National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tanzania togo uganda

  1. Trends in the clinical characteristics of HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 2009.therapy in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 2002 and 20092009 in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and in the International

  2. Embodied Energy of Fired Bricks: The Case of Uganda and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman; Cruickshank, Heather

    2015-07-30

    and wastes the energy while too little air flow will stop the fuel from burning properly. Providing dampers and wind breaks to control/protect the fire could greatly improve the fuel efficiency of kilns (Practical Action). 5. BRICK SUPPLIERS Artisans... , small- and medium-scale manufactures are the three major types of suppliers of bricks in Uganda (Table 2). Bricks produced by artisans take a larger share of the market compared to small- and medium-scale manufactured bricks. The handmade bricks...

  3. Office of Communication - Brochures Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tadjikistan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks & Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United...

  4. Sandia Energy - CACTUS Software Download

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay...

  5. Sandia Energy - SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States...

  6. Sandia Energy - MHK Materials Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay...

  7. Sandia Energy - Numerical Manufacturing And Design Tool (NuMAD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States...

  8. The work of vitalism : Murano Togo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuneishi, Norihiko

    2010-01-01

    Murano Togo (1891-1984) was a Japanese architect who based his practice in the city of Osaka. Throughout his long career, Murano won numerous awards, most notably the Order of Culture in 1967 presented by the Royal family. ...

  9. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to:bSouth Dakota:Togo: Energy

  10. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater NERC EQUIP;protected spring in Kampala (Uganda) · groundwater supplies 50% of world's drinking water Kundzewicz and Döll (2009) #12;maize plantation irrigated by a groundwater-fed pivot, Katwe (Zambia) · and 42

  11. L'IRD au BENIN, GHANA, NIGERIA et TOGO Rapport d'activit 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapport d'activité 2010 BENIN #12;L'IRD au BENIN, GHANA, NIGERIA et TOGO Rapport d'activité 2010 I'IRD AU NIGERIA p. 59 IV- L'IRD AU TOGO p. 61 Annexe 1 Publications Annexe 2 Organigramme Annexe 3 Budget

  12. Language Shift and National Identity in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngonyani, Deo

    1995-01-01

    School Students in Tanzania." ms. University of DaresPurposes: The Example of Tanzania." International Review ofEmerging Evidence from Tanzania." International Review of

  13. Women in Tanzania: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Sandra

    1983-01-01

    1983. 256 pages. Women in Tanzania: In the last decade, weing countries, Africa and Tanzania, and then moving on toduction and reproduction in Tanzania" because the oppression

  14. Tanzania Partnership Program An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanzania Partnership Program An Overview PartnershipsforSustainableCommunityDevelopment Michigan The Tanzania Partnership Program (TPP) provides an opportunity to develop, test, and refine the PSCD model. Tanzania was selected as the initial location for PSCD based on demonstrated need, potential for success

  15. Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda...

  16. Solar Power for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Christine; Gerace, Jay; Mehner, Nicole; Mohamed, Sharif; Reiss, Kelly

    1999-12-06

    Condensed list of products and activities: 8 educational posters and 1 informational brochure (all original illustrations and text); a business plan with micro-agreements; corporation created called Tanzanian Power, LLC; business feasibility study developed with the University of Albany; Hampshire College collaborated in project development; research conducted seeking similar projects in underdeveloped countries; Citibank proposal submitted (but rejected); cleaned and sent PV panels to Tanzania; community center built in Tanzania; research and list provided to Robinson for educational TV videos and product catalogs; networked with Chase Manhattan Bank for new solar panels; maintained flow of information among many people (stateside and Tanzania); wrote and sent press releases and other outreach information. Several families purchased panels.

  17. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  18. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

  19. Prescribing aid coordination in Uganda’s health sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Emma Michelle

    2011-11-22

    This thesis aims to contribute to the body of work that seeks to unpack development by asking: how does development work? Using a purposive case study of Uganda and taking a mixed methods approach, the thesis explores ...

  20. Tanzania's New National Stadium and the Rhetoric of Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sortijas, Steve

    2007-01-01

    topic/national-stadium-tanzania. Accessed on June 10, 2007.Review, June 2007. "Tanzania contractors thriving despiteof the United Republic of Tanzania, His Excellency Jakaya

  1. Local Responses to Marine Conservation in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Arielle

    2006-01-01

    World  Bank.     2005.     Tanzania:  World  Bank  Supports Management  Project  in  Tanzania.     News Re? lease No: development in Tanzania: studies on ac? cumulation 

  2. Political accountability at the local level in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Barak Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Surplus Labor: The Case of Tanzania. Paris: Organization forand Service Delivery in Tanzania. A Summary of Findings from1995. Land Tenure Reform in Tanzania: Legal Problems and

  3. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania Munenobu IkegamiEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania. CEGA Working Paper SeriesEvidence from Kagera, Tanzania ? Munenobu Ikegami † August

  4. Local responses to marine conservation in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Arielle

    2004-01-01

    Liberalized development in Tanzania: studies on accumulationbased Conservation in Tanzania. Occasional paper of the IUCNConservation Assistance in Tanzania. World Development. 30(

  5. UCD COMPUTERS FOR TANZANIA The Computers for Tanzania project is progressing well, but we still need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCD COMPUTERS FOR TANZANIA The Computers for Tanzania project is progressing well, but we still and the installation of the computers. UCDVO members will be traveling to Tanzania in the summer. All makes and models

  6. Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania WST 4417/6934 Gender, Culture, and Social Change in Africa: A Case Study of Tanzania May 9th -May 25th , 2015 Course Instructor: Dr. Josephine the Universities of Tanzania will present some guest lectures and lead class discussions. Topics to be covered

  7. Malaria control in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yhdego, M.; Majura, P. )

    1988-01-01

    A review of the malaria control programs and the problem encountered in the United Republic of Tanzania since 1945 to the year 1986 is discussed. Buguruni, one of the squatter areas in the city of Dar es Salaam, is chosen as a case study in order to evaluate the economic advantage of engineering methods for the control of malaria infection. Although the initial capital cost of engineering methods may be high, the cost effectiveness requires a much lower financial burden of only about Tshs. 3 million compared with the conventional methods of larviciding and insecticiding which requires more than Tshs. 10 million. Finally, recommendations for the adoption of engineering methods are made concerning the upgrading of existing roads and footpaths in general with particular emphasis on drainage of large pools of water which serve as breeding sites for mosquitoes.

  8. The Tanzania Summer Program Dr. Stoltzfus directs a summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    The Tanzania Summer Program Dr. Stoltzfus directs a summer program for Cornell Cornell University and Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College (KCMC) in Moshi, Tanzania. REBECCA STOLTZFUS knowledge. Students come away from Tanzania learning things that I dont know because theyre experienced

  9. The Position of Women on Rural Development Schemes in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain, James L.

    1975-01-01

    Status of \\'tm! n in Tanzania" canadian JournaZ of African~ PeopZes of Eastern Tanzania Ethnograpric Survey of Africaof court recxmls in Tanzania will show that a very 1aJ:9e

  10. The need to reemphasize behavior change for hiv prevention in Uganda: A qualitative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, EC; Kajubi, P; Ruark, A; Kamya, S; D'Errico, N; Hearst, N

    2013-01-01

    Ministry of Health (MOH) and ORC Macro. 2006. Uganda HI V/2005. Calverton, MD: MOH and ORC Macro. UNAIDS (Joint Unitedepidemic” (Uganda MOH and ORC Macro 2006: 3).Under Uganda’s

  11. Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Max Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Offshore Togo, West Africa provides exciting potential for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration is limited to four wells, drilled prior to 1986 in shallow water. This investigation focuses on a 625 km² section of 3100 km² of high quality...

  12. A Case Study of the Integration of Environmental, Development, and Reproductive Health Programs: TACARE-Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strunden, George; Gordon, Deanna; Greig, Fiona; Potts, Malcolm

    2002-01-01

    Grant proposal to the Packard Foundation. Maweni, Tanzania.Bureau of Statistics [Tanzania] and Macro InternationalInc. (1997). Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 1996.

  13. Tanzania: Crisis and Struggle for Survival by Jannik Boeson, et. Al. (eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Hilarie

    1988-01-01

    be necessary. Joyce Boss Tanzania: Crisis and Struggle forin a debate on whether Tanzania is a model for Africansuperficial, and heedless of Tanzania's particular needs.

  14. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Village Vigilante Groups in Tanzania. African Affairs 86:Groups among the Kuria of Tanzania. Africa: Journal of theRevivalism a Threat to Tanzania's Stability. In Questioning

  15. Negotiating reforms at home: Natural resources and the politics of energy access in urban Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanadan, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Eberhard, A. (2003). Tanzania Profile of the Electricityhousehold energy use in Tanzania." Energy Policy May: 454-of Social Unity in Tanzania." Journal of Modern African

  16. The Budget and the People: Reflections on the 1984 Budget in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Horace

    1985-01-01

    Salaam , 1979. Laws of Tanzania Art . 6 of 1983. Development215. See The Structural Adjustment Programne for Tanzania.Republic of Tanzania Ministry of Planning and Economic

  17. Addressing gaps in surgical skills training by means of low-cost simulation at Muhimbili University in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taché, Stephanie; Mbembati, Naboth; Marshall, Nell; Tendick, Frank; Mkony, Charles; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Muhimbili University in Tanzania Stephanie Taché †1 , NabothSciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and 3 Department of Healthis essential, particularly in Tanzania, where the mortality

  18. The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

    2007-01-01

    ecosystem of western Tanzania. Forest Ecology and ManagementFeylininae) from western Tanzania. Proceedings of theinto Rukwa Region, Tanzania. Cahiers d'Afrique 20:1-22.

  19. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng'habi, Kija R; Knols, Bart GJ; Lee, Yoosook; Ferguson, Heather M; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    from seven locations in Tanzania: six from the Kilomberothe Kilombero valley (Tanzania), showing mosquito collectionKilombero Valley, southern Tanzania. Both species occur in

  20. Incentivising safe sex: A randomised trial of conditional cash transfers for HIV and sexually transmitted infection prevention in rural Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    CCT for HIV/STI prevention in Tanzania related behaviors insurveillance system, Tanzania. In: Sankoh OA, Kahn K,infection prevention in rural Tanzania Damien de Walque, 1

  1. Mapping ntfp collection in Tanzania: A comparison of surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    1 Mapping ntfp collection in Tanzania: A comparison of surveys Marije Schaafsma 05 2012 CSERGE Working Paper 2012-05 #12;2 MAPPING NTFP COLLECTION IN TANZANIA: A COMPARISON OF SURVEYS Marije Schaafsma (NTFP) collection and income in the Eastern Arc Mountains (EAM) in Tanzania, using data of the Tanzanian

  2. Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania Fortunata U and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, U.K.; 3 Tanzania National Parks, PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania; 4 Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania; 5 Center for Collaborative

  3. Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania Brendan, Tanzania c World Wildlife Fund Tanzania Programme Office, Dar es Salaam PO Box 63117, Tanzania d services Common pool resources Payments for ecosystem services Water payments Tanzania Research into common

  4. Mass Adult Education: A Necessary Element in the Development of Socialism in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Budd L.

    1972-01-01

    on aduLt education in Tanzania. He is currentLy head of theof Adul-t Educators in Tanzania. A paper delivered at theAduLt Education in Tanzania-- A Handbook on Approaches,

  5. Problems in the Study of Witchcraft Eradication Movements in Southern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. Zar~a, N~ge~a .Mahenge Ulanga District, Tanzania," in Sholto cross and T.O.Eastern. 16 August 1946. Tanzania National Archives:

  6. A hydrogeochemical survey of Kilimanjaro (Tanzania): implications for water sources and ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    A hydrogeochemical survey of Kilimanjaro (Tanzania): implications for water sources and ages Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, the highest mountain in Africa, has undergone extensive hydrologic changes over (Tanzania). Sample sources included four glaciers, seven groundwater wells, 12 rivers, 10 springs

  7. What Role Can History Play for the Newly Urbanized Women of Kenya and Tanzania?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landau, Loren B.

    1995-01-01

    for Emplo~nr Riglus in Tanzania (London: The Women's Press,both between Kenya and Tanzania and between urban Eastpeople of South Eastern Tanzania. 6 A comparison with Latin

  8. The effect of Abstinence, Being faithful to one partner, and Condom use (ABC) messages on HIV infection among youth in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekwaru, John Paul

    2012-01-01

    of Health (MOH) [Uganda] and ORC Macro Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-USA: Ministry of Health and ORC Macro, 2006. 7. Harrison A,of Health (MOH) [Uganda] and ORC Macro Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-

  9. Who Changes How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviors in the Context of an Economic-based HIV Prevention Intervention in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packel, Laura

    2010-01-01

    and couples in Kenya, Tanzania, and Trinidad: a randomisedcollected in rural northern Tanzania using five methods.planning, 38(3), 147-162. Tanzania Commission for AIDS. (

  10. Implementing poultry vaccination and biosecurity at the village level in Tanzania: a social strategy to promote health in free-range poultry populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    in village chickens in Tanzania. Unpublished DissertationAgricul- ture, Morogoro, Tanzania. 230 pp. Yongolo, M.G.S. ,village in Morogoro Region, Tanzania. In: Proceedings of the

  11. HIV Testing, Tuberculosis, and AIDS Stigma in Kampala, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Samuel J

    2008-01-01

    503. Ministry of Health and ORC Macro (2006). Uganda HIV/Maryland, Minstry of Health and ORC Macro,. Monico, S.M. ,rates (Ministry of Health and ORC Macro 2006). HIV sentinel

  12. Institutions and the Volatility Curse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leong, Weishu; Mohaddes, Kamiar

    2011-07-10

    and 12 can be found in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Our sample also includes 32 out of the 34 OECD countries and 8 out of the 12 of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Thus our sample is very comprehensive... -Bissau Netherlands Tanzania Cameroon Guyana New Zealand Thailand Canada Haiti Nicaragua Togo Central African Rep. Honduras Niger Trinidad and Tobago Chad Hungary Nigeria Tunisia Chile India Norway Turkey China, People?s Rep. of Indonesia Oman Uganda Colombia Iran, I...

