National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tankage intercoastal tankers

  1. Tanker spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book evaluates a wide variety of ways to improve tank vessel resistance to penetration during an accident and assesses alternatives for reducing outflow if the ship's hull is breached. In addition to evaluating design options, the book recommends ways to make a tanker more crash-worthy and to allow the crew to respond more effectively to an accident. newly commissioned studies on ship stability, the mechanics of groundings, and the effects of hull designs on oil outflow provide new insight into tank vessel design.

  2. Central ballast tanker design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

  3. Probabilistic oil-outflow analysis of alternative tanker designs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 mandates double hulls for all newly constructed tankers calling in U.S. waters. This study addresses the equivalence of four proposed alternatives to the Double Hull design, based on projected oil outflow resulting from groundings and collisions. The four alternative designs were the Mid-Deck tanker, an underpressure system fitted to a MARPOL tanker, and two proprietary tankage configurations, the Coulombi Egg and POLMIS tankers. Three sizes of vessels, with cargo capacities of 50,000, 150,000, and 272,000 metric tons, were investigated. A probabilistic approach has been adopted for these analyses, utilizing statistical data for tanker casualties developed for the International Maritime Organization. Both side and bottom damage were considered. Loss calculations were based on hydrostatic balance principles. Initial oil loss at impact and dynamic losses due to current and waves were computed based on model tests. Plots illustrating the cumulative oil outflow for each damage condition are presented. Three figures of merit were computed for each damage condition. These are: the probability of zero outflow, the mean outflow, and the extreme (1/10) outflow.

  4. Tanker industry progressing in cleaning up operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.

    1993-10-18

    The international tanker industry has made significant strides in improving the safety and environmental awareness of its operations in recent years. With a string of mishaps following the Exxon Valdez spill, public scrutiny focused on the tanker industry and found it lacking. The U.S. government reacted strongly with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. OPA 90 set narrow requirements for tanker construction, forced the creation of a national spill response program, and made tanker operators solely liable for spill damage. The Aegean Sea and Braer accidents around the end of last year forced the pace of European legislation. Since then global initiatives have been announced to improve design and maintenance of tankers and take steps toward eliminating substandard ships and operators. The paper discusses priorities, tanker design, the tanker fleet, OPA status, spill response, the Tampa Bay spill, spill liability, European spills, EC legislation, and the Department of Transportation inquiry.

  5. Tanker spills: Prevention by design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-12

    The study, prompted by the March 1989 grounding of the EXXON VALDEZ in Prince William Sound, Alaska, focused on how alternative tank vessel (tanker and barge) designs might influence the safety of personnel, property, and the environment, and at what cost. In selecting designs to be considered, the committee included certain operational options that might minimize the oil spilled in an accident. The study did not consider means of averting accidents, altering the form of cargo, or responding to oil spills.

  6. Elements of oil-tanker transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, A.

    1982-01-01

    Historical, economic, and statistical aspects of oil tanker transportation are discussed. In addition, oil tanker applied technology using a Hewlett-Packard 67 calculator is detailed. HP-67 programs are given in addition to theoretical formulas, references and examples need to solve the equations using any calculator. The contents include: berthing energy computation; Poisson distribution computation for estimating berth requirements; ship collision probability computation; spill risk analysis; oil spill movement computation; tanker characteristic computations; and ASTM measurement computations. (JMT)

  7. Major tanker spill off Spain under control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that a 23 sq mile oil slick along Spain's northwest coast, spreading form the wreckage of the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea, was for the most part under control as of Dec. 10, Spanish authorities reported. Various press reports put the total spill volume at 490,000 bbl, about double that leaked by the Exxon Valdez supertanker off Alaska in 1989. If initial reports of the spill volume are borne out, the Aegean Sea spill would rank at least as one of the 10 biggest tanker spills.

  8. Alaska panel urges oil tanker changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillingham, S.

    1990-02-05

    A commission assigned by the state of Alaska to investigate the Exxon Valdez oil spill says the Coast Guard's regulation of oil transportation had grown slack over the decade preceding the 11 million-gallon spill. The vigilance over tanker traffic that was established in the early days of pipeline flow had given way to complacency and neglect, says the commission's report, which calls for a revamping of the U.S. oil transportation system. The review places the blame for the spill not only on the Coast Guard but on the oil industry's thirst for profits in the 1980s and blames the state itself for not living up to its obligation to manage and protect its own waters. The report offers 59 recommendations that cover tanker construction and crew training, spill prevention, strategies for responding to spills and cleanup technologies. The panel also wants to see more stringent tanker safety standards, strengthened enforcement of the new regulations and greater penalties levied against violators. The Coast Guard expects that it will be some time before revisions in its tanker monitoring operations are in place.

  9. Saturday effects in tanker oil spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodstein, E. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper documents a [open quotes]Saturday effect[close quotes] in the timing of tanker oil spills -- certain types of spills happen much more frequently on this day than one would expect if the spills were uniformly distributed. The phenomenon is restricted to Europe and North America, and is associated with [open quotes]vessel guidance[close quotes] accidents -- groundings, collisions, and rammings. Eliminating the Saturday effect would reduce tanker oil spills by around 163,000 gallons per year. Several policy responses are considered, including a Saturday harbor tax. A lower bound for an efficient tax is estimated to be $780 for a 20 million gal cargo. 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Tanker spills Norwegian crude oil off Shetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports that crude oil was spilling last week from the U.S. owned Braer tanker after the 89,000 dwt vessel ran aground on the south end of Scotland's Shetland Islands. Workers were trying to assess the extent of damage to the tanker, shoreline, and wildlife after the January 5 accident. Braer's cargo amounted to 607,000 bbl of Norwegian oil bound for Canada. Braer loaded its cargo and sailed January 3 from Den norske stats oljeselskap AS's Mongstad, Norway, terminal with crude from Gullfaks field in the Norwegian North Sea. The $11 million shipment was destined for Ultramar Canada Inc.'s 125,000 b/d refinery at St. Romuald, Que.

  11. Monitoring system tested during LPG tanker unloading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-14

    A specially developed computer-based hazardous-materials monitoring system has been successfully field tested. The test of the portable system occurred during the unloading of 45,000 metric tons of LPG from a 740-ft tanker at the petroleum dock of a plant along the Mississippi River. The function of this system is to detect, report, alarm, and record unacceptable concentrations of hazardous vapors during marine-transfer operations.

  12. China facing revamp of outmoded crude tanker terminal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Expectations of soaring growth in China's crude oil imports has officials taking another look at the country's coastal crude oil tanker terminals. At first glance, plans to add China's coastal tanker terminal capacity would seem to slightly exceed projected needs. However, officials say, existing major terminals are already woefully underutilized. That over capacity will only worsen as plans proceed to construct a number of major new terminals to accommodate the expected surge in calls by large ocean going tankers as exports increase. The paper describes China's existing crude tanker terminals, expansion plans, the reason for terminal underutilization, and the outlook for China becoming a net crude importer by 1995.

  13. Essays on the economic analysis of oil-tanker transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanti-Akom, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three models concerning the economic analysis of the oil tanker market are considered. The first model studies the behavior of a risk-neutral tanker owner under a stochastic framework. A dynamic linear rational expectations model is used to explore the tanker owners decisions regarding his tanker fleet in response to freight rate changes. The model assumes that the tanker owner operates in a competitive tanker market, in the sense that the stochastic freight rates are exogenously given in the model. The second model investigates the economic performance of oil tanker operations. The productivity growth of the tanker industry is explored. A general index of technical change developed by Baltagi and Griffin (1988) is used to examine the rate of technical change of the US flag tankers from 1978 to 1984. The third model compares econometric techniques using panel data to estimate a system of the multivariate translog model. Specification tests are performed, and they favor the random-effect model over the fixed-effect model.

  14. Tanker owners cope with OPA, but

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-27

    This paper reports that the Petroleum Industry Research Foundation Inc. (Pirinc), New York, reports the world tanker industry is learning to live with tough provisions of the US's Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990. But serious problems lie over the horizon. In a report prepared under contract for the Department of Energy, Pirinc noted US waterborne oil imports totaled 6.5 million b/d in 1991, three fourths of which was crude oil, and are expected to rise by almost 3 million b/d by 2000.

  15. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  16. Study shows tanker spills about equal from groundings and collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports that figures compiled by International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Ltd., London, dispel the commonly held belief that tanker groundings are more significant than collisions in terms of oil pollution. During the past 21 years, the number of spills and volumes released after collisions and groundings were almost the same, the Catherine Grey, the federation's database manager. The federation the efforts to design environmentally safer tankers, such as those with double hulls, to minimize oil spills following accidents should take full account of the causes of major spills.

