behavior has created ethical and legal problems. The talk will conclude with a discussion of possible ways to encourage changes that will benefit patients.

Rosenberg, Saul; Chu, Gilbert

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

Economic benefits of greenspace Research Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic benefits of greenspace Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Economic benefits of greenspace A critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits Forestry Commission: Edinburgh Vadim. ISBN 978-0-85538-865-2 Saraev, V. (2012) Economic benefits of greenspace: a critical assessment

52

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Productivity Benefits of IT Outsourcing Christopher R. Knittel and Victor Stango  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Productivity Benefits of IT Outsourcing Christopher R. Knittel and Victor Stango Abstract We examine the productivity benefits of IT outsourcing in the credit union industry, using data IT reduces operating costs by roughly 30%, once we control for the endogeneity of switches. Less productive

Rothman, Daniel

54

Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds not be calculated. As trees reduce energy use, they reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) produced at the power February 2009 Report to Chuck Morgan Asst. Director Building & Landscape Services Waste Management

Tsien, Roger Y.

55

A Self-Consistent Method to Assess Air Quality Co-Benefits from US Climate Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air quality co-benefits can potentially reduce the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. However, while many studies of the cost of greenhouse gas mitigation model the full macroeconomic welfare impacts, most studies of air ...

Saari, R.

56

Benefit Forms | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergy StevenHouseField Experiment |Benefit Forms

57

Benefits Plan Reports & Notices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi,Benefits Plan Reports & Notices

58

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling atSFO |Alternate|Benefits | National

59

Waste segregation procedures and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Segregation is a critical first step in handling hazardous and radioactive materials to minimize the generation of regulated wastes. In addition, segregation can significantly reduce the complexity and the total cost of managing waste. Procedures at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque require that wastes be segregated, first, by waste type (acids, solvents, low level radioactive, mixed, classified, etc.). Higher level segregation requirements, currently under development, are aimed at enhancing the possibilities for recovery, recycle and reapplication; reducing waste volumes; reducing waste disposal costs, and facilitating packaging storage, shipping and disposal. 2 tabs.

Fish, J.D.; Massey, C.D.; Ward, S.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measuring the Economic Benefits of Workplace Flexibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the Economic Benefits of Workplace Flexibility 24th Annual Transportation Research IMPACTS economics · It is tough to measure the CAUSAL relationship between workplace flexibility and economic benefits. #12;In the News... #12;Workforce flexibility defined Workplace flexibility can

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Emergence of Hybrid Vehicles: Ending oils strangleholdthe benefits of hybrid vehicles Dr. Thomas Turrentine Dr.the benefits of hybrid vehicles Report prepared for CSAA Dr.

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Methodologies for Determining Persistence of Commissioning Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies on the persistence of commissioning benefits to date have used a variety of methods to evaluate this persistence. This paper proposes a consistent framework for describing and evaluating the persistence of commissioning benefits. It begins...

Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EG. 2010. Human and environmental impact assessment ofof the overall environmental impacts and benefits of theand reducing environmental impacts of CCS Roger Sathre and

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Duke University Benefits Overview: Non-Exempt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection and Affordable Care Act (otherwise known as National Health Care Reform). You have the benefit Health Maintenance Organization, or HMO. If you choose this plan you must receive care from of some of the benefits that Duke offers: I. HEALTH BENEFITS Medical Insurance Duke offers four options

Reif, John H.

65

Operational benefits of relaxed axial power distribution control limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constant axial offset control (CAOC) was developed in the early 1970s in response to lower loss-of-coolant accident-based peaking factor limits. Th CAOC requires control of the axial power distribution within a specified band, typically +/- 5% or +3, -12% axial flux difference (AFD), about a measured target value of AFD. Operational outside of the CAOC limits results in the accumulation of penalty time. One hour of penalty time in any 24-h period is permitted. Although CAOC is sufficient to ensure peaking factor limits are satisfied, operation outside of CAOC limits is beneficial under certain conditions. Allowing a relaxation in CAOC restrictions can be used both to enhance the load follow capability of the plant by allowing control strategies that minimize the boron system duty or increase the return to power capability and to greatly increase the ability to return to power after a plant trip or shutdown. To achieve these benefits, relaxed axial offset control (RAOC) was developed. Other benefits of RAOC include a simplified technical specification and the ability to perform in-core/ex-core calibrations at higher powers. Duke Power Company has benefited in many of these ways by changing from CAOC power distribution limits to RAOC power distribution limits at the McGuire Nuclear Station. One of the chief benefits has been the ability to achieve full power much more quickly following shutdowns of short duration and reactor trips during the last half of the cycle lifetime.

Kitlan, M.S. Jr.; Miller, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target Chamber The interior of the NIF target chamber. The service module carrying technicians can be seen on the left. The target...

67

Logging and the Law How the U.S. Lacey Act Helps Reduce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cut global warming pollution by reducing tropical deforestation. More information about UCS a r y 3 C h a p t e r o n e introduction 4 Illegal Logging and Associated Trade 4 Causes of Illegal t e r f o U r global Benefits of the lacey act 14 Economic Benefits 15 Societal Benefits 16

68

Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target Chamber A service system lift allows technicians to access the target chamber interior for inspection and maintenance. Photo Number:...

70

Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda Sarah Carter 2009 #12;Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 2 Version control: V2 Date: 1tst August

71

First SNS Target Replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First SNS Target Replacement Experience M. Dayton, M. Rennich, Van Graves, J. DeVore Presented by T.S. Department of Energy AHIP Workshop Oct. 2009 Overview · Initial Target Replacement · Target Maintenance-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy AHIP Workshop Oct. 2009 First SNS Target Replacement · Replacement

McDonald, Kirk

72

MECO Production Target Developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

McDonald, Kirk

73

Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Polarized internal target apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

Holt, Roy J. (Downers Grove, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Polarized internal target apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

Holt, R.J.

1984-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Clean Energy and the Electric System: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and/ or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiativessuch as goals, standards, codes, funds and programscan generate many benefits including: Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on electric system benefits. Whats Inside: Why assess electric system benefits? How can state and local governments estimate potential electric system benefits? Quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in direct energy benefits. How to find more information. What are clean energy initiatives? Clean energy initiatives are policies and programs that state and local governments are using to save energy, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions, support electric system reliability and security, and improve economic development. Examples include: Energy efficiency policies that reduce demand for energy, such as: Building codes for energy efficiency in both commercial and residential buildings; energy efficiency portfolio standards; public benefit funds for energy efficiency; and appliance efficiency standards. Energy supply policies that increase the use of renewables and clean sources, such as: Clean distributed generation and net metering interconnection standards; output-based environmental regulations; public benefit funds for clean energy supply; combined heat and power; and renewable portfolio standards. Clean energy initiatives reduce demand for fossil-fuel powered electricity and increase electricity generated with clean, renewable energy, contributing to a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system. Specifically, energy efficiency and/or renewable energy are resources that can: Avoid costs typically associated with conventional generation, including: Fuel, variable operation, and maintenance costs; emissions allowances; costs of emission Greenhouse gas (GHG) related policies that measure or limit emissions, such as: GHG registries, mandatory GHG reporting; CO offset requirements;

unknown authors

77

Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

Paumier, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.paumier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beaudre, Anne [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs FY 2008 Budget is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable #12;Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency Coordinator: Michael Leifman o Biomass: Zia Haq, Tien Nguyen o Buildings: Jerry Dion, David Boomsma o Federal

79

Duke University Health System Benefits Overview: Exempt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection and Affordable Care Act (otherwise known as National Health Care Reform). You have the benefit Health Maintenance Organization, or HMO. If you choose this plan you must receive care fromDuke University Health System Benefits Overview: Exempt 2014 We are pleased to provide you

Reif, John H.

80

Department of the Navy Civilian Benefits Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Tammy Flanagan, senior benefits director of the National Institute of Transition Planning, Inc? Doris Kraemer, COO of Hire Family, and Mary Lou McGuinness, Director of Care Management of Long Term Flanagan, senior benefits director of the National Institute of Transition Planning, Inc., shows Federally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Magnetically attached sputter targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluating Economic andEvaluating Economic and Environmental BenefitsEnvironmental Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating Economic andEvaluating Economic and Environmental BenefitsEnvironmental Benefits of Soil@missouri.edu) Coordinator Publications & Communications, FAPRIMU. #12;Evaluating Economic and Environmental Benefits a combination of methods to evaluate the value of Missouri's Department of Natural Resources (MODNR

83

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target A NIF target contains a polished capsule about two millimeters in diameter, filled with cryogenic (super-cooled) hydrogen fuel. Photo...

84

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target Chamber This view from the bottom of the chamber shows the target positioner being inserted. Pulses from NIF's high-powered lasers...

85

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Hohlraum A metallic case called a hohlraum holds the fuel capsule for NIF experiments. Target handling systems precisely position the target...

86

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target Chamber Temperatures of 100 million degrees and pressures extreme enough to compress the target to densities up to 100 times the...

87

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Index Target Chamber Viewing Window A new viewing window recently installed on the NIF Target Chamber will allow members of the NIF team and visitors to see inside the...

88

Achieving the Benefits of Safeguards by Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching driver for developing a formalized process to achieve safeguards by design is to support the global growth of nuclear power while reducing nuclear security risks. This paper discusses an institutional approach to the design process for a nuclear facility, for designing proliferation resistance, international safeguards and U.S. national safeguards and security into new nuclear facilities. In the United States, the need exists to develop a simple, concise, formalized, and integrated approach for incorporating international safeguards and other non-proliferation considerations into the facility design process. An effective and efficient design process is one which clearly defines the functional requirements at the beginning of the project and provides for the execution of the project to achieve a reasonable balance among competing objectives in a cost effective manner. Safeguards by Design is defined as the integration of international and national safeguards, physical security and non-proliferation features as full and equal partners in the design process of a nuclear energy system or facility, with the objective to achieve facilities that are intrinsically more robust while being less expensive to safeguard and protect. This Safeguards by Design process has been developed such that it: Provides improved safeguards, security, and stronger proliferation barriers, while reducing the life cycle costs to the operator and regulatory agencies, Can be translated to any international context as a model for nuclear facility design, Fosters a culture change to ensure the treatment of nuclear security considerations as full and equal partners in the design process, Provides a useful tool for the project manager responsible for the design, construction, and start-up of nuclear facilities, and Addresses the key integration activities necessary to efficiently incorporate International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards into the design of nuclear facilities. This paper describes the work that has been completed in the development of a Safeguards by Design process for a project, illustrated by flow diagrams based upon the project phases described in U.S. Department of Energy Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The institutionalization of the Safeguards by Design process directly supports the goals of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and also aligns with goals and objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Other benefits from institutionalizing this Safeguards by Design process are discussed within this paper.

Trond Bjornard; Robert Bean; David Hebditch; Jim Morgan; Bruce Meppen; Scott DeMuth; Michael Ehinger; John Hockert

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fixed target electroweak and hard scattering physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibilities for future physics and experiments involving weak and electromagnetic interactions, neutrino oscillations, general hard scattering and experiments involving nuclear targets were explored. The studies were limited to the physics accessible using fixed target experimentation. While some of the avenues explored turn out to be relatively unrewarding in the light of competition elsewhere in the world, there are a number of positive conclusions reached about experimentation in the energy range available to the Main Injector and Tevatron. Some of the experiments would benefit from the increased intensity available from the Tevatron utilizing the Main Injector, while some require this increase. Finally, some of the experiments would use the Main Injector low energy, high intensity extracted beams directly. A program of electroweak and hard scattering experiments at fixed target energies retains the potential for important contributions to physics. The key to major parts of this program would appear to be the existence of the Main Injector. 115 refs, 17 figs.

Brock, R. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Brown, C.N.; Montgomery, H.E. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Corcoran, M.D. (eds.) (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High Power Cryogenic Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

Gregory Smith

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are consistency and fairness, early warning, environment and development, and public involvement. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [Integral Sustainability (Australia) [Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute (Australia); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa) [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa)] [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Gunn, Jill A.E., E-mail: jill.gunn@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning and School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Full efficiency benefits and implementation considerations for cruise altitude and speed optimization in the National Airspace system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

Jensen, Luke L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fuel Efficiency Benefits and Implementation Consideration for Cruise Altitude and Speed Optimization in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

Jensen, Luke

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Benefits | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi,Benefits Plan ReportsBenefitsBenefits

95

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS Thesis. I have benefitted from conversations with many persons w~ile engaged in this project. I would like

Winfree, Erik

96

WVU Personal Rapid Transit Benefit Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WVU Personal Rapid Transit Benefit Cost Analysis Morgantown, West Virginia Prepared For: West ......................................................................... 12 Demographic Data Summary techniques suitable for assessing the impact of the WVU Personal Rapid Transit System (PRT) was employed

Mohaghegh, Shahab

97

ACTUARIAL VALUATION OF BENEFITS PROVIDED UNDER THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................................................................6 Section 5. ACTUARIAL VALUATION METHODS AND ASSUMPTIONS - PENSION PLAN LIABILITIES.......................................................................................9 Table 6 ACTUARIAL ASSUMPTIONS AND COST METHOD ADOPTED IN CONDUCTING THE VALUATION OF THE DALHOUSIEACTUARIAL VALUATION OF BENEFITS PROVIDED UNDER THE DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY STAFF PENSION PLAN

Lotze, Heike K.

98

Wider benefits of Space Science & Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

academia who build subsystems) Platforms and platform systems, solar panels etc. Propulsion electric systems #12;Benefits summary Better solar panels CFRP construction Techniques Electric propulsion New Drivers: Lowest cost systems Robust supply chain Reliability/Quality Speed of build Willing

Anand, Mahesh

99

Benefits of Thermoelectric Technology for the Automobile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Discusses improved fuel efficiency and other benefits of automotive application of thermoelectric (power generation and heating/cooling) and the need for production quantities of high-efficiency thermoelectric modules

100

Benefits of redevelopment of outdated retail centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the benefits of redevelopment of outdated retail shopping centers and seeks to identify potential redevelopment opportunities. The focus is specific to sites located in Dallas, Texas, and the overall ...

Gitcho, Gregory William

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Market Benefits of Chain of Custody Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

schemes (PEFC), or the Sustainable Green Ecosystem Council (SGEC). In the mailed questionnaire) customer relations, and (3) environmental communication. The mean benefit rating of environmental communication was the highest, followed by customer relations. Business performance was rated significantly

102

The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia Alexander P. Miller Hang T. Nguyen Samantha D, and the recycling contacts from the participating Solid Waste Planning Units discussed in this study. #12;3 Table Determinants of Recycling_______________________________ 12 State Reports

Lewis, Robert Michael

103

The ABCD's of Texas Education: Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Reducing the Dropout Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, by State: School Year 2002-03 State or jurisd ictio n Averag ed fresh man gradu a tio n rate Regular diplo ma s , scho o l year 2002- 03 Estimated first-time 9th grad ers in 1999-2000 1 Grade 10 member sh ip , schoo l year... 2000-01 1 Grade 9 memb er sh ip , schoo l year 1999-2000 1 Grade 8 memb er sh ip , schoo l year 1998-99 1 United States (51 state s ) 73.9 2,719,947 3,682,202 3,529,652 3,986,992 3,529,963 Alabama 64.7 36,741 56,749 51,991 61,150 57...

Alvarez, Roman; Brennan, Stephanie; Carter, Narietha; Dong, Hsiang-Kai; Eldridge, Amanda; Fratto, Joseph; Harrison, Erin; Ryder, Eleanor; Sanderson, Kathleen; Thorburn, Pamela

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Prioritization of Risk Reducing Measures in View of Uncertain Cost/Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Helge Langseth SINTEF Industrial Management, N-7465 Trondheim, NORWAY and Norwegian University Introduction To improve the Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) situation, a decision-maker is typically

Langseth, Helge

105

Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies | Department ofMeasuring the Costs of U.S.