  13. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania J.A. Sathaye 1 , W.R.in the forest sector in Tanzania’, Mitigation and Adaptationin the forest sector of Tanzania’, LBNL-43966. Submitted to:

  14. Imbalances in the Modernization and Promotion of the Swahili Language in East Africa: The Case of Kenya and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryanga, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    wa Kiswahili ra Ushairi Tanzania." It is an au1000mous bodyAFRICA: TIIE CASE OF KENYA AND TANZANIA by Sheila Ryanga bi:organized between Tanzania and Kenya have focussed on the

  15. Chagga elites and the politics of ethnicity in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Thomas James

    2012-06-29

    The focus of this thesis is on elite members of the Chagga ethnic group. Originating from the fertile yet crowded slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro, this group is amongst the most entrepreneurial and best educated in Tanzania. ...

  16. Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvell, Catherine Drew

    Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania Molly A, Washington, DC, USA c Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Zanzibar, Tanzania a r t i c

  17. Precambrian Research xxx (2006) xxxxxx Anorthosites in the Eastern Granulites of Tanzania--New SIMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Precambrian Research xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Anorthosites in the Eastern Granulites of Tanzania, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Received 12 May 2005; received in revised form 3 March 2006; accepted 7 in Tanzania. These are tectonically incorporated into a suite of enderbitic rocks and migmatitic orthogneisses

  18. Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan owing to supply shocks in major exporting regions, Tanzania may be able to export more maize at higher

  19. Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra-focus earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations of the Tanzania network to estimate regional variation of sublithospheric mantle attenuation beneath the Tanzania craton and the eastern branch of the East African Rift

  20. Origins of non-equilibrium lithium isotopic fractionation in xenolithic peridotite minerals: Examples from Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    : Examples from Tanzania Sonja Aulbach , Roberta L. Rudnick Geochemistry Laboratory, Department of Geology metasomatised peridotite xenoliths from three lithospheric mantle sectionsbeneath theEast African Rift inTanzania, if the samples were erupted in lavas. In Tanzania, the peridotites experienced rift-related heating prior

  1. Herd size of Common Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) in Relation to Cover Type in Northern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Tanzania Emily Chudek University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Spring 2014 resources distributed within each park. Methods Study Area: Four areas throughout Northern Tanzania wildebeest in Tanzania. Figure 1: All data across entire study area. The median is the line between

  2. Targeting in a Community-Driven Development Program: Applications & Acceptance in Tanzania's TASAF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Targeting in a Community-Driven Development Program: Applications & Acceptance in Tanzania's TASAF the targeting of a major community-driven development program, Tanzanias $150m Social Action Fund (TASAF). We, this community may be better organized, more educated, and more patient. We use data from Tanzanias Social Action

  3. Determining the optimal river gauge location for a flood early warning system in Uganda using HEC-RAS and AHP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Joyce, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Flooding of the Manafwa River in Eastern Uganda causes significant damage in the district of Butaleja, and often occurs without advance warning. In 2012, the American Red Cross in Uganda requested MIT to develop a flood ...

  4. "Telling Your Father That He's Wrong": The Politics of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zlatunich, Nichole

    2012-01-01

    of Local Government 2011). (ORC Macr o 201 1). (Lloy d,and Development 23:105-113. ORC Macro. 2011, "Statcompiler,Uganda Ministry of Health and ORC Macro. 2006. Uganda HIV/

  5. Savanna Sounds : : Using Remote Acoustic Sensing to Study Spatiotemporal Patterns in Wild Chimpanzee Loud Vocalizations in the Issa Valley, Ugalla, Western Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piel, Alexander Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    movement in western Tanzania. PLoS One 8(3). Stewart, F.A. ,report from Ugalla, western Tanzania. Primates 55(1):35-40.Habitat: the Issa Valley, Tanzania. International Journal of

  6. The Making of the Entrepreneur in Tanzania: experimenting with neo-liberal power through discourses of partnership, entrepreneurship, and participatory education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boner, Elizabeth Helene

    2011-01-01

    as governmentality in Tanzania. In D. Mosse & D. Lewis (Hip Hop Language in Tanzania. In H. S. Alim, A. Ibrahim & A.on poverty reduction in Tanzania. Paper presented at the The

  7. For more than half a century, the Ministry of Water, the Dodoma Urban Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (DUWASA) and the Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Authority (DUWASA) and the Tanzania Meteorological Agency have been monitoring groundwater abstraction, groundwater levels, and rainfall in central Tanzania at the Makutapora Wellfield (Figure 1

  8. Greenhouse gases mitigation options and strategies for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwandosya, M.J.; Meena, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    Tanzania became a party to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UN FCCC) when she ratified the Convention in March, 1996. Now that Tanzania and other developing countries are Parties to the UN FCCC, compliance with its provisions is mandatory. The legal requirements therefore provide a basis for their participation in climate change studies and policy formulation. All parties to the Convention are required by Article 4.1 of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) to develop, periodically update, publish, and make available national inventories of anthropogenic emissions and removal of greenhouse gases that are not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This study on possible options for the mitigation of greenhouse gases in Tanzania is a preliminary effort towards the fulfilment of the obligation. In order to fulfil their obligations under the UN FCCC and have a meaningful mitigation assessment, identification and quantification of anthropogenic sources of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases in the country was undertaken. In this respect, the study of anthropogenic emissions by source and removals by sink of GHGs in Tanzania was done with the main objective of increasing the quantity and quality of base-line data available in order to further scientific understanding of the relationship of greenhouse gas emissions to climate change. Furthermore, the study facilitated identification of national policy and technological options that could reduce the level of emissions in the country.

  9. INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES INDIANA UNIVERSITY TANZANIA FIELD COURSE 1001 E. 10 th ST. BLOOMINGTON, IN 47405 USA #12;

  10. The Political economy of the Film Industry in Tanzania: From Socialism to an Open Market economy, 1961-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwakalinga, Mona Ngusekela

    2010-12-15

    This study examines the film industry in Tanzania from the 1960s to 2010 and assesses how government policies, legislation, and cultural institutions have impacted filmmaking in Tanzania. By employing a critical political economy theoretical...

  11. Towards transferable functions for extraction of Non-timber Forest Products: A case study on charcoal production in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    on charcoal production in Tanzania M. Schaafsma a, , S. Morse-Jones a , P. Posen a , R.D. Swetnam b , A, University of Copenhagen, Denmark e Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Morogoro, Tanzania f Woodrow Department, RSPB, UK h University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania i School of Geography

  12. The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania using ITS-1 primers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania Research Institute, P.O. Box 1026, Tanga, Tanzania Received 15 April 2007; received in revised form 26 July-scale field studies of trypanosome-infected tsetse in Tanzania in the National Parks of Tarangire

  13. Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from-arid northern Tanzania, the native woodland is being rapidly cleared and replaced by low input agriculture Tanzania, the indigenous tropical woodland is rapidly being replaced by low input agriculture. In addition

  14. The Uganda Offer, 1902-1905: A Study of Settlement Concessions in British East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cliansmith, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Hence the name "Uganda Offer." Amery, I~fe, pp. 264-5 . 53.attitude toward Chamberlain's offer may be viewed in severalgreat e:e'tGnt; it consaqwmtZy offers unlimited room for the

  15. Uganda Manafwa River early flood warning system development hydrologic watershed modeling using HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, ArcGIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The Manafwa River basin spans several districts in Eastern Uganda. Over the years, frequent floods have constantly posed a great threat to the local communities in these districts. The Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) intends ...

  16. Tanzania wildcats to evaluate Jurassic Mandawa salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagati, M.

    1996-10-07

    After 5 years of stagnant exploration in East Africa, Canadian independent Tanganyika Oil Co. of Vancouver, B.C., will drill two wildcats in Tanzania to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the coastal Jurassic Mandawa salt basin. Mita-1, spudded around Oct. 1, will be drilled to about 7,000 ft, East Lika-1 will be drilled in early December 1996 to approximately 6,000 ft. The two wells will test different structures and play concepts. The paper describes the exploration history, source rock potential, hydrocarbon shows, potential reservoir, and the prospects.

  17. Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformation Tanzania-Biofuels,

  18. An analysis of the potential economic impact of natural gas production in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umeike, Ekenedilinna (Ekenedilinna Onyedikachi)

    2014-01-01

    Following substantial discoveries of natural gas in recent years, Tanzania has new options for economic development. The country's policy makers are faced with having to make decisions about how best to utilize the gas in ...

  19. Political Ecology and Coastal Conservation: A Case Study of Menai Bay Conservation Area, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinn, Jamie Elizabeth

    2010-06-04

    , Tanzania. This study combines fieldwork and a literature review to conclude that while the conservation area recognizes the importance of authentic community empowerment, it has yet to achieve that goal, thereby compromising the overall success...

  20. Predicting Potential Risk Areas of Human Plague for the Western Usambara Mountains, Lushoto District, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neerinckx, Simon B.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Gulinck, Hubert; Deckers, Jozef; Kimaro, Didas; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-03-01

    A natural focus of plague exists in the Western Usambara Mountains of Tanzania. Despite intense research, questions remain as to why and how plague emerges repeatedly in the same suite of villages. We used human plague incidence data for 1986...

  1. Essays on Dynamics of Cattle Prices in Three Developing Countries of Mali, Kenya, and Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizimana, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-16

    countries of Mali, Kenya, and Tanzania. One way of assessing the efficiency of market and the impacts of liberalization policies is to test for market integration and price transmission. We also analyzed price leadership among the markets in each...

  2. Economic evaluation of rural woodlots in a developing country: Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kihiyo, V.B.M.S.

    1996-03-01

    Rural areas in developing countries use wood as their main source of energy. Previously, wood has been obtained free from natural forests and woodlands. The pressure of increased demand through population growth, and the fact that natural trees take longer to grow, has made this resource scarce. Thus, raising trees in woodlots has been adopted as the solution to its shortage in the wild. However, growing trees in woodlots will inevitably require resources in terms of capital, land and manpower. Economic evaluation becomes necessary to ascertain that these resources are used economically. This paper dwells on some of the salient features of the economic evaluation of woodlots, such as interest rates, shadow prices of factors of production, social opportunity, cost of capital and sensitivity analysis of such woodlots in a developing country such as Tanzania. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Improving Thermal Comfort in Low-income Tropical Housing: The Case of Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman; Cruickshank, Heather; Cheshmehzangi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The average temperature in East African countries is estimated to rise by 3-4 °C during the next 70 years due the global warming. Uganda is one of the East African countries which will be greatly affected by the global warming. Due...

  4. ELECTRICITY FROM WOOD-FIRED GASIFICATION IN UGANDA -A 250 AND 10KW CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    electricity at US$ 0.18 and 0.34/kWh, respectively. A stable electricity demand close to the rated capacityELECTRICITY FROM WOOD-FIRED GASIFICATION IN UGANDA - A 250 AND 10KW CASE STUDY Thomas Buchholza their potential to compete economically with diesel generated electricity when operating close to the rated

  5. Estimating Biomass in the Mountain Regions of Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda using Radar and Optical Remote Sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedrigo, Melissa

    2009-11-26

    Field measured estimates of aboveground biomass (AGB) for 15 transects in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP), Uganda were used to generate a number of prediction models for estimating aboveground biomass (AGB) over the full extent of BINP. AGB...

  6. Prevalences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hindu Indian subcommunities in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiya, K L; Swai, A B; McLarty, D G; Bhopal, Raj; Alberti, K G

    1991-01-01

    survey. SETTING--Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. SUBJECTS--Of 20 Hindu subcommunities categorised by caste in Dar-es-Salaam, seven were randomly selected. 1147 (76.7%) of 1495 subjects aged 15 or over participated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Blood glucose...

  7. Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 1 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda Sarah Carter 2009 #12;Socio-economic Kairu, Bbale Marcellinus, Willie McGhee, Alexa Morrison and Pauline Nantongo. #12;Socio-economic

  8. Geochemical characteristics of bitumens and seeps from Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mpanju, F. ); Philp, P. )

    1991-03-01

    A number of bitumen extracts from prospective source rocks and oil seeps of potential oil-producing areas in Tanzania have been characterized by a variety of geochemical techniques. The data obtained from this study have provided additional insight into the source rock potential of these areas. However, in this paper it is proposed to discuss in detail the results from two of the more unusual samples in this region, namely Wingayongo and Pemba. The Wingayongo bitumens isolated from an exposed Neocomian-aged sandstone, possibly a paleoreservoir, are almost totally devoid of n-alkanes and steranes and dominated by hopane-type biomarkers with the so-called immature {beta}{beta}-stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions. There is no typical evidence of biodegradation having occurred leading to the proposal of an unusual source material or maturity history for this sample. The Pemba seep samples were also characterized by relatively high concentrations of hopanes with the immature stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21}. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that the seeps in the Pemba region are not true oil seeps. Rather they are formed as a result of extremely high levels of bacterial activity with the bacteria utilizing natural gas in the region as the substrate. The net result is a material referred to in other areas of the world as paraffin dirt whose occurrence results from extensive microbial activity in the region and not directly from seepage of products having a thermal origin.

  9. Some suggestions for adapting group and pair work techniques in teaching English as a second language in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igwilla, Juma C.