  17. Conversion of existing tanker to North Sea FPSO use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voorst, O. van; Baan, J. de; Loenhout, A. van; Krekel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The use of existing tankers as a permanently moored floating storage off loading (FSO) or floating production storage and off loading (FPSO) has been wide spread in the oil industry ever since tankers were used for storage. However, the application of an existing tanker for North Sea FPSO use meeting the stringent demands of the regulatory bodies and the harsh environment of the North Sea has withheld operators from using existing tankers in the North Sea. The acceptance of FPSO technology in the North Sea and the proven ability to moor a tanker with a passive mooring system in a harsh environment has opened the avenue to use existing tankers for use as an FPSO in the North Sea. This is also driven by the search for cost effective solutions for field development plans in order to make marginal fields economically exploitable. The potential reuse of an FPSO on a different location also makes the depreciation period of the FPSO vessel life related instead of field life related. Many issues related to the use of an FPSO in the North Sea are currently subject of papers at various forums. This paper, however, only addresses three crucial areas: (1) the criteria for selection of an existing tanker; (2) the use of a passive mooring system; (3) the fatigue assessment and required modifications. The paper is based on experiences gained during the engineering, design and construction phase of the UISGE GORM, the FPSO, which Bluewater will initially use for Amerada Hess Limited`s Fife Field on the UK continental shelf and confirms that the conversion of a suitable tanker to North Sea FPSO use is a technically flexible and an economically attractive solution.

  18. World tanker industry maintains momentum from Persian Gulf war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-10

    The world tanker industry has managed to maintain the momentum generated during the Persian Gulf War. Freight rates for large vessels have regained the high levels seen during the first 2 months of this year, while the expected postwar decline in use of tankers has not materialized. The health of the tanker industry is linked closely with the volume of long haul crude oil from the Middle East, a spot charter from the gulf to Europe, an owner would only break even on the cost of building and operating a new tanker to the highest environmental standards. Owners currently can expect spot rates of about $40,000/day, excellent by the standards of the late 1980s and early 1990s but still below the level needed to justify new buildings. And there are many in the industry who think $40,000/day will be just a happy memory later in the year. Owners are facing pressure for major changes in the industry. Governments and the public want better operating standards and new environmentally sound tankers to reduce the risk of oil spills. At the same time, the industry has to learn to live with repercussion in the 1990 Oil Pollution Act in the U.S., which has opened the way for unlimited liability against tanker owners involved in spills off the U.S. The search also is on for improved profits to make investments required by the changing world of seaborne oil transportation.

  19. IMO group approves enhanced design rules for tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    This paper reports on a committee of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) which has approved ship design rules aimed at reducing the risk of oil spills from tankers. The approval by IMO's maritime environment protection committee (MEPC) assures that the next generation of tankers will have double hulls or, despite reservations by the U.S., middeck or other designs that offer protection against pollution equal to that provided by double hulls. The requirement for double hull or middeck design will apply to tankers larger than 5,000 dwt. Small tankers, of 600-5,000 dwt, must be fitted with a double bottom. There are no requirements for tankers of less than 600 dwt. The enhanced design criteria will take effect July 6, 1993, for new and existing vessels from 70 nations that have signed the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (Marpol 73/78). Owners in those countries control 90% of the world tanker fleet. MEPC also tackled the problem of existing single hulled vessels. They will be able to trade until they are 25-30 years old before they will be required to meet the enhanced design criteria.

  20. Tanker mooring, storage for sub-Arctic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, K.I.; King, R.D.; Post, G.J.

    1985-11-01

    The expansion of exploration into sub-arctic offshore waters has created a need for tanker mooring facilities for floating storage vessels and tanker loading. In many sub-arctic areas mooring facilities are subject to wind, wave and current conditions which approach conditions in the North Sea during storm seasons. In other seasons, the same facilities will be subject to impact and overturning forces from drifting ice floes and massive ice ridges. A study to develop suitable concepts and preliminary designs for such tanker mooring facilities is discussed. The study was limited to areas where risk of iceberg collision may be ignored, but where ice conditions generally occur 4-6 months during each year with ice coverage ranging up to 100% during this period. The scope of the study required development of suitable concepts and preliminary design studies for three basic SPM tanker loading and storage systems: for direct loading of ice-strengthened shuttle tankers; with a permanently moored icebreaking storage vessel with storage capacity for 1,400,000 bbl of crude oil; and with submerged storage capacity for 1,400,00 bbl of crude oil.

  1. U. S. oil spill law to cause growing tanker problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.B.

    1991-09-30

    This paper reports on tanker owners which face a growing dilemma on the issue of oil spill liability. The U.S. Oil Pollution Act, passed last year in the wake of the March 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, was intended to reduce risk of and damage from such accidents. However, in addition to phasing in double hulls on most tankers operating in U.S. waters, the law substantially increases shipowner's liability for spills. And the federal law does not preempt state liability laws, which in most cases amount to unlimited liability for spill cleanup. Rather than face potentially unlimited liability in the event of a spill, tanker owners worldwide are exercising a number of options to shield themselves. Some of those options could increase the potential for oil spills, industry officials warn. The act also threatens to shatter the international alliance among shippers. A report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London, says the law could have a devastating effect on operating practices. Tanker owners and operators have voiced the most opposition to the new spill law and the shackles it places on them. Now the industry that insures tankers has spoken up about is increased liability, and it too may launch a boycott.

  2. A revolutionary design of double hull oil tanker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akiba, Takehiko; Kitano, Kimio; Sumikama, Yutaka; Tsukuda, Hiroyuki; Toyofuku, Masatsugu; Shibasaki, Kohta; Hah, J.; Furukawa, Koichi

    1995-12-31

    For many years, oil tankers had been designed and constructed based on the single hull concept. However, new regulations which require ``Double Hulls`` in new oil tankers was enacted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1993. Conventional double hull tankers are designed to have the double hull spaces at the sides and bottoms which are normally used as ballast water tanks in order to reduce oil leakage in case of collision or grounding. Some critics, however, have pointed out various problems with the conventional double hull VLCC, such as difficulties in inspection and coating maintenance of the double hull spaces, higher hull girder still water bending moment, etc. In order to eliminate these potential problems, the authors have proposed a new design concept for double hull tankers. In this concept, the double hull spaces are designed as dry void spaces and the ballast water tanks are arranged in the same style as the single hull design. This paper presents a more detailed study and evaluation of this new concept, concerning the hull structural design, oil outflow probability and economic evaluation in comparison with conventional double hull tanker designs. The authors also show the advantages of this new concept which are beneficial to owners and operators.

  3. Tanker-based production eyed for Gulf of Mexico use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, S.

    1986-05-01

    The new oil price environment is sending industry engineers back to the drawing board. The search is on for cost effective and perhaps unconventional deepwater production systems. One candidate for Gulf of Mexico deepwater tracts is a tanker-based floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) system. Substantial experience with tanker-based FPSO systems has proven them to be cost effective when the field is remote from existing production facilities and pipelines. A tanker-based system offers the unique feature of integrating production, storage, and offloading capabilities into a single unit. Such systems can be installed in 12 to 15 months and can even be leased, significantly improving an operator's cash flow.

  4. Tanker under retrofit for arctic service gets new propulsion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-26

    The world's largest azimuthing propulsion drive will be installed on an oil tanker under retrofit for arctic service by a Finnish shipyard. And plans call for the drive's installation on four 135,000 cu m LNG carriers. The 11.4-mw (15,275 hp) Azipod azimuthing electric propulsion drive is being installed on Nemarc's 16,000 dwt arctic tanker M/T Uikku. The major difference between the Azipod system and traditional Z-type thrusters is that the Azipod's propulsion motor is an electric ac synchronous motor located inside the azimuthing unit. The motor drives a fixed-pitch propeller and is speed-controlled (0--100%) by a cycloconverter. The rotatable Azipod drive enables full power thrust in any desired direction.

  5. Design considerations for corrosion control of double-hull tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendexter, L.A. ); Diettrich, D. )

    1993-09-01

    The double-hull design for large vessels engaged in the transportation of oil at sea is not a new concept. The requirement for the future exclusive use of a double-hull configuration for all oil-carrying tank vessels trading in U.S. territorial waters is a result of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. By design, the structural area of the double-hull tanker exposed to ballast water will be considerably increased compared to the single-hull tanker. The choice of protective coatings and their application methods are of vital importance of the integrity of the structure. Of equal importance will be provision for thorough inspection and a well-planned maintenance program throughout the vessel's service life. To assist in meeting these demands, certain physical features can be incorporated during construction to provide access to all parts of the hull structure.

  6. Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-20

    World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

  7. Quantitative risk of oil tanker groundings. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrozowicz, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The culture, design, and operation of the maritime industry all contribute to create an error-inducing system. As oil tankers have become larger, the tolerance for error has decreased as the consequences have increased. Tankers are the largest contributor by vessel type to worldwide oil spill volume. Human error has consistently been attributed to 80 percent of the marine accidents. A closer look reveals that many accidents attributed to human error are system errors. In fact, the term human error is unwarranted in many high-risk accidents and its use is a perforation of the context. The maritime industry has been identified as a high risk operation, requiring an active risk management program. A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) provides a formal process of determining the full range of possible adverse occurrences, probabilities, and expected costs for any undesirable event. A PRA can identify those areas that offer the greatest risk-reducing potential. This thesis focuses on the first level of a proposed three-level risk model to determine the probability of a tanker grounding. The approach utilizes fault trees and event trees and incorporates The Human Error Rate Prediction data to quantify individual errors. The result allows the identification of high-leverage factors in order to determine the most effective and efficient use of resources to reduce the probability of grounding; showing that the development of the Electronic Chart Display and Information System incorporated with the International Safety Management Code can significantly reduce the probability of grounding.

