Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Market characteristics of future oil tanker operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work analyzes the market characteristics of future oil tanker operations with a particular emphasis on those aspects which will have a potential impact on the design of future vessels. The market analysis model used ...

Willemann, Simmy Dhawan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

arctic tanker design: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the leading shipping companies in the world. Evi Plomaritou 16 DETECTION OF CORROSION ATTACK ON OIL TANKERS BY MEANS OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) CiteSeer Summary: The...

4

Twin-screw tanker designed for high efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1994, the Ching Fu shipyard in Taiwan delivered a chemical tanker to Fram Shipping, for operations around Northern Europe for Norsk Hydro. The 13000 dwt tanker design is optimized to have the lowest possible operational cost for the given dead-weight capacity. Waertsilae Propulsion has from an early stage contributed to the development of the propulsion system. The company proposed the Waertsilae Propac concept, including the hydrodynamic design and the supply of the main components. The propeller was designed using in-house computer programs, and the results confirmed by model tests, both at Danish Maritime Institute (DMI) in Copenhagen, and at SSPA Maritime Consulting in Gothenburg. The hull form for the tanker was optimized by a special bulb design to reduce the wave resistance. The vessel is also designed with a special twin skeg arrangement in the stern. This solution allows for two large and efficient propellers to be installed.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

6

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. (Rowland (P.) Associates (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 | Department7 U.S. Department ofAbout FEMP »

8

Augmentation of Rural Piped Water Schemes for Supply of drinking water to tanker fed villages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augmentation of Rural Piped Water Schemes for Supply of drinking water to tanker fed villages-3000mm and biggest reservoirs like Tansa, Vaitarana and Bhatsa for supplying drinking water to Mumbai city. Many solutions have been explored in the past to provide drinking water security to people

Sohoni, Milind

9

Feasibility of methods and systems for reducng LNG tanker fire hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this program concepts for reducing fire hazards that may result from LNG tanker collisions are identified and their technical feasibility evaluated. Concepts considered include modifications to the shipborne LNG containers so that in the event of a container rupture less of the contents would spill and/or the contents would spill at a reduced rate. Changes in the cargo itself, including making the LNG into a gel, solidifying it, converting it to methanol, and adding flame suppressants are also evaluated. The relative effectiveness and the costs of implementing these methods in terms of increased cost of gas at the receiving terminal, are explained. The vulnerability of an LNG tanker and its crew to the thermal effects of a large pool fire caused by a collision spill is estimated and methods of protecting the crew are considered. It is shown that the protection of ship and crew so that further deterioration of a damaged ship might be ameliorated, would require the design and installation of extraordinary insulation systems and life support assistance for the crew. Methods of salvaging or disposing of cargo from a damaged and disabled ship are evaluated, and it is concluded that if the cargo cannot be transferred to another (empty) LNG tanker because of lack of availability, then the burning of the cargo at a location somewhat distant from the disabled tanker appears to be a promising approach. Finally, the likelihood of the vapors from a spill being ignited due to the frictional impact of the colliding ships was examined. It is found that the heating of metal sufficient to ignite flammable vapors would occur during a collision, but it is questionable whether flammable vapor and air will, in fact, come in contact with the hot metal surfaces.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A laboratory study of the effect of oil-soluble inhibitors on tanker corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, watex was present under the Cargo in '-. - ? Che form of residual fi~ on the metal. The thick rust eo~leq as present in . most tanks, tended to xstain moisture And aot as a shield (1$), ' Thus, corxosicn occurred during both ballait and I , 'cargo...'pxesencc of an; electrolyte solution, '. Xn tanker compart I ments the solient is water, It is supplied by condensation in all tarks&. and by sec water ballast in, a number of compartments; l. l . gone vessels still'employ &ttsXworthing~ or tank' washing...

Schneider, Frederick Haden

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Risks in DP Shuttle Tanker Offloading Dr Haibo Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fishtailing Normal Yawing Hs = 5.5 m loading / 4.5 m connection #12;SIMO Simulation Work (1999 ­ 2003 safety and incidents, and Mr. Torbjørn Hals from Kongsberg Maritime for information on DP control system platform ­ Submerged offloading systems such as OLS, SAL, STL · Direct offloading: ­ Tandem/alongside from

Nørvåg, Kjetil

14

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECMConstructionApplications |Applicationsa Suezmax Class

17

Conventional Gasoline Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data CBECSYearThousandPAD

18

alternative tanker designs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) conical, wingedbodied vehicle powered by two liquid hydrogen (LH2)liquid oxygen (LOX) supercharged ejector ramjets (SERJ). The 3 rd generation...

19

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Productive Energy of Corn Meal, Alfalfa Leaf Meal, Dried Buttermilk, Casein, Cottonseed Meal, and Tankage as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Chickens.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.45 . 57 . 82 Ether Extract 2.52 2.88 1.9~ 1.81 3.77 1.73 . 54 5.48 . 27 . 17 1.74 1.79 . 18 7.00 1.24 1.22 4.31 4.96 4.84 3.20 2.59 2.59 2.35 2.51 2.15 3.04 4.06 3.04 3.03 2.94 3.43 F.98 2.48 Nitrogen- free extract... fiber Nitro- extract I Protein -. 18.13 21.12 21.51 19.21 22.71 24.01 25.75 26.37 ?2.81 22.10 26 . 60 26.75 22.73 49.23 17.63 20.78 22.08 49.35 16.90 20.50 20.85 56.38 37.33 43.14 20.30 56.02 31 . 01 30.71 29.36 31.42 29...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Decision support tool for the tanker second-hand market using data mining techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes an innovative decision support tool intended for market leaders and those anticipating market states of "sale and purchase". This is feasible with the use of powerful data mining techniques and the ...