    1989-01-01

    English is regarded as a second language in Tanzania for it is the major language of law, government, education, business and industry. It is important that it is a compulsory subject in the curriculum - from primary to tertiary education level...

  10. Ra-Th disequilibria: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.; Gill, J.B.; Bruland, K.W. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses geologic models dealing with the formation of carbonatites from recent lavas of the Oldoninyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania. This paper also acts as a rebutal to an earlier writing which discussed potential flaws in the collection and dating of the carbonatites. The paper goes on to provide activity ratios from different carbonatites and discussion the lack of evidence for fractional crystallization in a olivine sovite magma.

  11. An overview of the global threat reduction initiative's physical protection work in Tanzania.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banzi, Firmi Paul; Itamura, Michael Takeshi; Robinson, Phillip W.; Strosinski, Micheal Vernon

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) mission to reduce and protect nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 80 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance security of facilities with these materials. In 2004, a GTRI delegation began working with the Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, (TAEC). The team conducted site assessments for the physical protection of radiological materials in Tanzania. Today, GTRI and the Government of Tanzania continue cooperative efforts to enhance physical security at several radiological sites, including a central sealed-source storage facility, and sites in the cities of Arusha, Dar Es Salaam, and Tanga. This paper describes the scope of physical protection work, lessons learned, and plans for future cooperation between the GTRI program and the TAEC. Additionally the paper will review the cooperative efforts between TAEC and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with regards to a remote monitoring system at a storage facility and to the repackaging of radioactive sources.

  12. SU-E-E-03: Developing Solutions to Critical Radiation Oncology Challenges in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenton, O; Dachi, J; Metz, J; Avery, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop solutions to critical medical physics challenges in Tanzania. Methods: In September of 2013 we began working with Jumaa Bin Dachi, a Therapy Physicist at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We developed a bi-lateral learning partnership over the course of eight qualitative Skype meetings with Jumaa. From these meetings we have ascertained that there is a gap between the installation of new equipment and treating patients. This gap has often been overlooked by international partners attempting to improve radiation therapy access. Relationships with academic institutions abroad can fill these gaps, and lead to sustained care of patients needing radiation. Results: Our efforts are best given in a supporting role to help develop solutions and new technology that can reduce the burden on the Medical Physicist. Solutions may include: training material, support for radiation therapy classes, development of appropriate local protocols, and peer-review on documents being produced. New technology needs to focus around simple and easy field shaping, improved patient imaging systems, and systems for patient set-up. We believe our work can help alleviate some of the burdens faced by this institute. Conclusion: While we are just in the beginning stage of this partnership, we believe there is great potential for success between both parties. We hope that the Ocean Road Cancer Institute will benefit from potential funding and resources by partnering with a High Income Country to develop affordable solutions to clinical problems in Tanzania.

  13. Edinburgh Research Explorer Citation for published version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    , Environmental Management and Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract in Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda are presented as three separate case studies. Each case examines

  14. INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM APPLICATION FORM Please type or print legibly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Infrastructure (General); Information / Communication Technology; Energy Roads & Transportation; Water; Ecology), Mali (Tiby), Nigeria (Pampaida), Rwanda (Mayange), Senegal (Potou), Tanzania (Mbola) and Uganda

  15. Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 50 Appendix 6.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda 50 Appendix 6.6 Socio-economic benefits in Plan Vivo projects: A complete manual for a project assessment 1. Survey for the Socio-economic study of a carbon offset Plan Vivo project. The methodology has been developed initially

  16. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  17. Low-income housing in Kampala, Uganda : a strategy package to overcome barriers for delivering housing opportunities affordable to the urban poor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Richard Campbell

    2011-01-01

    The city of Kampala, Uganda, is struggling with a housing deficit that is compounding each year and creating market distortions that threaten to derail recent economic success and destabilize the social fabric of the ...

  18. The influence of water, land, energy and soil-nutrient resource interactions on the food system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukuve, Feriha Mugisha; Fenner, Richard A.

    2014-12-31

    ’s Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) (CAADP, 2013), and the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA). They highlight low nutritional value and low productivity of these crops as some of major bottlenecks. Analysis... farmers. Government fuel subsidies could help to bridge this gap, especially where significant fossil fuel holdings exist. Uganda for instance, may rely on its recent oil discoveries to boost agricultural energy supplies. However, fuel subsidies...

  19. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Tom Dunkley; Bown, Paul R.; Pearson, Paul N.; Wade, Bridget S.; Coxall, Helen K.; Lear, Caroline H.

    2008-01-01

    phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production Tom Dunkley Jones, 1 Paul R. Bown, 2 Paul N. Pearson, 3 Bridget S. Wade, 4 Helen K. Coxall, 3 and Caroline H. Lear 3 Received... 28 April 2008; revised 30 June 2008; accepted 18 July 2008; published 22 October 2008. [1] A high-resolution record of exceptionally well preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from Tanzania is marked by two key transitions closely related...

  20. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201Energy Jump to: navigation,Jump

  1. Water management for hydroelectric power generation at Matera and Kidatu in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matondo, J.I.; Rutashobya, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The major sources of power in Tanzania are hydropower and thermo power. Most of the hydroelectric power is generated in the Great Ruaha river system (280 MW) and in the Pangani river system (46 MW). However, the generated power (hydro and thermo) does not meet the power demand and as a result, an accute power shortage occurred in August 1992. This paper explores the hydropower generation mechanism at Mtera and Kidatu hydroelectric power plants. It also looks into what measures could have been taken in order to avoid the massive power shedding which officially lasted for about six months, although unofficially, power shedding was continued well beyond that period. Strategies for future water management in the Great Ruaha river system for efficient generation of power are also presented.

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  3. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  4. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  5. Gold deposits in the late Archaean Nzega-Igunga greenstone belt, central plateau of tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiss, P.G.; Siyomana, S.

    1985-01-01

    2.2 m oz of gold have been produced, since 1935, from late Archaean (2480-2740 Ma) greenstone belts of the Central Plateau, Tanzania. North and east of Nzega (4/sup 0/12'S, 3/sup 0/11'E), 18% of the exposed basement, mainly Dodoman schists and granites, consists of metavolcanics and metasediments of the Nyanzian and Kavirondian Series. Four styles of mineralization are observed. 1. Stratabound quartz-gold veins with minor sulfides. Host rocks are quartz porphyry, banded iron formation (BIF), magnetite quartzite, and dense, cherty jasperite at the Sekenke and Canuck mines. The Canuck veins are on strike from BIF's in quartz-eye porphyry of the Igusule Hills. 2. Stratabound, disseminated gold in coarse-grained, crowded feldspar porphyry with lithic fragments and minor pyrite. At Bulangamilwa, the porphyry is conformable with Nyanzian-aged submarine (.) greenstone, volcanic sediment, felsic volcanics, and sericite phyllite. The deposits are on strike with BIF of the Wella Hills, which contains massive sulfide with up to 15% Pb+Zn. 3. Disseminated gold in quartz-albite metasomes in Nyanzian greenstones. At Kirondatal, alteration is associated with alaskites and feldspar porphyry dikes traceable several hundred meters into post-Dodoman diorite porphyry. Gold is with pyrite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, minor chalcopyrite, and sphalerite as well as tourmalinite and silica-cemented breccias. 4. Basal Kavirondian placers in metaconglomerates containing cobbles and boulders of Dodoman and Nyanzian rocks several hundred meters up-section from the stratabound, disseminated mineralization at Bulangamilwa.

  6. Social and economic aspects of the introduction of gasification technology in rural areas of developing countries (Tanzania)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneveld, M.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of third world rural areas depends largely on the availability of energy and for an improvement in agricultural production; an increase in energy consumption is required. It seems attractive to replace the fossil liquid fuels needed for machinery by locally produced fuels. The thermal gasification of agricultural waste which produces gas that can be used directly to drive engines is suggested. A study to identify the social and economic advantages of this process and its applicability in rural areas of Tanzania has been made.

  7. Nodding Syndrome In Uganda: Risk Factors At Disease Onset Mazumder R1 Palmer VS2,4 Spencer PS2,4 King P2 Stadnik R2 Lasarev M2 Kabahenda M 3 Kitara DL4 Stadler D2 and the Oregon-Uganda Nodding Syndrome Research Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    , Uganda Introduction/Background: · Nodding Syndrome (NS) is a little known seizure disorder epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa. Afr Health Sci. 2013 Jun;13(2):176-82. 2. Foltz JL, Makumbi I. 2013 Jun;13(2):183-198. 5. Kitgum District Local Government. Five Year Development Plan. 2012. 6. World

  8. Social and economic aspects of the introduction of gasification technology in rural areas of developing countries (Tanzania)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneveld, M.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    According to the evaluation criteria presented, the gasification of corn cobs is acceptable from the economical and agricultural point of view in the rural areas around Arusha (Tanzania). The gasification system is of relatively simple construction and local maintenance is possible. If the system is connected to the already existing corn mills in the villages, it is appropriate to the existing socio-cultural system. The economic calculations made clear that the use of gasification is attractive for both the owners of the corn mill and the government. The advantages for the government are the savings on imported oil and the extra income created for the users of the corn mill (inhabitants of the rural villages). The government loses income from taxes and from the production and transport of diesel oil. Evaluation methods presented can and should be used for gasification projects in other areas.

  9. Feasibility report for the installation and operation of an electrical power generating plant on the Islands of Zanzibar and Pemba, Tanzania. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, M.C.

    1994-04-04

    The study, conducted by S & Davis International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Tanzania`s Ministry of Water, Construction, Energy, Land, and Environment. The report reviews and evaluates the existing power source and support stations for the current and future reliability of providing power to the islands of Zanzibar and Pemba as well as the feasibility of obtaining an independent power source. The study also covers the cost of power generation and rate structures, including the execution schedule and budgetary costs. The report contains the Introduction and Executive Summary and is divided into the following chapters: (1) General Information; (2) Power Supply Assessment; (3) Estimate of Power Usage; (4) Recommended Power Plant Configuration; (5) Technical Data on Generators; (6) The Economics.

  10. SUSTAINABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (An Overview of Nigeria Experience)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    SUSTAINABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (An Overview of Nigeria Experience) By Asapo, E. S. (PhD) 20th Development. The Nigeria Experience. Conclusion. #12;Development that meets the needs of present generations, Malawi, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda projected to increase

  11. Unraveling the Kinship Network: Child Labor and Migration in Togo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchbinder, Liza S

    2006-01-01

    Risk, Network Quality and Family Structure: Child Fostering Decisions in Burkina Faso", Andvig, "Child Labour

  12. Forestry in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykstra, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    Forest types and plantations, and associated forest industries are described. Forests occupy 47% of the total land area, mostly open miombo woodland dominated by Julbernardia and Brachystegia, with small areas of tropical high forest, mangroves and plantations. About 97% of the total roundwood consumed is used as fuelwood or for charcoal. Early results from village forestry programmes (partially financed by SIDA), the less successful communal village plantations, and agroforestry practices are described briefly. Education, training and the importance of wildlife are discussed.

  13. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Burundi, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) and is used-Fired Power Plants in the Chattahoochee-Apalachicola (ACF) & Etowah-Coosa (ACT) Rivers Basic Information Title: Toxic Metalloid (As, Se, Sb) Enrichment from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Chattahoochee

  14. CAPREx Programme Information Cambridge in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAPREx Programme Information Cambridge in Africa The Cambridge in Africa (CiA) Programme in East Africa- Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda, that supports the training of African doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. It aims to strengthen Africa's own capacity for a sustainable research

  15. Going Global Inspired by passion and driven by research, Western Heads East (WHE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    women's groups, WHE has introduced probiotic yogurt as a means of addressing health issues related in Africa · Overall goal to establish probiotic yogurt programs in Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda and school lunch programs, while producing and distributing probiotic yogurt · Provides probiotic yogurt

  16. TheStar.com -Ideas -World looks to science to solve food crisis http://www.thestar.com/printArticle/454746 1 of 5 10/19/08 4:45 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and South Africa to develop genetically modified drought-tolerant corn, usingTheStar.com - Ideas - World looks to science to solve food crisis http world food crisis," former UN secretary general Koffi Annan called for a Green Revolution for Africa

  17. Cadastral Map Use in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bwanika, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    of infrastructure and utility planning like; sewer lines,that infrastructure and utility planning should proceed land

  18. Uganda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergy Informationin Africa |

  19. Has Democracy Reduced Inequalities in Child Mortality? An analysis of 5 million births from 50 developing countries since 1970.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Antonio Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Mozambique Kenya Kazakhstan Comoros Togo Uzbekistan Southsuch as Kazakhstan, Comoros, Togo. Uzbekistan, and Southfor Bangladesh,1975 for Comoros and 1976 for Vietnam ; all

  20. Metal pollution of river Msimbazi, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ak'habuhaya, J.; Lodenius, M. )

    1988-01-01

    The Misimbazi River in Dar es Salaam is polluted with industrial, urban and agricultural waste waters. A preliminary investigation on the extent of metal pollution (Hg, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Cd, Mn, Al) was made from samples of sediments and biological indicators. The metal concentrations were in general low, but some of our results indicated industrial pollution.