106

Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007Naval Reactors'InformationSOLAR MARKET0 HSSWorkMAY oof(IDIQ|

107

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Reducible oxide based catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reducing home lighting expenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ways to reduce lighting expenses are summarized. These include: turning off lights when not in use; keeping fixtures and lamps clean; replacing lamps with more efficient types; using three-way bulbs; use of daylighting; buying fewer lamps and reducing lamp wattage; consider repainting rooms; replacing recessed fixtures with tracklighting; and using efficient lamps for outdoor use. (MCW)

Aimone, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 61 Appendix 6.7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 61 Appendix 6 for Global Benefits, Uganda 62 Appendix 6.7 16. What size (ha) are they: Farm 1. ____________ Farm 2 if necessary #12;Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 63 Appendix 6

112

Air, Health, Clean Energy, and Related Economic Impacts: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and/or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiativessuch as goals, standards, codes, funds, and programscan generate many benefits, including: Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brief is part of a series and focuses on environmental and human health benefits. State and local governments can analyze their clean energy initiatives using methods and tools described in EPAs Assessing the

unknown authors

113

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Case for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of conventional unmagnetized targets by orders of magnitude; (b) makes fusion "easier" for any driver; (c) makes) drivers feasible; (d) allows experimentation at much higher energy (e.g., 20 MJ implosion kinetic energy can reduce the required radial convergence to drivers can lead to a new fusion

115

0 10 20 30 40 Target Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.tropicalisland.de Global spatial guidance results Guidance effectively reduces the set size to one third of the total Target Present ReactionTime(msec) Set Size Where would you look? Guiding visual search with global? Guiding visual search with global spatial information. Jeremy M Wolfe1,2 , Ester Reijnen3 , Hareem Ahmad4

116

Neutrino Factory Target Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Cooling Channel in both walls for draining · Downstream end can be shortened, assuming the window cooling is adequate #12;11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Remote Handling

McDonald, Kirk

117

Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

118

The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican Perspective Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in...

119

The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive Summary for The Lancet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate...

120

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this...

122

EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011 EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs - March 10, 2011...

123

Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercializati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of Ethanol Containing Diesel Fuels Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of...

124

DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers...

125

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

126

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

127

Benefits of Commisioning New & Existing Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of * Data from Whole Building Design Guide ? a program of National Institute of Building Sciences (06-21-2010) 5 $4.00 $1.00 WHY ARE OWNERS USING THE CX PROCESS? Data obtained from ?Costs and Benefits of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial... Buildings? ? June 21, 2005. LBNL, PECI, TAMU-ESL Data obtained from ?Costs and Benefits of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial Buildings? ? June 21, 2005. LBNL, PECI, TAMU-ESL WHAT HAPPENS WHEN NEW BUILDINGS AREN?T PROPERLY COMMISSIONED...

Meline, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Benefits of Stochastic Scheduling for Power Systems with Significant Installed Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits of Stochastic Scheduling for Power Systems with Significant Installed Wind Power Aidan a stochastic element due to the uncertainty of wind power forecasts. By explicitly taking into account the stochastic nature of wind power, it is expected that better schedules should be produced, thereby reducing

129

The Benefits of a Hot Meal: Identifying the Advantages of Postprandial Thermophily in Snakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many reptiles rely on external sources of heat energy (e.g., solar radiation and sun-warmed rocksThe Benefits of a Hot Meal: Identifying the Advantages of Postprandial Thermophily in Snakes MS to increase nutrient and energy assimilation and reduce meal retention time. Yet if PPT is beneficial

Espinoza, Robert E.

130

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O cost of energy (LCOE) [1]. The costs required to keep wind turbines working in extreme temperatures

McCalley, James D.

131

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2) emission reduction estimates were obtained for each of the measures. The package of measures the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions-makers will require estimates of both the potential emission reductions and the costs or benefits associated

132

University of Maryland, College Park Benefits Orientation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mental Health and Substance Abuse Vision Care Personal Accident and Dismemberment Flexible Spending 1. #12;State Sponsored Benefits Health Insurance/Vision Care Prescription Drug Card Dental Plans Accounts Long Term Care Term Life Insurance #12;Health Insurance Plans PPO Preferred Provider

Shapiro, Benjamin

133

Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To ensure that reimbursement of costs incurred by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors' pension and medical benefits are reasonable in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and contract requirements and reflect prudent business practices. This directive has been suspended as of June 19, 2006, for 1 year. For more information, see DOE N 251.66.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

results and benefits... The Bittern Line Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results and benefits... The Bittern Line Carbon Neutral Stations Transport Regeneration Ltd. June 2008 c a s e s t u d yCRed carbon reduction Project Summary Our client, Transport Regeneration Ltd., aims to make nine stations on the Bittern Line between Norwich and Sheringham carbon neutral

Everest, Graham R

135

Research Summary Health Benefits of Street Trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution, noise levels, wind speeds, summer temperatures, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation through shading benefits from reductions in noise, UV radiation, and wind speeds in winter is especially limited at present any measurable health outcomes such as avoided excess morbidity and mortality, increases in quality

136

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs · Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

New Mexico, University of

137

Quality health plans & benefits Healthier living  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, will comply with requirements for WomenQuality health plans & benefits Healthier living Financial well-being Intelligent solutions 05's Preventive Health Services. This means that for women with reproductive capacity, certain women

138

Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by plants instead of traveling into the water system #12;Water Storage on Conservation Lands · Upland areas.9 billion · In terms of water quality and groundwater purification, returns of $13.2 billion estimated #12Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting Water Resources November 2, 2011 Presented by

Demers, Nora Egan

139

ABSL Space Products 2011 BENEFITS / ECONOMIC PROSPECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSL Space Products 2011 BENEFITS / ECONOMIC PROSPECTS: Future exploration Roving Rendezvous Space Products 2011 ABSL Space Products for Growth: HERITAGE & RELEVANCE ABSL flew the first Lithium-Ion battery in space with 70 launched to date Now 100 people working on space batteries, including US office

Anand, Mahesh

140

Revised September 2013 Benefits Enrollment Worksheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and birth or adoption certification when covering a dependent child. CHECK YOUR BENEFITS Flexible Spending-line Spousal Coordination Form P1 ­ For State Pension Eligible employees Birth or Adoption Certificates Blood Information List Spouse/Dependent Name(s) Gender Social Security Number Birth Date Relationship Primary Care

Firestone, Jeremy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

This Document Contains: Indefinite Layoff Benefits Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company This Document Contains: Indefinite Layoff Benefits Checklist HR Vice Chancellor may be eligible for rehire privileges. See page 4. This checklist does not apply to Managers, Senior Professionals, or Senior Managers, for whom there are no layoff provisions. It also does not apply to career

Jun, Suckjoon

142

Strategic Industrial Energy Efficiency: Reduce Expenses, Build Revenues, and Control Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some manufacturing companies successfully boost their financial performance through optimized energy use. This leads not only to reduced energy consumption and associated environmental benefits, but also to capacity improvements that generate...

Russell, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tank closure reducing grout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

Caldwell, T.B.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Hohlraum This artist's rendering shows a NIF target pellet inside a hohlraum capsule with laser beams entering through openings on either...

145

In the Target Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 22 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Target Chamber On March 10, 2009, at 3:15 a.m., a 192-beam laser shot delivered 1.1 million joules of ultraviolet light to the center of the...

146

SNS Target Systems Operational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a failed gas seal on the shaft and leaking oil seals but has operated well since then · The moderator 7.5 k First target replacement · No observed corrosion · Internal Boroscope examination in progress · ~ 50 mm

McDonald, Kirk

147

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the demand for cooling energy, urban trees indirectly reducesurfaces and shade trees to reduce energy use and improvethe energy savings and GHG benefits of cool roofs and tree

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Turchi, John J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Zhang, Zhong-Yin, E-mail: zyzhang@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 2.0 Program Benefits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Program Benefits section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated August 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

151

A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of-life vehicle glazing recycling in France: a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and aluminum, and not minor wastes such as glazing (Gerrard and Kandlikar 2007). The new recycling target (95 and polluted with organic material. The treatment and recycling of glass does however become difficult1 A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of- life vehicle glazing recycling in France

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

152

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Enrolling in Benefits Using PeopleSoft Use this document to assist in your benefits enrollment. Your Benefits Enrollment packet contains the information you  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hire to make your benefit elections. Save vs. Submit: You may Save your elections and return to make enrollment. Your Benefits Enrollment packet contains the information you need to make benefit elections changes within the 30-day window, but your elections will not be processed until you click Submit

Chou, James

154

IntroducingBenefits+ a smarter way to pay for your benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: · you earn less than £6,500 a year, the Benefits+ Pay Protection Limit (PPL) or · your earnings fall checking your earnings against the PPL and NMW. More information is given on page 16. The University

Müller, Jens-Dominik

155

Benefits Forms and Information | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergy StevenHouseField Experiment |Benefit

156

Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

Clark, Howard L. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers (more)

Mandala, Venkata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Foam encapsulated targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Target | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:Taos County, New Mexico: EnergyTarget GmbH Jump to:Target

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimization Studies for ISOL Type High-Powered Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research studied one-step and two-step Isotope Separation on Line (ISOL) targets for future radioactive beam facilities with high driver-beam power through advanced computer simulations. As a target material uranium carbide in the form of foils was used because of increasing demand for actinide targets in rare-isotope beam facilities and because such material was under development in ISAC at TRIUMF when this project started. Simulations of effusion were performed for one-step and two step targets and the effects of target dimensions and foil matrix were studied. Diffusion simulations were limited by availability of diffusion parameters for UCx material at reduced density; however, the viability of the combined diffusion?effusion simulation methodology was demonstrated and could be used to extract physical parameters such as diffusion coefficients and effusion delay times from experimental isotope release curves. Dissipation of the heat from the isotope-producing targets is the limiting factor for high-power beam operation both for the direct and two-step targets. Detailed target models were used to simulate proton beam interactions with the targets to obtain the fission rates and power deposition distributions, which were then applied in the heat transfer calculations to study the performance of the targets. Results indicate that a direct target, with specification matching ISAC TRIUMF target, could operate in 500-MeV proton beam at beam powers up to ~40 kW, producing ~8 1013 fission/s with maximum temperature in UCx below 2200 C. Targets with larger radius allow higher beam powers and fission rates. For the target radius in the range 9-mm to 30-mm the achievable fission rate increases almost linearly with target radius, however, the effusion delay time also increases linearly with target radius.

Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University] [Michigan State University

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Reducing Power Factor Cost  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing Peak DemandLow

163

Targeted radionuclide therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Radiology Division, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Internal Medicine, University of California Davis Medical Center, 1508 Alhambra Boulevard, Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95816 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute WTI No. 117, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Future Fixed Target Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Economic Benefits of Advanced Materials in Nuclear Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key obstacles for the commercial deployment of advanced fast reactors (for either transuranic element burning or power generation) is the capital cost. There is a perception of higher capital cost for fast reactor systems than advanced light water reactors (ALWR). However, the cost estimates for a fast reactor come with a large uncertainty due to the fact that far fewer fast reactors have been built than LWR facilities. Furthermore, the large variability of industrial cost estimates complicates accurate comparisons. For example, under the Gen IV program, the Japanese Sodium Fast Reactor (JSFR) has a capital cost estimate that is lower than current LWR s, and considerably lower than that for the PRISM design (which is arguably among the most mature of today s fast reactor designs). Further reductions in capital cost must be made in US fast reactor systems to be considered economically viable. Three key approaches for cost reduction can be pursued. These include design simplifications, new technologies that allow reduced capital costs, and simulation techniques that help optimize system design. While it is plausible that improved materials will provide opportunities for both simplified design and reduced capital cost, the economic benefit of advanced materials has not been quantitatively analyzed. The objective of this work is to examine the potential impact of advanced materials on the capital investment costs of fast nuclear reactors.

Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ISAC target vacuum system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF has been in full operation since 1999. The ISAC east and west targets use proton beam from the cyclotron to produce various radioactive isotopes, which are then ionized and extracted. The ions are then passed through the mass separator and selected ions are transferred to the low energy experiments or injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The accompanying radioactive contamination from the production of radioactive ions requires a complex vacuum system. The main target vacuum space consists of two semiseparate (primary and secondary) volumes pumped by turbo-molecular pumps. The primary volume uses four pumps while the secondary volume uses two pumps. Two hermetic rotary vane pumps are used as backing pumps. The nominal vacuum in both volumes is about 1.33x10{sup -4} Pa (1.0x10{sup -6} Torr). The pressure is monitored by two cold cathode and two hot filament ion gauges. The cold cathode gauges are used to interlock the system, which is critical during the bake out of the target and beam production. The exhaust gas from the vacuum pumps can be radioactive. Three gas storage tanks (decay tanks) are used for temporary storage of the radioactive exhaust and its controlled release to the atmosphere. Gas-species insensitive membrane gauges are used for monitoring the pressure in the storage tanks. This article describes the details of the ISAC target vacuum system as well as some procedures related to the handling of the exhaust gas with traces of radioactive contamination produced by the targets.

Yosifov, Dimo; Sekachev, Igor [TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

CMI Membership Benefits | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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168

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricityAlternative FuelsTrainingBenefits to

170

Solid Target Options S. Childress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power is higher than for existing solid target designs - but not by a large factor. · NuMI graphite beam power) · High beam power solid targets frequently use higher z materials for increased yield plusSolid Target Options NuFACT'00 S. Childress Solid Target Options · The choice of a primary beam

McDonald, Kirk

171

Why People Travel? Examining Perceived Benefits of Tourism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thus, the primary purpose of this research was to examine the effects of perceived tourism benefits on travel behavior based on the model of attitude importance. Since existing scales of tourism benefits failed to incorporate some important items...

Chen, Chun-Chu

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsoft Word - Understanding Smart Grid Benefits_final.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at a high level, the benefits of a smart grid far outweigh its costs-that is, when all costs and all benefits applicable to all stakeholders are included. But will the smart...

173

Technical benefits and cultural barriers of networked Autonomous Undersea Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this thesis examines the technical benefits to using a collaborative network of Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUVs) in place of individual vehicles. Benefits could be achieved in the areas of ...

Wineman, Patrick L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Benefits of postponement for fashion products with forecast updates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the benefit of postponement of fashion products by considering the overage cost of the intermediate product and the correlation between the demand for each end products produced from it. The benefit ...

Gong, Huiling

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

176

An evaluation of Cydcoed: the social and economic benefits of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An evaluation of Cydcoed: the social and economic benefits of using trees and woodlands & Economic Research Group Environmental & Human Sciences Division The Research Agency of the Forestry social, economic and environmental benefits and; individuals able to play a positive role

177

The contracting benefits of accounting conservatism to lenders and borrowers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, I examine the ex post and ex ante benefits of conservatism to lenders and borrowers in the debt contracting process. First, I argue that conservatism benefits lenders ex post through a timely signal of default ...

Zhang, Jieying, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures Solar Energy to Benefit from New FERC Interconnection Procedures October 30, 2014 - 5:15pm Addthis As a major win...

179

Benefits of battery-uItracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the benefits of battery and battery-ultracapacitor hybrid energy storage systems (ESSs) in pulsed-load applications. It investigates and quantifies the benefits of the hybrid ESS over its battery-only ...

Smith, Ian C., S.M. (Ian Charles). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6476E 1 Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses, Lin, G, Piette, MA. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefits, and best practice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance...

182

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

John Stulp, Colorado Interbasin Compact Committee chairman, discusses how wind energy benefits rural communities, farms, and ranches.

185

Cost-benefit considerations in regulatory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Justification for safety enhancements at nuclear facilities, e.g., a compulsory backfit to nuclear power plants, requires a value-impact analysis of the increase in overall public protection versus the cost of implementation. It has been customary to assess the benefits in terms of radiation dose to the public averted by the introduction of the safety enhancement. Comparison of such benefits with the costs of the enhancement then requires an estimate of the monetary value of averted dose (dollars/person rem). This report reviews available information on a variety of factors that affect this valuation and assesses the continuing validity of the figure of $1000/person-rem averted, which has been widely used as a guideline in performing value-impact analyses. Factors that bear on this valuation include the health risks of radiation doses, especially the higher risk estimates of the BEIR V committee, recent calculations of doses and offsite costs by consequence codes for hypothesized severe accidents at U.S. nuclear power plants under the NUREG-1150 program, and recent information on the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in the Soviet Union and estimates of risk avoidance based on the willingness-to-pay criterion. The report analyzes these factors and presents results on the dollars/person-rem ratio arising from different assumptions on the values of these factors.