  8. Analysis of single point moored tanker using maneuvering hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimoto, K.; Brinati, H.L.; Fucatu, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Single Point Mooring Systems (SPM) are widely used as a tanker terminal in Brazilian south coast by Petrobras, Brazilian oil company. Although different authors (Wichers, 1987, Obokata, 1987, and Jiang et al., 1988) had analyzed the dynamic stability of SPM system, the down time of these systems due to large oscillatory ship motion in the horizontal plane is significant until now. The main source of the instability of these systems is considered to be the use of inadequate hawser length and bad weather. This paper deals with the dynamic behavior of SPM moored vessels considering the influence of the environmental forces as well as shallow water effects. In a first step, a nonlinear mathematical model developed for the simulation of low speed ship maneuvers (Takashina, 1986) is extended to study the behavior of a tanker moored to a single buoy in comparison with the Obokata`s SPM model, 1987. A large number of tanker motion simulations were carried out both for deep and shallow water and different environmental conditions. The influence of the system parameters shown by the study is, in general, in a good agreement with those obtained by the traditional SPM system analysis.

  9. Probabilistic oil outflow analysis of double hull with mid-deck tanker design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-11-24

    The risk of environmental damage from tankers has been the subject of considerable research and debate. Quantitative methods are important because the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA `90) regulations mandate that a study be carried out to determine whether other structural or operational tank vessel requirements would provide protection to the environment equal to, or greater than, double hull tanker designs. To evaluate alternative designs a rationally developed methodology based on expected oil outflow should be used. Herbert Engineering Corp. (HEC) was tasked to use this methodology to study five design variations of three tanker sizes utilizing damage statistics for tankers. A total of fifteen design configurations were studied.

  10. Method for controlling vapor emissions during loading of tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, T.K.

    1992-06-30

    This patent describes a method for loading crude oil into a tank of a tanker ship having a built-in crude oil loading manifold. It comprises generating and compressing foam at a point remote from the tank; supplying the foam through the crude oil loading manifold onto the bottom of the tank in an amount sufficient to form a layer of the foam having a thickness adequate to provide a barrier which will substantially prevent the passage of hydrocarbon vapors therethrough, the foam expanding while flowing through the manifold and into the tank; and supplying crude oil through the crude oil loading manifold into the tank beneath the layer of foam.

  11. Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, M. )

    1992-02-01

    Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

  12. Fuel-cell-propelled submarine-tanker-system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Court, K E; Kumm, W H; O'Callaghan, J E

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a systems analysis of a commercial Arctic Ocean submarine tanker system to carry fossil energy to markets. The submarine is to be propelled by a modular Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell system. The power level is 20 Megawatts. The DOE developed electric utility type fuel cell will be fueled with methanol. Oxidant will be provided from a liquid oxygen tank carried onboard. The twin screw submarine tanker design is sized at 165,000 deadweight tons and the study includes costs and an economic analysis of the transport system of 6 ships. The route will be under the polar icecap from a loading terminal located off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to a transshipment facility postulated to be in a Norwegian fjord. The system throughput of the gas-fed methanol cargo will be 450,000 barrels per day. The total delivered cost of the methanol including well head purchase price of natural gas, methanol production, and shipping would be $25/bbl from Alaska to the US East Coast. Of this, the shipping cost is $6.80/bbl. All costs in 1981 dollars.

  13. Oil-tanker waste-disposal practices: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 (EPA), launched an investigation into tanker waste disposal practices for vessels discharging ballast water at the Alyeska Pipeline Services Company's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility and marine terminal in Valdez, Alaska. It had been alleged that the Exxon Shipping Company was transferring 'toxic wastes originating in California' to Valdez. In response, EPA decided to examine all waste streams generated on board and determine what the fate of these wastes were in addition to investigating the Exxon specific charges. An extensive Information Request was generated and sent to the shipping companies that operate vessels transporting Alaska North Slope Crude. Findings included information on cargo and fuel tank washings, cleaning agents, and engine room waste.

  14. MMS worldwide tanker spill database: An overview. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The report is an attempt to share the contents of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Worldwide Tanker Spill Database with other government, public, and private entities. The report includes various spatial and temporal distributions of the more rigorous data from the database. Each section of the report focuses on a particular analysis of the data; because the data needed were sometimes incomplete, the number of spills in each section can vary. Each discussion contains a short description of the data included in the analysis and the overall results. In some cases, suggestions are made regarding possible external factors that may have caused or affected a specific distribution, but no attempts have been made to prove cause and effect.

  15. Puget Sound tanker size optimization. Final report Aug 80-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, R.J.; McKenzie, J.H.; Cebron, E.J.; Hammond, J.G.

    1981-06-01

    Relationships between oil tanker risk and certain quantifiable tanker and port activity characteristics are determined, with a special emphasis on tanker size. A model is developed which optimizes the average tanker size which should be used in a port system to minimize the risk of oil spillage. The study uses statistical techniques to analyze historical worldwide data in order to develop risk relationships. Calculus was used to minimize the risk of spillage based upon different risk indicators. The basic risk indicators developed in the analysis are the number of casualty spills, the total volume of casualty spills, and the total volumes of all spills (including operational). The development of optimal cases is dependent upon the assumption of constant tonnage throughput in a port system.

  16. Microbial influenced corrosion in cargo oil tanks of crude oil tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, R.T.; McFarland, B.L.; Hodgman, R.Z.

    1997-09-01

    Excessive pitting corrosion in the uncoated bottom platings of cargo oil tanks was detected in newbuilt crude oil tankers only 2 to 5 years old, and was diagnosed as microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) concentrations reached as high as 100,000 to 10,000,000 per milliliter in the settled water at the bottom of the cargo oil tanks. Biocide treatment to control MIC was studied in the laboratory using microbial consortia isolated from cargo oil tank bottoms. Biocide treatment to control MIC was attempted experimentally, but was found to be impractical onboard tankers. A MIC mitigation strategy, employing an enhanced pitting inspection and repair program combined with the coating of the bottom platings, was developed and implemented for existing crude oil tankers. Considerations for improvement of future newbuild crude oil tankers are also presented.

  17. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  18. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. Associates )

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  19. Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J. Franklin; Wellman, Gerald William; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

  20. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 1. Pacific coast. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the Pacific Coast to determine whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  1. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 2. Atlantic and Florida Gulf coasts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the east coast and Florida Gulf Coast. It discusses whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  2. Need for a probabilistic risk assessment of the oil tanker industry and a qualitative assessment of oil tanker groundings. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrozowiez, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The culture, design, and operation of the maritime industry all contribute to create an error-inducing system. A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) provides a formal process of determining the full range of possible adverse occurrences, probabilities, and expected costs for any undesirable event. A PRA can identify those areas that offer the greatest risk-reducing potential. Once the components with the greatest risk-reducing potential are identified, appropriate technology and management schemes can properly influence risk reduction. While human error is attributed to 80 percent of the marine accidents, a closer look reveals that many accidents attributed to human error are system errors. An application of a qualitative risk assessment is done for tanker groundings. A fault tree is developed to describe the top event of a tanker grounding. A number of well-known groundings are analyzed to test the utility of the grounding fault tree.

  3. Medium-speed diesel propulsion plant for new shallow-draft LPG tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Propulsion equipment from engine builder Krupp MaK and power transmission specialist Lohmann Stolterfoht has been specified for a series of liquefied petroleum gas tankers being built for various customers by Pattje Shipyards, of Waterhuizen, Holland. Pattje reports that the tankers are built using an innovative system of modular construction that has led to the very short building time of only nine months per ship. The tankers have a capacity of 4200 m[sup 3] of gas and a draft of only 5.2 m when fully loaded, to enable the use of shallow water ports. Further particulars of the vessels include an overall length of 100 m, beam dimension of 15.9 m and maximum speed of 14 knots. The tankers' propulsion system is based on a single, in-line, nine-cylinder type 9M453C medium-speed diesel from the [open quotes]C[close quotes] engine series of Krupp MaK, Kiel, Germany. The 33.8 L/cyl engine (bore 320 x stroke 420 mm) develops 3000 kW at 600 r/min. 2 figs.

  4. Tanker navigation safety standards: 20 year tanker size/capacity trend analysis. A study required by section 4111(b)(11) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the size, cargo capacity, and flag nation of tankers transporting oil or hazardous substances on the navigable waters and the waters of the Exclusive Economic Zone by: (1) identifying changes occurring in such size and cargo capacity and in vessel navigation and technology over the 20 year period from 1970 to 1990; and (2) evaluating the extent to which the risks or difficulties associated with tanker navigation, vessel traffic control, accidents, oil spills, and the containment and cleanup of such spills are influenced by or related to an increase in the tanker size and cargo capacity.

