Sample records for tankage intercoastal tankers

  1. Market characteristics of future oil tanker operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willemann, Simmy Dhawan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work analyzes the market characteristics of future oil tanker operations with a particular emphasis on those aspects which will have a potential impact on the design of future vessels. The market analysis model used ...

  2. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  3. arctic tanker design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the leading shipping companies in the world. Evi Plomaritou 16 DETECTION OF CORROSION ATTACK ON OIL TANKERS BY MEANS OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) CiteSeer Summary: The...

  4. Conversion of existing tanker to North Sea FPSO use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voorst, O. van; Baan, J. de; Loenhout, A. van; Krekel, M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of existing tankers as a permanently moored floating storage off loading (FSO) or floating production storage and off loading (FPSO) has been wide spread in the oil industry ever since tankers were used for storage. However, the application of an existing tanker for North Sea FPSO use meeting the stringent demands of the regulatory bodies and the harsh environment of the North Sea has withheld operators from using existing tankers in the North Sea. The acceptance of FPSO technology in the North Sea and the proven ability to moor a tanker with a passive mooring system in a harsh environment has opened the avenue to use existing tankers for use as an FPSO in the North Sea. This is also driven by the search for cost effective solutions for field development plans in order to make marginal fields economically exploitable. The potential reuse of an FPSO on a different location also makes the depreciation period of the FPSO vessel life related instead of field life related. Many issues related to the use of an FPSO in the North Sea are currently subject of papers at various forums. This paper, however, only addresses three crucial areas: (1) the criteria for selection of an existing tanker; (2) the use of a passive mooring system; (3) the fatigue assessment and required modifications. The paper is based on experiences gained during the engineering, design and construction phase of the UISGE GORM, the FPSO, which Bluewater will initially use for Amerada Hess Limited`s Fife Field on the UK continental shelf and confirms that the conversion of a suitable tanker to North Sea FPSO use is a technically flexible and an economically attractive solution.

  5. Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

  6. Nested Column Generation applied to the Crude Oil Tanker Routing and Scheduling Problem with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübbecke, Marco

    Nested Column Generation applied to the Crude Oil Tanker Routing and Scheduling Problem with Split, Germany March 7, 2012 Abstract The split pickup split delivery crude oil tanker routing and scheduling, because of the large expenses in crude oil shipping it is attractive to make use of optimization

  7. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  8. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. (Rowland (P.) Associates (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  9. Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

  10. Feasibility of methods and systems for reducng LNG tanker fire hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program concepts for reducing fire hazards that may result from LNG tanker collisions are identified and their technical feasibility evaluated. Concepts considered include modifications to the shipborne LNG containers so that in the event of a container rupture less of the contents would spill and/or the contents would spill at a reduced rate. Changes in the cargo itself, including making the LNG into a gel, solidifying it, converting it to methanol, and adding flame suppressants are also evaluated. The relative effectiveness and the costs of implementing these methods in terms of increased cost of gas at the receiving terminal, are explained. The vulnerability of an LNG tanker and its crew to the thermal effects of a large pool fire caused by a collision spill is estimated and methods of protecting the crew are considered. It is shown that the protection of ship and crew so that further deterioration of a damaged ship might be ameliorated, would require the design and installation of extraordinary insulation systems and life support assistance for the crew. Methods of salvaging or disposing of cargo from a damaged and disabled ship are evaluated, and it is concluded that if the cargo cannot be transferred to another (empty) LNG tanker because of lack of availability, then the burning of the cargo at a location somewhat distant from the disabled tanker appears to be a promising approach. Finally, the likelihood of the vapors from a spill being ignited due to the frictional impact of the colliding ships was examined. It is found that the heating of metal sufficient to ignite flammable vapors would occur during a collision, but it is questionable whether flammable vapor and air will, in fact, come in contact with the hot metal surfaces.

  11. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  12. A laboratory study of the effect of oil-soluble inhibitors on tanker corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Frederick Haden

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , watex was present under the Cargo in '-. - ? Che form of residual fi~ on the metal. The thick rust eo~leq as present in . most tanks, tended to xstain moisture And aot as a shield (1$), ' Thus, corxosicn occurred during both ballait and I , 'cargo...'pxesencc of an; electrolyte solution, '. Xn tanker compart I ments the solient is water, It is supplied by condensation in all tarks&. and by sec water ballast in, a number of compartments; l. l . gone vessels still'employ &ttsXworthing~ or tank' washing...

  13. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheXDistricts Tanker and

  14. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheXDistricts Tanker

  15. EIA-817, Monthly Tanker, Barge, and Rail Movement and Stocks in Transit Report Page 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7, Monthly Tanker, Barge,

  16. Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEtheInspection15 Intellectual PropertyAbout FEMP »

  17. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  18. Rawson, C., Crake, K. (students) and Brown, A.J., "Assessing the Environmental Performance of Tankers in Accidental Grounding and Collision", SNAME Transactions 106, pp. 41-58, 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    outflow divided by cargo capacity) as the best single outflow risk index until sufficient cost data can. This paper investigates alternatives for a tanker environmental risk index, and proposes a performance Organization (IMO) "Interim Guidelines for the Approval of Alternative Methods of Design and Construction

  19. Sirkar, J., Ameer, P., Brown, A.J., Goss, P., Michel, K., Nicastro, F., Willis, W., "A Framework for Assessing the Environmental Performance of Tankers in Accidental Grounding and Collision", SNAME Transactions 105, pp. 253-295, 1997.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    designs considering the costs of pollution, oil outflow characteristics and enhanced structural pollution with the oil outflow characteristics of various ship designs to arrive at a rational method performance." [1] Current international regulations for oil tankers intended to minimize pollution from oil

  20. The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutsikas, Angelos

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

  1. Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galle-Bishop, John Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

  2. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  3. aframax oil tanker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ultimately the whole cabin caught fire, and burned to the ground. The rock was oil shale. It was a sensational house warming Oil shales are reported to have been set afire...

  4. alternative tanker designs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) conical, wingedbodied vehicle powered by two liquid hydrogen (LH2)liquid oxygen (LOX) supercharged ejector ramjets (SERJ). The 3 rd generation...