Karaindros, Athanasios A. (Athanasios Andreas)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A shipping plan for bulk petroleum products by sea-going tankers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&k'rs can c &i y ro'. e L'r iu c & ' cui "o ' L oii I ', Iu in&lose?1. ':oci! Soir ?. . ; Lhe '(lie pili'. r )ji i&ui'i r)i'c, Uc?in i&)? ucd I)&I)o&c [2] is, 1 foJJou-iip Lo uo 'irlicr pi&)rr by Dent:zirg, :ir' IruJI &i)son [4]. Ct deals with a ahl ip...!& SOIIOTTGV 2. l G it"ii ? o' Vti!ji, d '!!ie fin&. ciiarL in. I i; iirc. I p' ~ v id & s, i u id &&! & n f ir thc na j or sL cps I al. cn in &olving tlit pro!ii e?. T&ie pro. i, &n begins by v&, . d iiig in ' I e ini Lial info & i& ion I iles mc &tinned n...

Boyd, David George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamic analysis of a semi-submersible connected to a tanker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency oscillation. 2. 16 Reproduction of API RP2P curve . 2. 17 Sedco 711 surge motion for low frequency motion calculations. 2. 18 Sedco 711 surge motion for low frequency motion calculations; details of 20 sec, surrounding extreme. . 2. 19 Curve... institutes (API) "Recommended Practices for The Analysis of Spread Mooring Systems for Floating Drilling Units (RP2P)" [18]. API RP2P contains an upper bound curve for the relationship between spectral significant wave height, mean wave drift force...

Maldonado-Aguirre, Georgina

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - aframax oil tanker Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in which the source was a ... Source: Vences, Miguel - Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Zoological Museum, Universiteit van Amsterdam; Vieites, David R. -...

25

Rutgers Fire Safety Precautions December 11, 2001 1.1 KETTLE/TANKER FIRE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tance away from any structure or combustible material. G. Where liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinders heating apparatus is used, it should be kept in constant motion while operating. To prevent smoldering contact with the flame of the torch. Small torches should be used to heat the underside of the membrane

26

Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNaturalInstituteCrosscuttingImports

27

Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude Oil Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand

28

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOilCompanyexcludingDistricts

29

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOilCompanyexcludingDistrictsRail between

30

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,99 Diagram 4.Future of

31

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,99 Diagram 4.Future ofSep-14

32

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26, 2008 (Next1,Product: Total Crude Oil

33

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion 5Wellhead PriceB.1. FRCC2009 2010

34

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion 5Wellhead PriceB.1. FRCC2009

35

Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2013

36

S-K Final Report Project Title: Examination of Coastal Aquaculture Effluent and Receiving Water Quality throughout the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bratvold Savannah River Ecology Laboratory University of Georgia Date: October 31, 2005 Abstract. The receiving water for this facility is an intercoastal water way. The second facility is a small operation

37

Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling: Status, Challenges, and R&D Needs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice -Template for aof Energy

38

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offshore Requirements Platform sites Gas treatment plantplants New technologies OTEC Tanker traffic lanes Barge traffic lanes OffshoreOffshore oil/gas production (tanker) Platform site Tanker loading bouy site On-site oil storage Gas treatment plant

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103. Relative2. Occupancy ofAviation Gasoline SalesNet Receipts by

40

Fuel consumption prediction methodology for early stages of naval ship design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, fuel consumption has increased in importance as a design parameter in Navy ships. Economical fuel consumption is important not only for operating cost measures but also for ship endurance tankage requirements. ...

Gheriani, Eran (Eran Y.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large diameter oil pipeline from Baku to the Turkish port ofoil tanker traffic through the Bosporus (Proposed Turkish Pipeline

Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry Alan L. Erera, Juan C on asset management problems faced by tank container operators, and formulates an operational tank modes: pipeline, bulk tankers, parcel tankers, tank containers, or drums. Pipeline and bulk tankers

Erera, Alan

43

air force bombers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engagement Effectiveness 12;Aircrew at Risk The Value of Range, Payload, Precision, and Stealth Bomb Droppers Air Escort Air Defense Suppression Tankers Total Aircrew At Risk...

44

TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 0 344 978...

45

Methods to Study Intervention Sustainability Using Pre-existing, Community Interventions: Examples from the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

safe water storage, sanitation, and rainwater harvesting.safe water storage, sanitation, and rainwater harvesting.rainwater harvesting or purchasing water from a tanker or

Arnold, Benjamin Ford

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Monthly, February 2006 Table 58. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2005 (Continued) (Thousand...

47

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Monthly, November 2005 Table 58. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, September 2005 (Continued) (Thousand...

48

TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Forms EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," and EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and...

49

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments...