  5. Feasibility of methods and systems for reducng LNG tanker fire hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    In this program concepts for reducing fire hazards that may result from LNG tanker collisions are identified and their technical feasibility evaluated. Concepts considered include modifications to the shipborne LNG containers so that in the event of a container rupture less of the contents would spill and/or the contents would spill at a reduced rate. Changes in the cargo itself, including making the LNG into a gel, solidifying it, converting it to methanol, and adding flame suppressants are also evaluated. The relative effectiveness and the costs of implementing these methods in terms of increased cost of gas at the receiving terminal, are explained. The vulnerability of an LNG tanker and its crew to the thermal effects of a large pool fire caused by a collision spill is estimated and methods of protecting the crew are considered. It is shown that the protection of ship and crew so that further deterioration of a damaged ship might be ameliorated, would require the design and installation of extraordinary insulation systems and life support assistance for the crew. Methods of salvaging or disposing of cargo from a damaged and disabled ship are evaluated, and it is concluded that if the cargo cannot be transferred to another (empty) LNG tanker because of lack of availability, then the burning of the cargo at a location somewhat distant from the disabled tanker appears to be a promising approach. Finally, the likelihood of the vapors from a spill being ignited due to the frictional impact of the colliding ships was examined. It is found that the heating of metal sufficient to ignite flammable vapors would occur during a collision, but it is questionable whether flammable vapor and air will, in fact, come in contact with the hot metal surfaces.

  6. Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hearings and Appeals (OHA) formulate and implement Subpart V special refund proceedings. ... set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 205, Subpart V. These procedures apply in situations where ...

  7. Tanker navigation safety standards: Tanker navigation safety research baseline: A study required by section 4111(b)(9) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 directed the Secretary of Transportation to review and incorporate the results of past studies, including studies by the Coast Guard and Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). This literature search and review focuses on materials pertinent to determining or evaluating current and/or `best` practices, and not on the adequacy of current statutes or regulations. In addition, it is not the intention of the report to assess best practices (e.g., suggest the appropriate crew sizes or what navigation equipment should be required on tankers), but to establish the baseline for future study of best practices. The report does not provide answers to new analytical quations, but presents the status of research so that questions addressed previoulsy will not be duplicated by future studies.

  8. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  9. Prince William Sound disabled tanker towing study. Part 1. Evaluation of existing equipment, personnel and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The study has been undertaken by the Glosten Associates, Inc., to evaluate the existing capability for emergency towing at Prince William Sound and to examine alternatives that could enhance the escort and assist capabilities for disabled tankers within the waterway from the Alyeska Oil Terminal at the Port of Valdez to the Gulf of Alaska outside Hinchinbrook Entrance. Part 1, reported herein, is an objective evaluation by an experienced salvage towing master of the existing tugs, emergency towing equipment, towing practices, and discussion of alternative tug types.

  10. Probabilistic oil outflow analysis of alternative tanker designs. Addendum 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report is an addendum to Probabilistic Oil Outflow Analysis of Alternative Tanker Designs, U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard, Report No. CG-D-14-92, July 1992. It covers the effects of design modifications to the Double Hull, Mid-Deck and Underpressure (MARPOL) designs for the 272,000 DWT size, and clarifies the evaluation made of the underpressure concept. The design modifications were made so that these ships would meet the requirements of Regulation 23 of the MARPOL 73/78 Annex for hypothetical outflow of oil. Results for two other designs, the Coulombi Egg and POLMIS, are also presented. A probabilistic approach has been adopted for these analyses, utilizing statistical data for tanker casualties developed for the International Maritime Organization. Both side and bottom damage were considered. Loss calculations were based on hydrostatic balance principles. Initial oil loss at impact and dynamic losses due to current and waves were computed based on model tests. Plots illustrating the cumulative oil outflow for each damage condition are presented. Three figures of merit were computed for each damage condition. These are: the probability of zero outflow, the mean outflow, and the extreme (1/10) outflow.

  11. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  12. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  13. Phillips using automated meter/prover for custody transfer at tanker terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on an automated metering/proving system for custody transfer of crude oil at the Phillips 66 Co. tanker unloading terminal in Freeport, Texas. It is described as one of the most sophisticated systems developed. The menu-driven, one-button automation removes the proving sequence entirely from manual control. The system also is the to be cost-effective and versatile compared to a dedicated flow computer with API calculation capabilities. Developed by Puffer-Sweiven, systems integrators, the new technology additionally is thought to be the first custody transfer system to employ a programmable logic controller (PLC). The PLC provides the automation, gathers and stores all raw data, and prints alarms. Also the system uses a personal computer operator interface (OI) that runs on the Intel iRMX real time operating system. The OI is loaded with Puffer-Sweiven application software that performs API meter factor and volume correction calculations as well as present color graphics and generate reports.

  14. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  15. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release

  16. S. 1461: Oil Tanker Navigation Safety Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill would enhance the navigation safety of oil tankers. Title I, Provisions applicable to nationally licensed personnel, explains provisions relating to motor vehicle driving records of vessel personnel; dangerous drugs and other grounds for suspension or revocation; alcohol testing and alcohol rehabilitation; prohibition on service; vessel traffic services; oil tanker construction and size; oil spill contingency plans and approval; international inventory of equipment and contractors; national council on oil spill technology research and development; oil spill disaster assistance; impact on other laws; penalties; and a report on user fees. Title II, Provisions applicable with respect to Alaska pilotage at Port of Valdez, includes explanations of Bligh reef light; Prince William Sound VTS; oil spill recovery institute; and the Trans-Alaska pipeline liability fund. Title III, Provisions applicable to Mississippi River radio communications on Mississippi River, is also included.

  17. Tanker navigation safety standards: Appropriate crew size. A study required by section 4111(b)(1) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This document presents the results gathered in response to the congressional mandate contained in Section 4111 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-380) to determine appropriate crew sizes on tankers. The definition of `appropriate crew size` is based on the objective of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, to ensure pollution prevention through safe navigation of vessels carrying hazardous substances and/or oil. The report addresses crew size and the impact of laws, implementing regulations, operating practices, ship and automation status, and potential changes thereof, on crew size.

  18. Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  19. Statoil's offshore submerged turret loading system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevik, K. ); Smedal, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Statoil, the Norwegian state oil company, and Marine Consulting Group (MCG), with support from Norwegian research institutes, are jointly developing a new offshore shuttle tanker loading concept called the Submerged Turret Loading (STL) system. The STL comprises a spread-moored buoy and export line riser configured such that, when not in use, the buoy remains submerged. For shuttle tanker loading, the vessel moves over the buoy and pulls it into a compartment in the bottom of its hull. Mooring loads are then transferred into the vessel's hull; and the export riser is connected to the shuttle's tankage within the chamber, below waterline. Principal features of the innovative new system that allows operations in seastates well beyond present-system limits, increases safety and reduces pollution potential are outlined here.

  20. Mooring system for oil tanker storage vessel or the like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hvide, H.J.

    1993-08-24

    A mooring system for an ocean going vessel, said vessel hull having a thickness, said system comprising: (a) a rigid shaft having an upper end and a lower end, said shaft being immovably fixed at said upper end to said vessel and said lower end of said shaft being disposed beneath and external of said hull; and (b) a chain table rotatably mounted on said lower end of said rigid shaft.

  1. Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-03-02

    Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

  2. System for control of oil leakage from damaged tanker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tornay, E.G.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a fluid control arrangement adapted to be fitted in an opening in a bulkhead common to a liquid cargo tank and a ballast tank. It comprises a section of pipe extending through and sealingly secured in an opening in a bulkhead and defining a passageway for fluid to flow from a cargo tank to a ballast tank; and one-shot valve means in sealing relationship with a first end of the pipe section.

  3. Conventional Gasoline Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PAD Districts 39,540 19,921 9,308 6,440 6,092 6,085 1993-2015 PADD 3 110 0 0 0 0 0 1993-2015 PADD 5 2004-2004 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 1,641 1,596 2,173 2,438 2,673 2,085 1993-2015 PADD 3 10,256 11,814 9,652 6,995 2,538 2,203 1993-2015 PADD 4 11,265 11,992 11,046 9,366 3,304 2,796 1993-2015 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 254,671 171,446 126,922 122,451 128,664 123,168 1993-2015 PADD 2 80,358 57,508 31,876 35,040 10,051 9,941 1993-2015 PADD 4 6,156 1993-2010 PADD 5 3,534 1,131 840 1993-2012 From PADD 4

  4. EIA-817, Monthly Tanker, Barge, and Rail Movement and Stocks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noticeoog.jsp * Electronic Filing Option: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is a Windows-based application that will enable you to enter data interactively,...

  5. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 126 115 90 125 91 1986-2016 PADD 3 339 562 201 104 0 18 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 9,514 9,513 8,614 6,677 7,556 4,888 1986-2016 ...

  6. Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lincoln Composites (Hexagon) CNG truck - Suitable from space perspective ISO container serves as ground storage - With drop & swap, minimum driver time at site Trailer ...