Mubayi, V.; Sailor, V.; Anandalingam, G.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences 5/31/12 Transportation Agency/31/12 Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences Center for Integrated Natural Resources, Mobility, & Transportation Authority Benefits, Farmer Costs, & Carbon Impacts Focus Groups and Surveys

Minnesota, University of

187

RESEARCH Open Access Childhood lead exposure in France: benefit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of exposure abatement. Methods: Monetary benefits were assessed in terms of avoided national costs avoided costs were included. Costs of pollutant exposure control were partially estimated in regardRESEARCH Open Access Childhood lead exposure in France: benefit estimation and partial cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

WORK PROGRAMME 2012 RESEARCH FOR THE BENEFIT OF SMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORK PROGRAMME 2012 CAPACITIES PART 2 RESEARCH FOR THE BENEFIT OF SMES (European Commission C (2011)5023 of 19 July) #12;FP7 Capacities Work Programme: Research for the Benefit of SMEs Page 2 of 30 Capacities Work Programme: Research for the Benefit of SMEs The available budget for the 2012 work programme

Rimon, Elon

189

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A PUBLIC OPTION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A PUBLIC OPTION IN HEALTH CARE REFORM: An Economic Analysis Ethan Kaplan and Benefits of a Public Option in Health Care Reform: An Economic Analysis ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would like Security|The Costs and Benefits of a Public Option in Health Care Reform: An Economic Analysis EXECUTIVE

Kammen, Daniel M.

190

Plan Benefits Administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan Benefits Administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico Dental Benefits Handbook Frm 108 Updated as of January 2009 #12;Delta Dental of New Mexico Frm 108 ­ 01/09 Welcome to the growing number of people who receive dental coverage administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico. This Dental Benefit Handbook, along

New Mexico, University of

191

Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in place and have collectively deployed approximately 46,000 MW of new renewable energy capacity through year-end 2012. Most of these policies have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS benefits and costs is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. A key aspect of this study is the comprehensive review of existing RPS cost and benefit estimates, in addition to an examination of the variety of methods used to calculate such estimates. Based on available data and estimates reported by utilities and regulators, this study summarizes RPS costs to date. The study considers how those costs may evolve going forward, given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms incorporated into existing policies. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states, and discusses key methodological considerations.

Heeter, Jenny; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Weaver, Samantha; Flores, Francisco; Kuskova-Burns, Ksenia; Wiser, Ryan

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Battery energy storage: A preliminary assessment of national benefits (the Gateway Benefits Study)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary estimates of national benefits from electric utility applications of battery energy storage through the year 2010 are presented along with a discussion of the particular applications studied. The estimates in this report were based on planning information reported to DOE by electric utilities across the United States. Future studies are planned to refine these estimates as more application-specific information becomes available.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zaininger, H. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Hurwitch, J.; Badin, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedChinas Target for Energy Intensity Reduction in 2010: Angoal of reducing energy intensity, defined as energy

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of patented, field-tested 100% oxy-fuel burner systems have been developed which provide fuel savings, reduced emissions (CO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]) and improved operational performances. These systems can be applied to high-temperature continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters. Fuel consumption and carbon dioxide and NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced by 40 to 60%. Burner design (including nonwater cooled models), commercial experience, measured and projected emissions reductions, and additional operating benefits associated with new and retrofitted applications are described.

Farrell, L.M. (Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)); Pavlack, T.T. (Praxair, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Linde Division); Rich, L. (North American Mfg. Co., Coraopolis, PA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steam from two on-site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and... the electricity required by TEX and sells excess power to wholesale customers in the region. It provides a large portion of TEX steam requirements, with sufficient reliability such that TEX decommissioned its coal-fired powerhouse and reduced operations...

Ratheal, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Flight Path Target 2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 This flight2 Target 2

199

Advanced Target Effects Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScience of SignaturesAdvanced Target

200

Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural resources, and emits less CO2 because less energy is required in the manufacture of products made saved energy and reduced Greenhouse Gases through recycling. Recycling uses less energy, preserves) of GHG (Greenhouse Gas) Emissions: We Recycled: 477 tons of mixed or office paper The recycling

Delgado, Mauricio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

McManamy, Thomas J [ORNL; Rennich, Mark J [ORNL; Crawford, Roy K [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Janney, Jim G [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Heat Exchanger Network Targeting, Design and Analysis: The MIDAS Package  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT EXCHANGER NETWORK TARGETING, DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: THE MIDAS PACKAGE I. BARTON, D.H. JONES AND G.J. SMITH TENSA Services, Houston, Texas ICI PLC, Wilton England ABSTRACT Recent work to consolidate pinch-based procedures for targeting... was reduced to industrial practice by the U.K. major, ICI PLC. A wide range of pinch-based procedures have been developed for process energy efficiency applications. These incl~de heat exchanger network (HEN) design [2,3], distillation system...

Barton, I.; Jones, D. H.; Smith, G. J.

203

Rethinking the Wirelength Benefit of 3D Integration Wai-Kei Mak, Member, IEEE, and Chris Chu, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--To sustain the pace of integration density improve- ment, 3D IC technology advantages to go 3D including smaller foot- print, reduced interconnect delay, higher system performance1 Rethinking the Wirelength Benefit of 3D Integration Wai-Kei Mak, Member, IEEE, and Chris Chu

Chu, Chris C.-N.

204

Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

PDFs for nuclear targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

Karol Kovarik

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

ORION laser target diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Research Framework for Demonstrating Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research presented here is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report serves as an outline for planned research on the benefits of greater modernization in the main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

Ronald Boring; Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Kenneth Thomas; Katya Le Blanc

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Levelized cost-benefit analysis of proposed diagnostics for the Ammunition Transfer Arm of the US Army`s Future Armored Resupply Vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (PM-AFAS/FARV) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be applied to the resupply vehicle for the Advanced Field Artillery System. The Engineering Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has proposed adding diagnostics/prognostics systems to four components of the Ammunition Transfer Arm of this vehicle, and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on the diagnostics/prognostics to show the potential savings that may be gained by incorporating these systems onto the vehicle. Possible savings could be in the form of reduced downtime, less unexpected or unnecessary maintenance, fewer regular maintenance checks. and/or tower collateral damage or loss. The diagnostics/prognostics systems are used to (1) help determine component problems, (2) determine the condition of the components, and (3) estimate the remaining life of the monitored components. The four components on the arm that are targeted for diagnostics/prognostics are (1) the electromechanical brakes, (2) the linear actuators, (3) the wheel/roller bearings, and (4) the conveyor drive system. These would be monitored using electrical signature analysis, vibration analysis, or a combination of both. Annual failure rates for the four components were obtained along with specifications for vehicle costs, crews, number of missions, etc. Accident scenarios based on component failures were postulated, and event trees for these scenarios were constructed to estimate the annual loss of the resupply vehicle, crew, arm. or mission aborts. A levelized cost-benefit analysis was then performed to examine the costs of such failures, both with and without some level of failure reduction due to the diagnostics/prognostics systems. Any savings resulting from using diagnostics/prognostics were calculated.

Wilkinson, V.K.; Young, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy...

211

Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban WaterConservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a project undertaken for theCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council (the Council) to create a newmethod of accounting for the diverse environmental benefits of raw watersavings. The environmental benefits (EB) model was designed to providewater utilities with a practical tool that they can use to assign amonetary value to the benefits that may accrue from implementing any ofthe Council-recommended Best Management Practices. The model treats onlyenvironmental services associated directly with water, and is intended tocover miscellaneous impacts that are not currently accounted for in anyother cost-benefit analysis.

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar 1 (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement, presented in October 2014 by Antonio Bouza, technology manager, and Pat Phelan, program manager, Building...

213

Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltai...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems solarpv.pdf More Documents & Publications SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book),...

214

Manual for Quantitative Evaluation of the Co-Benefits Approach...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of co-benefits: water quality improvement, air quality improvement, and waste management. When to Use This Tool This tool is most useful for development impacts assessments...

215

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Presentation Nine companies certified under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Superior Energy Performance...

216

Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Employers and Contractors Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for Employers and Contractors Photo of a weatherization worker writing notes for an energy...

217

Health and productivity benefits of improved indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two studies completed for a national contractor`s association on the health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The original study documented the general health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The second study expanded the scope to include medical cost reductions for specific illnesses from improved IAQ. General information on the objectives, assumptions, definitions, and results of the studies are presented, followed by detailed information on research methodology, building inventory and wellness categories, health and medical effects of poor IAQ, health cost benefits, productivity benefits, recommended improvements, and conclusions and future improvements.

Dorgan, C.B. [Dorgan Associates, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Dorgan, C.E.; Kanarek, M.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Willman, A.J. [Quantum Technology, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Agency...

219

Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment and The Potential Employment, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of...

220

Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utilities and Efficiency Program Administrators Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for Utilities and Efficiency Program Administrators Photo of a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act...

222

Panel 2, Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy Storage Applications in Distribution Systems Patrick Balducci, Senior Economist, Pacific NW National Laboratory Hydrogen Energy...

223

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy Performance (SEP(tm)) and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP...

224

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Notice of Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study Availability - Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Their Expansion: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 40 - Mar. 1, 2007...

226

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has two objectives. The first is to examine methodological issues involved in using guidelines to measure co-benefits from transport projects (developing baselines,...

227

Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

How training and experience affect the benefits of autonomy in a dirty-bomb experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dirty-bomb experiment conducted at the INL is used to evaluate the effectiveness and suitability of three different modes of robot control. The experiment uses three distinct user groups to understand how participants background and training affect the way in which they use and benefit from autonomy. The results show that the target mode, which involves automated mapping and plume tracing together with a point and click tasking tool, provides the best performance for each group. This is true for objective performance such as source detection and localization accuracy as well as subjective measures such as perceived workload, frustration and preference. The best overall performance is achieved by the Explosive Ordinance Disposal group which has experience in both robot teleoperation and dirty bomb response. The user group that benefits least from autonomy is the Nuclear Engineers that have no experience with either robot operation or dirty bomb response. The group that benefits most from autonomy is the Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Response Team that has extensive experience related to the task, but no robot training.

David J. Bruemmer; Curtis W. Nielsen; David I. Gertman

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Connecting Distributed Energy Resources to the Grid: Their Benefits to the DER Owner etc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electric capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user peak demand, in turn, may lower a distribution system peak load such that upgrades are deferred or avoided. This could benefit other consumers by providing them with higher reliability and power quality as well as avoiding their cost share of a distribution system upgrade. In this example, the costs of the DER may be born by the end user, but that user reaps only a share of the benefits. This report, the first product of a study to quantify the value of DER, documents initial project efforts to develop an assessment methodology. The focus of currently available site-specific DER assessment techniques are typically limited to two parties, the owner/user and the local utility. Rarely are the impacts on other stakeholders, including interconnected distribution utilities, transmission system operators, generating system operators, other local utility customers, local and regional industry and business, various levels of government, and the environment considered. The goal of this assessment is to quantify benefits and cost savings that accrue broadly across a region, recognizing that DER installations may have local, regional, or national benefits.

Poore, WP

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

Reduced-dimension transistors: Reduced-dimension transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reduced-dimension transistors: the HEMT LECTURE 20 · Reduced-dimension transistors · HEMT · 2-D;8 For a finite well · Wavefunction not completely confined · Use undoped spacer #12;9 Employment of a spacer scattering (µ ). · Electrons and donors separated no I I scattering, i.e., µ · Undoped spacer also helps

Pulfrey, David L.

231

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O'Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O'Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Safety Science Article HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin displays enhanced anti-tumorigenic effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 27 March 2012 Accepted 5 April 2012 Available online 21 April 2012 Keywords: Stem cell by cardiac toxicity. The potential for cardiotoxicity is a major consideration in the design and development, such as trastuzumab. In this regard, HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin was developed to pro- vide clinical benefit

Zandstra, Peter W.

233

Expected Economic Benefits of the El Morillo Drain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with conservation of approximately 900,000 acre feet of water annually. Abstract The study of the benefits (damages averted) attributable to the El Morillo Drain encompasses U.S. municipalities, industry, and agriculture. It is conservatively estimated... ......................................................................................................................... 2 Benefits .............................................................................................................................. 4 Municipal Impacts...

Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; DuBois, Megan; Rogers, Callie; Seawright, Emily

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

Real time sensors in geothermal fluids: their costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of the PNL effort, a background discussion on geothermal power plants, and a discussion of several cases where problems were identified and in some cases prevented are included. Cost factors, savings, and benefits-costs to the sponsor are summarized and brief conclusions concerning the benefits of having real time instrumentation installed in the power plant are characterized.

Jensen, G.A.; Shannon, D.W.; Hazelton, R.F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE, WKK, WQQ1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE, WKK, WQQ1 The following is a brief description of your Health Net Pharmacy benefits. PRESCRIPTIONS BY MAIL If your prescription is for a maintenance medication III. For complete information, log on as a Health Net member at www.healthnet.com > View prescription

Mullins, Dyche

236

Duke University Health System Benefits Overview: Non-Exempt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection and Affordable Care Act (otherwise known as National Health Care Reform). You have the benefit Health Maintenance Organization, or HMO. If you choose this plan you must receive care fromDuke University Health System Benefits Overview: Non-Exempt 2014 We are pleased to provide you

Reif, John H.

237

Measuring the Costs & Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the Costs & Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) Deployment ­ A Progress to measure the costs and benefits of nationwide geothermal heat pump (GHP) deployment. · First market study to quantify the entire GHP chain ­ Manufacturing ­ Design ­ Installation · GHPsRUS is short for "geothermal

238

Photosensitizer Conjugates For Pathogen Targeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conjugate molecules which include photosensitizer compositions conjugated to non-antibody non-affinity pair targeting moieties and methods of making and using such conjugates are described.

Hasan, Tayyaba (Arlington, MA); Hamblin, Michael R. (Revere, MA); Soukos, Nikos (Revere, MA)

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

POLARIZED TARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Experiment 61 at Fermilab, which is a large collaborationBernie Sandler, From From Fermilab. Alan Jonckheere andTARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB Owen Chamberlain January 1977

Chamberlain, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Target Space Duality III: Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generalize previous results on target space duality to the case where there are background fields and the sigma model lagrangian has a potential function.

Orlando Alvarez; Blazej Ruszczycki

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Die-target for dynamic powder consolidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A die/target is disclosed for consolidation of a powder, especially an atomized rapidly solidified metal powder, to produce monoliths by the dynamic action of a shock wave, especially a shock wave produced by the detonation of an explosive charge. The die/target comprises a rectangular metal block having a square primary surface with four rectangular mold cavities formed therein to receive the powder. The cavities are located away from the geometrical center of the primary surface and are distributed around such center while also being located away from the geometrical diagonals of the primary surface to reduce the action of reflected waves so as to avoid tensile cracking of the monoliths. The primary surface is covered by a powder retention plate which is engaged by a flyer plate to transmit the shock wave to the primary surface and the powder. Spawl plates are adhesively mounted on other surfaces of the block to act as momentum traps so as to reduce reflected waves in the block. 4 figs.