50

Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suezmax class tanker arrived at port of Los Angeles and LongPorts .September http://www.arb.ca.gov/ports/marinevess/vsr/

Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content is given  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is given below. The units are given in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) SC in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) CC = Carbon content of fuel (mass-%) M(C) = Molar_CRD = Crude Oil tankers, T_PROD = Oil Product tankers, BULK = Bulk Cargo ships, RoPax = Roll On ­ Roll Off

Meskhidze, Nicholas

52

Microsoft Word - 10121-4407-01 Final Report Clean as of 01October2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into a quickly available tanker for delivery to a U.S. GoM port. The restarting of offshore production in 2005 was made difficult by delays pertaining to the offloading issue...

53

Microsoft Word - ^App Slipsheets.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into a quickly available tanker for delivery to a U.S. GOM port. The restarting of offshore production in 2005 was made difficult by delays pertaining to the offloading issue...

54

Topic Significance Ranking of LDA Generative Loulwah AlSumait1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tanker , water oil/crude oil , price, barrel , crude (0.045), increase, product , petroleum , energy Na, coffee , quota , product , market , price , Brazil ship ship , gulf , attack , Iran , American , oil

Domeniconi, Carlotta

55

ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generating capacity, crude oil production~ total petroleumin the Alaskan crude oil production rate will significantlyProduction Oil/Gas Processing Tanker traffic lanes Barge traffic lanes Off-shore terminals/ lightering sites Pipelines Refinery Storage facilities Crude/

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Multi-Factor Model of Correlated Commodity - Forward Curves for Crude Oil and Shipping Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An arbitrage free multi-factor model is developed of the correlated forward curves of the crude oil, gasoline, heating oil and tanker shipping markets. Futures contracts trading on public exchanges are used as the primary ...

Ellefsen, Per Einar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Padding with Compressed Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We commonly find plants using padding to transport liquids or light solids short distances from tankers into storage tanks. Padding can wreck havoc in compressed air systems with limited storage, undersized cleanup equipment (dryers and filters...

Beals, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Characterization of FBG sensor interrogation based on a FDML wavelength swept laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Cargo Containment of LNG Tankers, Proc. SPIE 6770, 1-in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier ship [13-17]. Sincedielectric device for massive LNG carrier ships but their

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Water by truck in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To increase the security of Chinese oil tankers throughChinas Oil Diplomacy: Is it a Global Security Threat? ?s energy security concerns over rapidly growing oil demand

Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Decisionmetrices : dynamic structural estimation of shipping investment decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation develops structural models for analyzing shipping investment decisions, namely ordering, scrapping and lay-up decisions in the tanker industry. We develop models, based on a microeconomic specification, ...

Dikos, George

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fertilizers and Fertilizer Analyses: With the New Law Controlling the Sale of Fertilizers and Poisonous Insecticides in the State.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

superphosplzate or dis- solved hone. If it is pure bones, which are treated with sulphuric . acid, we have in the dissolved bone 3 to 5 per cent. of ammonia. If ammonia in any form is added to a superphosphate, it is then called an ammoniated superphosphate... used as a nitrate, comes almost entirely as the nitrate of soda. In the organic form, or as ammonia, it, may come with raw bone meal, tankage, cotton seed meal, bat guano, ammoniated super- phosphate, etc,, associated with phosphoric acid alone...

Harrington, H. H.

1899-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Carotene Consuming Power of Certain Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carotene consuming power. The dif- ferences were not great, however, but on the other hand were compara- tirely small. Very little carotene was aestroyed in the rats by the meat scraps with high carotene consuming power. Table 20. Effect of carotene... worked out and are given in detail. Samples of meat and bone scraps, meat scraps, tankage, dried fish, dried skim milk and dried butter milk may have it high consuming power for carotene. Vegetable feeds such as corn meal, cottonseed med, aheat pay...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

Not Available

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nationalization of the oil industry in Iran 1951-1953: a study in cold war diplomacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ort, facing p. 3)0. 23 The means of oil transportation were also controlled. by the seven~ together they owned. 5' of the world. tanker fleet and were under contract to two-thirds of private tankers. AU. pipelines outside the United States ware...NATIONALIZATION OF THE OIL INDUSTRY IN IRAN 195l-1953s A STUN IN COLD WAR DIPLIRAOI LINDA NILLS /AIM-lQLQAXI Sulaitte4 to the Graduate Callege of Texme AAH Vhiverssity & yartiel fulfiI1msnt of the requirement for the Legree of December 1973...

Qaim-Maqami, Linda Wills

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Towards a maintenance and servicing indicator Pascal Vrignat 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Preventive Maintenance, Maintenance planning, Hidden Markov Model, Failure detection. 1 Introduction, events may be prevented by applying a correct maintenance policy. Some tankers may not have sunk if some maintenance had been correctly applied. Factory should not have exploded with some preventive control

Boyer, Edmond

67

Mapping the Seafloor American Samoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-foot survey boat. The sonar sys- tem operates at an acoustic frequency of 300 kHz, fanning out as many tanker that exploded and sank in the harbor in 1949, and may still be a source of water pollution (see