  7. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  8. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  9. Small bore, two-stroke diesels after three years of chemical tanker service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Small-bore, two-stroke cross-head engines have been manufactured by MAN B&W Alpha Diesel in Frederikshavn, Denmark, for almost eight years. The 6L35MC engine (bore 350 x stroke 1050 mm) has an output of 3600 kW at 210 r/min, and runs on heavy fuel oil of IF380. The engine is equipped with a power take-off for a 600 kW shaft alternator, which operates almost 70% of the time. Therefore, the engine is normally running at a constant speed of 210 r/min. According to the logbook, the engine has been in operation for 12 290 hours and the shaft alternator for 8480 hours. The chief engineer`s records show a fuel oil consumption of 13610 to 13680 liters per 24 hours, at a power setting of 80% to 85% MCR and 210 r/ min, which is approximately equivalent to 195 g/kWh. Cylinder oil consumption is 76 L/day (about 1.0 g/KWh). These figures confirm that practical measurements comply with the theoretical values. This paper reports in brief, the operating results for the engine.

  10. EIA-817, Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report Page 1 U. S...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Send your surveys using this secure method to: https:... You may access the materials by following the steps: http:... on data from fewer than three respondents, or that are ...

  11. Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barge and Rail between PAD Districts 109,830 103,720 105,744 98,960 101,137 100,522 1981-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) -22,180 -21,172 -26,617 -13,481 -7,201 -4,629 1981-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) -82,108 -80,515 -75,498 -77,941 -89,010 -90,690 1981-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) -21,673 -17,622 -20,586 -22,290 -21,564 -20,439 1981-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 16,132 15,589 16,957 14,751 16,639 15,236

  12. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History From PADD 1 to PADD 2 274 590 1,646 2,729 3,915 2,727 1981-2015 PADD 3 9,242 13,779 3,624 9,369 11,607 8,639 1981-2015 PADD 4 0 0 0 2013-2015 PADD 5 20 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 6,186 7,683 24,235 84,910 140,671 141,332 1981-2015 PADD 3 56,820 86,484 176,744 270,731 305,252 372,799 1981-2015 PADD 4 22,494 27,587 33,807 25,727 40,502 75,117 1981-2015 PADD 5 453 1,608 7,948 33,172 52,932 50,063 2010-2015 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 10,096

  13. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,602 2,515 1,702 2,802 2,710 2,572 1981-2015 Crude Oil 274 590 294 1,100 1,492 906 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 1,328 1,925 1,408 1,702 1,218 1,666 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1981-2002 Unfinished Oils 685 686 571 20 184 550 1981-2015 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 144 710 248 1,157 663 275 1983-2015 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2015 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2015 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol*

  14. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 112,531 113,596 110,881 113,612 139,062 150,573 1981-2015 Crude Oil 274 590 1,646 2,729 3,915 2,727 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 112,257 113,006 109,235 110,883 135,147 147,846 1981-2015 Pentanes Plus 452 113 19 2 30 121 2009-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 236 23,034 33,098 1981-2015 Ethane/Ethylene 236 22,845 32,344 2013-2015 Propane/Propylene 0 0 0 0 135 538 2005-2015 Normal Butane/Butylene 0 0 0 0 15 60

  15. From PADD 3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 216,441 213,762 220,029 205,719 215,315 219,022 1981-2015 Crude Oil 3,636 6,372 972 5,049 9,588 13,715 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 212,805 207,390 219,057 200,670 205,727 205,307 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 584 328 146 232 220 144 1981-2015 Propane/Propylene 584 328 146 232 220 144 2005-2015 Unfinished Oils 437 305 0 1,084 1981-2015 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 75,434 75,906 107,437 96,812 106,100 96,777

  16. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 15 90 125 91 76 73 1986-2016 PADD 3 201 104 0 18 21 38 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 8,614 6,677 7,556 4,377 6,185 4,536 1986-2016 PADD 3 30,165 26,514 32,150 33,114 29,021 29,329 1986-2016 PADD 4 6,943 7,365 7,150 6,217 6,776 7,264 1986-2016 PADD 5 3,894 3,511 4,977 4,079 3,875 3,824 2010-2016 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 1,388 1,128 509 2,281 1,560 1,318 1986-2016 PADD 2 19,539 17,229 17,509 22,895 27,473 26,217 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

  17. Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 9,972 7,611 8,237 6,549 7,648 5,743 1981-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) -13,182 -10,465 -17,452 -7,812 -1,468 -3,442 1981-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 11,024 9,848 15,079 9,293 2,343 3,768 1981-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) -11,794 -10,738 -10,920 -12,189 -12,399 -9,893 1986-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 3,980 3,743 5,056 4,159 3,875 3,824

  18. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor

  19. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rail between PAD Districts 3,204 11,523 13,511 13,263 14,289 13,924 1986-2016 PADD 3 201 113 55 68 96 38 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 1986-2015 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 21,195 18,009 20,061 13,677 16,610 15,157 1986-2016 PADD 3 55,166 49,725 60,290 60,169 56,396 55,214 1986-2016 PADD 4 12,718 13,443 13,975 13,001 13,863 14,168 1986-2016 PADD 5 7,910 7,743 9,058 7,986 8,631 7,925 1986-2016 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 101,754 97,347 98,952 98,614 98,912 99,327 1986-2016 PADD 2 38,561 33,586

  20. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2016 Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1986-2002 Unfinished Oils 67 18 27 19 36 29 1986-2016 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 0 0 27 26 0 52 1986-2016 Reformulated 0 0 0 2005-2016 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 2008-2016 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 0 0 27 26 0 52 2008-2016 CBOB 0 0 27 0 0

  1. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 13,204 11,523 13,511 13,263 14,289 13,924 1986-2016 Crude Oil 115 90 125 91 76 73 1986-2016 Petroleum Products 13,089 11,433 13,386 13,172 14,213 13,851 1986-2016 Pentanes Plus 10 10 10 10 10 11 2009-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 3,947 3,528 3,803 3,541 4,012 3,681 1986-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 3,884 3,465 3,740 3,478 3,949 3,619 2013-2016 Propane/Propylene 45 45 45 45 45 44 2005-2016 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 5

  2. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, January 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 11,209 1,213 9,996 35,554 35,363 190 23,680 28,598 -4,918 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 106,990 8,669 107,347 29,831 18,055 -6,599 16,594 124,991 -103,885 Pentanes Plus

  3. Tanker navigation safety standards: Ability of crewmembers to take emergency actions. A study required by section 4111(b)(3) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of crewmembers to take emergency actions to prevent or remove a discharge of oil or hazardous substance from takers.

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from Other PADDs of Ethane-Ethylene (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Ethane-Ethylene (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Re-exports of LNG occur when an LNG shipment is offloaded from a tanker into storage tanks at a regasification terminal and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of ...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Total ...

  9. Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team October 22, 2015 - 10:50am Addthis A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. |

  10. TABLE55.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report." July 2004 Crude Oil ......

  11. Tanker navigation safety standards: Remote alcohol testing program for masters and pilots. A study required by section 4111(b)(12) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes current federal regulations that cover testing for use of alcohol and dangerous drugs. The report includes a discussion of legal issues concerning drug and alcohol testing, describes several tests used to detect alcohol testing, describes several tests used to detect alcohol or drug use, and discusses some tests capable of detecting impairment resulting from other causes in addition to alcohol or drug use.

  12. Study on structural damage of ships due to collision and grounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuroiwa, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kawamoto, Y.; Kondo, M.; Kusuba, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, structural failure of tankers due to collisions and groundings is studied. To investigate failure mechanism and energy absorption capacity of ship structures. Experiments and numerical simulations are carried out. In the numerical simulations, failure of fillet welds and rupture of plates are taken into account. To investigate structural integrity of Mid-Deck Tanker, which was newly developed to reduce accidental oil outflow, numerical simulations of grounding of the tanker are performed.

  13. FE0005958-Impact | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The objective is to advance SPI-CO2Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) gel technology by ... and offloading chemicals from delivery tanker trucks; four UET inline static mixers; ...

  14. table06.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  15. 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Program - The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Douglas ... 409 KB) Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker Harshit Agrawal University of California ...

  16. The Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... cans, plastic bottles, cardboard, waste oil products, paper and napkins from the food ... to area charities. * Y-12 donated two tanker cars to the Southern Appalachia Railway ...

  17. table08.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  18. table07.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  19. The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle ...

  20. table05.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  1. table10.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  2. table09.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  3. TABLE34.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Total ...... 1,247 24,793 3,065 177 0 0 177 Table 34. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker ...

  4. TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Table 35. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, PAD District I PAD District II Commodity Receipts Shipments Net ...

  5. 2004 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which allowed the conversion of over 60 conventional fuel oil burners to gas burners. ... To avoid this waste, VFA-41 implemented strategies that allowed a tanker jet to ...

  6. ORNL/TM-2015/655

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ...... 5 Fig. 4. Locations of oil and gas wells with higher than 215F ... between the costs of using pipeline and tanker trucks for transporting working fluid ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Algeria, Trinidad & Tobago, Qatar, Malaysia, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates and exported to Japan aboard ocean going tankers. The Quarterly Report Page can give...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  9. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  13. Wildfre Mitigation at Los Alamos ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine crews, Helo Crews, and light air resources are stationed on site during wildfre season. Large air tankers are stationed within two hours of Laboratory property in Durango, ...