Flinn, J.E.; Korth, G.E.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

THERMAL LOADING OF A DIRECT DRIVE TARGET IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optics. A background gas, such as Xe, could reduce the damage on the wall from ion and heat loading fusion micro explosion (~ 10 Hz), ions and heat loads threaten to damage the reactor wall and driver. · The thermal loading of a target (radiation from the chamber wall and convection from the protective gas) may

Raffray, A. René

243

VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL CALORIMETER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRIFT VC 1/2 FC 1/2 VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL DVC MC 13 HODOSCOPE H0 MONITOR BC 1/2 BC 3/4 TRD at Threashold Lambda Physics (u L spin transfer) Motivation: W L Target cell e beam L p p e Elastic: Peltier elements ( T ~ 20C ) Custom built electronics + HELIX chips low autgassing (

244

Comparison of Australian and US Cost-Benefit Approaches to MEPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Australian Greenhouse Office contracted with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) for LBNL to compare US and Australian approaches to analyzing costs and benefits of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS). This report compares the approaches for three types of products: household refrigerators and freezers, small electric storage water heaters, and commercial/industrial air conditioners. This report presents the findings of similarities and differences between the approaches of the two countries and suggests changes to consider in the approach taken in Australia. The purpose of the Australian program is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while the US program is intended to increase energy efficiency; each program is thus subject to specific constraints. The market and policy contexts are different, with the USA producing most of its own products and conducting pioneering engineering-economic studies to identify maximum energy efficiency levels that are technologically feasible and economically justified. In contrast, Australia imports a large share of its products and adopts MEPS already in place elsewhere. With these differences in circumstances, Australia's analysis approach could be expected to have less analytical detail and still result in MEPS levels that are appropriate for their policy and market context. In practice, the analysis required to meet these different objectives is quite similar. To date, Australia's cost-benefit analysis has served the goals and philosophies of the program well and been highly effective in successfully identifying MEPS that are significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions while providing economic benefits to consumers. In some cases, however, the experience of the USA--using more extensive data sets and more detailed analysis--suggests possible improvements to Australia's cost-benefit analysis. The principal findings of the comparison are: (1) The Technology and Market Assessments are similar; no changes are recommended. (2) The Australian approach to determining the relationship of price to energy efficiency is based on current market, while the US approach uses prospective estimates. Both approaches may benefit from increased retrospective analysis of impacts of MEPS on appliance and equipment prices. Under some circumstances, Australia may wish to consider analyzing two separate components leading to price impacts: (a) changes in manufacturing costs and (b) markups used to convert from manufacturing costs to consumer price. (3) The Life-Cycle Cost methods are similar, but the USA has statistical surveys that permit a more detailed analysis. Australia uses average values, while the US uses full distributions. If data and resources permit, Australia may benefit from greater depth here as well. If implemented, the changes will provide more information about the benefits and costs of the program, in particular identifying who benefits and who bears net costs so that programs can be designed to offset unintended negative consequences, and may assist the government in convincing affected parties of the justification for some MEPS. However, without a detailed and statistically representative national survey, such an approach may not be practical for Australia at this time. (4) The National Benefits and Costs methods are similar prospective estimates of shipments, costs and energy savings, as well as greenhouse gas emissions. Additional sensitivity studies could further illustrate the ranges in these estimates. Consideration of lower discount rates could lead to more stringent MEPS in some cases. (5) Both the Australian and US analyses of impacts on industry, competition, and trade ultimately depend upon sufficient consultation with industry experts. While the Australian analysis of financial impacts on manufacturers is less detailed than that of the US, the Australian treatment of impacts on market shares imported from different regions of the world is more detailed. No change is recommended. Implementing these changes would increase the depth o

McMahon, James E.

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. As the study title suggests, the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as 'economic savings potential'. Chinese energy demand has grown dramatically over the last few decades. While heavy industry still plays a dominant role in greenhouse gas emissions, demand from residential and commercial buildings has also seen rapid growth in percentage terms. In the residential sector this growth is driven by internal migration from the countryside to cities. Meanwhile, income in both urban and rural subsectors allows ownership of major appliances. While residences are still relatively small by U.S. or European standards, nearly all households own a refrigerator, a television and an air conditioner. In the future, ownership rates are not expected to grow as much as in other developing countries, because they are already close to saturation. However, the gradual turnover of equipment in the world's largest consumer market provides a huge opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation. In addition to residences, commercial floor space has expanded rapidly in recent years, and construction continues at a rapid pace. Growth in this sector means that commercial lighting and HVAC will play an increasingly important role in energy demand in China. The outlook for efficiency improvement in China is encouraging, since the Chinese national and local governments have implemented significant policies to contain energy intensity and announced their intention to continue and accelerate these. In particular, the Chinese appliance standards program, first established in 1989, was significantly strengthened and modernized after the passage of the Energy Conservation Law of 1997. Since then, the program has expanded to encompass over 30 equipment types (including motor vehicles). The current study suggests that, in spite of these efforts, there is significant savings to be captured through wide adoption of technologies already available on the Chinese market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. 'Short-term' market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while 'long-term' energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. Early in 2011, the Chinese government announced a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions intensity (per unit GDP) by 16% by 2015 as part of the 12th five year plan. These targets are consistent with longer term goals to reduce emissions intensity 40-45% relative to 2005 levels by 2020. The efforts of the 12th FYP focus on short-term gains to meet the four-year targets, and concentrate mainly in industry. Implementation of cost-effective technologies for all new equipment in the buildings sector thus is largely complementary to the 12th FYP goals, and would provide a mechanism to sustain intensity reductions in the medium and long term. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products, in the sense that delay of implementation postpones economic benefits and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponin

McNeil, Michael A.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; Qin, Yining; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Fridley, David; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reduced shedding regenerator and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

Qiu, Songgang (Richland, WA); Augenblick, John E. (Richland, WA); Erbeznik, Raymond M. (Kennewick, WA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Essays on prescription drug benefits in Medicare managed care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I estimate a structural demand model for prescription drug benefits by Medicare beneficiaries using data from the Medicare HMO program. I then use the utility parameter estimates to explore other questions ...

Hall, Anne Elizabeth, 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

DIRECTOR CIVILIAN BENEFITS CENTER Date: 3 October 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annuity. Join James Marshall of Federal Retirement Planning, LLC, as he discusses options you might.public.navy.mil/donhr/Benefits/ebis/Pages/Default.aspx. Thank you, Mary E. Foley #12;

251

Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large Diameter Fans on Air Cooled Heat Exchangers (A Case Study in the Use of Large Fan Air Cooled Condensers at the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal...

252

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Assessing the Benefits of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power during the August 14, 2003 Blackout Public Report Subcontract Number: 4000027086 June 2004 Prepared for: Jan Berry Oak...

253

We Benefit from That: A Novel in Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We Benefit from That is a novel in stories about one suburban family. The father, Tony, divorced with two kids, meets Elaine at a support group for children of alcoholics, and marries her. Together Tony, Elaine, and the ...

Anderegg, Elizabeth Anne

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: The Environmental Benefit...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Benefit of Bioenergy This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science...

255

Can propane school buses save money and provide other benefits...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Can propane school buses save money and provide other benefits? October 1, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint School districts across the country are looking for ways to save money and be more...

256

analyzes risks benefits: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the uncertainty and risk associated with power planning. The difficult lessons we have learned may benefit other parts of the country. In the 1970s, utility planners... Sheets, E....

257

Desiccants: Benefits for the Second Century of Air-Conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Desiccant technology now stands where mechanical cooling stood in the 1930's. Desiccant systems have been used by industrial engineers to achieve productivity and energy benefits which far outweigh their installed cost. Now, with lower cost...

McGahey, K.; Harriman, L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE FY 2015 Allocation Cost or Classified.2% URI Budget & Financial Planning Office 9.17.14 Office:fringebenefits:office of sponsored projects: FY2015 Allocation #12;

Rhode Island, University of

259

Net Benefits to Agriculture from the Trinity River Project, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to estimate the agricultural benefits due to flood protection provided by the proposed Trinity River Project. The area examined was the land located between the 100-year flood plain with the project and without...

Fish, B.; Williford, G.; Elling, H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hosch, P.; Griffin, W.; Reddell, D. L.; Hiler, E. A.; Bausch, W.

260

BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar 2 (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement 2, presented in October 2014 by Antonio Bouza and Jim Payne of the Building Technologies Office.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Program Focuses on Genetic Benefits and Improved Pregnancy Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sire evaluation and selection, diagnostic palpation, and other core practices. Since 2007, the schools 86,000 head of cattle. Economic Impact The economic benefit of the schools was measured in terms

262

additional virological benefit: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

benefits for the environment? Not all agree on this. This article discusses how a smart meter helps a utility to monitor energy usage. That monitoring data then allows the...

263

CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

264

2014 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT INSURANCE PLAN CONTACTS Health Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT INSURANCE PLAN CONTACTS Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield www.anthem.com ? BlueAdvantage Point of Service Plan (HMO/POS) ? PRIME Health Plan (PPO) and Custom Plus Health Plan Phone

265

Microsoft Word - Smart Grid Benefits Outway Costs_open.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RELEASE Tuesday, May 27, 2014 CONTACT: Teresa Waugh, 503-230-7536 or 503-230-5131 Smart grid benefits shown to outweigh costs Regional Business Case to help region make...

266

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

IPNS enriched uranium booster target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

Schulke, A.W. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grids potential contribution to the nations goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grids potential contribution to the nations goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

Scholten, Johannes

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reduced Crude Conversion-2: demetallization unit broadens RCC feed slate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Crude Conversion (RCC) process has been shown as capable of handling feedstocks with high levels of heavy metals contamination. This article extends the applicability of the RCC process further to handle feedstock derived in part from extremely high metal crude oils, in discussing a commercial unit installed by Ashland which is capable of metals removal using the ART technology. Nickel and vanadium removal from certain highly contaminated RCC feedstocks shown that the RCC unit with ART technology benefits from substantial catalyst savings while extending RCC technology to more challenging feedstocks. The demetallized product is mixed with virgin reduced crude oil and with lower metal content asphalts to provide feedstock for the RCC unit.

Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.; Krock, R.P.

1984-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

QWhat conservation plans and technical tools exist (or are needed) to better define and target environmental benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iowa's biofuels industry was creating economic competition to put more land into production production and lands that should be protected from conversion to agricultural crops? Approach and methods in March and April 2007. Competitive Grant Report EP2007-30 Adapting land retirement programs in response

Debinski, Diane M.

275

Benefits of master alloy melt treatments in the aluminum foundry industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general benefits of the master alloy approach to foundry melt treatment in terms of environmental and technical advantages are reviewed. New data on the environmental impact of master alloy treatments compared with other addition methods are provided. It is shown that use of master alloy grain refiners and modifiers can significantly reduce emissions from the foundry, thus reducing the need for capital investment in extraction or fume treatment equipment. New application areas for melt treatment are described with reference to strontium in gravity and high pressure die castings. The results of controlled trials on high pressure die cast A380 and gravity die cast A319 alloys are presented. It is shown that strontium offers benefits in terms of the redistribution of gross porosity and improvements to the consistency of casting properties as measured using Weibull statistics. Strontium modifies the microstructure, particularly of thicker section castings, virtually removing gross porosity leading to improved mechanical properties and a reduction in the variability of castings.

Cook, R.; Cooper, P.S.; Kearns, M.A. [London and Scandinavian Metallurgical Co. Ltd., Rotherham (United Kingdom)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of KeyElectrical Products: The Case of India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These products--refrigerators, room air conditioners, electric motors, and distribution transformers--are important targets for efficiency improvement in India and in other developing countries. India is an interesting subject of study because of it's size and rapid economic growth. Implementation of efficient technologies in India would save billions in energy costs, and avoid hundreds of megatons of greenhouse gas emissions. India also serves as an example of the kinds of improvement opportunities that could be pursued in other developing countries.

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert,Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reduced Harmonic Representation of Partitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present article the reduced integral representation of partitions in terms of harmonic products has been derived first by using hypergeometry and the new concept of fractional sum and secondly by studying the Fourier series of the kernel function appearing in the integral representation. Using the method of induction, a generalization of the theory has also been obtained.

Michalis Psimopoulos

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Announcing: All Recycling Reduce your  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Announcing: All Recycling Go Green! Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling toters and containers around campus. ONLY THE ITEMS BELOW ARE ACCEPTED FOR ALL RECYCLING Please do not contaminate the recycling containers with trash

Papautsky, Ian

279

Conservation Stand! Reducing My Commute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. + Diverts plastic waste for food production. + Placed beside window, replaces light input with solarConservation Stand! Reducing My Commute 72.6 mi to 5.1 mi #12;#12;Conserving Water and Energy or contribution to sedimentation. + Food produced on site without transportation costs. - Depends on energy input

Schweik, Charles M.

280

Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

04/18/2005 1 of 3 Voluntary and Involuntary Termination Benefits Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

04/18/2005 1 of 3 Voluntary and Involuntary Termination Benefits Guidelines Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement #47 requires two classification types of termination benefits voluntary and involuntary. Voluntary termination benefits include inducements to hasten separation from employment

Yamamoto, Keith

284

Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research...

285

Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 November 2014 Review of the...

286

A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production Print Thursday, 02 February 2012 13:34 The sesquiterpene bisabolene was...

287

Progress with developing a target for magnetized target fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to fusion where a preheated and magnetized plasma is adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions. Successful MTF requires a suitable initial target plasma with an embedded magnetic field of at least 5 T in a closed-field-line topology, a density of roughly 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, a temperature of at least 50 eV, and must be free of impurities which would raise radiation losses. Target plasma generation experiments are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the Colt facility; a 0.25 MJ, 2--3 {micro}s rise-time capacitor bank. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate plasma conditions meeting the minimum requirements for a MTF initial target plasma. In the first experiments, a Z-pinch is produced in a 2 cm radius by 2 cm high conducting wall using a static gas-fill of hydrogen or deuterium gas in the range of 0.5 to 2 torr. Thus far, the diagnostics include an array of 12 B-dot probes, framing camera, gated OMA visible spectrometer, time-resolved monochrometer, filtered silicon photodiodes, neutron yield, and plasma-density interferometer. These diagnostics show that a plasma is produced in the containment region that lasts roughly 10 to 20 {micro}s with a maximum plasma density exceeding 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The experimental design and data are presented.

Wysocki, F.J.; Chrien, R.E.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Whiteson, D.O.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Reducing carbon dioxide to products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approval of Its Amended Renewable Energy Plan. June 3, 2013.Benefits of Complying with Renewable Portfolio Standards:The Costs and Benefits of Renewable Resource Procurement in

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - andtechnology cooperation benefits Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

benefit others as an automatic... strict assumptions of tit-for-tat cooperation) to any interaction where costly benefits are exchanged... choice and sanctions are perplexing:...

291

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Target  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8, 2013 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY7,TankLifetime

293

Targets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWPCarbonTakeRVTape Mounts

294

Non-PGM Target Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at 0.80 V set for a measured activity target of 11 Acm 3 at 0.90 V, iR-corrected. (Equivalent to 300 Acm 3 at 0.80 V assuming 70 mVdec Tafel slope.) Consistent criteria...

295

Correlation of gross tumor volume excursion with potential benefits of respiratory gating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the magnitude of thoracic tumor motion can be used to determine the desirability of respiratory gating. Methods and materials: Twenty patients to be treated for lung tumors had computed tomography image data sets acquired under assisted breath hold at normal inspiration (100% tidal volume), at full expiration (0% tidal volume), and under free breathing. A radiation oncologist outlined gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the breath-hold computed tomographic images. These data sets were registered to the free-breathing image data set. Two sets of treatment plans were generated: one based on an internal target volume explicitly formed from assessment of the excursion of the clinical target volume (CTV) through the respiratory cycle, representing an ungated treatment, and the other based on the 0% tidal volume CTV, representing a gated treatment with little margin for residual motion. Dose-volume statistics were correlated to the magnitude of the motion of the center of the GTV during respiration. Results: Patients whose GTVs were >100 cm{sup 3} showed little decrease in lung dose under gating. The other patients showed a correlation between the excursion of the center of the GTV and a reduction in potential lung toxicity. As residual motion increased, the benefits of respiratory gating increased. Conclusion: Gating seems to be advantageous for patients whose GTVs are <100 cm{sup 3} and for whom the center of the GTV exhibits significant motion, provided residual motion under gating is kept small.

Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.org; Forster, Kenneth M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kitamura, Kei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Cardenas, Alex [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biomathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Accurate parameters of 93 solar-type Kepler targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed spectroscopic study of 93 solar-type stars that are targets of the NASA/Kepler mission and provide detailed chemical composition of each target. We find that the overall metallicity is well-represented by Fe lines. Relative abundances of light elements (CNO) and alpha-elements are generally higher for low-metallicity stars. Our spectroscopic analysis benefits from the accurately measured surface gravity from the asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler light curves. The log g parameter is known to better than 0.03 dex and is held fixed in the analysis. We compare our Teff determination with a recent colour calibration of V-K (TYCHO V magnitude minus 2MASS Ks magnitude) and find very good agreement and a scatter of only 80 K, showing that for other nearby Kepler targets this index can be used. The asteroseismic log g values agree very well with the classical determination using Fe1-Fe2 balance, although we find a small systematic offset of 0.08 dex (asteroseismic log g values are lower). The ...

Bruntt, H; Smalley, B; Chaplin, W J; Verner, G A; Bedding, T R; Catala, C; Gazzano, J -C; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Karoff, C; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Appourchaux, T; Campante, T L; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Handberg, R; Metcalfe, T S; Quirion, P -O; Regulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Morris, R L; Quintana, E V; Sanderfer, D T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The HERMES Polarized Hydrogen Internal Gas Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal gas targets. The HERMES hydrogen target is an internal polarized gas target using the storage cell frame on the right. atomic hydrogen beam and focuses it into a storage cell. The storage cellThe HERMES Polarized Hydrogen Internal Gas Target J. Stewart for The HERMES Collaboration

298

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYSIS OF FORECAST BASED REORDER POINT POLICIES : THE BENEFIT OF USING FORECASTS Mohamed Zied Ch^atenay-Malabry Cedex, France Abstract: In this paper, we analyze forecast based inventory control policies for a non-stationary demand. We assume that forecasts and the associated uncertainties are given

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 http://www.managenergy.net/conference/ren0702/gierulski.pdf #12;Biomass DHP of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n Technical assistance (,,Feasibility

300

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 #12;Biomass DHP/ CHP in Poland n Plan of the presentation n Promotion and dissemination of best practices (,,Promotion of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WE -ADKWindows Embedded Automotive Development Kit Benefits to the developer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WE -ADKWindows Embedded Automotive Development Kit Benefits to the developer: The Official-ADK, Microsoft Auto 4.1 installs on top of Windows® Embedded CE 6.0 R3 and adds automotive -specific an Automotive Infotainment Solution with Microsoft Auto 4.1 and Qualnetics WE

Narasayya, Vivek

302

The Benefits of Student Research in Information Systems Security Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to batteries. At the age of eight, I learned the difference between series and parallel circuits and how benefitted from that choice. Mrs. Demerec's classroom was like no other. Housed in the old cafeteria for the younger students. For example, in fourth grade I painted some cardboard boxes to look like houses

Irvine, Cynthia E.

303

New Jersey State Health Benefits Monthly Group Dental Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Jersey State Health Benefits Monthly Group Dental Rates Effective January 1, 2013 to December.68 305 CIGNA Dental Health, Inc www.cigna.com/stateofnj 800-367-1037 All of New Jersey (Except Cape May County); Eastern Pennsylvania $11.28 $19.63 $32.10 $23.79 307 Healthplex (International Heath Care

304

benefit description Mit student/Affiliate Medical plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that includes a variety of health care benefits. The MIT Student Health Plan is designed to fulfill the state is the Mit student Medical plan. It provides you with primary care, outpatient mental health care, and a wide hospitalization, inpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment, surgical procedures, and prescription

Polz, Martin

305

The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the costs and benefits of NEM to the Governor and Legislature. 4 Id. 5 California Solar Future: Growing to the total, "bundled" energy rate, which includes not only the cost of generation, but transmission of 2013 3 See Net Energy Metering Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation, Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc

Kammen, Daniel M.

306

Participant Benefit Booklet July 1, 2010 -June 30, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of New Mexico for its Public Operation known as University of New Mexico (UNM) #12;PHP Customer Benefit Booklet PPO Plan Plan Code: HWP10016 EFFECTIVE: July 1, 2010 Offered by University of New Mexico.................................................................... 19 Utilization Management Procedures

New Mexico, University of

307

Participant Benefit Booklet July 1, 2011 -June 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of New Mexico for its Public Operation known as University of New Mexico (UNM) #12;Presbyterian Participant Benefit Booklet PPO Plan Plan Code: HWP10016 EFFECTIVE: July 1, 2011 Offered by University of New.................................................................... 18 Utilization Management Procedures

New Mexico, University of

308

Participant Benefit Booklet July 1, 2012 -June 30, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of New Mexico for its Public Operation known as University of New Mexico (UNM) #12;Presbyterian Participant Benefit Booklet PPO Plan Plan Code: HWP10016 EFFECTIVE: July 1, 2012 Offered by University of New.................................................................... 18 Utilization Management Procedures

New Mexico, University of

309

Job Title Health & Group Benefits Intern (University Graduates) The Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Job Title Health & Group Benefits Intern (University Graduates) The Company Towers Watson is a leading global professional services company that helps organizations improve performance through.towerswatson.com/careers . Scroll to the bottom of the job search screen and enter in 6468 into the Search by Job ID field

Bowers, Philip L.

310

Job Title Health & Group Benefits Analyst (University Graduates) The Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Job Title Health & Group Benefits Analyst (University Graduates) The Company Towers Watson is a leading global professional services company that helps organizations improve performance through to the bottom of the job search screen and enter in 6468 into the Search by Job ID field then click search

Bowers, Philip L.

311

Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to operate fans cost 0.10 per kWh, the daily energy costdata, and energy costs of 0.04 per kWh for heat and 0.1 0.05 and 0.15 per kWh, the benefit-cost ratios are 80 and

Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Enhancing the Benefits of Geospatial Data NNeebbrraasskkaaMMAAPP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing the Benefits of Geospatial Data NNeebbrraasskkaaMMAAPP http://www.NebraskaMAP.gov Improving Access to Geospatial Data for Nebraskans More than 80% of the decisions made in government and the private sector are based on analyses of geospatial data. Such decisions involve property valuation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

313

Potential Materials Science Benefits from a Burning Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Materials Science Benefits from a Burning Plasma Science Experiment S.J. Zinkle Oak Ridge;Introduction · The main materials science advances from a BPSX would occur during the R&D phase prior to construction ­e.g., CIT/BPX, ITER · Materials science opportunities during operation of a BPSX would likely

314

ANIMAL TRACING: BENEFITS IN CATTLE INDUSTRY AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES The economic implications of foreign animal diseases and their mitigation options haveANIMAL TRACING: BENEFITS IN CATTLE INDUSTRY AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES LEVAN ELBAKIDZE Assistant Research Professor Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX, 77843

McCarl, Bruce A.

315

The Composition of Compensation Policy: From Cash to Fringe Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the design of incentives by employers. However, this issue has been surprisingly left aside of economic composition of the compensation policy with both monetary and nonmonetary incentives. We characterize over monetary and nonmonetary benefits is common knowledge to both parties, nonmonetary incentives

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

316

The Benefits of Planar Magnetics in OF Power Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is increased, are related to the magnetic components: transformers and inductors. Unless the copper and coreThe Benefits of Planar Magnetics in OF Power Conversion Planar Magnetics (PM): The Technology that Meets the Challenges of HF Switch and Resonant Mode Power Conversion Professor Sam Ben-Yaakov Department

317

results and benefits... Birmingham Cutting your CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results and benefits... Birmingham Cutting your CO2 Birmingham City Council July 2007 c a s e s t u of the BirminghamCutting CO2 campaign, news items, display materials etc. · Advising on pledge gathering materials system was launched in July 2007 as part of the `Birmingham Cutting Your CO2' campaign. By the end

Everest, Graham R

318

3DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total cost (quality level 2) $32.41 million Payback 0.7 years Quality level 1 buy-up estimate $203DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits (quality level 2) $45.73 million Estimated resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction

Torgersen, Christian

319

Benefits of Windows Small Business Server Code Name "Aurora"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits of Windows Small Business Server Code Name "Aurora" includes: Daily automatic backups Business Server Code Name "Aurora" provides an easy-to-use solution ideal for first server small businesses with up to 25 users, Windows Small Business Server Code Name "Aurora" provides a cost-effective and easy

Hunt, Galen

320

Benefits and Limitations of Tapping into Stored Energy For Datacenters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits and Limitations of Tapping into Stored Energy For Datacenters Sriram Govindan, Anand University Park, PA {sgovinda,anand,bhuvan}@cse.psu.edu Abstract. Datacenter power consumption has a signifBuff) available in the form of UPS batteries in datacenters for this cost optimization. Intuitively, eBuff stores

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Eat your way to better health Quality health plans & benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eat your way to better health Quality health plans & benefits Healthier living Financial well-being Intelligent solutions Good food is the key to good health If we ate a variety of healthy foods and didn't eat oils. Or those found in olive, canola and peanut oils. They can help improve your health when you use

Acton, Scott

322

The Impacts and Benefits Yielded from the Sport of Quidditch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grounded theory approach and examined the impact and benefits for volunteers who chose to work for the IQA. Findings suggested the unique atmosphere of quidditch was able to produce an environment that yielded positive impact on the volunteers. It was found...

Cohen, Adam

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Vacancy Chains Provide Aggregate Benefits To Coenobita clypeatus Hermit Crabs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy Chains Provide Aggregate Benefits To Coenobita clypeatus Hermit Crabs Sara M. Lewis-dwelling clownfish and cavity-nesting birds. Vacancy chain theory was developed in social sci- ence research to describe how vacancies involving discrete, reusable resources such as apartments or jobs will propagate

Lewis, Sara

324

Blue Choice New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue Choice New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards Reform Law. #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in Blue Choice New England, you

Aalberts, Daniel P.

325

Who benefits from the US withdrawal of the Kyoto protocol?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gases. This convention, called the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC and that Japan and Russia benefited from the United States withdrawal (in term of a priori decisional power). Key-made) interference with the climate system". The UNFCCC is the governing body for international negotiations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

An abrupt stochastic damage function to analyse climate policy benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the quantification of impacts at the local level, the effects of adaptation and mitigation activities, the definition-efficiency analysis to stochastic cost-benefit analysis. Early assessments highlighted that if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) con- centration is to be stabilised at a level of 450 ppmv or below, economically optim

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

327

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits EMPLOYEE___________ ACCIDENT DATA (to be completed by employee) Date of Injury_____/_____/____ Time of Injury the employee How did the injury or illness occur? (Describe fully the events that caused the accident) Describe

Jia, Songtao

328

Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major difference was that LBNL started working with the AEO 2004NEMS code and EIA was using AEO 2005 NEMS code. Unlike the High Price Scenario the Carbon Cap scenario gives a radically different forecast than the Reference Scenario. NEMS-LBNL proved that it can handle these alternative scenarios. However, results are price inelastic (for both oil and natural gas prices) within the price range evaluated. Perhaps even higher price paths would lead to a distinctly different forecast than the Reference Scenario. On the other hand, the Carbon Cap Scenario behaves more like an alternative future. The future in the Carbon Cap Scenario has higher electricity prices, reduced driving, more renewable capacity, and reduced energy consumption. The next step for this work is to evaluate the EE benefits under each of the three scenarios. Comparing those three sets of predicted benefits will indicate how much uncertainty is inherent within this sort of deterministic forecasting.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reduced Rank Models for Contingency Tables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution problem 73-14, Rank factorization of nonnegativein Great Britain Reduced rank models for contingency tablesclass analysis; Reduced rank models. 1. INTRODUCTION In

Jan de Leeuw; Peter van der Heijden

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

August 15, 2013 Bargaining Update 7: UC, Nurses' Union discuss benefits, workplace safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Revised eligibility rules for retiree health care Even with these changes, UC's retirement benefits organizations do not offer a pension plan and very few offer retiree health benefits. #12; These reforms key issues such as health benefits and post-employment benefits. In addition to providing employees

Leistikow, Bruce N.

331

Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AFLEET Tool allows fleets to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles.

332

Demonstration of Security Benefits of Renewable Generation at FE Warren Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report detailing field demonstration of security benefits of renewable generation at FE Warren Air Force Base.

Warwick, William M.; Myers, Kurt; Seifert, Gary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Enhanced video-based target detection using multi-frame correlation filtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most existing video-based target detection systems employ state-space models to keep track of an explicit number of individual targets. We introduce a framework for enhancing target detection in video by applying probabilistic models to the soft information in correlation outputs before thresholding. We show how to efficiently compute arrays of posterior target probabilities for every position in the scene conditioned on all current and past frames of a video sequence. These arrays can then be thresholded in the typical manner to yield more reliable target detections. Because the framework avoids the formation of explicit tracks, it is well suited for handling scenes with unknown numbers of targets at unknown positions. Simulation results on forward-looking infrared (FLIR) video sequences show that our proposed framework can significantly reduce the false-alarm rate of a bank of correlation filters while requiring only a marginal increase in computation.

Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya [Carnegie Mellon University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sun Life Financial (Sun Life) Benefit Adjudication Effective December 1, 2008, Sun Life became the health and dental benefits carrier for active  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sun Life Financial (Sun Life) Benefit Adjudication Effective December 1, 2008, Sun Life became to maintain the level of benefits coverage with Sun Life. Sun Life has identified a number of GWL practices not been processed by Sun Life The Pension & Benefits office was advised by GWL that they would process all

335

LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA); Corey, Garth P. (KTech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Benefits of ceramic fiber for saving energy in reheat furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractory ceramic fiber products offer thermal insulation investment in reheat furnaces by helping to keep operating cost low and product quality high. These products are used in a range of applications that include: furnace linings; charge and discharge door insulation; skidpipe insulation; and furnace repair and maintenance. The many product forms (blankets, modules, boards, textiles, and coatings) provide several key benefits: faster cycling, energy savings and personnel protection.

Norris, A. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reduced models for quantum gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The preceding talks given at this conference have dealt mainly with general ideas for, main problems of and techniques for the task of quantizing gravity canonically. Since one of the major motivations to arrange for this meeting was that it should serve as a beginner's introduction to canonical quantum gravity, we regard it as important to demonstrate the usefulness of the formalism by means of applying it to simplified models of quantum gravity, here formulated in terms of Ashtekar's new variables. From the various, completely solvable, models that have been discussed in the literature we choose those that we consider as most suitable for our pedagogical reasons, namely 2+1 gravity and the spherically symmetric model. The former model arises from a dimensional, the latter from a Killing reduction of full 3+1 gravity. While 2+1 gravity is usually treated in terms of closed topologies without boundary of the initial data hypersurface, the toplogy for the spherically symmetric system is chosen to be asymptotically flat. Finally, 2+1 gravity is more suitably quantized using the loop representation while spherically symmetric gravity is easier to quantize via the self-dual representation. Accordingly, both types of reductions, both types of topologies and both types of representations that are mainly employed in the literature in the context of the new variables come into practice. What makes the discussion especially clear is the fact that for both models the reduced phase space turns out to be finitely dimensional.

T. Thiemann

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Benefits of an International Database for UF6 Cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reasonable expectation regarding the nuclear energy renaissance is that the location of fuel cycle nuclear materials throughout the world will be known. We ask--would an international system for uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders provide the effective assurances expected for international fuel supply and of the international fuel centers? This paper introduces the question and discusses the potential benefits of tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders through the development of an international database. The nonproliferation benefits of an international database for UF{sub 6} cylinders being used in the fuel cycle include an enhanced capability to reconcile nuclear material imports and exports. Currently, import and export declarations only require the reporting of total 'rolled up' quantities of nuclear materials contained in all items--not the quantities of materials in individual items like individual UF{sub 6} cylinders. The database could provide supplier countries with more assurance on the location of the UF{sub 6} cylinders they export. Additionally, a comprehensive database on all declared cylinders would be a valuable resource in detecting and recognizing undeclared cylinders. The database could potentially be administered by the IAEA and be accessible to authorized countries around the world. During the nuclear renaissance, the general public, as well as the participants will expect transparency and quality information about movement of nuclear fuel cycle nuclear materials. We will discuss the potential benefits of such a database for the suppliers, inspectorates, and general public.