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

68

MFR PAPER 1255 Use of Salt (NaCI) Water to Reduce Mortality of Chinook Salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

handling and haul- ing by truck tanker is becoming increas- ingly important to the success of a major mortality of salmon and trout during handling and hauling by tank trucks. LITERATURE SEARCHED tshawytscha, During Handling and Hauling CLIFFORD W. LONG, JERRY R. McCOMAS, and BRUCE H. MONK ABSTRACT

69

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

70

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of years required to pay for the specified propane storage facilities having a used tank for a four OF PURCHASING PROPANE GAS AS "TANKER" LOADS Fuel costs comprise 15 to 20% of the total cost of production for a contract broiler grower. During recent years, seasonal supply and demand for propane has caused prices

Navara, Kristen

71

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-684 l^&'i Age and Size Composition of tlie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study. Part DC; The sea-level wind field and wind stress values, July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office. Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C. Stoner

72

' >'"'! . ilf^i^iev^^: :.;:-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C- Stoner

73

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-685 An Annotated List of Larval and Juvenile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970. iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C Stoner

74

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-691 Seasonal Distributions of Larval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C. Stoner

75

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-689 NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel. By Gunter R. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R C

76

AN AGGREGATED VECTORIAL MODEL OF PETROLEUM FLOW IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCESSING - CONSUMPTION 49. Tanker and Barge Crude Oil andCrude Oil Pricing Model/System VI W 73. Energy ConsumptionCONSUMPTION :rF I PETROLEUM PRODUCT STORAGE PROCESSING / II I I I i I I REFINERY REFINERY CRUDE OIL

Krishnan, V. V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Distribution and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport hydrogen by pipeline or over roadways using tube trailers or cryogenic liquid hydrogen tankers in comparison with the more-than-one million miles of natural Suppliers currently transport hydrogen by pipeline composed of substantial amounts of hydrogen, as well as other elements. gas pipelines, the current hydrogen

78

The Status of COThe Status of CO22 CaptureCapture and Storage Technologyand Storage Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydrogen from fossil fuels · Energy models show that without CCS, the cost of mitigating climate change (Electricity, Fuels, Chemicals, Hydrogen) CO2 CO2 Capture & Compress CO2 Transport CO2 Storage (Sequestration) - Post-combustion - Pre-combustion - Oxyfuel combustion - Pipeline - Tanker - Depleted oil/gas fields

79

CCPPressRelease 13 June 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in prison for the worldwide price fixing of flexible marine hoses, used to transport oil between tankersCCPPressRelease 13 June 2008 Stiff sentences in first criminal price fixing case fail to make a big Stephan ­ t: 07712 343600 or 01603 259560 e: a.stephan@uea.ac.uk Stiff sentences in first criminal price

Feigon, Brooke

80

Tufts University Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Their operations are as follows. Crude oil is transported via pipelines and tankers from the oilfields the solution to this problem. Supply and Transportation Costs Crude oilfield C1 produces 30,000 bbl, to the refineries, costing $0.30/bbl for shipment to R1 and $0.60/bbl for shipment to R2. Crude oilfield C2 produces

MacLachlan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIS-0035: Use of VLCCs and VLCCs as Floating Storage Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed use of tankers as floating storage facilities. This statement is a draft supplement to the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

82

Sabine-Neches Waterway Channel Improvement Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 500 to 800 feet wide, from the Gulf of Mexico; a channel 40 feet deep and 400 feet wide to Beaumont of navigation on the waterway. The current channel was completed in 1960. At that time, crude oil tankers are now used routinely for crude oil imports to both Beaumont and Port Arthur. In addition to larger

US Army Corps of Engineers

83

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep-loaded to traverse the waterway. The current channel depth requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation

US Army Corps of Engineers

84

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation takes place in the Gulf of Mexico where the two ships

US Army Corps of Engineers

85

FODDIS et al Identification of the unknown pollution source in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and model design of carbon tetrachloride pollution in the Alsatian aquifer has been the subject of various strategies in polluted aquifers. This work aims at studying the spreading of a dangerous chemical - carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) - that contaminated a part of the Alsatian aquifer (France) because of a tanker accident

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Profile of George Oster n 1980, when biophysicist George  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. He spent his sophomore year sailing on freighters and tankers to various ports of call, in- cluding dur- ing the first year.'' A Doctorate and then Some Although nuclear energy was a booming field he was relieved to be awarded a graduate fellowship from the Atomic Energy Commission in 1964. He

Oster, George

87

Conceptual Framework for the Use of Fish Parasites as Bioindicators of Acute and Chronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Perturbation After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 1Auburn University: Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico- exploratory oil well Ixtoc explodes, sinks (10.8, 5%) March 24th, 1989: Prince: Gulf of Mexico- oil tanker Megaborg fire (378, 189%) January 21st, 1991: Kuwait- Gulf War I, Iraqi

Kane, Andrew S.