  1. Erika Smith, '08 Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that they did have. There was simply nobody to teach them that a doll has more play potential than just

  2. Tanzania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P

  3. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:

  4. Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergy Informationin Africa | Open|

  5. UNESCO MANUAL 23 November 2009 page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suriname Colombia Mauritania Tajikistan Comoros Mauritius Togo Democratic Republic of the New Caledonia

  6. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  7. How Does Health Promotion Work? Evidence from the Dirty Business of Eliminating Dirty Defecation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gertler, Paul; Shah, Manisha; Alzua, Maria Laura; Cameron, Lisa; Martinez, Sebastian; Patil, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    Experiment   in   Rural   Tanzania.   Washington,   DC:  and   Martinez   led   the   Tanzania   evaluation.   Ben  Indonesia,   Mali,   and   Tanzania.   Health   promotion  

  8. Uganda-GTZ Promotion of EERE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA

  9. Uganda-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergy Information

  10. Uganda-Supporting Low Carbon Development and Climate Resilient Strategies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergy Informationin Africa | Open

  11. Marketing policy for developing countries: the case for Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazaala, Nalumansi Mariam

    1993-01-01

    The need to diversify the agricultural sector and avoid dependence upon the export of a narrow range of crops has necessitated increasing participation in non-traditional crops trade. For an agro-based economy to expand ...

  12. Kampala's shitscape: exploring urbanity and sanitation in Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terreni Brown, Stephanie Elizabeth; Brown, Stephanie

    2014-11-27

    In this thesis, I explore the collective excrement apparatus of Kampala, or the “shitscape”. I consider the diverse ways that the city’s inhabitants utilise different materials to manage their daily defecation, from flush ...

  13. Creative capacity building in post-conflict Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha, Kofi A. (Kofi Abdul Malik)

    2011-01-01

    Creative Capacity Building (CCB) is a methodology that emphasizes the ability of people living in poverty to create livelihood technologies, i.e., machines and tools that increase income, improve health and safety, decrease ...

  14. Uganda-Supporting Low Carbon Development and Climate Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development and Climate Resilient Strategies in Africa AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development (AFD) Partner ADETEF Sector Climate Focus Area People and...

  15. The Evolving Braid: An Ethnography of Technology Change in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Melissa Rita

    2012-01-01

    RHVP Organization Chart, 2006-2008 . . . . . . .RHVP Organization Chart, 2009-Summary Reports . . . . . . RHVP Organization Chart, 2006-

  16. Solar Energy for Uganda Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium deEnergy InformationDepot IncHomeSystems

  17. Uganda-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMAT

  18. Uganda-REEEP Energy Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMATin Developing

  19. Uganda-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMATin DevelopingEnergy

  20. Uganda-Support for NIE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMATin

  1. Uganda-Support for NIE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMATin

  2. Uganda-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLCAND HYDROLOGIC5605 Jump71

  3. Uganda-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLCAND HYDROLOGIC5605 Jump71(CTI

  4. Uganda-USAID Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLCAND HYDROLOGIC5605

  5. Competing for Capital: The Diffusion of Bilateral Investment Treaties, 1960-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Zachary; Guzman, Andrew T; Simmons, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Greece Tunisia Togo Thailand Liberia Morocco Niger Cote d’Madagascar Rwanda Tunisia Liberia Cameroon Sri Lanka Tunisia

  6. Project 2012: Increasing Female Representation in Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Sierra Leone Suriname Liberia French Guiana Ghana TogoHG) Iceland (HG) Ireland (HS) Liberia (HS/HG) Lithuania (HS)

  7. Epidemiology and control of human schistosomiasis in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazigo, Humphrey D.; Nuwaha, Fred; Kinung’hi, Safari M.; Morona, Domenica; de Moira, Angela Pinot; Wilson, Shona; Heukelbach, Jorg; Dunne, David W.

    2012-11-28

    [28]. It was observed that S. mansoni was of little public health im- portance in the two islands due to absence of its inter- mediate hosts: snails, the Biomphalaria species [3,7,19]. The construction of the hydroelectric dams and devel- opment... as the risk areas for transmission of schistosomiasis for communi- ties that lived and worked in areas surrounding the hydroelectrical dams and irrigation schemes. The areas created favourable environmental conditions for the snail intermediate hosts...

  8. Rural students’ experiences at the Open University of Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahai, Lulu Simon

    2014-07-04

    This ethnographic study has been undertaken to address a literature gap relating to rural students’ experiences of distance education in developing countries. It gives an account of teaching and learning practices at the ...

  9. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    and seminar participants at “Agriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan Africa” or- ganized by African Economic Research

  10. Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJump

  11. Tanzania-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformation

  12. Tanzania-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValley

  13. Tanzania-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergyProgramme of

  14. Tanzania-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergyProgramme

  15. Tanzania-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN) |

  16. Tanzania-Developing Energy Enterprises Project (DEEP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN)

  17. Green grabbing and the dynamics of local-level engagement with neoliberalization in Tanzania’s wildlife management areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Kathryn E.; Adams, William M.

    2014-11-03

    Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK Click for updates The Journal of Peasant Studies Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http... to physical enclosure of land and physical removal of people, but also to changes in access, rights, institutions and rules as a result of commodification, as well as the restructuring of authority and human-ecological relationships (Fairhead, Leach...

  18. Vote Buying and Accountability in Democratic Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    study of cousinage in Mali. American Political Sciencemoros, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mali, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Togo,Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia,

  19. Uganda-Demonstrating Wind and Solar Energy on Lake Victoria | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUStoNRCSInformation

  20. Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUStoNRCSInformationEnergy

  1. Uganda-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergy Information National

  2. Price discovery in the wholesale markets for maize and beans in Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuteesa, Annette

    2006-08-16

    Market information services established in 1999 were aimed at the promotion of market efficiency through provision of information across the nation. While the responsible bodies have improved the knowledge of prices, ...

  3. Abducted: The Lord's Resistance Army and Forced Conscription in Northern Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Phuong; Vinck, Patrick; Stover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) programs worldwide.will help centers and DDR programs track former childDemobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) programs worldwide.

  4. Potential of distributed wood-based biopower systems serving basic electricity needs in rural Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    evolve around satisfying growing urban demand as well as stabilizing and boosting a low electricity-dried tons per ha per year), a low electrical conversion efficiency (15%) and a high demand competing of electricity to certain times of the day (load shedding), unmet demand, high electricity prices, uneven

  5. Climate benefits from alternative energy uses of biomass plantations in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    to the grid. High electricity prices, frequent power outages, and high line losses pose hurdles to increasing UNIQUE Forestry Consultants Ltd, Schnewlinstraße 10, 79098 Freiburg, Germany a r t i c l e i n f o electricity sources and unsustainable forest use. The study evaluates the greenhouse gas benefits that could

  6. Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial and subsistence groups in western Uganda's forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    with large endow- ments of fossil fuels like Gabon and Nigeria, woodfuels are a significant energy source, Conservation International, 1919 M St., Washington, DC 20036, USA c Energy and Resources Group, Goldman School Devolution Community-based conservation A B S T R A C T Woodfuels are the most heavily used energy source

  7. Key Aspects of Health Policy Development to Improve Surgical Services in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luboga, Sam; Galukande, Moses; Mabweijano, Jacqueline; Ozgediz, Doruk; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2010-01-01

    Vaz F et al (2007) Economic evaluation of surgically trainedof surgical conditions, economic evaluation of surgicalsurgical conditions, economic evaluation including impact on

  8. Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecinati, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

  9. Uganda-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLCAdministrationUSIMATin Developing and

  10. Keeping the Doctor Away: Experimental Evidence on Investment in Preventative Health Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meredith, Jennifer; Robinson, Jonathan; Walker, Sarah; Wydick, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    a field experiment in Guatemala. ” Environment, Developmentin three smaller studies in Guatemala, India, and Uganda inthree smaller studies in Guatemala, India, Uganda, conducted

  11. A planning paradigm for electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa : a case study of Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimson, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, a lack of clean electricity generation sources, poor electricity access and low levels of electricity consumption are profoundly stifling sustainable development. This thesis presents a specialized ...

  12. In quest of a vernacular writing style for the Rangi of Tanzania: assumptions, processes, challenges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegen, Oliver

    2011-11-23

    Despite increased efforts by linguists and educationalists to facilitate literacy and literature development in minority languages, there are still many languages worldwide which do not have a written form. One area that ...

  13. Ecology of a vector-borne zoonosis in a complex ecosystem: trypanosomiasis in Serengeti, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auty, Harriet K.

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling the complexities of a disease with multiple wildlife host and multiple tsetse vector species is no easy task. After over a century of field observations, experimental studies, anecdotal evidence and conjecture, ...

  14. Innovation for Development: A comparative analysis of improved cookstoves in Sri Lanka and Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haick, Cathrin

    2011-11-24

    This dissertation analyses innovation for development. Based on the case study of improved cookstoves, it aims to understand why some innovations are more successful than others, and what is needed for successful innovations ...

  15. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    1971. "Health Service Marketing: A Suggested Model."Journal of Marketing 35:19-27.A. 1998. Social Marketing Centerpiece: An Interview With

  16. Privatizing Public Health: Social Marketing for HIV Prevention in Tanzania, East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahaffey, Erin Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    J-F. 1993. The State in Africa: The Politics of the Belly.Time, and Aging in West Africa. Chicago: Chicago University2006. Global Shadows: Africa in the Neoliberal World Order.

  17. Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValleyEnergy

  18. Tanzania-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation, searchTalty, Texas:(CTI PFAN)Energy

  19. The globalization of addiction research: Capacity-building mechanisms and selected examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawson, RA; Woody, G; Kresina, TF; Gust, S

    2015-01-01

    injectors in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Afr J Drug Alcoholof Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Drug Alcohol Depend 2006;82injecting drug users in Tanzania. Addiction 2010;105(6):

  20. Financing medicine's last mile in Uganda : exploring linkages between patient access to medicine and supply chain access to finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmo, Charles Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies operating in Africa are well positioned to contribute to the United Nations' ongoing efforts to improve access to medicine in Africa. This thesis explores how access to finance for businesses in ...

  1. Early childhood care and education in Uganda: the challenges and possibilities for achieving quality and accessible provision 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisitu, Winifred

    2009-07-06

    The importance of Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) as a prerequisite for national development has been emphasized in recent years by developing countries and by donor agencies. Research findings point to the ...

  2. Impact of undesirable plant communities on the carrying capacity and livestock performance in pastoral systems of south-western Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byenkya, Gilbert Steven

    2004-09-30

    The impact of undesirable plant communities (Cymbopogon afronardus and woody species dominated by Acacia species) on livestock carrying capacity and performance was investigated on 15 farms in an Acacia/Cymbopogon dominated pastoral system of south...

  3. ¿Maybe his blood is still strong¿: a qualitative study among HIV-sero-discordant couples on ART in rural Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Rachel; Wamai, Nafuna; Khana, Kenneth; Johansson, Eva; Lindkvist, Pille; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    2010, 304:346–347. 39. Saldana J: Longitudinal Qualitativeor behavior happened. Saldana calls this ‘epiphanies’ when

  4. Contract Farming, Smallholders and Commercialization of Agriculture in Uganda: The Case of Sorghum, Sunflower, and Rice Contract Farming Schemes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elepu, Gabriel; Nalukenge, Imelda

    2009-01-01

    of soil fertility Other Note: CFs = Contracted farmers; NCFsSorghum NCFs Total (n = 116) (n = 246) _ 2 or F-test CFs (n= 143) CFs (n = 72) _ 2 or F-test Sunflower NCFs Total (n =

  5. Scale variability of water, land, and energy resource interactions and their influence on the food system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukuve, Feriha Mugisha; Fenner, Richard A.

    2015-08-04

    hand, and policies to spur economic growth on the other such as increased energy production (hydropower and biofuels) and industrialisation, which may conflict with the overarching food security objective. Crucially however, policies to address... competition between water-use for agricultural purposes versus hydropower production to meet energy objectives. McCartney & Girma (2012) investigated the trade- offs between hydropower production and irrigation water use for the Nile’s riparian countries...

  6. Interactions Amongst the Community of Endemic Pathogens of African Cattle: A Longitudinal Study in South East Uganda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosas Auguet, Olga

    The work presented in this thesis is focused upon the community of endemic pathogens of African cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa, which has long constrained livestock production in these areas. The first aim of this work is ...

  7. What Impedes Efficient Adoption of Products? Evidence from Randomized Variation in Sales Offers for Improved Cookstoves in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, David I.; Cotterman, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    energy savings have been used in the United States by companies that improve heating and air conditioning efficiency

  8. REDD at the crossroads? The Opportunities and Challenges of REDD for Conservation and Human Welfare in South West Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twongyirwe, Ronald; Sheil, Douglas; Sandbrook, Chris G.; Sandbrook, Lindsey C.

    2015-01-01

    (to meet domestic energy needs and to market) Demand for timber Environmentally harmful government agricultural policies Forest fires (generally associated with droughts) Environmentally harmful government energy policies (which make electricity... to build capacity for conservation leadership through his teaching, and conducts interdisciplinary research on biodiversity conservation and its relationship with society. His current research addresses trade-offs between conservation and development...

  9. What Impedes Efficient Adoption of Products? Evidence from Randomized Variation in Sales Offers for Improved Cookstoves in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, David I.; Beltramo, Theresa; Blalock, Garrick; Cotterman, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    to pay with the traditional offer as accepted the free trialthe same uptake as the free trial and time payments offer.the Effects of a Novel Offer and Marketing Messages on

  10. What Impedes Efficient Adoption of Products? Evidence from Randomized Variation in Sales Offers for Improved Cookstoves in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, David I.; Cotterman, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    ambitious than our sales offer can achieve. It is important3 years or more? ” N Sales Offer Free Time Trial PaymentsRandomized Variation in Sales Offers for Improved Cookstoves

  11. Biomarker Testing to Estimate Under-Reported Heavy Alcohol Consumption by Persons with HIV Initiating ART in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Judith A.; Bwana, Mwebesa B.; Javors, Martin A.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Emenyonu, Nneka I.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We compared self-reported alcohol consumption with levels ofthan expected self-reported alcohol consumption in personsalcohol was Self-reported heavy alcohol consumption was con?