Babcock, R A; Whitaker, J M; Murphy, J; Oakberg, J

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

standard work specifications that define the outcomes of quality energy upgrades. Reduce energy upgrade costs and maximize energy cost savings by contracting quality work from...

343

Potential Dosimetric Benefits of Four-Dimensional Radiation Treatment Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the extent of dosimetric differences between conventional three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations and four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations based on deformation of organ models. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional dose calculations were retrospectively performed on computed tomography data sets for 15 patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer, using a model-based deformable registration algorithm on a research version of a commercial radiation treatment planning system. Target volume coverage and doses to critical structures calculated using the 4D methodology were compared with those calculated using conventional 3D methodology. Results: For 11 of 15 patients, clinical target volume coverage was comparable in the 3D and 4D calculations, whereas for 7 of 15 patients, planning target volume coverage was comparable. For the other patients, the 4D calculation indicated a difference in target volume dose sufficiently great to warrant replanning. No correlations could be established between differences in 3D and 4D calculations and gross tumor volume size or extent of motion. Negligible differences were observed between 3D and 4D dose-volume relationships for normal anatomic structures. Conclusions: Use of 4D dose calculations, when possible, helps ensure that target volumes will not be underirradiated when respiratory motion may affect the dose distribution.

Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.org; Britton, Keith [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kaus, Michael R.; Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

Darrow, P. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z. [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final report SI 08-SI-004: Fusion application targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex target structures are necessary to take full advantage of the unique laboratory environment created by inertial confinement fusion experiments. For example, uses-of-ignition targets that contain a thin layer of a low density nanoporous material inside a spherical ablator shell allow placing dopants in direct contact with the DT fuel. The ideal foam for this application is a low-density hydrocarbon foam that is strong enough to survive wetting with cryogenic hydrogen, and low enough in density (density less than {approx}30 mg/cc) to not reduce the yield of the target. Here, we discuss the fabrication foam-lined uses-of-ignition targets, and the development of low-density foams that can be used for this application. Much effort has been directed over the last 20 years toward the development of spherical foam targets for direct-drive and fast-ignition experiments. In these targets, the spherical foam shell is used to define the shape of the cryogenic DT fuel layer, or acts as a surrogate to simulate the cryogenic fuel layer. These targets are fabricated from relatively high-density aerogels (>100 mg/cc) and coated with a few micron thick permeation barrier. With exception of the above mentioned fast ignition targets, the wall of these targets is typically larger than 100 microns. In contrast, the fusion application targets for indirect-drive experiments on NIF will require a much thinner foam shell surrounded by a much thicker ablator shell. The design requirements for both types of targets are compared in Table 1. The foam shell targets for direct-drive experiments can be made in large quantities and with reasonably high yields using an encapsulation technique pioneered by Takagi et al. in the early 90's. In this approach, targets are made by first generating unsupported foam shells using a triple-orifice droplet generator, followed by coating the dried foam shells with a thin permeation barrier. However, this approach is difficult, if not impossible, to transfer to the lower density and thinner wall foam shells required for indirect-drive uses-of-ignition targets for NIF that then would have to be coated with an at least hundred-micron-thick ablator film. So far, the thinnest shells that have been fabricated using the triple-orifice-droplet generator technique had a wall thickness of {approx}20 microns, but despite of being made from a higher-density foam formulation, the shells were mechanically very sensitive, difficult to dry, and showed large deviations from roundness. We thus decided to explore a different approach based on using prefabricated thick-walled spherical ablator shells as templates for the thin-walled foam shell. As in the case of the above mentioned encapsulation technique, the foam is made by sol-gel chemistry. However, our approach removes much the requirements on the mechanical stability of the foam shell as the foam shell is never handled in its free-standing form, and promises superior ablator uniformity and surface roughness. As discussed below, the success of this approach depends strongly on the availability of suitable aerogel chemistries (ideally pure hydrocarbon (CH)-based systems) with suitable rheological properties (high viscosity and high modulus near the gel point) that produce low-density and mechanically strong foams.

Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, M Y; Dawedeit, C; Worsley, M A; Kim, S H; Walton, C; Gilmer, G; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Chernov, A A; Lee, J I; Willey, T M; Biener, M M; van Buuren, T; Wu, K J; Satcher, J H; Hamza, A V

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Targets and processes for fabricating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

Cowan, Thomas (Dresden, DE); Malekos, Steven (Reno, NV); Korgan, Grant (Reno, NV); Adams, Jesse (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Fuchs, Julien (Paris, FR)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Review of the Renewable Energy Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of the Renewable Energy Target Response to Expert Panel's Call for Submissions Paper #12;NSW Government Submission to the Review of the Renewable Energy Target, May 2014 2/20 Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY IN NSW

Peters, Richard

349

Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund incentive is available for companies that create high wage jobs in targeted high value-added industries. The incentive refunds up to $3,000 per new full...

350

Nanoparticles for targeting the infarcted heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a nanoparticulate system capable of targeting the heart after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting is based on overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in the infarcted heart. Liposomes 142 nm in ...

Dvir, Tal

351

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric-of-service regulation to market-oriented environments for many U.S. electric generating plants. Our estimates of input their wholesale electricity markets improved the most. The results suggest modest medium-term efficiency benefits

Kammen, Daniel M.

352

Development of granular target for CADS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subcritical core/blanket #12;· Solid target options, which consist of a solid material in the form of rods 5L/s Width of Lacuna 7cm #12;CW-316LSS The free surface in windowless target Water loop test-Parallel CFD (GPU) for Beam-Target-Coupled 15360 cores Test by the electron beam coupled with water Annular

McDonald, Kirk

353

Constraints on target chamber first wall and target designs that will enable NIF debris shields to survive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility target chamber interior materials and target designs themselves have to be compatible with survival of the final-optics debris shields. To meet the planned maintenance and refinishing rate, the contamination of the debris shields cannot exceed about 1 nm equivalent thickness per shot of total material. This implies that the target mass must be limited to no more than 1 gram and the ablated mass released to the chamber from all other components must not exceed 3 grams. In addition, the targets themselves must either completely vaporize or send any minor amounts of shrapnel towards the chamber waist to prevent excessive cratering of the debris shields. The constraints on the first-wall ablation require that it be louvered to provide passive collection of remobilized contamination, because the expected target debris will remobilize at a rate fast enough to require cleaning every 3 weeks, about three times more frequent than possible with planned robotics. Furthermore, a comparison of ablatants from B{sub 4}C and stainless-steel louvers suggests that remobilization of target debris by x rays will be greater than of the base material in both cases, thereby reducing the performance advantage of clean B{sub 4}C over much-cheaper stainless steel. Neutronics calculations indicate that activation of thin Ni-free stainless steel is not a significant source of maintenance personnel radiation dose. Consequently, the most attractive first wall design consists of stainless-steel louvers. Evaluation of various unconverted-light beam dump designs indicates that stainless steel louvers generate no more debris than other materials, so one single design can serve as both first wall and beam dumps, eliminating beam steering restrictions caused by size and location of the beam dumps. One reservation is that the allowable contamination rate of the debris shield is not yet completely understood.

Hibbard,W.; Burnham, A. K.; Curran, D. R; Genin, F. Y.; Gerassimenko, M.; Latkowski, J. F.; Peterson, P. F.; Scott, J. M.; Tokheim, R. E.; Whitman, P. K.

1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO{sub 2} emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives. Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions in the cement, iron &steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO{sub 2} mitigation scenarios and SO{sub 2} control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects. In the power sector, although the end of pipe SO{sub 2} control technology such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has the largest reduction potential for SO{sub 2} emissions, other CO{sub 2} control options have important co-benefits in reducing SO{sub 2} emissions of 52.6 Mt of SO{sub 2} accumulatively. Coal efficiency improvements along with hydropower, renewable and nuclear capacity expansion will result in more than half of the SO{sub 2} emission reductions as the SO{sub 2} control technology through 2016. In comparison, the reduction from carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is much less and has negative SO{sub 2} reductions potential. The expanded biomass generation scenario does not have significant potential for reducing SO{sub 2} emissions, because of its limited availability. For the cement sector, the optimal co-control strategy includes accelerated adoption of energy efficiency measures, decreased use of clinker in cement production, increased use of alternative fuels, and fuel-switching to biomass. If desired, additional SO{sub 2} mitigation could be realized by more fully adopting SO{sub 2} abatement mitigation technology measures. The optimal co-control scenario results in annual SO{sub 2} emissions reductions in 2030 of 0.16 Mt SO{sub 2} and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reductions of 76 Mt CO{sub 2}. For the iron and steel sector, the optimal co-control strategy includes accelerated adoption of energy efficiency measures, increased share of electric arc furnace steel production, and reduced use of coal and increased use of natural gas in steel production. The strategy also assumes full implementation of sinter waste gas recycling and wet desulfurization. This strategy results in annual SO{sub 2} emissions reductions in 2030 of 1.3 Mt SO{sub 2} and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reductions of 173 Mt CO{sub 2}.

Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Optimizing MapReduce for Multicore Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MapReduce is a programming model for data-parallel programs originally intended for data centers. MapReduce simplifies parallel programming, hiding synchronization and task management. These properties make it a promising ...

Kaashoek, Frans

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Significantly reduce maintenance time Documents&Mediabecomesthekey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significantly reduce maintenance time Documents&Mediabecomesthekey contactforallmaintenanceneeds. MajorpartsarestoredbyDocuments& MediaattheMissionCenter.Thisreduces thetimeneededtoorderpartsandresultsin&Mediaoffersthecampus communityaconvenientandeconomicsolution foritscopiers,multifunctiondevicesandprinter needs. Print Management Program advantages Reduce

Mullins, Dyche

357

Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

Cai, Hong (Los Alamos, NM); Goodwin, Peter M (Los Alamos, NM); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Nolan, Rhiannon L. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergy StevenHouseField Experiment |BenefitEnergy

359

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHumanJune 2008 Basic EnergyB. GrantBarry F. Smith,Benefits

360

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHumanJune 2008 Basic EnergyB. GrantBarry F.Benefits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ARM - Possible Benefits of Global Warming on Agriculture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP AnalysesListPossible Benefits of

362

Local firms benefit from Jefferson Lab upgrade | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local Correlations andLocal firms benefit from

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics to someone byEthanol Benefits

364

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the manufacturer . Replaced with energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) signs. Project reduced risk of tritium

365

Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

Rathore, Dharmendar (Blacksburg, VA); Jani, Dewal (Blacksburg, VA); Nagarkatti, Rana (Blacksburg, VA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fabrication of boron sputter targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI); Mruzek, Michael T. (Britton, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reducing the Energy Usage of Oce Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the Energy Usage of Oce Applications Jason Flinn 1 , Eyal de Lara 2 , M. Satyanarayanan 1 of the energy usage of Microsoft's PowerPoint application and show that adaptive policies can reduce energy research e#11;ort, no silver bullet for reducing energy usage has yet been found. Instead, a comprehensive

Flinn, Jason

370

Experimental Target Injection and Tracking System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targets must be injected into an IFE power plant with an accuracy of and plusmn; 5 mm at a rate of approximately 5 to 10 each second. Targets must be tracked very accurately to allow driver beams to be aligned with defined points on the targets with accuracy {+-}200{mu}m for indirect drive and {+-}20{mu}m for direct drive. An experimental target injection and tracking system has been designed and is being constructed at General Atomics to investigate injection and tracking of both direct drive and indirect drive targets. The design is modular to allow testing of alternate target acceleration and tracking methods. The injector system will be used as a tool for testing the survivability of various target designs and provide feed back to the target designers. This 30 m long system will be the centerpiece of a Facility for developing IFE target fabrication and injection technologies. A high-speed high-flow gas valve (designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will provide helium propellant gas to the targets. To avoid target damage from excessive acceleration, an 8 m gun barrel is being built to achieve 400 m/s target speed while not exceeding 10,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Direct-drive targets are protected in the barrel by sabots that are spring loaded to separate into two halves after acceleration. A sabot deflector directs the sabot halves away from the target injection path. Gas expansion chambers and orifices, keep propellant gas out of the target-tracking region. Targets will be optically tracked with laser beams and line scan cameras. High-speed computations will calculate target position in less than 2 ms based on the output from the line-scan cameras. Target position and arrival time to a plane in the reaction chamber center will be predicted in real-time based on early target position measurements. The system design, construction progress, and early testing results will be presented.

Petzoldt, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Alexander, N.B. [General Atomics (United States); Drake, T.J. [General Atomics (United States); Goodin, D.T. [General Atomics (United States); Stemke, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Jonestrask, K

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During the August 14, 2003, Blackout, June 2004 Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power During the...

372

Analysis of Battery Wear and V2G Benefits Using Real-world Drive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Battery Wear and V2G Benefits Using Real-world Drive Cycles and Ambient Data Analysis of Battery Wear and V2G Benefits Using Real-world Drive Cycles and Ambient Data 2011 DOE...

373

Sunk costs and sunk benefits in environmental policy : I. basic theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard framework in which economists evaluate environmental policies is cost-benefit analysis, so that policy debates usually focus on expected costs and benefits, or on the choice of discount rate. But this framework ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Awardee share: 378,732 - Funding for FY10: 627,151 * Barriers - Ground Source Heat Pumps - Reduce levelized cost of electricity (ton) by 30% by 2016 * Partners - Bob...

375

New Research Further Strengthens Evidence of the Benefits of the Health Care Safety Net  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expanding ISSUE BRIEF New Research Further Strengthens Evidence of the Benefits of the Health Care Safety Net

Dow, William H.; Roby, Dylan H. `; Kominski, Gerald; Jacobs, Ken

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A critical evaluation of benefit-cost analysis of population control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extended the model by applying cost-benefit ratio analysis in calculating the economic contribution of investment in population control [15; 16; 19; 24[. In his first attempt using a micro approach, he compared the present value of future consumption... of benefit-cost which is applicable to population control investment. Based on these findings, the foregoing controversies will be evaluated . CHAPTER II WELFARE ECONOMICS AND THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS Benefit-cost analysis has been...

Purba, Oloan Hasiholan Saur

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2007 Budget Request (GPRA 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE's programs, as described in the FY 2007 Budget Request.

Sheehan, J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

What Scientific Applications can Benefit from Hardware Transactional Memory?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving efficient and correct synchronization of multiple threads is a difficult and error-prone task at small scale and, as we march towards extreme scale computing, will be even more challenging when the resulting application is supposed to utilize millions of cores efficiently. Transactional Memory (TM) is a promising technique to ease the burden on the programmer, but only recently has become available on commercial hardware in the new Blue Gene/Q system and hence the real benefit for realistic applications has not been studied, yet. This paper presents the first performance results of TM embedded into OpenMP on a prototype system of BG/Q and characterizes code properties that will likely lead to benefits when augmented with TM primitives. We first, study the influence of thread count, environment variables and memory layout on TM performance and identify code properties that will yield performance gains with TM. Second, we evaluate the combination of OpenMP with multiple synchronization primitives on top of MPI to determine suitable task to thread ratios per node. Finally, we condense our findings into a set of best practices. These are applied to a Monte Carlo Benchmark and a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. In both cases an optimized TM version, executed with 64 threads on one node, outperforms a simple TM implementation. MCB with optimized TM yields a speedup of 27.45 over baseline.