88

Self-traveling robotic system for autonomous abrasive blast cleaning in double-hulled structures of ships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil tankers carrying crude oil, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), lead, vessels such as very large crude oil carriers (VLCCs), bulk carriers (B/C), and liquefied natural gas after midnight on March 24, 1989, the 987-foot tank vessel Exxon Valdez, of the Exxon shipping company

Kim, Jongwon

89

Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix ``E``), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

Not Available

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California. [Curly Top Virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix E''), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

Not Available

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

Childers, M. [Oceaneering Production Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Barnes, J. [Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)]|[UMC Petroleum Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

92

Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

FUNGIBLE AND COMPATIBLE BIOFUELS: LITERATURE SEARCH, SUMMARY, AND RECOMMENDATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study described in this report is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of bio-fuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of bio-fuels, in support of a renewable fuels standard and possible future low-carbon fuel standards. These barriers can be classified into several categories, including operating practice, regulatory, technical, and acceptability barriers. Possible solutions to these issues are discussed; including compatibility evaluation, changes to bio-fuels, regulatory changes, and changes in the distribution system or distribution practices. No actual experimental research has been conducted in the writing of this report, but results are used to develop recommendations for future research and additional study as appropriate. This project addresses recognized barriers to the wider use of bio-fuels in the areas of development of codes and standards, industrial and consumer awareness, and materials compatibility issues.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

S.1930: Royalty Enhancement Act of 1998, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this bill is to provide certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. Sections of the Bill describe: definitions; rights, obligations and responsibilities; costs responsibility; transporter charges; imbalances; royalty-in-kind for trucked, tankered, or barged oil or gas; limitations on application; reporting; audit; lease terms not affected; eligible and small refiners; applicable laws; indian lands; effective; and regulations.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Africa's natural gas: potentialities and letdowns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although Africa has experienced 10 times less hydrocarbon exploration than Western Europe, its proved gas reserves already amount to 220-223 trillion CF or 7% of world reserves, while Europe holds 6% or 167 TCF. Yet Africa marketed only 1.3 TCF in 1982 against Europe's 6.5 TCF. Because of the lack of domestic demand for gas, Africa flares up to 21% of its gas output. Algeria is the continent's primary gas consumer, with Egypt, Libya, and Nigeria trying to expand local gas markets. The vast majority of marketed African gas goes to Europe, either as gas sent through the Trans-Med pipeline or as LNG via tanker.

Baladian, K.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SAIC's development of VACIS provides useful 'lessons learned' in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify ''lessons learned'' useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

Orphan, Victor J. [Science Applications International Corporation, 7455 W. Washington Avenue, Suite 290, Las Vegas, NV 89428 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The effects of four different oils on the metabolic activities of a euryhaline salt-marsh fish, Cyprinodon variegatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to recogn1ze the invaluable guidance, time and suggestions given to me by my major professor, Dr. Jack W. Anderson, under whose direction thi s research was made possible. I also wish to thank my commi ttee members, Dr. Kalman Horvath and Or. William J... that gasoline, diesel fuel oil, and tanker nii wer t ate tn th jnvenii Aaeri an h d, tinea ~aidisisi Roberts (1926) al "o found that gasoline and diesel oil were toxic to fish and attributed their toxic action to the water-soluble constituents...

Hightower, Glenn Michael

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An analysis of international grain freight rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and large holds arranged and structurally reinforced to carry ore, oil and light bulk cargoes. Other types include ore/oil (OO) and ore/slurry/oil (OSO). These tankers have a tight hatch provided on top of a central tank (Bernhard 1980). While adding... and suggestions for further research. CHAPTER H OVERVIEW OF OCEAN SHIPPING INDUSTRY Ocean shipping is often divided into the carriage of liquid and dry cargoes. The discussion in this chapter is mainly concentrated on ocean shipping of dry cargoes. The dry...

Jonnala, Sneha Latha

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS SurveyAnnual",20131Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,

100

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PAD Districts"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PAD

102

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber and Capacity of

103

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber and Capacity

104

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber and CapacityFuel

105

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber and

106

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber andas Feedstock

107

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber andas

108

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber andasBlender Net

109

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber andasBlender

110

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumber

111

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumberYield of

112

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumberYield

113

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumberYieldNet

114

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between PADNumberYieldNetBlender

115

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge between

116

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput to Atmospheric Crude

117

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput to Atmospheric

118

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput to

119

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput toIndustrial "

120

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput toIndustrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput toIndustrialThrough

122

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInput

123

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInputIndustrial "

124

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge betweenInputIndustrial

125

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and Barge

126

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales for Resale "

127

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales for Resale

128

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales for

129

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales forHeating Oil and

130

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales forHeating Oil

131

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales forHeating

132

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene Sales

133

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and BargeKerosene

134

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker and

135

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTanker

136

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom forImports fromTankerAnnual",2014,"6/30/1956"

137

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: SulfurBase Gas)Dry Natural Gas Proved Reservesin Storage -mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available fromTanker, Pipeline,

138

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: SulfurBase Gas)Dry Natural Gas Proved Reservesin Storage -mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available fromTanker,

139

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: SulfurBase Gas)Dry Natural Gas Proved Reservesin Storage -mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available fromTanker,by Rail"

140

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: SulfurBase Gas)Dry Natural Gas Proved Reservesin Storage -mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available fromTanker,by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gasoline vapor recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a gasoline distribution network wherein gasoline is drawn from a gasoline storage tank and pumped into individual vehicles and wherein the gasoline storage tank is refilled periodically from a gasoline tanker truck, a method of recovering liquid gasoline from gasoline vapor that collects in the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom, said method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a source of inert gas; (b) introducing inert gas into the gasoline storage tank as liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom so that liquid gasoline drawn from the tank is displaced by inert gas and gasoline vapor mixes with the inert gas in the headspace of the tank; (c) collecting the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture from the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the tank is refilled from a gasoline tanker truck; (d) cooling the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture to a temperature sufficient to condense the gasoline vapor in the mixture to liquid gasoline but not sufficient to liquify the inert gas in the mixture; (e) separating the condensed liquid gasoline from the inert gas; and delivering the condensed liquid gasoline to a remote location for subsequent use.