  12. Visa Students by Country of Citizenship -November 2013 Region Undergraduate Graduate Total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Togo 0 0 0 272 7 279 Burundi 8 1 9 Comoros 0 0 0 Djibouti 2 0 2 Eritrea 6 1 7 Ethiopia 11 1 12 Kenya 23

  13. Directional pre-verbs and the registration of path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Richard Alan

    2005-01-01

    to paths: bi- ‘coming’, ani- ‘going’, bi'mi- ‘goingto this. The morpheme ani- away also appears in future= to-go- coming-mm (Zb) anI'- anim- ni-zlmad ‘go away‘

  14. Bottle Revolution: Constructing Consumer and Producer Identities in the Craft Beer Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pozner, Jo-Ellen; DeSoucey, Michaela; Sikavica, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    B. (2003). The American Brewery: From Colonia Evolution toGoes Global: A Kansas City Brewery's Tale. Morning edition.611-639. Bland, A. 2014. Big Breweries Move Into Small Beer

  15. A TUTUREFORTHE DUGONG? HeleneMarsh, Helen Penroseand CaroleEros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    on dugong status and management within lts range East Africa Kenya Tanzania Mozambique Madagascar Comoros

  16. BioMed Central Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Madagascar, Comoros Islands, Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique, Cameroun, Gabon) were collected during active case

  17. Comment on Ra-Th disequilibria systematics: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittins, J. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses potential flaws in study by Williams, Gill, and bruland (1986) dealing with the extreme disequilibria between uranium and thorium series nuclides in alkalic carbonatite lava specimens. It discusses the apparent discrepencies between chemical compositions of lava which were reported from the same eruption. Clarification is made on the actual timing of eruptions in this volcanic region and the effects this would have on the petrogenesis interpretation of these rocks.

  18. Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries. The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At present little land and labour resources are expended on energy production, but the woodlands in Dodoma are disappearing, causing villagers to save time by switching from fuelwood collected on foot to charcoal shipped in by truck. Results of a linear program show that if the costs of growing the wood for charcoal are counted the switch to charcoal saves time only in areas where population is relatively dense and natural woodland remote. Woodland preservation in Dodoma will require more plantations, increased plantation productivity, improved efficiency of charcoal kilns or stoves and ultimately a switch to some other fuel than wood.

  19. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Makundi, W.; Andrasko, K.; Boer, R.; Ravindranath, N.; Sudha, P.; Rao, S.; Lasco, R.; Pulhin, F.; Masera, O.; Ceron, A.; Ordonez, J.; Deying, X.; Zhang, X.; Zuomin, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon (C) mitigation potential and costs of about 40 forestry options in seven developing countries. Each study uses the same methodological approach - Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (COMAP) - to estimate the above parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios. Coupled with data on a per ha basis on C sequestration or avoidance, and costs and benefits, it allows the estimation of monetary benefit per Mg C, and the total costs and carbon potential. The results show that about half (3.0 Pg C) the cumulative mitigation potential of 6.2 Petagram (Pg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (about 200 x 106 Mg C yr-1) could be achieved at a negative cost and the remainder at costs ranging up to $100 Mg C-1. About 5 Pg C could be achieved, at a cost less than $20 per Mg C. Negative cost potential indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of these options. The achievable potential is likely to be smaller, however, due to market, institutional, and sociocultural barriers that can delay or prevent the implementation of the analyzed options.

  20. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

  1. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng'habi, Kija R; Knols, Bart GJ; Lee, Yoosook; Ferguson, Heather M; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    situated along the river (Mali- nyi, Ukindu, Lupiro, andAnopheles gambiae complex in Mali, West Africa. ParassitolAnopheles gambiae s.s. in Mali, West Africa. Genetica 1994,

  2. An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

    2012-12-03

    .................................................................................................... 91 Table 13: Linking air-pollutants and Land use / Land cover (LULC) in the recent studies (2007 ? 2011) inquiries indexed in MEDLINE database....................... 103 xvi Table 14: Disbursement to the local government authorities (LGA... the link between land cover and disease is of increasing interest to researchers across academic disciplines. Different land cover types have been associated with either being sources or sinks of particulate air pollution, and by extension, the spatial...

  3. The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

    2007-01-01

    863-885. Irwin, A. 1995. Citizen science: A study of people,comanagement schemes, and citizen-science initiatives arewith ecotourism and citizen science, has considerable

  4. Energy Sustainability: Role of Makerere University inRole of Makerere University in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xun

    Energy Sustainability: Role of Makerere University inRole of Makerere University in Facing a eas · More information: http://mak.ac.ug; www.cit.mak.ac.ug #12;Sustainability of Energy in UgandaSustainability of Energy in Uganda · Research at CIT· Research at CIT · Energy challenges in Uganda: prices of energy

  5. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  6. Walk on the Wild Side: Estimating the Global Magnitude of Visits to Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmford, Andrew; Green, Jonathan M. H.; Anderson, Michael; Beresford, James; Huang, Charles; Naidoo, Robin; Walpole, Matt; Manica, Andrea

    2015-02-24

    Protegées (Madagascar), Protected Area Management Board (Philippines), South African National Parks (South Africa), Servicio Nacional de Areas Protegidas (Bolivia), Tanzania National Parks (Tanzania), Thanh Hoa Provincial Forest Protection Department...

  7. How Does Health Promotion Work? Evidence from the Dirty Business of Eliminating Dirty Defecation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gertler, Paul; Shah, Manisha; Alzua, Maria Laura; Cameron, Lisa; Martinez, Sebastian; Patil, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    CLTS)   in   rural   Mali",   Working   Paper.   Ashraf,  Alzua   led   the   Mali   evaluation   and   Martinez  India,   Indonesia,   Mali,   and   Tanzania.   Health  

  8. 34 December 1997/Vol. 40, No. 12 COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM Shaman with elephant, Sandawe,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santini, Simone

    , Tanzania National Museum #12;COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM December 1997/Vol. 40, No. 12 35 Amarnath Gupta

  9. How Robust Is Muslim Support for Patriarchal Values? A Cross-National Multi-Level Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Amy C.; Welzel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Italy Tanzania Trinidad Ireland Macedonia S. Korea MoldovaDenmark Sweden Iceland Spain Macedonia France Y = 8E-18 + .

  10. Using multi-criteria decision analysis to assess private sector agents' preferences and priorities in stocking malaria rapid diagnostic test kits in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carland, Corinne M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of malaria is important in order to ensure early and effective treatment, to facilitate public health surveillance, and to prevent drug resistance. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are an important tool in ...

  11. Matthew Kam Lessons From Deploying the Remote Transaction System Page 1 of 46 Tu Tran With Three Microfinance Institutions in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam, Matthew

    2004). Many believe that the microfinance industry has been successful in breaking the cycle of poverty members live below the poverty line, compared with 56 percent for comparable non- Grameen members (Grameen

  12. Increasing incidence of malaria in children despite insecticide-treated bed nets and prompt anti-malarial therapy in Tororo, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    malaria were treated with quinine. Clinical treatmentmalaria were treated with quinine. Those occurringinitiation of therapy with quinine were treated with quinine

  13. Anti-malarial prescription practices among outpatients with laboratory-confirmed malaria in the setting of a health facility-based sentinel site surveillance system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    the proportion prescribed quinine versus ACT differed basedfirst-line therapy. Oral quinine was recom- mended asmal- aria and parenteral quinine remained first-line therapy

  14. Declining and rebounding unhealthy alcohol consumption during the first year of HIV care in rural Uganda, using phosphatidylethanol to augment self-report.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Decreases in self-reported alcohol consumption following HIVY, et al. Comparison of self-reported alcohol consumption toY, et al. Comparison of self-reported alcohol consumption to

  15. 'It is like a tomato stall where someone can pick what he likes': structure and practices of female sex work in Kampala, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mbonye, Martin; Nakamanya, Sarah; Nalukenge, Winifred; King, Rachel; Vandepitte, Judith; Seeley, Janet

    2013-01-01

    1) were in night car parks or car wash stands. A 32 year oldher work place: It is a car wash and the owner put an

  16. 'It is like a tomato stall where someone can pick what he likes': structure and practices of female sex work in Kampala, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mbonye, Martin; Nakamanya, Sarah; Nalukenge, Winifred; King, Rachel; Vandepitte, Judith; Seeley, Janet

    2013-01-01

    women reported moving from bars to streets and vice versastreets to bars and vice versa. Some women reported moving

  17. Savanna Sounds : : Using Remote Acoustic Sensing to Study Spatiotemporal Patterns in Wild Chimpanzee Loud Vocalizations in the Issa Valley, Ugalla, Western Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piel, Alexander Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Third, SPATUs rely on solar power to recharge long-livedThird, SPATUs relied on solar power to recharge long-lived

  18. Who Changes How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviors in the Context of an Economic-based HIV Prevention Intervention in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packel, Laura

    2010-01-01

    How: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction BehaviorsHow: Strategies and Motivation for Risk Reduction Behaviorspers—explores strategies and motivation for risk reduction

  19. The Making of the Entrepreneur in Tanzania: experimenting with neo-liberal power through discourses of partnership, entrepreneurship, and participatory education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boner, Elizabeth Helene

    2011-01-01

    Garvey. Gaynair, G. (2010). Exxon Mobil Explands Support forpotential entrepreneurs. Exxon Mobil for example, partneringefforts such as those of Exxon- Mobil (which has one of the

  20. LED Retrofit Project in TSH Basement On July 14 2014, McMaster Facilities Services completed an energy conservation lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    replaced with the new LED (light emitting diode) tubes. LEDs have better lighting quality, lower energyLED Retrofit Project in TSH Basement On July 14 2014, McMaster Facilities Services completed an energy conservation lighting retrofit project. About 150 lamps in Togo Salmon Hall basement hallways were

  1. TIMBER INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION REPORT ON EXPORT OF WOOD PRODUCTS, MAY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghana. The ECOWAS market (mainly Nigeria, Senegal, Niger, Gambia, Mali, Benin, Burkina Faso and Togo,115 14,315,949 310 Niger 17,555 1,944,223 111 Niger 10,581 1,290,526 122 Mali 817 105,438 129 Mali 607

  2. Journal of Coastal Research Longshore drift cell development on the human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Volta River delta in Ghana, to the west, and the western conf River delta in Nigeria to the east the Volta River delta, terminus of a large river catchment of 397,000 km2, although wave energy conditions by the construction of three deepwater ports in Lomé (Togo), Cotonou (Benin) and Lagos (Nigeria) that have Volta River

  3. Has Democracy Reduced Inequalities in Child Mortality? An analysis of 5 million births from 50 developing countries since 1970.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Antonio Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Pakistan Paraguay Indonesia Turkey Mali Ghana Cote d IvoireKyrgyzstan Bangladesh Niger Mali Ethiopia PhilippinesBangladesh Nigeria Niger Mali Uganda Philippines Turkey

  4. Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    study in Uganda and India looking at the opportunities that carbon offset projects offer for poor rural communities." References "Carbon Offsets for Forestry and...

  5. War, peace, and international politics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, D.W. )

    1987-01-01

    We must conclude that war remains a major problem in the last quarter of the twentieth century. My intention in this book is to introduce you to international relations by focusing on this problem. War is not the only problem of international relations, and so this book does not exhaust the field. But war is a central problem, and the possibility of resort to war affects other aspects of international relations. Whatever else we may look at, we cannot avoid looking at war. In fact, in looking at war, we will touch on most of the other subjects important in international relations. War is conflict among states carried on by their armed forces. To distinguish war from border skirmishes and other minor incidents we usually say it must reach a certain magnitude (for example, at least 1,000 soldiers killed in battle over a year). It would be ideal if we could systematically study all the wars in the last hundred years, but such an exhaustive study would be out of place here. At the same time we cannot discuss such subjects as the cause of war or proposals for preventing it without some knowledge about actual wars. We must test theories against historical facts. What follows in Part I is a somewhat detailed history of seven wars (or groups of wars) fought in the last hundred years. These include the most destructive of the wars World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953). By way of background to World War I, we will look at the wars of German unification (1864-1871), which preceded and in some ways prepared the way for it. To balance our account, we will also look at several recent wars India and Pakistan (1971), Uganda and Tanzania (1978-1979), and Cambodia, Vietnam, and China (1978-1980). After looking at some of the major wars of the last hundred years, we will look at what people have the about the causes of war in general.

  6. MSU at Work in Africa: Improving Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 individuals in Liberia and Tanzania, compared to 5 to 7 epilepsy patients per 1,000 individuals in the United

  7. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This working paper includes new analyses of the six R-PPs recently submitted by Argentina, Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal, Republic of Congo and Tanzania for formal consideration...

  8. Clean Cities: Detroit Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation; the Olkonorei Integrated Pastoralist Survival Program in Tanzania, Africa; and as an instructor at the Japanese Ministry of Education in Imadate, Japan. He has...