  14. TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ...... 0 433 0 344 ...

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    tankers, and barges provides more complete and accurate data on regional supplies of biofuels. In addition, incorporating biodiesel and ethanol movements into regional volumetric ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 3) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain (PADD 4) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  20. TABLE53.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 53. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between July 2004 Crude Oil ... 0 383 0...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Barge from Midwest (PADD 2) of Conventional Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from Midwest (PADD 2) of...

  2. An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of ...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to clean oil residue from the storage tanks, which was then dumped into the sea. Over time, environmental regulations were slowly tightened, and now tankers are not permitted...

  4. Accidental oil spill due to grounding: Summary of model test results. Summary report, Jan-Jun 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karafiath, G.

    1992-06-01

    The International Maritime Organization (IMO) sponsored model tests to help in their evaluation of accidental oil spillage from a Mid-Deck Tanker (MDT) and from a Double Hull Tanker (DHT) Design. These tests were conducted at Tsukuba Institute, Japan, and at the Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The test results are explained herein and their significance is summarized.

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 61. Movements of Crude Oil by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 73 0 0 73 3 ............................................................................ 38 0 0 38 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5

  6. Fungible and Compatible Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fungible and Compatible Biofuels Fungible and Compatible Biofuels The purpose of this study is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of biofuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals, and with a special focus on biofuels, which may come into increased usage in the future. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of

  7. Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickey, A.

    1980-06-12

    The Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea consists of a tanker about the size of a VLCC, a turret platform moored with anchors and equipped with processing equipment for oil and gas treatment, living quarters, and helicopter landing facilities. The platform is permanently moored at the field during depletion and is connected to a subsea completion. Offloading the oil from the tanker can be done via a subsea pipeline to a nearby loading buoy or directly to shuttle tankers.

  8. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    facility in New Jersey, near the Philadelphia refining center. While EIA does report inter-PADD domestic barge and tanker movements of crude oil, the intra-PADD shipment of...

  9. Offshore oil storage and transfer facility and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M.C.

    1987-04-28

    A method is described for mooring a floating tanker to a submerged fluid supply structure and for operating the structure to deploy to a water surface on which a tanker floats and to retrieve from the water surface to a submerged location a fluid supplying duct. The method includes: engaging at the water surface a buoy line from a surface buoy to the supply structure; engaging with the buoy line a mooring device; directing the mooring device along the buoy line into mating engagement with the supply structure; drawing the buoy line toward the tanker through the engaged mooring device to retrieve the supply duct from the water surface to its latched submerged state in the structure; releasing the mooring device from the supply structure and thereby securing the duct in its latched state in the structure; and recovering the mooring device along the buoy line to the tanker.

  10. UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... above safe operating range. Turn off hot-oil system and start to send feed gas to flare ... be delivered once per run via a cryogenic tanker truck and stored in a cryogenic oxygen ...

  11. Microsoft Word - 2011-YIR-043012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... about 220 miles off the coast of Oman in the Indian Ocean. The tanker was carrying about 2 million barrels of Kuwaiti crude oil destined for refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast. ...

  12. Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into a wellbore ...

  13. U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Historical O

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Loaned 750,000 barrels of crude oil to ConocoPhilips and Citgo following the closure of the Calcasieu Ship Channel that cut off tanker deliveries to refiners near Lake ...

  14. The Future of Home Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as B10 High heating efficiency Costly replacement for oil system Shale gas vs FRAC Act? ... Redistribution Via truck from Canada Via tanker from Canada, Venez., VI, And "Other" ...

  15. Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For more information, visit the Office of Science website. A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. ...

  16. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by Pipeline Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 34 Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 35 Net Movements of Crude Oil ...

  17. Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... May 23, 2016 A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into ...

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    water) at 80-150C are coproduced at oil and gas wells in the US (DOE 2015). * These ... Introduction Components at geothermal site Transported with tanker truck or stored at ...

  19. OHIO E.P.A.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Only 23 Valve House 24 Boiler System 25 Oil Storage Facility 26 Maintenance, Stores, ... X-1305 HF Storage Tank Area 10 X-1305A HF Tanker Car Containment Pit 11 X-1310 Nitrogen ...

  20. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... by Pipeline Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 34 Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 35 Net Movements of Crude Oil ...

  1. World oil trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A. )

    1991-01-01

    This book provides data on many facets of the world oil industry topics include; oil consumption; oils share of energy consumption; crude oil production; natural gas production; oil reserves; prices of oil; world refining capacity; and oil tankers.

  2. A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT MAGAZINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Clovelly site is a part of the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) system, a deepwater port in the Gulf of Mexico providing tanker offoading for crude oil transported on some of ...

  3. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... when the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in the Prince William Sound (Graham et al., 2012; Peterson et al., 2003; Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, 2006). ...

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    for a new LNG liquefaction project to be built in Nikiski, along with storage tanks and a marine tanker terminal. This project would also include the construction of a...

  5. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 137 106 0 243 3 ............................................................................ 472 498 0 970 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5 ............................................................................ - - 0 0 From 2 to 1

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain (PADD 4) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","West Coast (PADD 5) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 3) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Day)","Midwest (PADD 2) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Midwest (PADD 2) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For much of 2016, the total cost to ship petroleum products on a Long Range 1 (LR1) tanker from the Arab Gulf to Europe has been the lowest since at least 2007 (Figure 10). The LR1 ...

  14. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    to Philadelphia. A 325,000-barrel tanker has economies of scale that make it more economic than the smaller barge movements that typically move on this route. While terms may...

  15. EIA-820, Annual Refinery Report Page 1 U. S. ENERGY INFORMATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crude oil that first traveled 5,000 miles by tanker and then traveled 105 miles by pipeline to the refinery, report pipeline as the method of transportation. * If the refinery...

  16. An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision-Making Procedures | Department of Energy Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures August 15, 2014 - 9:00am Addthis A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of

  17. A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procedures | Department of Energy A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures May 29, 2014 - 2:22pm Addthis A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory

  18. System for collecting products dumped on the surface of a mass of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carro, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    A system for collecting products dumped on the surface of a mass of water includes cages to be arranged at the sides of a tanker. Each cage is preferably prismatic in shape. The height of the cages is such that when the tanker is at ballast, the lower parts of the cages will be submerged while the upper parts will be above the maximum loading line of the tanker. The cages are fastened to the sides of the tanker by freely rotating connection points. In the interiors of the cages is housed a series of floating suction pump inlet members or housings, likewise prismatic in shape, having appropriate dimensions to permit a great sensitivity to the least fluctuating movements of the liquid surface. The complete face of each suction pump inlet member, which is oriented in the direction of travel of the tanker, is provided with an opening which has a height such that the lower edge thereof will be positioned below the floating line of the suction pumps at an approximate depth of 0.01 meter.

  19. Petroleum logistics. Final report and summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The results of this analysis of petroleum logistics are presented in this report. The analysis consists of 3 tasks. Task I, an overview of the petroleum supply and tanker industry, places emphasis on oil company decision-making processes; the organization and decision-making of oil companies as related to crude oil acquisition, supply, distribution and tanker management; the movement of oil to California (including potential constraints); and the evolution of the world crude oil market and oil tankers. Task II is an evaluation of critical elements and constraints affecting the petroleum supply and tanker transportation industry. This report discusses the causes of international petroleum logistical stress including supply reduction, interruption or dislocation, demand increase, and tanker shortage. The report further describes constraining factors affecting the supply of petroleum to California under conditions of international petroleum logistical stress, as well as factors which, themselves, can cause constraint to California oil supply during normal conditions. Task III represents a proposed plan for CEC monitoring of the supply and movement of oil to California. Nine critical areas are discussed, as are the major considerations of standby versus continuous monitoring, present and proposed activities, proposed organization for monitoring, and monitoring of the oil industry.

  20. Double hull grounding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodd, J.L.; Sikora, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    In the last few years the public and governments of many nations have become increasingly aware of the need for improving oil tanker safety. The requirements for double hull tankers are an attempt to address this need through legislation. Even though a number of investigations on the mechanics of collisions have been done in the past, until recently very little research supported the development of structural improvements to reduce oil tanker damage during grounding and stranding accidents. An aggressive evaluation of double hull tanker crashworthiness in stranding and grounding accidents is underway at CD/NSWC (formerly the David Taylor Research Center). The ability to predict damage from grounding accidents accurately is not currently available. The objective of this paper is to present qualitatively the structural failure mechanisms associated with stranding and grounding events for candidate double hull tanker structures and to present some simple methods for comparing damage scenarios. A comparison of the structural performance of key features in several very different designs will provide useful information toward this understanding.

  1. Marine crude oil terminal measuring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubenas, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    The accurate determination of quantity and quality of crude oil transferred from shore to tanker or tanker to shore, is the function of Marine Crude Oil Terminal Measuring Systems. From the measurement data, a Bill of Lading can be prepared and transport costs, taxes, royalties, and customs fees can be computed Accuracy is essential as each tanker load represents a value of ten to twenty million dollars. Even errors of {+-} 0.1% represent a significant amount of revenue. In addition to accuracy, meter systems offer several other advantages over older more traditional tank gaging methods. Specification guidelines for meter systems and associated equipment are presented in this paper. Since most ports are in environmentally sensitive areas, design for protection from spills is also essential.