  5. Conventional Gasoline Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanyS Light Duty

  6. Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | Department ofEmily Knouse About UsEnergya Suezmax

  7. Dynamic analysis of a semi-submersible connected to a tanker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado-Aguirre, Georgina

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    frequency oscillation. 2. 16 Reproduction of API RP2P curve . 2. 17 Sedco 711 surge motion for low frequency motion calculations. 2. 18 Sedco 711 surge motion for low frequency motion calculations; details of 20 sec, surrounding extreme. . 2. 19 Curve... institutes (API) "Recommended Practices for The Analysis of Spread Mooring Systems for Floating Drilling Units (RP2P)" [18]. API RP2P contains an upper bound curve for the relationship between spectral significant wave height, mean wave drift force...

  8. Decision support tool for the tanker second-hand market using data mining techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaindros, Athanasios A. (Athanasios Andreas)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes an innovative decision support tool intended for market leaders and those anticipating market states of "sale and purchase". This is feasible with the use of powerful data mining techniques and the ...

  9. Rutgers Fire Safety Precautions December 11, 2001 1.1 KETTLE/TANKER FIRE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tance away from any structure or combustible material. G. Where liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinders heating apparatus is used, it should be kept in constant motion while operating. To prevent smoldering contact with the flame of the torch. Small torches should be used to heat the underside of the membrane

  10. The testing of anti-corrosion tank linings for marine tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, G. [George Mills and Associates International, Inc., Humble, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern anti-corrosion tank coatings are complex polymeric systems which are expected to provide corrosion protection after portage of many types of strong chemical and solvent cargoes. Longevity of the applied coating system is a function of the characteristics and quality of the formulated coating as well as the physical application. A tank coating testing program has been developed to evaluate specific failure modes with troublesome representative solvents frequently traded in large multi-tank marine vessels. Methanol, benzene, acetone, ethylene dichloride, vinyl and ethyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate as well as hot crude tall oil have been used as test cargoes to evaluate candidate tank linings. The evaluation techniques utilize monitoring cargo absorption and desorption rates as a function of coating weight followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) of the test solutions to identify extracted coating materials released into the solvent cargoes. Solvent retention in the lining is followed by GC/MS of coating chips with known exposure histories. Failure modes are demonstrated and mechanisms are proposed.

  11. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  12. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  13. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

  14. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  15. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  16. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX ImeansCrude Oil

  17. Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX ImeansCrude

  18. Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  19. Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling: Status, Challenges, and R&D Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTank 48HThisDepartment ofSatish Tamhankar

  20. ad libitum feeding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cottonseed, rice hulls, corn bran, blood meal, digester tankage, cracli-lings, meat scrap, meat meal, meat and bone scrap, meat and bone meal... Youngblood, B. (Bonney)...

  1. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlantGross WithdrawalsMarketedShaleNet

  2. Fuel consumption prediction methodology for early stages of naval ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gheriani, Eran (Eran Y.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, fuel consumption has increased in importance as a design parameter in Navy ships. Economical fuel consumption is important not only for operating cost measures but also for ship endurance tankage requirements. ...

  3. TABLE55.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report." July 2004 Crude Oil ......

  4. The Journal of Industrial Economics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hijack an oil tanker. They can get $1,000 for it on the black market. To the oil company it is worth $2,000. The oil company can take the tanker by force at a cost of $1,700. The pirates have a set business plan, under which they demand a ransom of $1,500 for tankers of this size. The oil company counters

  5. A Similarity Parameter for Capillary Flows of Relevance to Micropropulsion Kurt A. Polzin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Y. Choueiri Electric Propulsion and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory (EPPDyL) Mechanical and Aerospace and handling. Propellant storage typically requires the car- rying of additional tankage mass. Also, micro Electric Propulsion Conference, Toulouse, France. Copyright c 2003 by authors. Published by the ERPS

  6. President Bush Directs Energy Secretary to Draw Down Strategic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on the transportation by ship of petroleum, gasoline and other refined petroleum products. This action will allow additional tankers and barges to transport oil and...

  7. TABLE53.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 53. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between July 2004 Crude Oil ... 0 383 0...

  8. TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 0 344 978...

  9. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments...

  10. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastruct...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and isolating oil cavern wellheads, and filling tanks to prescribed depths to withstand wind and flood effects. Disruptions in tanker and barge traffic can present challenges for...

  11. Methods to Study Intervention Sustainability Using Pre-existing, Community Interventions: Examples from the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Benjamin Ford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rainwater harvesting or purchasing water from a tanker orsafe water storage, sanitation, and rainwater harvesting.safe water storage, sanitation, and rainwater harvesting.

  12. air force bombers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engagement Effectiveness 12;Aircrew at Risk The Value of Range, Payload, Precision, and Stealth Bomb Droppers Air Escort Air Defense Suppression Tankers Total Aircrew At Risk...

  13. Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 33 US Codethe passage of the Oil Pollution Act, however, the tanker

  14. SUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content is given

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    is given below. The units are given in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) SC in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) CC = Carbon content of fuel (mass-%) M(C) = Molar_CRD = Crude Oil tankers, T_PROD = Oil Product tankers, BULK = Bulk Cargo ships, RoPax = Roll On ­ Roll Off

  15. GWU Personnel: Dr. J. Rene van Dorp VCU Personnel: Dr. Jason R. W. Merrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    0 0 27 32 37 31 37 4 0 0 168 RO/RO 11 10 12 12 12 13 10 10 12 11 10 10 133 ATB INCLUDED IN PETROL TANKER COUNTS VEHICLES 15 15 19 16 13 17 16 17 12 17 18 15 190 PETROL TANKER 49 46 49 46 51 49 55 51 51 48 47 58 600 NON-PETROL TANKER 0 3 0 0 3 0 1 1 1 2 1 2 14 OTHER* 2 0 4 2 2 4 5 6 5 1 4 0 35 2005 MXPS

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY. SYMPOSIUM AND BANQUET SPEECHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the use of coal slurry pipelines. pipelines is finely-major future lies in coal slurry tankers of perhaps 300,000to mine coal in Utah, and to move it via a slurry pipeline

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 35 5,081 0 5,627 13,335...

  18. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) 2 3 5 1 3 5 1 New England Crude Oil 35 149 0 3,170 0 0 0 0...

  19. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generating capacity, crude oil production~ total petroleumin the Alaskan crude oil production rate will significantlyProduction Oil/Gas Processing Tanker traffic lanes Barge traffic lanes Off-shore terminals/ lightering sites Pipelines Refinery Storage facilities Crude/

  20. Multi-Factor Model of Correlated Commodity - Forward Curves for Crude Oil and Shipping Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellefsen, Per Einar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arbitrage free multi-factor model is developed of the correlated forward curves of the crude oil, gasoline, heating oil and tanker shipping markets. Futures contracts trading on public exchanges are used as the primary ...