  9. No Solution in Sight : the Problem of Protracted Refugee Situations in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisp, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Changing priorities in refugee protection: the Rwandanfrom Tanzania’, New Issues in Refugee Research, No. 53,The Problem of Protracted Refugee Situations in Africa By

  10. You are invited to the 8th Annual Africa Institute of South Africa's (AISA) Young Graduates and Scholars Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    are from institutions, organisations and universities in Nigeria, Germany, Zimbabwe, Japan, Tanzania focus areas are: Climate change, energy and water supply security, science and technology, international

  11. Godfrey Kasozi, Former Apprentice, Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Center for Environment Technology and Rural Development (environment, and give tangible hope to poor people in Uganda. We focus on people, nature, and appropriate technology.Technology and Rural Development (CETRUD) in western Uganda, which is working to create a more sustainable economy and environment

  12. Ashley B. Rockenbach ashrock@umich.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    --C.V. and Project Description--Page 2 of 3 Project: "Moral Rehabilitation and National Development: The role and Entebbe, Uganda Kabale District Archives Uganda National Archives 2/2011 ­ 3/2011 Independent archival Centre Library ­ Tristram Betts' papers Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes

  13. Comparing changes in haematologic parameters occurring in patients included in randomized controlled trials of artesunate-amodiaquine vs single and combination treatments of uncomplicated falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    AQ AS non-ACT Total AQ+SP Mali Uganda Rwanda ACT vs ACT andD0, D7, D14, D28 D0, D28 Mali Rwanda Rwanda Uganda D0, D14Kenya Madagascar maximum Mali-Bancouna Mali-Bougoula Rwanda-

  14. Health and Disease in East Africa Course Syllabus; Spring 2011 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Health and Disease in East Africa Course Syllabus; Spring 2011 1 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Health and Disease: Uganda PHS 644: Section 30 Course Syllabus ­ Spring 2012 Wednesdays 5 Prerequisites: Graduate and health professional students who plan field study in Uganda and/or East Africa

  15. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kushnir, Hadas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37- 41 Mortimer and Ecological Risk Factors for Unprovoked Lion Attacks on Humans in Southeastern Tanzania Hadas Kushnira ; Helga Wildlife Research Institute, Arusha, Tanzania d Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University

  16. Notes and records Reptiles of Katavi National Park, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    , PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania, 3 PO Box 345, Usa River, Tanzania, 4 Conservation Science Group plains. Annual rainfall totals approximately 900 mm falling between November and April. The first study hinged terrapin X X X Squamata Lizards and Snakes Gekkonidae Geckos Hemidactylus mabouiaeac Tropical

  17. A l u m n i C a m p u si n h a l t i m p r e s s u m Eine Freundin Tanzanias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    neue Krebsmedikamente Küstenschutz und Windkraft auf See Karriere ­ Köpfe ­ Konzerne Prominente Alumni

  18. A quantitative analysis of the impact of land use changes on floods in the Manafwa River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bingwa, Fidele

    2013-01-01

    Flood events in the Manafwa watershed, located in eastern Uganda, have increased in frequency in recent years. The risk of flooding is increasing globally due partly to climate change which enhances the number of weather ...

  19. Putting the press to the test : effects of temperature on Shea nut oil output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tacoronte, Lisa Cristina

    2010-01-01

    In northern Ghana, part of a belt reaching from Sub-Saharan Africa to northern Uganda, women collect and process Shea nuts for their valuable oil. This oil is then used in various cosmetic, cooking, and medicinal products. ...

  20. The globalization of addiction research: Capacity-building mechanisms and selected examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawson, RA; Woody, G; Kresina, TF; Gust, S

    2015-01-01

    drug users in Kiev, Ukraine. AIDS Care 2010;22(11):1305-13.Brazil, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Republic of Georgia,Sweden, Tajikistan, Uganda, and Ukraine. Two former fellows

  1. Exhumation, rift-flank uplift, and the thermal evolution of the Rwenzori Mountains determined by combined (U-Th)/He and U-Pb thermochronometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacPhee, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Rising over 5 km along the border of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Rwenzori Mountains represent an extreme example of basement rift-flank uplift in the western branch of the East African Rift, a ...

  2. An overview of recent trends and current status of Forest Stewardship Council ) certification | July 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by engaging the power of market dynamics. Activities FSC, a multi-stakeholder organization, was foundedPacific(HK) LatinAmerica(Peru) Russia+CIS(Russia) Colombia Uganda Argentina Congo India Indonesia Ireland Latvia

  3. ATR 1 (1) pp. 131137 Intellect Limited 2013 Applied Theatre Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    , Uganda, Argentina, Peru, Sri Lanka, #12;book Reviews 132 Cambodia, Australia, Israel and the United. This is only one of the many stories that strike the heart of the reader and showcase the power of performance

  4. Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmedov, Zafarbek

    2013-08-22

    , Paraguay, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, Uganda, Ukraine, Uruguay Excess Demand Regions (Importing Countries) Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bosnia Herzegovina, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, France...

  5. THE YOUNG ACADEMY MOVEMENT CTHB MEMBER PLAYS A LEADING ROLE IN THE GLOBAL YOUNG ACADEMY AND THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Nigeria, Pakistan, Sudan, Thailand and Uganda, all nations where the tolerance and rationality inherent than their older peers in interactions with society and with politicians. They also bring new energy

  6. 2010-2011 ANNUAl REPoRt O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    , Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. ·Each year, Einstein faculty members and some 50 medical, Einstein's Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus pulses with energy. Our research centers are where our world

  7. Ajon: A Beer Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks, Paige

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to beer brewing: In the 1970s, in northernwith the Karamojong, the brewing and selling of beer bywomen is unique. Beer brewing in Uganda dates back to 1000

  8. DAVID LAHTI University of Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahti, David C.

    . A mar- gin of trees near a field of rice or sorghum can be filled with village weaver colonies, as many in Africa following European colonization. Even today in some areas, such as central Uganda and eastern

  9. Kakira Sugar Works (1985) Limited, Kakira biomass cogeneration: Volume 3 -- Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This report, conducted by John H. Payne, Inc., was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study concerns the technical and financial feasibility of the Kakira Sugar Works Limited to increase its capacity to 5,000 TCD and to sell its surplus power to the Uganda Electricity Board. This is Volume 3, the Purchase Energy Contract between Kakira Cogeneration Company Limited and Uganda Electricity Board.

  10. Evaluating the potential impact of vaginal microbicides to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blower, Sally

    of at least one more this year in several African countries, including South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia [8 to condoms [2,3]. The hope is that microbicides can be added to lubricants for convenient use or combined

  11. The Development of an Academically-Based Entertainment-Education (ABEE) Model: Co-opting Behavioral Change Efficacy of Entertainment-Education for Academic Learning Targeting the Societal Landscape of U.S. Geographic Illiteracy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simms, Michelle

    2011-07-22

    and detrimental behaviors by presenting positive role models in entertainment products designed to stimulate changes in viewers' behavior. For example, soap operas promote condoms use as a HIV prevention strategy (Tanzania), model culturally-sensitive actions...

  12. Keyword Publications Company Profiles Thesaurus Cited References Indexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --more clumsily and with less success--are struggling to lift the best hammer they can find. All this activity their studies of wild chimpanzees at two field sites in Tanzania. (Goodall's research station at Gombe

  13. Why is it so difficult to grow fuelwood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noronha, R.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of successful and unsuccessful woodlot programmes are cited from China, Korea, India, Tanzania and Niger and the role of social factors examined. Effective village forestry involves social, cultural, economic and local political factors. (Refs. 15).

  14. $6000 FUNDED INTERNSHIPS GCFSI sponsored internees are expected to work in developing countries on projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , to packaging, to transportation. Students will also be placed on projects related to workforce training, gender organizations (e.g. universities, industries, and NGOs) in Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia, India, Vietnam, Nepal

  15. The evolution of shelter: ecology and ethology of chimpanzee nest building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Fiona Anne

    2011-11-08

    characteristics of chimpanzee nests, nesting trees, nest shape, and architecture in two savanna-dwelling populations on opposite sides of Africa: Fongoli, Senegal, and Issa, Tanzania. Savanna habitats are the most extreme habitats in which chimpanzees survive...

  16. The Political Economy of Health Care Problems in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ityavyar, Dennis A.

    1983-01-01

    the comparison between Nigeria and Tanzania are taken from:and Economic Changes in Nigeria and the Organization ofOF HEALTH CARE PROBLEMS IN NIGERIA by Dennis A. Ityavyar The

  17. Urban-bias and the Roots of Political Instability: The case for the strategic importance of the rural periphery in sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinowitz, Beth Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Changing Rural-urban Linkages in Mali, Nigeria and Tanzania.the Nation and Democracy in Mali: A View from Modibo Keita'sand the Party System in Mali. The Journal of Modern African

  18. Land use change in Maasailand drivers, dynamics and impacts on largeherbivores and agro-pastoralism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Msoffe, Fortunata Urban

    2010-11-24

    The Maasailand of Kenya and Tanzania supports one of the richest wildlife populations remaining on Earth. However, over the last century, Maasailand has experienced land transformation notably through conversion of former ...

  19. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Energy Science - - 117 98 - - 16 22 Asian and African Area Studies - - - 21 - - 36 13 Informatics - - 182 of Nigeria 2 Republic of South Africa 2 The Republic of the Sudan 1 United Republic of Tanzania 3 Republic

  20. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Environmental Studies 129 127 150 161 - - 86 44 Energy Science - - 135 107 - - 14 15 Asian and African Area of Senegal 1 United Republ;ic of Tanzania 2 Republic of Tunisia 3 Federal Republic of Nigeria 2 Republic

  1. 10 17 14 20 23,000 100 1,700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Environmental Studies 129 127 150 161 - - 86 44 Energy Science - - 135 107 - - 14 15 Asian and African Area of Senegal 1 United Republ;ic of Tanzania 2 Republic of Tunisia 3 Federal Republic of Nigeria 2 Republic

  2. KYOTO UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS GUIDE for INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Integrated Human Studies/ Human and Environmental Studies 127 112 140 155 - - 70 46 Energy Science - - 128 Georgia 2 Egypt 13 Sudan 3 Libya 2 Tunisia 3 Kenya 6 Tanzania 1 Democratic Republic of the Congo 2 Nigeria

  3. The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership Conference is presented by NDIA with technical support from ONR The Naval Postgraduate School's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Directed Energy Systems · Software Engineering · Combat System Physics · Electronic Warfare · SIGINT 1 Kenya 1 Nigeria 1 Rwanda 1 Senegal 1 Tanzania 1 Tunisia 4 11 #12;The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership

  4. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

  5. Tokamachi Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to:bSouth Dakota:Togo:

  6. Toledo, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to:bSouth Dakota:Togo:Toledo,

  7. Samnites, Ligurians and Romans revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, John Robert

    2013-10-29

    , 2004). 16 E. Dench, ‘Samnites in English: the legacy of E. Togo Salmon in the English-speaking world’, in Jones 2004 (n. 15), p. 7-22. 17 E. Dench, From barbarians to new men: Greek Roman and modern perceptions of peoples from the central Apennines... describes how the Roman army was surrounded by Ligurian forces in a narrow defile, and recounts how the soldiers were reminded of the disastrous defeat at the hands of the Samnites at the Caudine Forks.52 Later we are told of the Ligurians assembling...

  8. Three Essays on Economic Development in Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musumba, Mark

    2012-10-19

    to economic development in Africa. Climate change is examined in terms of its effects on the Egyptian agricultural sector; transmission of world price to small scale growers is examined in Uganda; and the benefits of insecticide-treated bed nets use...

  9. A KIR B centromeric region present in Africans but not Europeans protects pregnant women from pre-eclampsia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakimuli, Annettee; Chazara, Olympe; Hiby, Susan E.; Farrell, Lydia; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Traherne, James A.; Trowsdale, John; Colucci, Francesco; Lougee, Emma; Vaughan, Robert W.; Elliott, Alison M.; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mirembe, Florence; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J.; Moffett, Ashley

    2015-01-05

    preeclamptic pregnancies at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. The combination of maternal KIR AA and fetal HLA-C2 associates with pre-eclampsia (P=0.0318, OR 1.49). The KIR genes associated with protection are located in centromeric KIR B regions...

  10. Genomic Survey of the Non-Cultivatable Opportunistic Human Pathogen, Enterocytozoon bieneusi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Patrick

    University Medical School, Kampala, Uganda, 5 Department of Botany, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 6 Department of Medicine, Albert of a dearth of genes encoding proteins associated with pathways for fatty acid and core carbon metabolism

  11. Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure Jackson Efitre & Lauren J. Chapman & Debra J. Murie Received: 22 June 2007 /Accepted: 2 crater lakes in western Uganda. We asked whether fish condition differs among lakes characterized

  12. AI.IALYSIS OF RINGING RECOVERIES OF RUFF INVOLVING SOUTHERN AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    and India to Siberia, east of the Ural Mountains (6o"n). RESULTS ( a) Recoveries. Of the 17 long in Uatarii and Uganda, one in lran, one in Russia and eight in Siberia. fn addition, two foreign-ringed Ruffs NUMBER OF RECOVERIES !iHERE MORE THAN ONE. 76 #12;The birds recovered in Russia and Iran \\dere both

  13. The Innovation Journal: The Public Sector Innovation Journal, 18(1), 2013, article 3. Protecting the Internet from Dictators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, L. Jean

    Internet communications, activists, and the state in Egypt, Syria, Libya, Uganda and northern Sudan that there are three critical variables in this interaction: redundancy in communications, distribution of power across in situations of a popular uprising, and what can be done to prevent it?1 Egypt is not the only country

  14. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Tracey Holloway, (608) 262-5356, taholloway@wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    the technology might be applied in biogas plants, calling their project Cellulose Digesting Biogas Plants, receiving $2,000 each: BioGRASP (Biogas Growth: Regional and Sustainable Partnerships), proposing a collaborative network of biogas installations in western Uganda and beyond. Team members and their academic

  15. Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 54(4) August 2009 Special issue: Groundwater and Climate in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    : Groundwater and Climate in Africa 655 Groundwater and climate in Africa--a review RICHARD G. TAYLOR1 , ANTONIS on water resources commonly exclude groundwater. This omission is of particular concern in Africa, where. The Groundwater and Climate in Africa Conference (http://www.gwclim.org/), held in Kampala, Uganda on 24­28 June

  16. ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 Genes and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 FUNDING Genes and disease In this issue... FUNDING AND UPDATES 2­5 Project building, in Kenya, South Africa, Uganda and elsewhere in Africa (see page 5). The largest ever study. The Institute will devote a large part of its high-throughput genotyping pipeline, headed by Dr Panos Deloukas