Schindewolf, M; Bihari, B; Gyllenhaal, J; Schulz, M; Wang, A; Karl, W

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Defining groundwater remediation objectives with cost-1 benefit analysis: does it work?2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or decontamination are related to direct50 groundwater use. Benefits are often considered as avoided costs1 Defining groundwater remediation objectives with cost-1 benefit analysis: does it work?2 3 J.7 *Corresponding author (E-mail: jd.rinaudo@brgm.fr)8 9 Abstract10 The use of cost-benefit analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

383

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

384

Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2008 Budget Request  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE's programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs. Benefits for the FY 2008 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2008-2030) and long term (2030-2050).

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Explanations of FreedomCAR/DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Explanations of FreedomCARDOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Explanations of FreedomCARDOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Summary of FreedomCAR Targets and Basis for...

386

The study of downstream targets and other characteristics of NTT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAN DIEGO The Study of Downstream Targets and OtherOF THE THESIS The Study of Downstream Targets and Othera number of putative downstream targets of NTT, including

Fung, Michelle W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 February 2012 Targeted Review...

388

Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Targeted Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - April 2014 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - April 2014 April 2014 Targeted Review of...

389

Tensor Target Polarization at TRIUMF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first measurements of tensor observables in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ scattering experiments were performed in the mid-80's at TRIUMF, and later at SIN/PSI. The full suite of tensor observables accessible in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ elastic scattering were measured: $T_{20}$, $T_{21}$, and $T_{22}$. The vector analyzing power $iT_{11}$ was also measured. These results led to a better understanding of the three-body theory used to describe this reaction. %Some measurements were also made in the absorption and breakup channels. A direct measurement of the target tensor polarization was also made independent of the usual NMR techniques by exploiting the (nearly) model-independent result for the tensor analyzing power at 90$^\\circ _{cm}$ in the $\\pi \\vec{d} \\rightarrow 2p$ reaction. This method was also used to check efforts to enhance the tensor polarization by RF burning of the NMR spectrum. A brief description of the methods developed to measure and analyze these experiments is provided.

Smith, G

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposal to use polarized atomic hydrogen gas as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on the Moller scattering is described. Such a gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, would provide a target of practically 100\\% polarized electrons. It is conceivable to reach a $\\sim$0.3\\% systematic accuracy of the beam polarimetry with such a target. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed.

Chudakov, Eugene [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Luppov, V. [University of Michigan Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nancy Garland DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Operation at Sub- Freezing Temperatures DOE ProgramTargets and Workshop Objectives Sub-Freezing Temperature Effects on Fuel Cells...

393

Enterprise Assessments, Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

purpose of these targeted assessments was to evaluate the flowdown of occupational radiation protection program requirements into work planning, control, and execution...

394

Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits of the Solar America Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The President's Solar America Initiative (SAI) was launched in January 2006 as part of the administration's Advanced Energy Initiative. The SAI is being led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), with NREL providing analytical and technical support. The SAI has a goal of installing 5-10 GW of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States by 2015 and 70-100 GW of PV systems in the United States by 2030. To make PV cost-competitive with other energy resources, this requires that the installed cost of PV fall from approximately $8/Wdc in 2005 to $3.3/Wdc in 2015 and $2.5/Wdc in 2030. This report presents estimates of the potential energy, economic, and environmental benefits that could result should the SAI PV installation goals be achieved.

Grover, S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

Blink, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chapter Five Assessing the Economic Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given the strong link between economic performance and energy use, it is important for states to account for the macroeconomic effects of potential clean energy policies and programs during the process of selecting and designing these policies. Many studies have shown that when a state makes cost-effective investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy, the states entire economy will benefit. For example, Wisconsins Focus on Energy Program was created to manage rising energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect the environment, and control the states growing demand for electricity. An analysis conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Administration anticipates that it will meet these objectives while creating more than 60,000 job years, generating more than eight billion dollars in sales for Wisconsin businesses, increasing value added or gross state product by more than five billion dollars, and increasing disposable income for residents by more than four billion dollars

unknown authors

397

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mgel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Costs and benefits of energy efficiency improvements in ceiling fans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, especially in developing countries with warm climates. The paper provides analysis of costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans to assess the global potential for electricity savings and green house gas (GHG) emission reductions. Ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terawatt hours per year could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize potential savings.

Shah, Nihar; Sathaye, Nakul; Phadke, Amol; Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cryogenic Neutron Protein Crystallography: routine methods and potential benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of cryocooling in neutron diffraction has been hampered by several technical challenges such as the need for specialized equipment and techniques. Recently we have developed and deployed equipment and strategies that allow for routine neutron data collection on cryocooled crystals using off the shelf components. This system has several advantages, compared to a closed displex cooling system such as fast cooling coupled with easier crystal mounting and centering. The ability to routinely collect cryogenic neutron data for analysis will significantly broaden the range of scientific questions that can be examined by neutron protein crystallography. Cryogenic neutron data collection for macromolecules has recently become available at the new Biological Diffractometer BIODIFF at FRM II and the Macromolecular Diffractometer (MaNDi) at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To evaluate the benefits of a cryocooled neutron structure we collected a full neutron data set on the BIODIFF instrument on a Toho-1 lactamase structure at 100K.

Weiss, Kevin L [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL; NG, Joseph D [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Enrolling in Benefits Using PeopleSoft Use this document to assist in your benefits enrollment. Your New Hire packet contains the information you need to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to make your benefit elections. Save vs. Submit: You may Save your elections and return to make changes enrollment. Your New Hire packet contains the information you need to make benefit elections. If you require within the 30day window, but your elections will not be processed until you click Submit on the Submit

Goodrich, Lisa V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Benefits Office: Phone: (352) 392-2HRS Fax: (352) 392-5166 E-mail: benefits@ufl.edu Pet Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits Office: Phone: (352) 392-2HRS Fax: (352) 392-5166 E-mail: benefits@ufl.edu Pet Insurance* Injury Plan $5/paycheck* $5/paycheck* Veterinary Pet Insurance ® Veterinary Pet Insurance® is the nation's oldest, largest and number one veterinarian-recommended pet health insurance provider. With comprehensive

Mair, Bernard A.

402

Urban Design to Reduce Automobile Dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport energy and area of the city, but in terms oftransport energy (reduce the area for the city, i.e. ,

Newman, Peter; Kenworthy, Jeffrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel 2002 DEER Conference...

404

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport:...

405

Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

Aluffi, Paolo

407

Convective Heating of the LIFE Engine Target During Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Target survival in the hostile, high temperature xenon environment of the proposed Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine is critical. This work focuses on the flow properties and convective heat load imposed upon the surface of the indirect drive target while traveling through the xenon gas. While this rarefied flow is traditionally characterized as being within the continuum regime, it is approaching transition where conventional CFD codes reach their bounds of operation. Thus ANSYS, specifically the Navier-Stokes module CFX, will be used in parallel with direct simulation Monte Carlo code DS2V and analytically and empirically derived expressions for heat transfer to the hohlraum for validation. Comparison of the viscous and thermal boundary layers of ANSYS and DS2V were shown to be nearly identical, with the surface heat flux varying less than 8% on average. From the results herein, external baffles have been shown to reduce this heat transfer to the sensitive laser entrance hole (LEH) windows and optimize target survival independent of other reactor parameters.

Holdener, D S; Tillack, M S; Wang, X R

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

TARGET STATION INFRASTRUCTURE THE CNGS EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aluminum Water cooled Current: 150kA (horn) ­ 180 kA (reflector) Pulse duration 7ms #12;Key elements Remote handling Remote station for radiation survey in the target chamber #12;CNGS Target Area I per cooling circuit 2007 run radiation effects on ventilation system electronics broken flexible stripline

McDonald, Kirk

409

THE ROTATING TARGET FLOW TEST FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@idom.com) Fernando Sordo, ESS Bilbao Tom McManamy, ORNL/SNS #12;Status of the RTFT 4th HPTW of a RotaAng Target for ESS · In 2009 ESS Bilbao worked out a preliminary design for a rotaZng target for ESS. · Disc formed by un-clad tungsten bricks cooled

McDonald, Kirk

410

Target Options for a Neutrino Factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shield WC 6. Target station engineering Target integration Remote maintenance Shielding 7. Beam dump 7a possible/preferable? · Can the beam size be increased (from 1.2 mm (rms) baseline)? #12;Heat loads ­ Heating and material damage Issues ­ Heat load from 4 MW pulsed proton beam · Total Heat load

McDonald, Kirk

411

Possible Target Options Michael A. Green  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from low Z material. The target material should be ductile, with high thermal conductivity and should. These materials are strong and non- corrosive. The problem with niobium-titanium is its poor thermal conductivity, a desirable target material should have a medium to high Z. For low energy drivers the targe should be made

McDonald, Kirk

412

Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market structures like the EIM. In addition to more efficient energy transactions in the WI, the EIM would reduce the amount of flexibility reserves needed to accommodate forecast errors associated with variable production from wind and solar energy resources. The modeling approach takes full advantage of variable resource diversity over the entire market footprint, but the projected reduction in flexibility reserves may be overly optimistic. While some reduction would undoubtedly occur, the EIM is only an energy market and would therefore not realize the same reduction in reserves as an ancillary services market. In our opinion the methodology does not adequately capture the impact of transmission constraints on the deployment of flexibility reserves. Estimates of flexibility reserves assume that forecast errors follow a normal distribution. Improved estimates could be obtained by using other probability distributions to estimate up and down reserves to capture the underlying uncertainty of these resources under specific operating conditions. Also, the use of a persistence forecast method for solar is questionable, because solar insolation follows a deterministic pattern dictated by the sun's path through the sky. We suggest a more rigorous method for forecasting solar insolation using the sun's relatively predictable daily pattern at specific locations. The EIM study considered only one scenario for hydropower resources. While this scenario is within the normal range over the WI footprint, it represents a severe drought condition in the Colorado River Basin from which Western schedules power. Given hydropower's prominent role in the WI, we recommend simulating a range of hydropower conditions since the relationship between water availability and WI dispatch costs is nonlinear. Also, the representation of specific operational constraints faced by hydropower operators in the WI needs improvements. The model used in the study cannot fully capture all of the EIM impacts and complexities of power system operations. In particular, a primary benefit of the EIM is a shorter dispa

Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Computer Generated Reduced Iso-Octane Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Applied to Simulation of HCCI Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows how a computer can systematically remove non-essential chemical reactions from a large chemical kinetic mechanism. The computer removes the reactions based upon a single solution using a detailed mechanism. The resulting reduced chemical mechanism produces similar numerical predictions significantly faster than predictions that use the detailed mechanism. Specifically, a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for iso-octane has been derived from a detailed mechanism by eliminating unimportant reaction steps and species. The reduced mechanism has been developed for the specific purpose of fast and accurate prediction of ignition timing in an HCCI engine. The reduced mechanism contains 199 species and 383 reactions, while the detailed mechanism contains 859 species and 3606 reactions. Both mechanisms have been used in numerical simulation of HCCI combustion. The simulations show that the reduced mechanism predicts pressure traces and heat release with good accuracy, similar to the accuracy obtained with the detailed mechanism. As may be expected, emissions of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide are not as well predicted with the reduced mechanism as with the detailed mechanism, since the reduced mechanism was targeted for predicting HCCI ignition and not HC and CO emissions. Considering that the reduced mechanism requires about 25 times less computational time than the detailed mechanism (2 hours vs. 2 days), the ability to automatically generate a problem specific reduced mechanism is an important new tool for combustion research in general.

Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Chen, J Y

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Techniques for targeted Fermi-GBM follow-up of gravitational-wave events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are projected to come online 2015-2016, reaching a final sensitivity sufficient to observe dozens of binary neutron star mergers per year by 2018. We present a fully-automated, targeted search strategy for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in offline Fermi-GBM data. The multi-detector method makes use of a detailed model response of the instrument, and benefits from time and sky location information derived from the gravitational-wave signal.

Lindy Blackburn; Michael S. Briggs; Jordan Camp; Nelson Christensen; Valerie Connaughton; Peter Jenke; John Veitch

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of Mature Computations Ganesh Venkatesh, Jack Sampson! Dark Silicon #12;9 Conservation Cores Specialized cores for reducing energy ­ Automatically generated Conservation Core Architecture & Synthesis Patchable Hardware Results Conclusions #12;12 Constructing a C

Wang, Deli

416

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aims to reduce waste by banning plastic bags in light of the California state law AB 2449 which Primary energy Plastic uses 23% less Paper uses 80% less Solid waste Plastic contributes 76% less AbioticIdentify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most

Iglesia, Enrique

417

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 7. Effects of Alternative Energy Efficiency Businessand Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (and Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

Stefano Panebianco; Pavel Bokov; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

Panebianco, Stefano; Dore, Diane; Ledoux, Xavier; Letourneau, Alain; Prevost, Aurelien; Ridikas, Danas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100`s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots.

Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Particle production and energy deposition studies for the Neutrino Factory target station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet and solid tungsten bars.

Back, John J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S. [University of California Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: Risks and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996--1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 {micro}g/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level. Contrary to residents` perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted.

Chan, H.M.; Trifonopoulos, M.; Ing, A.; Receveur, O. [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada)] [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada); Johnson, E. [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)] [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Tests show benefits of new polished rod lubricator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests with beam-pumped oil wells, completed over 7-months at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (Rmotc), indicated that a new lubricator supplying supplementary grease to polished rods lowered operating costs by reducing maintenance, material costs, and electrical requirements. It also minimized polished rod corrosion and enhanced pollution control. The lubricator worked with extremely hot fluids and in adverse weather conditions. The paper describes Rmotc, the new lubrication, the test wells, and cost reduction.

Tyler, M.R.; Khatib, A. [Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center, Casper, WY (United States)

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Self-assessing target with automatic feedback  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self assessing target with four quadrants and a method of use thereof. Each quadrant containing possible causes for why shots are going into that particular quadrant rather than the center mass of the target. Each possible cause is followed by a solution intended to help the marksman correct the problem causing the marksman to shoot in that particular area. In addition, the self assessing target contains possible causes for general shooting errors and solutions to the causes of the general shooting error. The automatic feedback with instant suggestions and corrections enables the shooter to improve their marksmanship.

Larkin, Stephen W.; Kramer, Robert L.

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

429

Advances in target normal sheath acceleration theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical model of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) process, able to go beyond the limits of available descriptions, is developed. It allows to achieve a more satisfactory interpretation of TNSA. The theory, also supported by two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, elucidates the role played by the main laser and target parameters. Comparison between model predictions and experimental data related to the target thickness dependence of the maximum ion energy is discussed, showing satisfactory agreement. The model can be used as a simple but effective tool to guide the design of future experiments.

Passoni, M.; Sgattoni, A. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy); Perego, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Batani, D. [Universit Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France) [Universit Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

ESO Imaging Survey: Finding Targets for VLT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data from the wide-angle, moderately deep ESO Imaging Survey have been used to produce target lists for the first year of the VLT. About 250 candidate clusters of galaxies have been identified from the I-band images covering $\\sim$ 17 square degrees. In addition, using the multicolor data available over an area of 1.3 square degrees over 300 potentially interesting point-sources have been selected. The color-selected targets include low-mass stars/brown dwarfs, white-dwarfs and quasars. Images, object catalogs and derived target lists are available from the world-wide web (http://www.eso.org/eis)

L. N. da Costa

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy or creating waste? Big changes for a smaller carbon footprint and less pollution The Lab is working to reduce emissions by nearly 30 percent from energy use in...

432

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help...

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption Eric Niemeyer, Operations Superintendent Drilling Specialties Company A division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity...

Niemeyer, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Examples of Process Modifications that Reduce Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ideal approach to reducing or eliminating waste products is to avoid making them in the first place. This article will examine numerous process modifications that have accomplished that goal. We'll look at changes to raw materials, reactors...

Nelson, K. E.

436

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in Tempe's Emerging Urban Setting David V. Summers will be served) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 RSVP link: Download any free QR-Code reader app to your smart phone. Scan

Zhang, Junshan

438

Technologies for Reducing Nutrients in Dairy Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the amount of phosphorus that the river can accept safely. These limits, or total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), require that annual loading and annual average soluble concentrations of phosphorus in the river be reduced by 50 percent. To meet these new... standards, phosphorus must be reduced from dairy effluent applied to waste application fields. Consequently, dairies will need to adopt new, more effective and more efficient waste management practices. Case studies were conducted on a Geotube ? de...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Wagner, Kevin; Gregory, Lucas

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI . Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major... Subject: Aerospace Engineering A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI Submitted to Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content...