  1. Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a North Slope relatively heavy oil (API gravity=29), as wellmoderate oiling and 2.6% had heavy oil levels 9 ; 87% of themillion liters North Slope Heavy Oil (API 29) Tanker spill

  2. Water by truck in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

  3. Characterization of FBG sensor interrogation based on a FDML wavelength swept laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Cargo Containment of LNG Tankers,” Proc. SPIE 6770, 1-in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier ship [13-17]. Sincedielectric device for massive LNG carrier ships but their

  4. Padding with Compressed Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We commonly find plants using padding to transport liquids or light solids short distances from tankers into storage tanks. Padding can wreck havoc in compressed air systems with limited storage, undersized cleanup equipment (dryers and filters...

  5. Strategic Safety Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPA Not Reported in ORPS BPA employee driving a government vehicle suffered a fatal heart attack and collided head-on with a tanker truck 01282008 No accident investigation...

  6. acoustic flame-out detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at least four hours before actual failure. Nathan Ida Razvan Ciocan 94 DETECTION OF CORROSION ATTACK ON OIL TANKERS BY MEANS OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) CiteSeer Summary: The...

  7. acoustic detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at least four hours before actual failure. Nathan Ida Razvan Ciocan 94 DETECTION OF CORROSION ATTACK ON OIL TANKERS BY MEANS OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) CiteSeer Summary: The...

  8. Decisionmetrices : dynamic structural estimation of shipping investment decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dikos, George

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops structural models for analyzing shipping investment decisions, namely ordering, scrapping and lay-up decisions in the tanker industry. We develop models, based on a microeconomic specification, ...

  9. The Carotene Consuming Power of Certain Feeds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carotene consuming power. The dif- ferences were not great, however, but on the other hand were compara- tirely small. Very little carotene was aestroyed in the rats by the meat scraps with high carotene consuming power. Table 20. Effect of carotene... worked out and are given in detail. Samples of meat and bone scraps, meat scraps, tankage, dried fish, dried skim milk and dried butter milk may have it high consuming power for carotene. Vegetable feeds such as corn meal, cottonseed med, aheat pay...

  10. EIS-0035: Use of VLCCs and VLCCs as Floating Storage Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed use of tankers as floating storage facilities. This statement is a draft supplement to the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

  11. The Status of COThe Status of CO22 CaptureCapture and Storage Technologyand Storage Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Post-combustion - Pre-combustion - Oxyfuel combustion - Pipeline - Tanker - Depleted oil/gas fields for CCSLeading Candidates for CCS · Fossil fuel power plants Pulverized coal combustion (PC) Natural gas: PrePre--Combustion CaptureCombustion Capture Electricity Shift Reactor Sulfur Removal Combined Cycle

  12. FODDIS et al Identification of the unknown pollution source in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and model design of carbon tetrachloride pollution in the Alsatian aquifer has been the subject of various strategies in polluted aquifers. This work aims at studying the spreading of a dangerous chemical - carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) - that contaminated a part of the Alsatian aquifer (France) because of a tanker accident

  13. If you are intrigued by the technologies that allow for the construction of highly complex modern ships, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    knowledge, skills, and tools to aid in the analysis and design of ships and offshore structures, as well it possible to extract oil from the seabed and load it on to a tanker in high winds and heavy seas. Develop Hydromechanics and Ship and Offshore Structures. The field of ship hydromechanics focuses on ship motion

  14. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-689 NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel. By Gunter R. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R C

  15. AN AGGREGATED VECTORIAL MODEL OF PETROLEUM FLOW IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, V. V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROCESSING - CONSUMPTION 49. Tanker and Barge Crude Oil andCrude Oil Pricing Model/System VI W 73. Energy ConsumptionCONSUMPTION :rF I PETROLEUM PRODUCT STORAGE PROCESSING / II I I I i I I REFINERY REFINERY CRUDE OIL

  16. GWU Personnel: Dr. J. Rene van Dorp VCU Personnel: Dr. Jason R. W. Merrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    with the USCG VTS and Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee for data + validation 103 Perpendicular Kinetic Energy Example of potential experts: USCG VTS Operators, Puget Sound Pilots, Tanker Captains and First Mates, Tug Bouy J - Georgia Strait 1159 Bouy J - Puget Sound 322 Puget Sound - Georgia Strait 0 Total Change Bulk

  17. GWU Personnel: Dr. J. Rene van Dorp VCU Personnel: Dr. Jason R. W. Merrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    with the USCG VTS and Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee for data + validation 103 Perpendicular Kinetic Energy Example of potential experts: USCG VTS Operators, Puget Sound Pilots, Tanker Captains and First Mates, Tug COLUMN 2010 Bouy J - Georgia Strait 1159 Bouy J - Puget Sound 322 Puget Sound - Georgia Strait 0 Total

  18. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Distribution and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport hydrogen by pipeline or over roadways using tube trailers or cryogenic liquid hydrogen tankers in comparison with the more-than-one million miles of natural Suppliers currently transport hydrogen by pipeline composed of substantial amounts of hydrogen, as well as other elements. gas pipelines, the current hydrogen

  19. CCPPressRelease 13 June 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    in prison for the worldwide price fixing of flexible marine hoses, used to transport oil between tankersCCPPressRelease 13 June 2008 Stiff sentences in first criminal price fixing case fail to make a big Stephan ­ t: 07712 343600 or 01603 259560 e: a.stephan@uea.ac.uk Stiff sentences in first criminal price

  20. cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Gas As a Transportation Fuel About Clean Energy Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Port Trucking LNG Station LNG Tanker Trailer Largest Natural Gas Fuel Provider in North America 660+ Fleet Customers 400 and Construction LNG #12;7 cleanenergyfuels.com CNG Station Reality ...the majority are not "Truck Friendly" #12

  1. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  2. Towards a maintenance and servicing indicator Pascal Vrignat 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : Preventive Maintenance, Maintenance planning, Hidden Markov Model, Failure detection. 1 Introduction, events may be prevented by applying a correct maintenance policy. Some tankers may not have sunk if some maintenance had been correctly applied. Factory should not have exploded with some preventive control

  3. Mapping the Seafloor American Samoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    -foot survey boat. The sonar sys- tem operates at an acoustic frequency of 300 kHz, fanning out as many tanker that exploded and sank in the harbor in 1949, and may still be a source of water pollution (see