  2. Owners fight pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Large-scale movement of oil by sea entails risks that are compounded by variable weather conditions, occasional human fallibility, and mechanical inadequacies. The Int'l Tanker Owners Pollution Federation was established in 1968 to minimize these risks and to help mitigate the impacts of tanker oil spills. The federation recently recommended measures to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of government and industry to respond to tanker oil spills. These include: the establishment of a database on the properties of various oils/ a formal equipment inventory worldwide/ better training facilities for personnel likely to supervise oil recovery operations/ exchange of information between countries on spill experience and research findings/ and international testing and standardization of equipment.

  3. STL, a new approach to field development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Submerged Turret and Loading (STL) is an efficient and safe system for offshore loading and storage. The loading system can effectively be adapted to specific field requirements and operational conditions. The STL is designed to meet the requirements for versatile and flexible field development, allowing loading operations to take place all year round in the harshest environments. The STL concept has been selected for field development projects with different operational requirements i.e. (1) Direct Shuttle Loading (DSL) which permits loading of processed crude oil directly into shuttle tankers without the requirement for oil storage at the field. A Direct Shuttle Loading system is installed at the Heidrun Field (Conoco). (2) STL as a Floating Storage Unit (FSU) application has been selected for the Fulmar Field (Shell/Esso) and the Yme Field (Statoil). Both FSU`s are converted standard tankers (Aframax and Suezmax) and designed for operation in extreme North Sea environments. (3) An STL buoy can be arranged as an effective offshore loading terminal. BP have selected STL for the Harding Field. The STL loading terminal will be used for export from a subsea field storage. (4) Based on the STL technology Statoil have launched a new design, Multipurpose Shuttle Tanker (MST). This unit will be equipped with the STL ship systems allowing it to operate as an STL tanker for direct shuttle loading, as an STL loading terminal or as a storage unit. In addition the vessel is equipped for operation as a standard North Sea shuttle tanker capable of loading from floating storage units and standard North Sea loading terminals via a loading hose in the conventional manner. (5) The production concept, developed from STL technology can effectively be used for conversion of standard tankers to FPSO or for new-built FPSOs.

  4. Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

  5. Alternatives to Double Hull Tank Vessel Design, Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-24

    The report required by section 4115(e) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. The report concludes that, at present, there are no equivalent designs to the double hull tanker for the prevention of oil outflow due to groundings, which are the most prevalent type of serious vessel accident in U.S. waters. The report does not recommend any changes to the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 to allow alternatives to double hull design, but does recommend that the Coast Guard continue to evaluate novel tanker designs and associated technologies.

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","From PADD 3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge",47,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail",3,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scrapbook Page 2 The BooNE collaboration in winter. A tour of the construction site. Working with the BooNE Horn. BooNE in the winter A tour of the construction site. A day with the Horn Janet, Bonnie, and Jen in the Tank. Janet and Bill: the early years. Bill, Richard, Jeff, and Shawn in the midst of discussion. Preparing the tubes Janet and Bill: the early days Discussion in progress The oil tanker arrives. The final stages of oil filling. The BooNE Collaboration in the summer. The oil tanker

  10. Dynamic behavior of articulated single point mooring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of an Articulated Single Point Mooring System subjected to wave loading is presented. The analysis considers non-linearities caused due to Morison Equation`s hydrodynamic drag; variable buoyancy and variable added mass introduced by the variable submergence effect; the effect of instantaneous position of the tower; and the surge motion of the tanker transferred to the tower. The random time history of the oil tanker is derived with the help of it`s Response Amplitude Operator and the specified sea surface elevation spectrum. The analysis is carried out by an iterative frequency domain method which takes care of the above non-linearities. With the proposed method of analysis, a parametric study is conducted, in order to investigate the behavior of the single point mooring system subjected to random waves. The parameters include surge motion o the tanker, current velocity, random waves and point of attachment of the tanker to the tower. From the analysis, the mean peak value of the response and the statistics of the distribution of peak value of heel angle response are also obtained.

  11. Economical development of small isolated fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.G.

    1995-11-01

    U.K. offshore oil supplies could be in decline in 10 years unless new methods and technology are developed to open fields that are uncommercial by conventional methods. Such technology is being developed, and much of it is aimed at pressure boosting subsea stepout fields to improve production rate and recovery over increasing distances to a host platform. This paper is concerned with the development of small isolated fields for which a new platform facility is not justified or where no suitable existing host platform is available. The isolated-field production system described here comprises a two-stage subsea separator near the subsea well(s) from which production is tied in by flexible flowlines. Oil/water/gas separation is achieved at near atmosphere pressure, allowing safe loading of the ``dead`` crude into a tanker. The gas is flared at a surface buoy (directly above the separator unit) that also contains power generation and chemical injection facilities. Liquids are pumped to an offshore tanker-loading catenary anchor leg mooring (CALM) buoy, and then to the connected shuttle tanker. Control of the separator system is autonomous based on a programmable logic controller in the subsea control module, with commands and monitoring by an umbilical from a production center on the tanker.

  12. Numerical and experimental analysis of a retrievable offshore loading facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; O`Brien, P.

    1995-12-31

    ROLF (Retrievable Offshore Loading Facility) has been proposed as an alternative offshore oil export tanker loading system for the North Sea. The system consists of a flexible riser ascending from the seabed in a lazy wave configuration to the bow of a dynamically positioned tanker. In order to supplant and support the numerical analyses performed to design the system, an extensive model test program was carried out in a 3D offshore basin at scale 1:50. A model riser with properties equivalent to the properties of the oil filled prototype riser installed in seawater was tested in several combinations of waves and current. During the tests the forces at the bow of the tanker and at the pipeline end manifold were measured together with the motions of the tanker and the riser. The riser motions were measured by means of a video based 3D motion monitoring system. Of special importance was accurate determination of the minimum bending radius for the riser. This was derived based on the measured riser motions. The results of the model tests were compared to numerical analyses by an MCS proprietary riser analysis program.

  13. For oil spills, no slick solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oil spills from tankers and offshore wells are getting bigger and more numerous. Oil spill cleanup technology is hard-pressed to keep up with the problem. The use of skimming devices, sorbents and chemical agents, and microorganisms to control oil spills is described. The environmental effects of oil spills are briefly discussed.

  14. EIS-0035: Use of VLCCs and VLCCs as Floating Storage Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed use of tankers as floating storage facilities. This statement is a draft supplement to the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

  15. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  16. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 2,423 1,492 0 3,915 3 ............................................................................ 3,400 8,207 0 11,607 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5 ............................................................................ - - 0 0 From 2 to 1

  17. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8.PDF Table 38. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 106 498 - 223 2,810 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 107 40 0 1,206 2,416 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 0 0 - 357 848 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 125 0 0 723 2,384 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils

  19. The Heidrun Field: Oil offtake system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajabi, F.D.; Breivik, K.; Syvertsen, K.

    1996-12-31

    Offtake of oil from the Heidrun field is achieved through a Direct Shuttle Loading (DSL) system. This approach eliminates the need for an intermediate storage facility, allowing continuous production and transfer of oil directly from the Heidrun TLP to shuttle tankers. Purpose-built or appropriately converted tankers with an integral bow turret locate and connect to a Submerged Turret Loading (STL) buoy which functions both as a tanker mooring point and a termination for the flexible offloading line. The system is designed to permit the tankers to remain connected during loading and to disengage from the STL buoy on completion of loading in all weather conditions up to and including the 100 year storm. This paper describes implementation of the Heidrun DSL system from conception to first oil. It gives the background for choosing the DSL system and information on the data generated to support the selection process. Design, fabrication and installation of various components are explained to give an insight into the challenges that had to be overcome for realization of this first-of-its-kind system in a record time of about one year. Installation of the complete DSL system in the summer of 1994, approximately one year ahead of the original plans, enabled full scale in situ testing of the system with a purpose-modified shuttle tanker. The two-month test program provided the equivalent of one year of operational experience with the system before first oil. The paper addresses data obtained during the full scale testing, and comparison with analytical results. The operation of the Heidrun DSL system is also described. These data together with the experience gained during realization of this bold concept will give key information on how such a concept can be effectively applied to any major or marginal field development scenario either as an offtake system or in conjunction with an FPSO/FSO.

  20. Silicone injection restores failing submarine cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilstra, M.

    1995-12-01

    Faced with the prospect of replacing nearly 10 miles of aging undersea cables, Orcas Power & Light Co (Opalco) elected instead to inject silicone into as many of the cables as possible. Silicone injection has been used extensively on underground residential distribution (URD) and feeder cables, but only two underwater cables had previously been injected: a feeder cable for Florida Power Corp under an intercoastal waterway and a cable for Washington Water Power Co under a lake in western Idaho. The compound restores power cables damaged by water treeing and prevents further water damage. Selection criteria included age, type, and whether the cables had ever been spliced. Older, soldered, hand-wrapped splices were avoided as they block the CableCure fluid from flowing through. This makes the cable uninjectable unless the splices are replaced with the molded type. The first cables chosen for injection were between 15 and 30 years old and clear of soldered splices. They also were free from faults. 4 figs.