Lievens, G.; Tiberi, T.P.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

Whitehead, J.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Foinaven development - breaking the mould  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foinaven Phase I, the first oil field development West of Shetland, had produced a new standard in the time required between discovery and development. The bedrock of this performance improvement stems from the clarity of hydrocarbon imaging available with new technology based on the 3D seismic data. Oil in the Foinaven field (discovered in late 1992) lies within Palaeocene reservoir sands interbedded with impermeable mudstones. Reservoir quality is excellent, although the sands are relatively thin, distributed over a large area, and are overlain by a gas cap. Prior to appraisal drilling, 3D seismic data were acquired over Foinaven as part of an extensive 2000 sq km survey shot in the summer of 1993. The conventional 3D seismic data have been inverted to produce an acoustic impedance (AI) dataset. Comparisons of predicted vs. actual hydrocarbon pore thickness during appraisal drilling using the AI data have shown a typical variance of +/- 10%. An horizontal appraisal well, was spudded in mid-1994. Once the target reservoir was entered, directional information from the MWD tool was used to steer the well along a desired path in real time to interact with specific targets. Once the hole had been cleaned, it was then completed using a pre-packed production liner. To further evaluate the reservoir, following an initial horizontal well drill-stem test, an extended well test, using a semi-submersible linked to a shuttle tanker was undertaken. Over 400,000 bbl oil were produced from the Foinaven reservoir. Foinaven Phase I will be developed by Petrojarl IV, a ship shaped Floating Production, Storage and Off loading (FPSO) facility, currently being rebuilt in Northern Spain. In conjunction with the FPSO horizontal production wells will be used with subsea completions and following processing the crude oil will be exported by shuttle tanker to the refinery. Development drilling started in November 1994. First oil is programmed for early 1996 at a plateau rate around 85 mbd.

Maclean, C. [BP exploration, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

PLUTONIUM-238 RECOVERY FROM IRRADIATED NEPTUNIUM TARGETS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy proposes to re-establish a domestic capability for producing plutonium-238 (238Pu) to fuel radioisotope power systems primarily in support of future space missions. A conceptual design report is currently being prepared for a new 238Pu, and neptunium-237 (237Np) target fabrication and processing facility tentatively to be built at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the USA. The facility would be capable of producing at least 5 kg of 238Pu-oxide powder per year. Production of 238Pu requires fabrication of 237Np targets with subsequent irradiation in the existing Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the INL. The targets are 237Np oxide dispersed in a compact of powdered aluminum and clad with aluminum metal. The 238Pu product is separated and purified from the residual 237Np, aluminum matrix, and fission products. The unconverted 237Np is also a valuable starting material and is separated, purified and recycled to the target fabrication process. The proposed baseline method for separating and purifying 238Pu and unconverted 237Np post irradiation is by anion exchange (IX). Separation of Pu from Np by IX was chosen as the baseline method because of the methods proven ability to produce a quality Pu product and because it is amenable to the relatively small scale, batch type production methods used (small batches of ~200g 238Pu are processed at a time). Multiple IX cycles are required involving substantial volumes of nitric acid and other process solutions which must be cleaned and recycled or disposed of as waste. Acid recycle requires rather large evaporator systems, including one contained in a hot cell for remote operation. Finally, the organic based anion exchange resins are rapidly degraded due to the high a-dose and associated heat production from 238Pu decay, and must be regularly replaced (and disposed of as waste). In summary, IX is time consuming, cumbersome, and requires substantial tankage to accommodate the process. The primary purpose of the preliminary study discussed here is to develop an alternative process flowsheet using well-known solvent extraction (SX) techniques based on decades of experience with PUREX processing of nuclear materials. Ultimately, this initial study will be used to determine if an SX approach would offer any significant processing advantages relative to the currently proposed anion exchange process.

Scott Herbst; Terry Todd; Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Steve Frank; John Swanson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrostatic Mooring System. Final Technical Report: Main Report plus Appendices A, B, and C - Volume 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main conclusions from the work carried out under this contract are: An ordinary seafarer can learn by training on a simulator, to moor large tanker vessels to the Hydrostatic Mooring, safely and quickly, in all weather conditions up to storms generating waves with a significant wave height of 8 m. Complete conceptual design of the Hydrostatic Mooring buoy was carried out which proved that the buoy could be constructed entirely from commercially available standard components and materials. The design is robust, and damage resistant. The mooring tests had a 100% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being securely attached and moored to the vessel following every mooring attempt. The tests had an 80% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being adequately centered such that petroleum transfer equipment on the vessel could be attached to the corresponding equipment on the buoy. The results given in Table 3-2 of the mooring tests show a consistently improving performance from test to test by the Captain that performed the mooring operations. This is not surprising, in view of the fact that the Captain had only three days of training on the simulator prior to conducting the tests, that the maneuvering required is non-standard, and the test program itself lasted four days. One conclusion of the test performance is that the Captain was not fully trained at the initiation of the test. It may therefore be concluded that a thoroughly trained navigator would probably be able to make the mooring such that the fluid transfer equipment can be connected with reliability in excess of 90%. Considering that the typical standard buoy has enough power aboard to make eight mooring attempts, this implies that the probability that the mooring attempt should fail because of the inability to connect the fluid transfer equipment is of the order of 10{sup {minus}8}. It may therefore be concluded that the mooring operation between a Hydrostatic Mooring and a large tanker vessel can be carried out with near absolute reliability in all sea states up to a sea state where the significant wave height is 8 m.