  4. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    of years required to pay for the specified propane storage facilities having a used tank for a four OF PURCHASING PROPANE GAS AS "TANKER" LOADS Fuel costs comprise 15 to 20% of the total cost of production for a contract broiler grower. During recent years, seasonal supply and demand for propane has caused prices

  5. MFR PAPER 1255 Use of Salt (NaCI) Water to Reduce Mortality of Chinook Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    handling and haul- ing by truck tanker is becoming increas- ingly important to the success of a major mortality of salmon and trout during handling and hauling by tank trucks. LITERATURE SEARCHED tshawytscha, During Handling and Hauling CLIFFORD W. LONG, JERRY R. McCOMAS, and BRUCE H. MONK ABSTRACT

  6. Conceptual Framework for the Use of Fish Parasites as Bioindicators of Acute and Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    Environmental Perturbation After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 1Auburn University: Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico- exploratory oil well Ixtoc explodes, sinks (10.8, 5%) March 24th, 1989: Prince: Gulf of Mexico- oil tanker Megaborg fire (378, 189%) January 21st, 1991: Kuwait- Gulf War I, Iraqi

  7. From Waste to Hydrogen: An Optimal Design of Energy Production and Distribution Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yueyue

    impacts on freight volumes in both rural and urban areas. This paper focuses on the optimal design to operate for small quantities of hydrogen transported over short distances. Cryogenic or liquid tanker production, including biomass feedstock availability and costs (ORNL, 2005), the costs of producing hydrogen

  8. Anti-Spin Control for Marine Propulsion Systems yvind N. Smogeli1, Jostein Hansen2, Asgeir J. Srensen1 and Tor Arne Johansen2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    propellers on offshore supply vessels and shuttle tankers. In order to counteract the problem of ventilation. A monitoring algo- rithm utilizing the estimated torque loss detects ventilation incidents, and activates the anti-spin control action. When a ventilation situation is detected, the anti-spin control action

  9. GWU Personnel: Dr. J. Rene van Dorp VCU Personnel: Dr. Jason R. W. Merrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Captains and First Mates, etc. 77 A B C D E F Generating Accident Scenarios: Counting Collision Accident Scenario's Counting Drift Grounding Accident Scenario's Counting Powered Grounding Accident Scenario TANKER CALL NUMBER HIGH-LOW ANALYSIS FROM 1998-2012 +150-191 118 - 1998 : 3 111 - 2007 : -+4 LOW - YEAR

  10. Math 120: Handout 02/16/11 Alex Kasman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    it is just to keep things simple for you that we are making this restrictive assumption.) · The method a name in the question. Question 1: An tanker ship is leaking oil, which is expanding in a big circle around it. Since the oil is leaking out of the ship at a constant rate, the area of the circle

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report V, Volume 1 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Flare System (Plant 19), Tankage (Plant 20), Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21), River Facilities (Plant 22), Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23), and Electrical Distribution (Plant 30). Flare System (Plant 19) provides primary and auxiliary flare systems for safe collection and disposal of overpressure relief discharges, and operational and emergency venting of flammable vapors and liquids from the various processing plants and loading facilities. Tankage (Plant 20) provides storage for propane and heavier liquid hydrocarbon products, as well as for by-product ammonia, phenols, and liquid sulfur. Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21) includes the fuel gas blending and distribution system and the interconnecting process and utility piping between process plants and offsites. River Facilities (Plant 22) provides the loading of liquid products and by-products into barges for marine surface transportation, and the unloading of coal from barges. Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23) provides loading and unloading of products shipped by either rail or truck. Electrical Distribution (Plant 30) receives main utility power from the Big River Electric Corporation and distributes the power to the other plants. The following information is included for each of the six plants: a description of the plant's design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams, as applicable; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for piping and instrument diagrams.

  12. Corpus Christi oil port eyed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, M.B.

    1993-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Port of Corpus Christi, Texas, with the support of several oil companies and the blessing of the US Coast Guard, plans to build a $600-million deepwater harbor to accommodate supertankers. The proposed port, Safeharbor, is touted as an environmentally sound solution to current risks associated with off-loading crude oil from very large tankers at shore ports. In a system called lightering, crude now is transferred from supertankers in deep water to smaller vessels that can negotiate shallow channels. While smaller tankers need only 45 ft of water, supertankers need 80 ft. Corpus Christi has the advantage of being closer to deep water than other Gulf ports, but nevertheless, half the proposed project's cost, $300 million, would be for dredging a 10-mile channel to deep water.

  13. Design and analysis of hybrid tubular joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepanian, Christopher John

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil products may either be stored on the platform or immediately off- loaded by shuttle tanker or pipeline to onshore processing sites. Deep offshore wells typically lack access to nearby subsea pipelines. Off-platform storage enables the designer... &om the subsea well. Riser design evolution is moving towards more highly loaded risers due to their longer length. The ability of a rig to cost effec- tively repair or replace riser strings decreases with increasing riser length. Consequently...

  14. Tufts University Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLachlan, Scott

    -of-line with modern costs. Feel free to speculate on how changes in the worldwide market for oil might update/day (barrels/day). This oil can be sold directly on the open market for $3.50/bbl or be shipped, by tanker ship all of its oil via pipeline before selling any to the open market. Refining Refinery R1 can

  15. Long range weathering effects on the chemical properties of two Venezuelan crude oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bautz, Anton Frank

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number and size of oil tankers carrying oil from South America and the Middle East to the United States and Western Europe increases the risk of future oil spills and the associated pollution of the open seas, estuaries, and harbors. Thus an Increase..., and c'!eanup of oil spills. Research is very intensive in the analysis of the spilled and weathered petroleum products found on the seas. When exposed to the marine environment, petroleum and its products undergo chemical and physical compositional...