  17. Research and Satellite Applications -Cristina Bentz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications ·New projects Overview #12;PETROBRAS Oil, Gas and Energy Company E&P TRADINGHEAD OFFICE DOWNSTREAM GAS & ENERGY REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE Houston Colombia Argentina Angola United Kingdom USA BRAZIL Bolivia Rio de Janeiro NigeriaVenezuela Ecuador Peru Mexico Tanzania Iran China Japan New York Uruguay Libya

  18. **The total number of academic personnel is 18,122. Appointments excluded from the above data include clinical faculty (5,911), affiliate faculty (2,737), and other faculty and academic personnel (4,898). UNITED KINGDOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    ICELAND 2 INDONESIA 2 LIBYA 2 NEPAL 2 SINGAPORE 2 TANZANIA 1 ALGERIA 1 ARMENIA 1 AZERBAIJAN 1 BRUNEI 1 179 224 8 63 6 26 0 255 7 38 NEW HIRE STATISTICS BY RANK AND TRACK AS OF 10/31/2014 NEW HIRE STATISTICS BYYEAR ­ PROFESSORIAL FACULTY Year Total Male Female American Indian Asian Black Hispanic Pacific

  19. Service in Cambridge ROLE MODELS FOR TOMORROW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    the launch of their efficient, rechargeable batteries in Tanzania. EGG- energy customers can also swap@MIT.EDU Photos: courtesy of Public Service Fellows and Grantees Ruben has "an abiding reverence for education their depleted batteries for fully-charged ones. Jukka concentrated on improving EGG's day-to-day operations

  20. Increased use of Renewable Energy in Africa through a Program of Energy Enterprise Development and Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine Eibs Singer

    2005-03-11

    To provide training in enterprise development and technical applications, local partner capacity building, individualized enterprise development services and seed capital investment to catalyze the creation of sustainable renewable energy enterprises that deliver clean energy services to households and businesses in South Africa, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

  1. A solar box cooker for mass production in East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, P.A.; Wilcke, W.F.

    1992-12-31

    A solar box cooker produced in Tanzania, East Africa with indigenous materials is described. When compared to a commercially produced glass and cardboard one, it was found to perform as well. Heat transfer through each major component of the cooker is presented. The smallest losses were through the walls of the box. The greatest losses were observed in the cover system.

  2. African mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  3. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 62476270, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/6247/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    of Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere R. Wang et al. Correspondence to: R Kingdom 77 1.39 1.49 0.95 Nigeria 22 1.28 2.08 0.46 Tanzania 24 1.12 0.90 0.85 Zambia 14 2.07 3.35 0

  4. Are there other programs? Yes! This advising guide is a good place to start, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    -related internship, and elective options such as Environmental Issues in Chi- na, Politics in China, Chinese History, Sustainable Energy, Ethics & Sustainability, Frieburg: Green City, and many more. Wildlife Conservation and Political Ecology (SIT) Arusha, Tanzania Language Req: None Class Standing: Sophomore & Above Minimum GPA: 2

  5. Are there other programs? Yes! This advising guide is a good place to start, but you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    -related intern- ship, and elective options such as Environmental Issues in China, Politics in China, Chinese, Sustainable Energy, Ethics & Sustainability, Frieburg: Green City, and many more. Wildlife Conservation and Political Ecology (SIT) Arusha, Tanzania Language Req: None Class Standing: Sophomore & Above Minimum GPA: 2

  6. AS ENGAGED LEARNERS UAlbany students assist government, non-profits and business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    enrolled in Honors College #12;UALBANY ACTS AS A MAJOR FORCE FOR ECONOMIC VITALITY AND GROWTH A Regional, such as engaging in post-tsunami clean-up in Japan and HIV/AIDS education in Tanzania. UALBANY STUDENTS Distinguished Professors (current faculty) 3 separate library facilities with more than 2 million volumes

  7. 5 6 Institut de recherche pour le dveloppement < Health/Benin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and nutrition; agriculture and aquaculture; impact of climate change and adaptation of societies; energy, Congo, DR Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Madagascar, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Chad. 5 8 for proposals now in course of preparation concern agroforestry, energy in the South, protected areas

  8. Complex seismic anisotropy at the border of a very low velocity province at the base of the Earth's mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Lianxing

    Complex seismic anisotropy at the border of a very low velocity province at the base of the Earth at distances between 90° and 150° by the seismic stations in three temporary broadband PASSCAL seismic arrays: the Kaapvaal seismic array (1997­1999), the Tanzania seismic array (1994­1995), and the Ethiopia/Kenya seismic

  9. Africa Becoming a Biofuel Battleground Western companies are pushing to acquire vast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a bit of fishing and the production of charcoal. There isn't much else in Mtamba. That could change," an energy plant with a high oil content, which it hopes to plant on Kisarawe's farmland. The Tanzanian the Netherlands, the United States, Sweden, Japan, Canada and Germany have already sent their scouts to Tanzania

  10. PF SECRETARIAT January 2010 BBRRIIEEFF RREEPPOORRTT OONN TTHHEE 77

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    being one of them has a wealth of natural resources if managed sustainably can support people in OECD led to dramatic increase in demand for nat. Resources Policy Forum on this month's Debate in Tanzania. The presentations debate was done by Dr. Cosmas Sokoni Department of Geography ­University of Dar

  11. Monopolizing Global Justice: International Criminal Law as Challenge to Human Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nouwen, Sarah M. H.; Werner, Wouter G.

    2014-12-17

    , argued: 28 See also, and more elaborately, H. Porter, After Rape: Justice and Social Harmony in Northern Uganda (PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science), http... ://etheses.lse.ac.uk/717/1/Porter_After_rape_2013.pdf (visited 7 November 2014). 29 This section heavily relies on S. Nouwen, Complementarity in the Line of Fire, supra note 18, at 141-159. 30 Nouwen’s interview with an expert, Gulu, September 2008. On different...

  12. Supplement 24, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Subject Headings: A to I 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

    1982-01-01

    within liver abscess, radiological and histological aspects: France, Dominican native Abscess Ongom VL 198 0 Tr Roy Soc Trop Med and Hyg 74 (3) 417 Wa Fasciola gigantica, human, episternal abscess: Uganda Abscess Trejo-Padilla E et al 1977 Arch... amoebic abscess, man, case report, diagnosis using In-lll-leukocyte scan Abscess, Amebic Mahajan RC; Ganguly NK 198 0 Tr Roy Soc Trop Med and Hyg 74 (3) 300-302 Wa Entamoeba histolytica, human, liver abscess, immunodiagnosis and prognosis, detection...

  13. Reduction of ruminant methane emissions - a win-win-win opportunity for business, development, and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes research efforts of The Global Livestock Producers Program (GLPP) in establishing self-sustaining enterprises for cost-effective technologies (i.e., animal nutrition and genetic improvement) and global methane emissions reductions in developing world nations. The US Environmental Protection Agency has funded several studies to examine the possibilities of reducing ruminant methane emissions in India, Tanzania, Bangladesh, and Brazil. The results of the studies showed that: (1) many developing countries` production systems are inefficient, and (2) great potential exists for decreasing global methane emissions through increasing animal productivity. From this effort, the GLPP established livestock development projects in India, Zimbabwe, and Tanzania, and is developing projects for Bangladesh, Nepal, and Brazil. The GLPP has developed a proven methodology for assessing ruminant methane and incorporating methane emissions monitoring into viable projects.

  14. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  15. East African coast overlooked. [Oil and gas potential of the east African coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews the petroleum and gas potential of the Tanzania-Mozambique basinal areas. It discusses the locations of the various sedimentary basins in the onshore and near offshore areas, including the central African rift zone. The paper describes the structure, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology of these basins. Finally the paper reviews the exploration history and the outlook for the future of these basins.

  16. The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay Leentvaar, Jan

    2011-04-15

    This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

  17. Experience of Consolidation Of Disused Sources In Developing Countries, An African Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kifanga, L.D.; Mompome, W.K.; Shao, D.

    2008-07-01

    Application of sealed sources in agriculture, medicine and industry was used in many African countries without having any arrangements in place for managing the sources when their useful life was over. In Tanzania a substantial use of such sources was utilized. In the early days source management was not an area that was given the required attention hence a legacy associated with sealed sources became evident in many African countries and Tanzania was one of them. In the 90's Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission (TAEC), realized the scope of the waste problem and began to participate in an International Atomic Energy Agency Regional (IAEA) project on waste management. Tanzania in cooperation with IAEA initiated activities under the IAEA Technical Cooperation and the Regional projects 'Strengthening Waste Management Infrastructure, RAF/4/015'; and 'Sustaining the Waste Management Infrastructure RAF/3/005' which played a significant role. The first outcome of the project was realized in 1999, as the first 'Temporary Radioactive Waste Storage Facility' began to operate. This particular Storage facility gave the first impact as well as the need to develop this particular infrastructure further. As the project carried on, more and more orphan sources were recovered, collected and safely stored at the facility. As the use of nuclear technology was expanding and the identification of the extent of sealed sources in the countries became more defined, the need to develop a 'Central Radioactive Waste Management Facility' (CRWMF) was becoming more desired. The central radioactive waste storage facility was constructed and commissioned in 2005. The facility was more advanced and could be used for much longer periods of time, as one of the most advanced storage facility in the Region. At present a large number of disused sources from various industries as well as from different activities are being stored at the facility. Tanzanian authorities are also planning to initiate a nationwide mission to recover and properly store as well as dispose of abandoned sources. Cooperation among the AFRA Member states has been very rewarding in terms of experience and its importance. Skills that have been gained during the past years of existence of the AFRA project will be a vital contribution for years to come. This paper discusses the experiences of United Republic of Tanzania on management of orphan radioactive sources. The need to develop its own radioactive waste management infrastructure was required due to the fact, that many disused radioactive sources have been found abandoned and needed to be properly disposed of. The paper will also discuss some of these experiences. (authors)

  18. Energy resources in southern Africa: a select bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavan, A.

    1981-01-01

    The aims, progress, and possibilities involved in Southern Africa's energy development are the subject of this 473-item bibliography. The primary items of information described in this document are relatively recent (1975-81), originate from both indigenous and international sources, and are mostly in English, although a few are in French and Portuguese. The presented information focuses on the African continent, the Southern African region, and the nations of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The energy source topics include alcohol, coal, gas, oil, solar, uranium, water, wind, and wood; as well as a general energy-development category.

  19. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Options for developing countries in mining development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walrond, G.W.; Kumar, R.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a study of the issues that developing countries face in planning and implementing mineral development, taking as case studies Botswana, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Tanzania, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and the developed states of Quebec and Western Australia. The authors consider the major aspects of the matter including organization and administration; regulation; taxation and surplus distribution; the dynamics of such instruments as royalty, rent resource tax and capital allowances under various cost/price scenarios; and selected mining agreements and their key provisions. They stress throughout the need for foreign investment while maximizing the economic benefits reaped from exhaustible resources.

  1. Integrated rural energy planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mahgary, Y.; Biswas, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on integrated community energy systems in developing countries. Topics considered include an integrated rural energy system in Sri Lanka, rural energy systems in Indonesia, integrated rural food-energy systems and technology diffusion in India, bringing energy to the rural sector in the Philippines, the development of a new energy village in China, the Niaga Wolof experimental rural energy center, designing a model rural energy system for Nigeria, the Basaisa village integrated field project, a rural energy project in Tanzania, rural energy development in Columbia, and guidelines for the planning, development and operation of integrated rural energy projects.

  2. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-06-04

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  3. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-05-27

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  4. Effects of steeping and germination time on malt properties of two sorghum cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrema, Greyson Chris

    1993-01-01

    University of Agriculture, Tanzania Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, Lloyd W. Rooney Effects of steeping and germination on malt properties of two sorghum cultivars; ATx623xSC103-12, a high tannin sorghum with purple plant color and Dorado a food type... matter in ATx623xSC103-12 and Dorado melts respectively. Leaching and seed respiration accounted for more than 60% of the total dry matter loss. Less than 40% of the total dry matter loss were due to root and shoot development. Tannin content of ATx...

  5. Effects of prescribed seasonal burning on a Combretum-Commiphora plant community in South Central Kenya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinyamario, Jenesio Ikindu

    1982-01-01

    ) I NRRS Headquarters Kiboko z B eb Nairobi referee N. R. R. S TANZANIA 0 000 K Mombasa 0 oq 2'20'5 NATIONAL RANGE RESEARCH STATION 0 oi oi Z 0 Z D 0 Aug Control Nov Reserve BLOCK I Jan Jul Mar X e 0 0 5 37'50'E Jut... Reserve Jul Msr 0 s o N Jan Cofilrol Reserve Aug Aug Nov Jan Nov Z ei Z c 37 50'E Plot~s 2' 20'S Experimental BLOCK III Mar Control BLOCK II Experimental plots 200 180 160 140 A verage Rainfall ~ tace CZ2 t904-t990 Average...

  6. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Gas in developing countries: Volume 2, Country studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains detailed case-studies of the history and prospects for natural gas utilization in eight developing countries: Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand and Tunisia. All of these countries have been visited by members of the research team, with the exception of Pakistan. Running through all the case-histories is the importance of defining a clear market for the gas. In some cases this can prove remarkably difficult, especially when the oil price is relatively low. In other cases a market does exist, but is very limited in relation to the size of available reserves. The other theme which recurs over and over again is the importance of the relationship between the government and its agencies, and the foreign oil companies which are involved in exploration and development of gas reserves. These two issues are addressed in detail in each case study. But it is also the case that each country highlights specific aspects of the gas story.