Jens Korsgaard

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

none,

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Wright, Mathew C. [JLAB; Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Recommended research on LNG safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the safety and other environmental aspects of liquefied energy gases including liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effort reported here was conducted as part of the planning for further research into the safety aspects of transporting and storing LNG, with primary emphasis on public safety. Although the modern LNG industry has enjoyed excellent success in providing for safe operations, significant questions remain on the part of many, the expressions of which were intensified with the addition of marine-based LNG import terminals. Public safety with regard to large-scale importation of this fuel has received widespread attention in the US Congress, state legislatures, county and city governments, and from various individuals and public groups, with coverage in all the news media, including books published on the subject. The safety concerns have centered around the consequences to the public of a large spill of the cryogenic liquid from an ocean tanker or a larger storage tank, either of which might hold as much as 125,000 m/sup 3/ of LNG.

Carpenter, H.J.; Gilmore, F.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarter`s feature report focuses on natural gas exports to Mexico. OFP invites ideas from the public on future topics dealing with North American natural gas import/export trade. Such suggestions should be left on OFP`s electronic bulletin board. Natural Gas exports to Mexico continued to grow and reached an historic high for the month of June (7.8 Bcf). Two new long-term contracts were activated; Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company began importing 14.7 MMcf per day from TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Renaissance Energy (U.S.) Inc. began importing 2.8 MMcf per day from Renaissance Energy Ltd. for resale to Delmarva Power & Light Company. Algerian LNG imports remained stagnant with only one tanker being imported by Pan National Gas Sales, Inc. (Pan National). During the first six months of 1995, data indicates gas imports increased by about 10 percent over the 1994 level (1,418 vs. 1,285 Bcf), with Canadian imports increasing by 14 percent and Algerian imports decreasing by 81 percent. During the same time period, exports increased by 18 percent (83 vs. 70.1 Bcf).

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Damping of liquid sloshing by foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

Alban Sauret; Franois Boulogne; Jean Cappello; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Non-nuclear power sources for deep space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate ports. Results from laboratory operations showed that the ASTM specification for bound acylglycerides was achieved only at extended reaction times ({approx}25 min) using a single-stage batch contact at elevated temperature and pressure. In the single-pass configuration, the time required gives no throughput advantage over the current batch reaction process. The limitation seems to be the presence of glycerine, which hinders complete conversion because of reversible reactions. Significant improvement in quality was indicated after a second and third passes, where product from the first stage was collected and separated from the glycerine, and further reacted with a minor addition of methanol. Chemical kinetics calculations suggest that five consecutive stages of 2 min residence time would produce better than ASTM specification fuel with no addition of methanol past the first stage. Additional stages may increase the capital investment, but the increase should be offset by reduced operating costs and a factor of 3 higher throughput. Biodiesel, a mixture of methyl esters, is made commercially from the transesterification of oil, often soy oil (see Reaction 1). The kinetics of the transesterification process is rapid; however, multiphase separations after the synthesis of the fuel can be problematic. Therefore, the process is typically run in batch mode. The biodiesel fuel and the glycerine product take several hours to separate. In addition, to push yields to completion, an excess of methoxide catalyst is typically used, which has to be removed from both the biodiesel and the glycerine phase after reaction. Washing steps are often employed to remove free fatty acids, which can lead to undesirable saponification. Standards for biodiesel purity are based either on the removal of contaminants before the oil feedstock is esterified or on the separation of unwanted by-products. Various methods have been examined to enhance either the pretreatment of biodiesel feedstocks or the posttreatment of reaction products, including the use of a cavitation reactor in the process i

Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC); Hullette, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tankage intercoastal tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Liquefaction of natural gas to methanol for shipping and storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The penetration of natural gas into distant markets can be substantially increased by a new methanol synthesis process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new methanol process is made possible by the discovery of a catalyst that drops synthesis temperatures from about 275/sup 0/C to about 100/sup 0/C. The new low temperature liquid catalyst can convert synthesis gas completely to methanol in a single pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This characteristic leads to a further major improvement in the methanol plant. As a result of process design factors made possible by the BNL catalyst, the plant required to convert natural gas to methanol is very simple. Conversion of natural gas to methanol requires two chemical reactions, both of which are exothermic, and thus represent a loss of heating value in the feed natural gas. This loss is about 20% of the feed gas energy, and is, therefore, higher than the 10% loss in energy in natural gas liquefaction, which is a simpler physical - not a chemical - change. The energy disadvantage of the methanol option must be balanced against the advantage of a much lower capital investment requirement made possible by the new BNL synthesis. Preliminary estimates show that methanol conversion and shipping require an investment for liquefaction to methanol, and shipping liquefied methanol that can range from 35 to 50% of the capital needed for the LNG plant and LNG tanker fleet. This large reduction in capital requirements is expected to make liquefaction to methanol attractive in many cases where the LNG capital needs are prohibitive. 3 tabs.