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Technology RoadmapS STR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /kW Asteroid Deflection Demonstration >1,000 m2 Solar Sail Orbital Demo Space Demo Refueling from tanker >2,500 m2 Solar Sail Space Demo Momentum Exchange Tether Boost Station Demo CRYOSTAT Interstellar Probe MPD 250-500 kW Li MPD 1 MW Li MPD NTR 5klbf Engine test NTP 5 klbf Demo >40,000 m2 Solar Sail Space

  17. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A. [Mobil Shipping and Transportation, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  18. Gras Dowr joins world`s FPSO fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gras Dowr, a floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSD) for Amerada Hess Ltd.`s North Sea Durward and Dauntless fields, is one of the latest additions to the world`s growing FPSO fleet. The Gras Dowr, anchored in about 90 m of water, lies between the Durward (U.K. Block 21/16) and Dauntless (U.K. Block 21/11) fields, about 3.5 km from the subsea wellhead locations. The Gras Dowr`s main functions, according to Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., are to: receive fluids from well risers; process incoming fluids to separate the fluid into crude, water, and gas; store dry crude oil and maintain the required temperature; treat effluent to allow for water discharge to the sea; compress gas for gas lift as a future option; provide chemical injection skid for process chemical injection; use a part of the produced gas for fuel gas, and flare excess gas; inject treated seawater into the injection wells; house power generation for process and offloading operation and utilities; offload to a tandem moored shuttle tanker including receiving liquid fuel from the same tanker; provide accommodations for operating and maintenance crews; allow helicopters landings and takeoffs; allow handling and storage of goods transported by supply vessels; moor a shuttle tanker; and control the subsea wells.

  19. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  20. FUNGIBLE AND COMPATIBLE BIOFUELS: LITERATURE SEARCH, SUMMARY, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study described in this report is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of bio-fuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of bio-fuels, in support of a renewable fuels standard and possible future low-carbon fuel standards. These barriers can be classified into several categories, including operating practice, regulatory, technical, and acceptability barriers. Possible solutions to these issues are discussed; including compatibility evaluation, changes to bio-fuels, regulatory changes, and changes in the distribution system or distribution practices. No actual experimental research has been conducted in the writing of this report, but results are used to develop recommendations for future research and additional study as appropriate. This project addresses recognized barriers to the wider use of bio-fuels in the areas of development of codes and standards, industrial and consumer awareness, and materials compatibility issues.

  1. An analysis of international grain freight rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnala, Sneha Latha

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and large holds arranged and structurally reinforced to carry ore, oil and light bulk cargoes. Other types include ore/oil (OO) and ore/slurry/oil (OSO). These tankers have a tight hatch provided on top of a central tank (Bernhard 1980). While adding... and suggestions for further research. CHAPTER H OVERVIEW OF OCEAN SHIPPING INDUSTRY Ocean shipping is often divided into the carriage of liquid and dry cargoes. The discussion in this chapter is mainly concentrated on ocean shipping of dry cargoes. The dry...

  2. Africa's natural gas: potentialities and letdowns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baladian, K.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although Africa has experienced 10 times less hydrocarbon exploration than Western Europe, its proved gas reserves already amount to 220-223 trillion CF or 7% of world reserves, while Europe holds 6% or 167 TCF. Yet Africa marketed only 1.3 TCF in 1982 against Europe's 6.5 TCF. Because of the lack of domestic demand for gas, Africa flares up to 21% of its gas output. Algeria is the continent's primary gas consumer, with Egypt, Libya, and Nigeria trying to expand local gas markets. The vast majority of marketed African gas goes to Europe, either as gas sent through the Trans-Med pipeline or as LNG via tanker.

  3. East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth SciencePipeline, Tanker,

  4. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth SciencePipeline, Tanker,MTBE

  5. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. Coal StocksArea DefinitionsRailTanker and

  6. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. Coal StocksArea DefinitionsRailTanker

  7. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. Coal StocksArea DefinitionsRailTankerImports

  8. EIA-819

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7, Monthly Tanker, Barge,

  9. EIA-819

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7, Monthly Tanker,

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker, Pipeline,

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil by

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil byof by

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil byof

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909" ,"Click worksheetProduct Supplied forImports by Area of Entry"Netby Tanker,Oil"

  17. From Project Sapphire to Today | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal NTFusion EnergyofJeffersonTankerFrom

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway Use " ,"Click worksheet name or tabNet Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products intoPipelineTanker,

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway Use " ,"Click worksheet name or tabNet Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products byof ResidualTanker

  20. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  1. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

  2. Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

  3. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  4. Dimethyl ether fuel proposed as an alternative to LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikkawa, Yoshitsugi; Aoki, Ichizo [Chiyoda Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To cope with the emerging energy demand in Asia, alternative fuels to LNG must be considered. Alternative measures, which convert the natural gas to liquid fuel, include the Fischer-Tropsch conversion, methanol synthesis, and dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis. Comparisons are evaluated based on both transportation cost and feed-gas cost. The analysis will show that DME, one alternative to LNG as transportation fuel, will be more economical for longer distances between the natural-gas source and the consumer. LNG requires a costly tanker and receiving terminal. The break-even distance will be around 5,000--7,000 km and vary depending on the transported volume. There will be risk, however, since there has never been a DME plant the size of an LNG-equivalent plant [6 million metric tons/year (mty)].

  5. Operational experience of FPSO Uisge Gorm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voorst, O. van

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bluewater was awarded a contract by Amerada Hess Limited to provide production services for the Fife Field in the North Sea using an FPSO based on a converted tanker. The contract required Bluewater to provide the production services form the wellhead to the refinery. The construction period of less than 17 months resulted in first oil in August 1995. Preparing for the operational phase and actual operation of the installation after first oil were also part of the contract. This paper briefly describes the construction phase, the preparatory phase for operations and the first 4.5 months of operations up to December 1995. The paper concludes that a wellhead to refinery contract is a feasible and commercially attractive solution for both oil company and FPSO contractor. The Fife Field could not have been developed if this contracting strategy had not been used, as after depletion of the Fife Field the Uisge Gorm will be available to be utilized on other fields.

  6. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

  7. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: A "Worst Case Scenario" for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, at the interchange known as the "MacArthur Maze." The accident involved a double tanker truck of gasoline overturning and bursting into flames. The subsequent fire reduced the strength of the supporting steel structure of an overhead interstate roadway causing the collapse of portions of that overpass onto the lower roadway in less than 20 minutes. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has analyzed what might have happened had a spent nuclear fuel transportation package been involved in this accident, to determine if there are any potential regulatory implications of this accident to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper provides a summary of this effort, presents preliminary results and conclusions, and discusses future work related to the NRC's analysis of the consequences of this type of severe accident.