Mani, Somnath

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: JICA's Assistance for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents/201304-IPA-Renewables- Report.pdf. Springfield,and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards: ACommission). (2009). 33% Renewables Portfolio Standard:

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lurmann.2010. "Air pollution, health and economic benefits-health impact factors from the literature are used to quantify total harm attributable to indoor air pollution.

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides a summary assessment of concentrating solar power and its potential economic return, energy supply impact, and environmental benefits for the State of California.

Stoddard, L.; Abiecunas, J.; O'Connell, R.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Benefits, Challenges, and Implementation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation for the Clean Cities Website highlighting the benefits, challenges, and implementation considerations when utilizing natural gas as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam Relicensing Consumers Protection Act (1986), which instructs federal regulators to ``balance'' hydropower

Kotchen, Matthew J.

446

The Costs And Benefits Of Telecommuting: An Evaluation Of Macro-scale Literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Sector Public Infrastructure Environmental Impacts Energy Consumptionpublic-sector benefits are clearly the focus. Public infrastructure, environmental impacts, and energy consumption

Shafizadeh, K.; Niemeier, D.; Mokhtarian, P.; Salomon, I.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

448

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the eighth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Analyses were performed to determine the effects of coal product moisture on unit performance. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level affects parameters such as boiler efficiency, power required to drive the fluidizing air fan, other station service power needed for fans and pulverizers, net unit heat rate, thermal energy rejected by the cooling tower, and stack emissions.

Nenad Sarunac; Edward Levy

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Webinar: Targeted Algal Biofuels and Bioproducts FOA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Departments Bioenergy Technologies Office will present a live informational webcast on the Targeted Algal Biomass and Bioproducts Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001162) on October 8, 2014...

450

Beam Pulse Structure and Targets Roger Bennett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a target. The shock wave travels through matter at the speed of sound, where E is Young's modulus of elasticity and is the density. E s = #12;The time taken for the wave to travel from the outer surface

McDonald, Kirk

451

EMC effect: asymptotic freedom with nuclear targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General features of the EMC effect are discussed within the framework of quantum chromodynamics as expressed via the operator product expansion and asymptotic freedom. These techniques are reviewed with emphasis on the target dependence. 22 references.

West, G.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Statistical Modeling of Single Target Cell Encapsulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High throughput drop-on-demand systems for separation and encapsulation of individual target cells from heterogeneous mixtures of multiple cell types is an emerging method in biotechnology that has broad applications in ...

Moon, SangJun

453

Nanotechnology-mediated targeting of tumor angiogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Angiogenesis is disregulated in many diseased states, most notably in cancer. An emerging strategy for the development of therapies targeting tumor-associated angiogenesis is to harness the potential of nanotechnology ...

Banerjee, Deboshri

454

Computing the apparent centroid of radar targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-frequency multibounce radar scattering code was used as a simulation platform for demonstrating an algorithm to compute the ARC of specific radar targets. To illustrate this simulation process, several targets models were used. Simulation results for a sphere model were used to determine the errors of approximation associated with the simulation; verifying the process. The severity of glint induced tracking errors was also illustrated using a model of an F-15 aircraft. It was shown, in a deterministic manner, that the ARC of a target can fall well outside its physical extent. Finally, the apparent radar centroid simulation based on a ray casting procedure is well suited for use on most massively parallel computing platforms and could lead to the development of a near real-time radar tracking simulation for applications such as endgame fuzing, survivability, and vulnerability analyses using specific radar targets and fuze algorithms.

Lee, C.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Analysis of Climate Policy Targets under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although policymaking in response to the climate change is essentially a challenge of risk management, most studies of the relation of emissions targets to desired climate outcomes are either deterministic or subject to a ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

456

Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

457

SNS Target R&D Presented by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

since been resolved ­ QA program would have to be very stringent for long lifetime Second target station implemented #12;11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Spallation Neutron Source

McDonald, Kirk

458

Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction modification to improve energy efficiency.

Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Application of a Tractive Energy Analysis to Quantify the Benefits of Advanced Efficiency Technologies Using Characteristic Drive Cycle Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately predicting the fuel savings that can be achieved with the implementation of various technologies developed for fuel efficiency can be very challenging, particularly when considering combinations of technologies. Differences in the usage of highway vehicles can strongly influence the benefits realized with any given technology, which makes generalizations about fuel savings inappropriate for different vehicle applications. A model has been developed to estimate the potential for reducing fuel consumption when advanced efficiency technologies, or combinations of these technologies, are employed on highway vehicles, particularly medium- and heavy-duty trucks. The approach is based on a tractive energy analysis applied to drive cycles representative of the vehicle usage, and the analysis specifically accounts for individual energy loss factors that characterize the technologies of interest. This tractive energy evaluation is demonstrated by analyzing measured drive cycles from a long-haul trucking fleet and the results of an assessment of the fuel savings potential for combinations of technologies are presented. The results of this research will enable more reliable estimates of the fuel savings benefits that can be realized with particular technologies and technology combinations for individual trucking applications so that decision makers can make informed investment decisions for the implementation of advanced efficiency technologies.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agencys R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our clients efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fitting Reduced Rank Regression Models by Alternating Maximum Likelihoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fitting longitudinal reduced rank regression models byA J . (1965). Reduced-rank regression for the multivariateFITTING LONGITUDINAL REDUCED RANK REGRESSION MODELS BY

Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Creation of mixed beam from alloy target and couple of pure targets with laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To create mixed species ion beam with laser pulses, we investigated charge state distributions of plasma formed from both Al-Fe alloy targets and pure Al and Fe targets placed close together. With two targets, we observed that the two kinds of atoms were mixed when the interval of two laser pulses was large enough (40 ?s). On the other hand, when the interval was 0.0 ?s, we observed fewer Fe ions and they did not mix well with the Al ions. The two species were mixed well in the plasma from the alloy target. Furthermore, we observed that specific charge states of Fe ions increased. From the results, it was determined that we can use two pure targets to mix two species whose difference of the drift velocity is large. On the other hand, we must use an alloy target when the drift velocities of the species are close.

Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan) [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Munemoto, Naoya; Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Jin, Qianyu [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Economic Costs and Benefits of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMX)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Costs and Benefits of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMX) for BC and Metro.thegoodman.com November 10, 2014 #12;SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY Economic Costs and Benefits of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMX) for BC and Metro Vancouver ii Table of Contents 1 Executive Summary

467

HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE and 21B (HMO)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE and 21B (HMO)1 Plan codes WQQ and 22B (EOA)1 The following is a brief description of your Health Net Pharmacy benefits. PRESCRIPTIONS BY MAIL If your / $70 level III. For complete information, log on as a Health Net member at www.healthnet.com > View

Mullins, Dyche

468

The Intangible Costs and Benefits of Computer Investments: Evidence from the Financial Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Intangible Costs and Benefits of Computer Investments: Evidence from the Financial Markets Erik for computer capital in firm-level productivity studies. Costly investments in software, training the intangible costs and benefits of computer capital and we present several new empirical results based

469

ACADEMIC RESEARCH: A HIGH-COST, LOW-BENEFITS BUSINESS Denis Besnard & Lindsay Marshall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACADEMIC RESEARCH: A HIGH-COST, LOW-BENEFITS BUSINESS Denis Besnard & Lindsay Marshall School is a critical insider's look at the world of academic research. It has been written by one researcher and one, to the benefit of whom, and at what cost. 1. The absurdity of scientific publications Writing articles and having

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

471

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part are that it is the most proven waste- to-energy technology in the world, has demonstrated high plant availability (>90

472

Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Research Summary Critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Summary Critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits of initiatives to create infrastructure in sustainable development and the creation of attractive and economically vibrant communities. This study provides a critical review of evidence of the net economic benefits, both direct and indirect

474

Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E.R. Keeley1 , P.A. Slaney2 from the literature to assess the effects of stream restoration efforts on densities of salmonid fish

Keeley, Ernest R.

475

New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits. The report estimates that U.S. offshore winds have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater wind resources can provide many potential benefits, and with effective research, policies

476

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Conference Report - September 2007 & The Oil And Gas Development Partnership #12;ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR May 16, 2007 St. John's Conference Report September

deYoung, Brad

477

GENERATION Y PREFERENCES FOR EMPLOYER BRAND BENEFITS Chlo Guillot Soulez -chloe.guillot-soulez@uha.fr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATION Y PREFERENCES FOR EMPLOYER BRAND BENEFITS Chloé Guillot Soulez - chloe Manuscrit auteur, publié dans " " #12;Generation Y preferences for employer brand benefits ABSTRACT This paper studies the preoccupations of young graduates from Generation Y transitioning from education

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

478

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

1985-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "targeted benefits reduced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

Hirschfeld, T.B.

1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

482

Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

Pau, George Shu Heng

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

483

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI ReducingBurden Reducing

484

Reducing Power Factor Cost | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs ThroughReducing Power

485

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing PeakReducing

486

Fuel switching from wood to LPG can benefit the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Himalaya in India is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Various scientific studies have reported and proven that many factors are responsible for the tremendous decline of the Himalayan forests. Extraction of wood biomass from the forests for fuel is one of the factors, as rural households rely entirely on this for their domestic energy. Efforts continue for both conservation and development of the Himalayan forests and landscape. It has been reported that people are still looking for more viable solutions that could help them to improve their lifestyle as well as facilitate ecosystem conservation and preservation of existing biodiversity. In this direction, we have documented the potential of the introduction of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which is one of the solutions that have been offered to the local people as a substitute for woodfuel to help meet their domestic energy demand. The results of the current study found dramatic change in per capita woodfuel consumption in the last two decades in the villages where people are using LPG. The outcome showed that woodfuel consumption had been about 475 kg per capita per year in the region, but after introduction of LPG, this was reduced to 285 kg per capita per year in 1990-1995, and was further reduced to 46 kg per capita per year in 2000-2005. Besides improving the living conditions of the local people, this transformation has had great environmental consequences. Empirical evidence shows that this new paradigm shift is having positive external effects on the surrounding forests. Consequently, we have observed a high density of tree saplings and seedlings in adjacent forests, which serves as an assessment indicator of forest health. With the help of the current study, we propose that when thinking about a top-down approach to conservation, better solutions, which are often ignored, should be offered to local people.

Nautiyal, Sunil [Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socioeconomics, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Muencheberg (Germany)], E-mail: sunil.nautiyal@zalf.de; Kaechele, Harald [Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socioeconomics, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Muencheberg (Germany)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Economic and environmental benefits of advanced FGD technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1988, the U. S. Department of Energy selected Pure Air to build and operate an advanced flue gas desulfurization system under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal 2 Technology Demonstration Program. The objective of this project was to demonstrate that an advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system could be built and operated to comply with the impending requirements of the Clean Air Act at a cost of one-half of conventional AFGD systems that were then operating in the U.S. A second objective was to minimize/eliminate secondary solid and liquid by-product disposal problems from the AFGD system. These objectives were achieved by using the following strategies: reducing capital and operating costs by utilizing the most advanced technology features; producing and marketing commercial by-products; reducing the cost per ton of SO{sub 2} removed by achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and high system availability. Pure Air, in collaboration with Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO), which is the host utility for this project, commenced construction of this advanced AFGD system at NIPSCO`s Bailly station, located approximately 60 miles southeast of Chicago, in April 1990. The Bailly power station generates 528 MW of power from two boilers fired with high-sulfur (3 to 4 percent) Illinois Basin coals. The advanced AFGD system was constructed ahead of schedule and under budget and commenced operation in June 1992. It has completed its first year of operation with results achieving or exceeding project objectives. This chapter will summarize the design features included in this project to achieve the project objectives and strategies and the operating results achieved to date.

Conley, R.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

The CNGS Target Station Presented by L.Bruno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sealed system filled with 0.5 bar of He. The tube has annular fins to enhance convective heat transfer enclosure Inlet target Inlet fixed shielding Outlet Beam #12;The target Assembly The CNGS Target Station as

McDonald, Kirk

489

THE COMPETITION BETWEEN METHYLMERCURY RISKS AND OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID BENEFITS: A REVIEW OF CONFLICTING EVIDENCE ON FISH CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health concerns of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination of seafood have recently been extended to include cardiovascular effects, especially premature mortality. Although the fatty acids (fish oils) found in most species are thought to confer a wide range of health benefits, especially to the cardiovascular system, some epidemiological studies have suggested that such benefits may be offset by adverse effects of MeHg. This comprehensive review is based on searches of the NIH MEDLINE database and compares and contrasts 145 published studies involving cardiovascular effects and exposures to mercury and other fish contaminants, intake of fatty acids including dietary supplements of fish oils, and rates of seafood consumption. Since few of these studies include adequate simultaneous measurements of all of these potential predictor variables, we summarized their effects separately, across the available studies of each, and then drew conclusions based on the aggregated findings. It is important to realize that studies of seafood consumption encompass the net effects of all of these predictor variables, but that seafood intake studies are rarely supported by human biomarker measurements that reflect the actual uptake of harmful as well as beneficial fish ingredients. As a result, exposure measurement error is an issue when comparing studies and predictor variables. It is also possible that the observed benefits of eating fish may relate more to the characteristics of the consumers than to those of the fish. We found the evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of MeHg to be sparse and unconvincing. Studies of cardiovascular mortality show net benefits, and the findings of adverse effects are mainly limited to studies Finland at high mercury exposure levels. By contrast, a very consistent picture of beneficial effects is seen for fatty acids, after recognizing the effects of exposure uncertainties and the presence of threshold effects. Studies based on measured biomarker levels are seen to be the most reliable and present a convincing picture of strong beneficial effects, especially for those causes of death involving cardiac arrhythmia. This conclusion also extends to studies of fish-oil supplementation. Studies based on fish consumption show mainly benefits from increased consumption. This finding is supported by an ecological study at the national population level, for which the lifestyle effects that might be correlated with fish consumption within a given population would be expected to ''average out'' across nations. Finally, the net survival benefits resulting from eating fish are consistent with studies involving complete diets, although benefits are also seen to accrue from reduced consumption of red meat and saturated fats.

LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Combination process for upgrading reduced crude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reduced crude conversion process is described for heavy oil feeds having Conradson carbon numbers above two, which process comprises contacting a heavy oil feed with a catalyst to form products comprising lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and coke-on-catalyst, the coke containing minor amounts of hydrogen, and thereafter regenerating the catalyst by removing at least a portion of the coke.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

Bardsley, John

492

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

493

Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

494

Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

495

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE Brake Cleaner Recycling System Mercury Utility Devices Substitution 60 Hazardous Waste $1,750 $2,500 $1 of one PCB spill and clean-up event. Organic Solvents Substitution 678 Hazardous Waste $1,355 $36,500 $26

496

Kittiwakes strategically reduce investment in replacement clutches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kittiwakes strategically reduce investment in replacement clutches Julien Gasparini1,*, Alexandre). In birds, egg production is lower in replacement clutches than in first clutches, but it is unknown whether the replacement clutch is produced) or from a strategic allocation of resources between the two breeding attempts

Alvarez, Nadir

497

Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID. Abstract: The NIAID-funded SSGCID is a consortium established to...

498

Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,Y-12 National Security...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2015 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2015 March 2015 Targeted Review of Work Planning and...

499

EV Everywhere Electric Drive Workshop: Preliminary Target-Setting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Drive Workshop: Preliminary Target-Setting Framework EV Everywhere Electric Drive Workshop: Preliminary Target-Setting Framework Presentation given at the EV Everywhere...

500

Antibody-free, targeted mass-spectrometric approach for quantification...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

free, targeted mass-spectrometric approach for quantification of proteins at low picogram per milliliter levels in Antibody-free, targeted mass-spectrometric approach for...