  8. McHuchuma/Katewaka coal fired power plant feasibility study. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-22

    This study, conducted by Black and Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility for the development of a new coal fueled power plant in Tanzania at the Mchuchuma/Katewaka coal concession area. Volume 3, the Main Report, is divided into the following sections: (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Power System Development Studies; (3.0) Conceptual Design Summary of the Mchuchuma Coal Fired Power Plant; (4.0) Fuel Supply Evaluation; (5.0) Transmission System Evaluation; (6.0) Power Plant Site and Infrastructure Evaluation; (7.0) Environmental Impact Assessment; (8.0) Institutional Aspects; (9.0) Financial Evaluation and Benefit Analysis; (10.0) Sources of Finance; Appendix (A) Preliminary Design of Mchuchuma Coal Plant.

  9. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  10. Opportunities in African power generation: A business briefing for industry and investment executives. Held in Baltimore, Maryland, June 21-22, 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-21

    The report, prepared by the Institute of International Education, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The information contained in the report was compiled in part for a power generation conference held in Baltimore, Maryland. The focus of the report is the market created by electric power projects financed by multilateral development banks. The study contains country information and project profiles related to the energy sector for eleven countries: Benin, Botswana, Cote D`Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Morocoo, Senegal, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The report also outlines the range of service opportunities in the region such as consulting, engineering, construction and project management, and equipment procurement. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Agenda/Program; (2) African Energy Sector Overview; (3) Project Profiles; (4) Country Information; and (5) Attendees.

  11. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  12. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  13. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  14. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  15. Forestry mitigation potential and costs in developing countries - Preface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Makundi, Willy; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  16. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  17. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  18. Clean energy for development investment framework: the World Bank Group action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-03-06

    In September 2005 the Development Committee requested the World Bank to develop an Investment Framework for Clean Energy and Development - in the context of the Gleneagles Communique on Climate Change, Clean Energy and Sustainable Development which was issued in July 2005. This Action Plan provides an update of work undertaken to date as well as actions planned by the World Bank Group (WBG) in support of the Clean Energy for Development Investment Framework (CEIF). The Action Plan relies on partnerships, including with the International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and the private sector. While it concentrates on maximizing and extending existing instruments, it provides for continued dialogue with governments and the private sector on new approaches to accelerate the transition to a low carbon economy. In addition to increased investments, the private sector has an important role to play in closing the investment gap in many countries. Projects such as Bujagali (Uganda), Nam Theun II (Laos) and China and India Thermal Power Plant Rehabilitation projects are examples of how partnerships with the private sector can work, both on financing but also on enhancing the overall regulatory framework for enhanced partnerships. The report was prepared for the 15 April 2007 Development Committee meeting, a joint committee of the Board of Governors of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund on the transfer of real resources to developing countries. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 5 annexes.

  19. A versatile technique to minimize electrical losses in distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyaruzi, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    This dissertation presents a method of minimizing electrical losses in radial distribution feeders by the use of shunt capacitors. The engineering benefits of reducing peak electrical power and energy losses are compared to the costs associated with the current engineering practice of buying, installing and servicing capacitor banks in the distribution feeders. The present analysis defines this cost-benefit problem and the formulation of the problem of nonuniform feeders with different wire gauges at various feeder sections. Standard utility capacitor bank sizes are used to give a more realistic model. An original computer solution methodology based on techniques developed for this study determines: (i) Whether it is economical to install compensating capacitor banks on a particular radial distribution feeder or not. (ii) The locations at which capacitor banks should be installed. (iii) The types and sizes of capacitor banks to be installed. (iv) The time setting of switched capacitor banks. The techniques have been applied to a typical radial distribution feeder in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The results and the engineering implications of this work are discussed and recommendations for the engineering community made.

  20. Transfer of carbon and a polychlorinated biphenyl through the pelagic microbial food web in a coastal ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallberg, P.; Andersson, A.

    2000-04-01

    In order to estimate fluxes of carbon within the microbial community, seawater was collected in a coastal area off Zanzibar Island, Tanzania, during a rainy season (November 1994) and a dry season (September 1996). Diel experiments were conducted in a 24-L polycarbonate bottle and samples were retrieved every third hour over a period of 30 to 33 h. Abundance and production rates of bacteria, nonoflagellates, and microplankton were determined. To determine possible connections between the fluxes of carbon and the fate of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) no. 153, a time-course experiment was conducted after the diel experiment. The initial PCB partitioning was similar in the two experiments, but the subsequent distribution among the organism groups was different. In the rainy season experiment, the PCB concentration in the largest size fraction was almost three times higher than during the dry season experiment. This was in line with results from the diel experiments where the carbon flux through the microbial food web was approximately three times higher during the rainy season than during the dry season experiment. These results suggest that the transfer rate of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl through the microbial food web is coupled to the carbon flux.

  1. Pigmented foils for radiative cooling and condensation irrigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, T.M.J.; Vargas, W.E.; Niklasson, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports on the development of pigmented polyethylene foils for radiative cooling. The optical properties of the foils were optimized for applications in day-time radiative cooling and water condensation. The authors first study highly scattering foils used as convection shields. These cover foils combine a high solar reflectance and a high transmittance in the atmospheric window region in the infrared. Different pigment materials were studied and ZnS was the only one that could prevent heating of an underlying blackbody at noon, with the sun in its zenith. A 400 {micro}m thick ZnS pigmented polyethylene foil with a pigment volume fraction of 0.15 was tested in Tanzania. At noon the observed temperature of the covered blackbody was only 1.5 K above the ambient. Secondly, they study the potential for condensation of water in an arid region. Pigmented foils for this purpose should combine a high solar reflectance and a high infrared emittance, in order to promote condensation by the radiative cooling effect. Titanium dioxide is a fairly good infrared emitter, but the emittance can be improved by using a mixture of TiO{sub 2} and BaSO{sub 4} pigments or only employing a composite SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}. Field tests with a 390 {micro}m thick polyethylene foil with TiO{sub 2} and BaSO{sub 4} pigments gave encouraging results.

  2. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  3. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  4. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  5. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  6. Carbon flows and economic evaluation of mitigation options in Tanzani's forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.R.; Okinting'Ati, Aku

    1995-02-02

    This paper presents estimates of the rate of forest use, deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the corresponding carbon flows, in the Tanzanian forest sector. It is estimated that the country lost 525,000 ha of forests in 1990, with associated committed emissions of 31.5 Mt. Carbon (MtC), and 7.05 MtC of committed carbon sequestration. The paper then describes the possible response options in the forest sector to mitigate GHG emissions, and evaluates the most stable subset of these-i.e. forest conservation, woodfuel plantations and agroforestry. The conservation options were found to cost an average of U.S. $1.27 per tonne of carbon (tC) conserved. Five options for fuelwood plantations and agroforestry, with two different ownership regimes were evaluated. Each one of the options gives a positive net present value at low rates of discount, ranging from U.S. $1.06 to 3.4/1C of avoided emissions at 0 percent discount rate. At 10 percent discount, the eucalyptus and maize option has a highest PNV of U.S. $1.73 tC, and the government plantation gives a negative PNV (loss) of U.S. $0.13 tC sequestered. The options with a private/community type of ownership scheme fared better than government run options. This conclusion also held true when ranking the options by the BRAC indicator, with the government fuelwood plantation ranked the lowest, and the private agroforestry option of eucalyptus and corn performing best. The mitigation options evaluated here show that the forest sector in Tanzania has one of the most cost-effective GHG mitigation opportunities in the world, and they are within the developmental aspirations of the country.

  7. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel; NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 ; Utzinger, Jürg; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel ; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Münch, Anna K.; Singer, Burton H.; Krieger, Gary R.; Wielga, Mark; NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projects—a uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: • We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. • We piloted the methodology on two corporate projects—a mine and a plantation. • Human rights impact assessment exposed impacts not foreseen in ESIA. • Corporations adopted the majority of findings, but not necessarily immediately. • Methodological advancements are expected for monitoring processes.

  8. Incorporation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po to Poultry through the Addition of Dicalcium Phosphate (DCP) to the Diet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casacuberta, N.; Masque, P.; Garcia-Orellana, J.; Gasa, J.; Anguita, M.

    2008-08-07

    Due to the replacement of calcium by uranium in the phosphorite, sedimentary phosphate rock contains high concentrations of {sup 238}U (i.e. from 1500 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} in Morocco to 4000 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} in Tanzania ores). Dicalcium Phosphate (DCP) is produced by the wet acid digestion of the phosphorite, and is used as a source of calcium and phosphorus for livestock feed supplement. If the phosphorite acid digestion is made with hydrochloric acid, DCP may present specific activities of about 10{sup 3} Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} of {sup 238}U and some of its decay chain daughters. In particular, due to its radiological implications, the presence of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in DCP is of special relevance. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential incorporation of these radionuclides to poultry through its diet. Three different diets were therefore prepared with different contents of both DCP and {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Diet A was used as a blank, and had a 2.5% in weight of monocalcium phosphate (MCP); diet B, with a 5% in weight of DCP; and diet C, with a 2.5% of DCP. Concentrations of {sup 210}Pb were 0.93, 101.4 and 51.2 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}; whereas concentrations of {sup 210}Po were 0.92, 74 and 36 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} of food for diets A, B and C, respectively. Accumulation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po was analysed at several times during poultry growth in samples of bone, liver, kidney, muscle, excrements as well as entire animals, with a total of 30 broilers fed with the 3 different diets. Results showed clear enhancements in the accumulation of both {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in chicken for diets B and C, and in particular in liver and bone. However, total accumulation of radionuclides in chicken, and especially in edible parts, is low compared to its expulsion through excrements. These results are interpreted in terms of the potential dose through consumption of chicken.

  9. Scapolite as a potential sensor of fluid composition in calc-silicates and granulites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moecher, D.P.; Essene, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Scapolite has been proposed as reservoir for CO/sub 2/ in the lower crust (Goldsmith 1976) and as a sensor of fluid composition in scapolite-bearing calc-silicates and granulites. The scapolite decarbonation reaction 2Meionite(Me)+Quartz(Qz)=5Anorthite(An)+Grossular(Gr)+2CO/sub 2/, obtained by addition of the reaction 3An+Cc=Me and An+2Cc+Qz=Gr+2CO/sub 2/, is a potential equilibrium applicable to a variety of lithologies and grades by which CO/sub 2/ activities could theoretically be calculated. Assuming partial ordering in natural scapolite, and S/sub 298//sup 0/ (Me)=728.6J/mol x K, the scapolite decarbonation reaction has a virtually flat slope in the range 700-1000/sup 0/C and 2.2+/-0.1kb with 2Me+Qz on the high P side of the reaction. Values of logK for the reaction were determined at elevated P, and aCO/sub 2/ calculated for scapolite-bearing calc-silicate assemblages (Sc+Pg+Gt+Q+Di+/-Cc) from Perry Sound (PS), Ontario and the Furua Complex (FC), Tanzania (Coolen 1980), for which X(Gr)approx. =0.8, X(An)approx. =0.6-0.8, and X(Me)greater than or equal to0.7. The a-X relations used were Perkins (1979) for garnet, Newton and Perkins (1982) for plagioclase, and Oterdoom and Gunter (1983) for scapolite. However application of the scapolite decarbonation reaction to garnet-bearing granulites with X(Gr)less than or equal to0.20 yields erroneous estimates of aCO/sub 2/(greater than or equal to1.0) suggesting incorrect assumptions used to determine S/sub 298//sup 0/ for stably ordered meionite or the a-X relations of Oterdoom and Gunter. Further refinement of the thermodynamic data base and evaluation of the degree and effect of order-disorder in natural scapolites must be performed in order to use scapolite to calculate fluid composition in high grade metamorphites.

  10. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security plans, etc. This standardized approach is applied to specific country and regional needs. Recent examples (FY 2003-2004) include foreign missions to Lithuania, Russian Federation Navy, Russia - PNPI, Greece (joint mission with IAEA), Tanzania, Iraq, Chile, Ecuador, and Egypt. Some of the ambitions and results of the RTR program may be characterized by the successes in Lithuania, Greece, and Russia.

  11. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortfeld, T; Ngoma, T; Odedina, F; Morgan, S; Wu, R; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global health to help increase AMPERE and alleviate the growing global burden of cancer; To present and discuss a new model for harmonizing Medical Physics Training across countries and how this model (UMass and Heidelberg) could be extended to LMIC in collaboration with the IAEA; To highlight a new platform and program for facilitating contributions by Medical Physicists to increase AMPERE towards the elimination of global cancer disparities. Challenges in Cancer Control in Africa Twalib A. Ngoma, MD, Professor, Executive Director, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Cancer care in Africa is beset by lack of attention, political will, cancer registries, cancer plans, human resources, financial resources and treatment facilities.. As a result of this, cancer patients in Africa are far more likely to die of their disease than those in developed countries. According to data from the WHO 750,000 new cancer cases occur in Africa every year and this number is predicted to rise by 70% by 2020. To make matters worse, an estimated 75% of cancer patients in Africa have advanced or incurable cancers at diagnosis making palliative care the most realistic approach to their management. Furthermore, Cancer prevention is nearly nonexistent, cancer detection is rare and treatment usually comes too late and is inefficient. The overall mortality-to-incidence ratio for men with cancer in the Africa is 0.75 compared with 0.54 in the developed world while the ratios for women in Africa, is 0.65 compared with 0.45 for women in the developed world. There is also limited access to radiotherapy. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), whilst developed countries usually have one radiotherapy machine per 250,000 people, most African nations have only one machine per ten million people. The above numbers are alarming and speak for themselves. The only solution to improve this alarming situation is to address the major challenges which African countries face in provision of cancer services which include but not limited to lack of cancer registries, lack of funding