  8. Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

  9. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  10. Hydrostatic Mooring System. Final Technical Report: Main Report plus Appendices A, B, and C - Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jens Korsgaard

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The main conclusions from the work carried out under this contract are: An ordinary seafarer can learn by training on a simulator, to moor large tanker vessels to the Hydrostatic Mooring, safely and quickly, in all weather conditions up to storms generating waves with a significant wave height of 8 m. Complete conceptual design of the Hydrostatic Mooring buoy was carried out which proved that the buoy could be constructed entirely from commercially available standard components and materials. The design is robust, and damage resistant. The mooring tests had a 100% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being securely attached and moored to the vessel following every mooring attempt. The tests had an 80% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being adequately centered such that petroleum transfer equipment on the vessel could be attached to the corresponding equipment on the buoy. The results given in Table 3-2 of the mooring tests show a consistently improving performance from test to test by the Captain that performed the mooring operations. This is not surprising, in view of the fact that the Captain had only three days of training on the simulator prior to conducting the tests, that the maneuvering required is non-standard, and the test program itself lasted four days. One conclusion of the test performance is that the Captain was not fully trained at the initiation of the test. It may therefore be concluded that a thoroughly trained navigator would probably be able to make the mooring such that the fluid transfer equipment can be connected with reliability in excess of 90%. Considering that the typical standard buoy has enough power aboard to make eight mooring attempts, this implies that the probability that the mooring attempt should fail because of the inability to connect the fluid transfer equipment is of the order of 10{sup {minus}8}. It may therefore be concluded that the mooring operation between a Hydrostatic Mooring and a large tanker vessel can be carried out with near absolute reliability in all sea states up to a sea state where the significant wave height is 8 m.

  11. Project management plan for Project W-178, 219-S secondary containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckles, D.I.

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) establishes the organizational responsibilities, control systems, and procedures for managing the execution of project activities for Project W-178, the 219-S Secondary Containment Upgrade. The scope of this project will provide the 219-S Facility with secondary containment for all tanks and piping systems. Tank 103 will be replaced with a new tank which will be designated as Tank 104. Corrosion protection shall be installed as required. The cells shall be cleaned and the surface repaired as required. The 219-S Waste Handling Facility (219-S Facility), located in the 200 West Area, was constructed in 1951 to support the 222-S Laboratory Facility. The 219-S Facility has three tanks, TK-101, TK-102, and TK-103, which receive and neutralize low level radioactive wastes from the 222-S Laboratory. For purposes of the laboratory, the different low level waste streams have been designated as high activity and intermediate activity. The 219-S Facility accumulates and treats the liquid waste prior to transferring it to SY Tank Farm in the 200-W Area. Transfers are normally made by pipeline from the 219-S Facility to the 241-SY Tank Farm. Presently transfers are being made by tanker truck to the 200-E Area Tank Farms due to the diversion box catch tank which has been removed from service.

  12. Dome takes a 20% interest in the Arctic pilot project to move LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, B.; Bell, J.

    1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to B. Richards of Dome Petroleum Ltd., Dome's interest will be shared with its partially owned subsidiary, Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Ltd. According to J. Bell of Petro-Canada, the operator for the Arctic project, negotiations are under way with Tenneco Inc. for gas sales of up to 225 million cu ft/day to begin in 1985-86. At first, two tankers would ship LNG to a delivery terminal at an as yet unselected site on Canada's east coast, but by 1992, nine ships capable of delivering 1.23 billion cu ft/day of LNG, could be in service. The U.S. and European potential LNG markets amounts to 3-4 trillion cu ft/yr and 3.5-4 trillion cu ft/yr, respectively. Petro-Canada also supports the Polar Gas Ltd. project to lay a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands and Mackenzie Delta to the south; the projects are not considered to be in competition.

  13. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

  14. A comparison of methods for evaluating structure during ship collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Daidola, J.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison is provided of the results of various methods for evaluating structure during a ship-to-ship collision. The baseline vessel utilized in the analyses is a 67.4 meter in length displacement hull struck by an identical vessel traveling at speeds ranging from 10 to 30 knots. The structural response of the struck vessel and motion of both the struck and striking vessels are assessed by finite element analysis. These same results are then compared to predictions utilizing the {open_quotes}Tanker Structural Analysis for Minor Collisions{close_quotes} (TSAMC) Method, the Minorsky Method, the Haywood Collision Process, and comparison to full-scale tests. Consideration is given to the nature of structural deformation, absorbed energy, penetration, rigid body motion, and virtual mass affecting the hydrodynamic response. Insights are provided with regard to the calibration of the finite element model which was achievable through utilizing the more empirical analyses and the extent to which the finite element analysis is able to simulate the entire collision event. 7 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  16. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Wright, Mathew C. [JLAB; Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  17. Overview study of LNG release prevention and control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Holter, G.M.; Powers, T.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry employs a variety of release prevention and control techniques to reduce the likelihood and the consequences of accidental LNG releases. A study of the effectiveness of these release prevention and control systems is being performed. Reference descriptions for the basic types of LNG facilities were developed. Then an overview study was performed to identify areas that merit subsequent and more detailed analyses. The specific objectives were to characterize the LNG facilities of interest and their release prevention and control systems, identify possible weak links and research needs, and provide an analytical framework for subsequent detailed analyses. The LNG facilities analyzed include a reference export terminal, marine vessel, import terminal, peakshaving facility, truck tanker, and satellite facility. A reference description for these facilities, a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA), and a list of representative release scenarios are included. The reference facility descriptions outline basic process flows, plant layouts, and safety features. The PHA identifies the important release prevention operations. Representative release scenarios provide a format for discussing potential initiating events, effects of the release prevention and control systems, information needs, and potential design changes. These scenarios range from relatively frequent but low consequence releases to unlikely but large releases and are the principal basis for the next stage of analysis.

  18. Basic research opportunities to support LNG technology. Topical report, July 1989-December 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groten, B.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As additional gas reserves come on production during the next decade in areas with limited local markets, worldwide LNG trade is expected to expand. The availability of dedicated LNG tankers may well determine the rate at which this growth occurs. Plans are being made now to bring the four U.S. import terminals up to capacity during this period. As LNG becomes a more significant factor in the domestic natural gas market, consideration should be given to applications other than simply regassifying and comingling it with other supplies entering the pipeline grid. The higher energy density and the low temperature of LNG offer opportunities for expanding the use of natural gas into the industrial and transportation sectors. Greater use of LNG in peak shaving and intermediate storage may also provide benefits in increased reliability and performance of the gas transmission and distribution grid. In order to provide new and more cost-effective technologies to respond to these opportunities, it is recommended that GRI broaden the range of research it is currently performing on LNG.