O'Hare, T.E.; Sapienza, R.S.; Mahajan, D.; Skaperdas, G.T.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site, chromate was used throughout the 100 Areas (100-B, 100-C, 100-D/DR, 100-F, 100-H, and 100 K) as a corrosion inhibitor in reactor cooling water. Chromate was delivered in rail cars, tanker trucks, barrels, and local pipelines as dichromate granular solid or stock solution. In many occasions, chromate was inevitably discharged to surface or near-surface ground through spills during handling, pipeline leaks, or during disposal to cribs. The composition of the liquids that were discharged is not known and it is quite possible that Cr(VI) fate and transport in the contaminated sediments would be a function of the chemical composition of the waste fluids. The major objectives of this investigation which was limited in scope by the financial resources available, were to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100-D Area spill sites; 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of macroscopic leaching studies, and microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone that can be used for developing options for environmental remediation. The information gathered from this research effort will help to further improve our understanding of Cr(VI) behavior in the vadose zone and will also help in accelerating the 100 Area Columbia River Corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of column experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns. Column experiments used the field size fraction of the sediment samples and a simulated Hanford Site groundwater solution. Periodic stop flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using some microscale techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mssbauer spectroscopy.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; McKinley, James P.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Um, Wooyong; Resch, Charles T.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Petersen, Scott W.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cayuga County Regional Digester - Vision Becomes Reality - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at mesophilic temperatures, is designed to process the daily feedstock and produce 220,000 SCF2 of biogas per day. The digester also produces 44,000 gallons of digested slurry per day. 3. Biogas Conditioning System: The plant employs a biological biogas conditioning system to remove the H2S and moisture contents of the biogas and prepare it to be used by the plant generation system. 4. Combined Heat and Power System (CHP): This is a 633kW high efficiency biogas-fired GE-Jenbacher model JMS-312 GS-NL reciprocating engine cogeneration system. The heat recovery system incorporated into the package is designed to capture the waste heat from the engine exhaust, the jacket cooling water and the engine oil circuit. 5. Electrical Substation and Power Distribution Systems: An electrical distribution system has been constructed on-site that aggregates the electrical service of the different county buildings on the District campus into a county owned electric distribution system that is interconnected with the CHP and the local electric grid. The electrical system is designed, in accordance with the utility guidelines, to allow grid-parallel operation of CHP and provide for import and export of electric power. 6. Thermal Energy Distribution System: The heat recovery system has been integrated into a high temperature water distribution system that distributes the heat to the thermal circuits for the anaerobic digester facility. Additional piping has also been installed to transfer the remaining thermal energy to other county buildings on the campus. On a daily basis, the plant will co-process 35,000 gallons of manure from local dairy farms, 8,500 gallons of food-processor waste and 1,200 gallons of brown grease to produce 200,000 ft3/d of biogas and 44,000 gallons of pathogen-free nutrient-rich digested slurry for agricultural use by farms and in the local area. The biogas fueled CHP produces 5,157,000 kWh of electricity and 19,506 dekatherms of thermal energy per year. Electrical power generated by the cogeneration system powers all the buildings on the Cayuga County campus an

Kamyar V. Zadeh, Ph.D.; Blue Electron Technology Solutions International LLC

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

Grant, K E

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie, Simon and Vernon assisted with sorting and spawning Summer Chinook at the Wells hatchery for the Summer Chinook reintroduction program on the lower Yakima River. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 12,909 gallons/min. Four river pumps (12,400gpm) and one well pump No.2 (509gpm) are supplying water to the facility main head box and the egg incubation building. ACCLIMATION SITES: Easton had much activity in October, the electrical power panel that's switches commercial power operation to generator power (transfer switch) malfunctioned. Charlie called Wallace Electric as well as ASCO Services to trouble shoot the problem which has yet to be determined. Heaters have been turned on in all service buildings at the acclimation sites. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission traveled to Easton to install a pole to mount a satellite and a new ups backup system with new monitors and computers for pit tag data recording and transmitting. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tanks at Easton and Clark Flat. AMB Tools performed maintenance on the compressors at the acclimation sites as well as Cle Elum (5 total). VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Day Wireless performed maintenance on all handheld and vehicle radios. Day Wireless repaired radio communications (static noise) on the 6th also. All vehicles mileages and conditions are reported monthly to Toppenish. Cle Elum staff continues to clean and maintain all facility vehicles weekly. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Kevin of Raincountry was called in response to repairs needed to the water chiller system. Cle Elum staff winterized all irrigation as well as shop grounds. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the hatchery on the 22nd. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation room has been set up for transfer of eggs from isolation buckets to vertical stacks, temperature units are recorded daily. RESENTDENTIAL HOUSING: Residents irrigation has been winterized and fall fertilizer was applied to all grass on facility. Four Seasons performed maintenance on all heating sy

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z