  19. The Asia Pacific LNG trade: Status and technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovdestad, W.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asia Pacific Region is experiencing a period of sustained economic expansion. Economic growth has led to an increasing demand for energy that has spurred a rapid expansion of baseload liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in this region. This is illustrated by the fact that seven of the ten baseload facilities in existence provide LNG for markets in the Asia Pacific region. With the three exceptions having been initially commissioned in 1972 and earlier, it is fair to observed that most advances in LNG technology have been developed and applied for this market. The paper presents the current status and identified future trends for the Asia Pacific LNG trade. Technology development in terms of application to onstream production, processing and transportation facilities, including LNG tankers, is presented. The potential of future advances to applied technology and operational practices to improve the cost-effectiveness of new and existing facilities is discussed. Current design data and methods as actually used are examined in terms of identifying where fundamental research and basic physical data are insufficient for optimization purposes. These findings are then summarized and presented in terms of the likely evolution of future and existing LNG projects in the Asia Pacific region.

  20. LNG shipments in 1994 set records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide LNG shipments by ocean-going vessels in 1994 increased to 1,619 voyages, according to an LNG shipping industry statistical annual. LNG Log 20 published the recently compiled 1994 data in the last quarter of 1995. The publication is from the Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators Ltd., London. The year`s total was 8.8% more than for 1993 and the most in 35 years of records. The trips were made and the vessels loaded and discharged without report of serious safety or environmental incident, says the publication. Of the voyages completed during the year, 596 were to European receiving terminals (up 2.8% over 1993), and 1,003 went to the Far East (an increase of 10.7%); shipments to the US, however, dropped to 20, from 32 in 1993. This paper shows that the 1,619 voyages represent 3.6 million nautical miles logged by 78 vessels active during the year. These ships pumped ashore record annual volumes of approximately 144.3 million cu m of LNG, 110.1 million cu m (76.3%) of which went to Far Eastern customers. The paper also summarizes containment systems in use in 1994 and since LNG began to be shipped in 1959.

  1. Development of mid-scale and floating LNG facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, B.C.; Mortko, R.A. [Black and Veatch Pritchard, Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of large-scale base load LNG facilities has dominated the process industry for decades. However, in many areas of the world, base load facilities are not feasible due to inadequate reserves. Mid-scale facilities can be economically attractive in certain locations and, in fact, have several advantages which aid in their development. The PRICO II LNG liquefaction process offers a process configuration which fits well with these developments. The process has been used in a range of facility sizes from base load to peak shaving applications. In addition to onshore facilities, floating liquefaction facilities can be developed on barges or tankers to handle mid-scale to large scale LNG production. Concepts for several sizes and configurations of floating facilities have been developed using the PRICO II process integrated into a total production, liquefaction, and load-out system. This paper covers the PRICO process concept, application areas and facility configurations which are currently being developed for mid-scale and floating LNG facilities.

  2. Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

  3. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

  4. Recommended research on LNG safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, H.J.; Gilmore, F.R.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the safety and other environmental aspects of liquefied energy gases including liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effort reported here was conducted as part of the planning for further research into the safety aspects of transporting and storing LNG, with primary emphasis on public safety. Although the modern LNG industry has enjoyed excellent success in providing for safe operations, significant questions remain on the part of many, the expressions of which were intensified with the addition of marine-based LNG import terminals. Public safety with regard to large-scale importation of this fuel has received widespread attention in the US Congress, state legislatures, county and city governments, and from various individuals and public groups, with coverage in all the news media, including books published on the subject. The safety concerns have centered around the consequences to the public of a large spill of the cryogenic liquid from an ocean tanker or a larger storage tank, either of which might hold as much as 125,000 m/sup 3/ of LNG.

  5. Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarter`s feature report focuses on natural gas exports to Mexico. OFP invites ideas from the public on future topics dealing with North American natural gas import/export trade. Such suggestions should be left on OFP`s electronic bulletin board. Natural Gas exports to Mexico continued to grow and reached an historic high for the month of June (7.8 Bcf). Two new long-term contracts were activated; Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company began importing 14.7 MMcf per day from TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Renaissance Energy (U.S.) Inc. began importing 2.8 MMcf per day from Renaissance Energy Ltd. for resale to Delmarva Power & Light Company. Algerian LNG imports remained stagnant with only one tanker being imported by Pan National Gas Sales, Inc. (Pan National). During the first six months of 1995, data indicates gas imports increased by about 10 percent over the 1994 level (1,418 vs. 1,285 Bcf), with Canadian imports increasing by 14 percent and Algerian imports decreasing by 81 percent. During the same time period, exports increased by 18 percent (83 vs. 70.1 Bcf).

  6. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alban Sauret; François Boulogne; Jean Cappello; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  7. Non-nuclear power sources for deep space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

  8. A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC); Hullette, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate ports. Results from laboratory operations showed that the ASTM specification for bound acylglycerides was achieved only at extended reaction times ({approx}25 min) using a single-stage batch contact at elevated temperature and pressure. In the single-pass configuration, the time required gives no throughput advantage over the current batch reaction process. The limitation seems to be the presence of glycerine, which hinders complete conversion because of reversible reactions. Significant improvement in quality was indicated after a second and third passes, where product from the first stage was collected and separated from the glycerine, and further reacted with a minor addition of methanol. Chemical kinetics calculations suggest that five consecutive stages of 2 min residence time would produce better than ASTM specification fuel with no addition of methanol past the first stage. Additional stages may increase the capital investment, but the increase should be offset by reduced operating costs and a factor of 3 higher throughput. Biodiesel, a mixture of methyl esters, is made commercially from the transesterification of oil, often soy oil (see Reaction 1). The kinetics of the transesterification process is rapid; however, multiphase separations after the synthesis of the fuel can be problematic. Therefore, the process is typically run in batch mode. The biodiesel fuel and the glycerine product take several hours to separate. In addition, to push yields to completion, an excess of methoxide catalyst is typically used, which has to be removed from both the biodiesel and the glycerine phase after reaction. Washing steps are often employed to remove free fatty acids, which can lead to undesirable saponification. Standards for biodiesel purity are based either on the removal of contaminants before the oil feedstock is esterified or on the separation of unwanted by-products. Various methods have been examined to enhance either the pretreatment of biodiesel feedstocks or the posttreatment of reaction products, including the use of a cavitation reactor in the process i

  9. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  10. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  11. The liquid Argon TPC: a powerful detector for future neutrino experiments and proton decay searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ereditato; A. Rubbia

    2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility of new generation neutrino and astroparticle physics experiments exploiting the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique, following a graded strategy that envisions applications with increasing detector masses (from 100 ton to 100 kton). The ICARUS R&D program has already demonstrated that the technology is mature with the test of the T600 detector at surface. Since 2003 we have been working with the conceptual design of a very large LAr TPC with a mass of 50-100 kton to be built by employing a monolithic technology based on the use of industrial, large volume, cryogenic tankers developed by the petro-chemical industry. Such a detector, if realized, would be an ideal match for a Super Beam, Beta Beam or Neutrino Factory, covering a broad physics program that includes the detection of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos, and searches for proton decay, in addition to the rich accelerator neutrino physics program. A "test module" with a mass of the order of 10 kton operated underground or at shallow depth would represent a necessary milestone towards the realization of the 100 kton detector, with an interesting physics program on its own. In parallel, physics is calling for a shorter scale application of the LAr TPC technique at the level of 100 ton mass, for low energy neutrino physics and for use as a near station setup in future long baseline neutrino facilities. We outline here the main physics objectives and the design of such a detector for operation in the upcoming T2K neutrino beam. We finally present the result of a series of R&D studies conducted with the aim of validating the design of the proposed detectors.

  12. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

  13. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  14. Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

  15. Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

  16. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

  17. Cayuga County Regional Digester - Vision Becomes Reality - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamyar V. Zadeh, Ph.D.; Blue Electron Technology Solutions International LLC

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at mesophilic temperatures, is designed to process the daily feedstock and produce 220,000 SCF2 of biogas per day. The digester also produces 44,000 gallons of digested slurry per day. 3. Biogas Conditioning System: The plant employs a biological biogas conditioning system to remove the H2S and moisture contents of the biogas and prepare it to be used by the plant generation system. 4. Combined Heat and Power System (CHP): This is a 633kW high efficiency biogas-fired GE-Jenbacher model JMS-312 GS-NL reciprocating engine cogeneration system. The heat recovery system incorporated into the package is designed to capture the waste heat from the engine exhaust, the jacket cooling water and the engine oil circuit. 5. Electrical Substation and Power Distribution Systems: An electrical distribution system has been constructed on-site that aggregates the electrical service of the different county buildings on the District campus into a county owned electric distribution system that is interconnected with the CHP and the local electric grid. The electrical system is designed, in accordance with the utility guidelines, to allow grid-parallel operation of CHP and provide for import and export of electric power. 6. Thermal Energy Distribution System: The heat recovery system has been integrated into a high temperature water distribution system that distributes the heat to the thermal circuits for the anaerobic digester facility. Additional piping has also been installed to transfer the remaining thermal energy to other county buildings on the campus. On a daily basis, the plant will co-process 35,000 gallons of manure from local dairy farms, 8,500 gallons of food-processor waste and 1,200 gallons of brown grease to produce 200,000 ft3/d of biogas and 44,000 gallons of pathogen-free nutrient-rich digested slurry for agricultural use by farms and in the local area. The biogas fueled CHP produces 5,157,000 kWh of electricity and 19,506 dekatherms of thermal energy per year. Electrical power generated by the cogeneration system powers all the buildings on the Cayuga County campus an

  18. FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER MS

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

  19. Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

  20. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

  1. QER- Comment of Jennifer Markens 8

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I am writing to express profound concern about the proposed pipeline that will bring shale gas directly from the Marcellus shale beds all along the top of Northern Massachusetts. After careful examination over the past three months, since this was announced, I strongly feel that this scheme has very little to do with the needs of Massachusetts residents for "more gas" and much more to do with the needs of a private, obscenely wealthy corporation to profit from the Marcellus shale by bringing this gas to port and its waiting tankers, for sale abroad. This pipeline is many times larger than any current demand by a mind-boggling factor: there are other pipeline expansion/development efforts underway, also running through Massachusetts. It is very clear that we are being set up as the shipping and storage grid for the Marcellus shale. Marcellus gas is well known to be high in radioactivity. A report by Marvin Resnikoff, Phd. details reasons why bringing this gas to New York will be deadly to citizens. Given Massachusetts proximity to the Marcellus shale, everything in that report would be equally true for Massachusetts. Fugitive emissions will ruin land all across Norther Mass, and permanently destroy water and land. This level of radioactivity: the benzene, neurotoxins, VOC's and carcinogens will be pumped all over Massachusetts under high pressure to meet shipping deadlines: so that an obscenely wealthy company can make profits for a handful of individuals while all of the expense, risk, and destruction, now and in the future will be put on Massachusetts citizens: now and for many years in the future. Due to the endless advertising budgets of the gas industry, the public has no idea how much their safety and well being are at risk, when radioactive gas, and the chemicals used to produce and extract shale gas, are shipped through neighborhoods and yards for sale abroad. This pipeline is being planned as a feeder line all around the Marcellus shale. This has the additional concern of opening up gas development in NY: This will erase any benefits from closing coal plants and our Massachusetts air quality will grow worse: not be improved. While gas burns cleanly, its production now destroys drinking water, and contributes in a far worse manner to climate change. It is deeply concerning that only gas investment interests were involved in this decision: that our electrical infrastructure is now monopolized by gas investment interests, and that rates to consumers of electricity are determined by a corporation whose principle concern in gas investment and development for private profit: Even the consultants who determined this "need" were primarily involved in gas investments and development. There was NO effort to seek alternatives, and there has been no investigation of the long term destruction to Massachusetts, the safety of citizens, or the safety and well being of land within our state borders. NO renewable and less invasive option was considered, and the meetings held that made this determination were secretive. Northeast Utilities posted a profit following a merger. The expense of this seems to have been passed on to electricity customers: and prices on the "spot" market can be artificially inflated to create advantageous scenarios for gas investment interests. A further concern is that the only people involved in determining this need appear to have both the power to create the need, and a means of filling it which provides windfall for themselves. All of these entities have been involved with Massachusetts before: violating merger agreements: FERC agreements: DPU agreements according to what we have observed: NSTAR/NU immediately eliminated work positions despite merger agreements with the DPU: TGP has failed to complete restoration and conservation agreements from their existing pipeline, according to citizens living along the southern, existing route, and I have no confidence, as a citizen, that our electrical bill or the tariff imposed will be used for anything that will benefit Massachusetts: only gas investments. Al