  1. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report V, Volume 1 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Flare System (Plant 19), Tankage (Plant 20), Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21), River Facilities (Plant 22), Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23), and Electrical Distribution (Plant 30). Flare System (Plant 19) provides primary and auxiliary flare systems for safe collection and disposal of overpressure relief discharges, and operational and emergency venting of flammable vapors and liquids from the various processing plants and loading facilities. Tankage (Plant 20) provides storage for propane and heavier liquid hydrocarbon products, as well as for by-product ammonia, phenols, and liquid sulfur. Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21) includes the fuel gas blending and distribution system and the interconnecting process and utility piping between process plants and offsites. River Facilities (Plant 22) provides the loading of liquid products and by-products into barges for marine surface transportation, and the unloading of coal from barges. Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23) provides loading and unloading of products shipped by either rail or truck. Electrical Distribution (Plant 30) receives main utility power from the Big River Electric Corporation and distributes the power to the other plants. The following information is included for each of the six plants: a description of the plant's design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams, as applicable; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for piping and instrument diagrams.

  2. Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childers, M.; Barnes, J. |

    1995-07-17

    The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

  3. Model simulation of the drift and spread of the Aegean Sea oil spill near La Coruna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, P.

    1994-12-31

    On the 3 December 1992 the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea ran aground at Torre de Hercules near the entrance to the Ria de Coruna and La Coruna harbor, Spain. The 291 m tanker of 114,036-dwt carrying 79,096 tons of Brent type crude oil, broke up and exploded. Practically all of the oil was released into the sea. Over 200 km of shore was affected. A two-dimensional depth-integrated model on a .25 ft. x .25 ft. grid was implemented with the capability of predicting wind driven movements in the area of La Coruna. It is driven by meteorological analysis from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMRWF) global numerical weather prediction model.

  4. H. R. 2325: Comprehensive Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, May 11, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 2325 would establish a domestic liability and compensation system for oil pollution from vessels and facilities and would implement the 1984 Protocols to the 1969 Civil Liability and 1971 Fund Conventions concerning seagoing tanker-source oil pollution. The goal of this act is to: (1) strengthen the four existing oil pollution liability and compensation regimes under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, the Deepwater Port Act, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to create a unified program; (2) establish a system financed by vessel and facility owners and the oil industry to compensate the US government, the states, and Indian tribes for removal and restoration costs associated with oil spills; and (3) provide greater protection from foreign tanker oil spills by implementing the existing protocols and conventions.

  5. A design-oriented investigation into the collision strength of double-hulled structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kitano, K.

    1994-12-31

    The installation of a double-hulled structure or equivalent alteration for oil tankers was adopted by IMO (International Maritime Organization) in 1992. There is, however, few practical information on what is the minimum size of a double hull to prevent an oil leak or how the size of a double hull affects the collision strength. To give such information, the effects on the dimensions of the double-hulled structure on the collision strength were investigated quantitatively by means of an analytical method developed by the authors. The effects of the side shell plate thickness, transverse webs thickness, the size of longitudinal stiffeners, the size of transverse web stiffener and the depth of a double-hulled tanker were examined.

  6. The Kirki episode: Detailed biomarker analysis provides some surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, T.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I.

    1996-12-31

    On Sunday 21st July 1991 the oil tanker Kirki caught fire when its bow broke off in heavy seas just 40 km off the Western Australian coastline near Jurien, approximately 200 km north of Perth. The tanker was carrying 80,000 tonnes of Murban light crude oil from the Middle East. Over the next three days approximately 10,000 tonnes of this oil was released into the marine environment, the heavy seas rapidly spreading the oil slick to a thin sheen. There was extensive media coverage of this event and it was widely considered that the spill posed a serious environmental threat to reef systems, recreational beaches and the local rock lobster fishery. This report describes results of analysis performed on several of the samples.

  7. Barracuda field: New records for turret moored FPSO`s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, P.R.B.

    1995-12-01

    An early production system will introduce several innovations and set records when it comes on stream at Barracuda, the third largest of the giant oilfields offshore Brazil. The floating production unit will be a 52,000 dwt FPSO, turret type mooring and a process plant with capacity to process 30,000 bopd. It will remain on location for a minimum of five years. The tanker modifications and overhaul are underway. The FPSO will be prepared to process the oil and offload it to a tandem moored shuttle tanker. The produced gas will be both reinjected and exported to shore through a dedicated riser pipeline. This unit will comprise the world`s largest turret with capacity for 34 risers and the world`s deepest FPSO, moored in 840 meters water depth.

  8. Hydrocarbons in seawater, sediment, and oyster from the Omani coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Over half of the world crude oil supply is transported from the Arabian Gulf area via tankers through the narrow Strait of Hormuz, which forms the northern boundary of the Sultanate of Oman. Generally, crude oil tanker traffic off the coast of Oman is relatively heavy and all the vessels entering the Gulf to load at various terminals pass by the coastal line of Oman. The present work plays an essential part on the Omani marine monitoring program. The purpose of this program was to establish baseline levels of selected heavy metals, chlorinated and petroleum hydrocarbons in some marine species. This study aims to assess hydrocarbons in seawater, sediment and rocky oysters from the different sites along Omani coastal waters.

  9. Largest Taiwan SPM terminal installed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, A.R. )

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports on the largest Taiwan single-point mooring (SPM) terminal. Chinese Petroleum Corp. (CPC) last year installed and commissioned Taiwan's SPM terminal. This, the third of four planned SPM terminals, is unloading 100,000-300,000 dwt crude-oil tankers 5 miles offshore Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on the southwest coast of the Republic of China. Construction on the fourth SPM terminal, for unloading naphtha and diesel gas oil from 20,000 -100,000 dwt tankers, began late last year. The third terminal consists of a catenary anchor leg mooring (CALM) system, a 56-in, (1,422 mm) OD crude-oil pipeline and a 16-in. (406 mm) OD fuel-oil pipeline. The subsea pipelines extend from the CALM installed in a water depth of 118 ft to an existing shore tank farm tie-in valve station.

  10. Risk analysis for truck transportation of high consequence cargo.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Robert David

    2010-09-01

    The fixed facilities control everything they can to drive down risk. They control the environment, work processes, work pace and workers. The transportation sector drive the State and US highways with high kinetic energy and less-controllable risks such as: (1) other drivers (beginners, impaired, distracted, etc.); (2) other vehicles (tankers, hazmat, super-heavies); (3) road environments (bridges/tunnels/abutments/construction); and (4) degraded weather.

  11. EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

  12. Mega borg oil spill: Fate and effect studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    The Mega Borg, a Norwegian tanker, released an estimated 5.1 million gallons (gal) of Palanca Angola crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during a lightering accident and subsequent fire. The collection of reports was designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the spill chronology, the fate of the oil released, and subsequent studies that were conducted to assess the impacts of the oil spill on the environment and its biota.

  13. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, December 14,1989-August 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brantley, S.R.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on explosive volcanic activity at Redoubt Volcano, 177 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, which generated numerous tephra plumes that disrupted air traffic above southern Alaska, damaged aircraft, and caused locally heavy tephra fall. Pyroclastic flows triggered debris flows that inundated part of an oil-tanker facility, temporarily suspending oil production in Cook Inlet. The newly established Alaska Volcano Observatory increased its monitoring effort and disseminated volcanic hazard information to government agencies, industry, and the public.

  14. Flexible riser and mooring system develops small oil fields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, A.M.; Holmes, G. ); Benstead, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on the flexible riser and mooring system (FRAMS) which provides a technically straightforward, commercially attractive method of developing small oil fields. A passively moored 60,000-deadweight-ton (60,000-DWT) tanker with deck-mounted equipment provides a swivelless well fluid and injection water path from and to the wellheads. The system can be disconnected rapidly in severe weather.

  15. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,492 8,207 - 3,723 29,770 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 1,218 257 0 11,971 36,169 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils .....................................................

  16. LNG Safety Research Report to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Research Report to Congress LNG Safety Research Report to Congress LNG Safety Research Report to Congress May 2012 The February 2007 Government Accountability Office Report (GAO Report 07-316), Public Safety Consequences of a Terrorist Attack on a Tanker Carrying Liquefied Natural Gas Need Clarification, identified several key Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) research priorities highlighted by a GAO-convened panel of experts on LNG safety in order to provide the most comprehensive and accurate

  17. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery » Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen is most commonly transported and delivered as a liquid when high-volume transport is needed in the absence of pipelines. To liquefy hydrogen it must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures through a liquefaction process. Trucks transporting liquid hydrogen are referred to as liquid tankers. Liquefaction Gaseous hydrogen is liquefied by cooling it to below -253°C (-423°F). Once hydrogen is liquefied it can be stored at

  18. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other

  19. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 62. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 5,854 111 5,743 41,510 44,952 -3,442 31,303 27,535 3,768 Petroleum Products 2

  20. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate

  4. Transport woes threaten California production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-23

    California oil producers face a loss of production this year because of constraints on pipeline and tanker transportation to Los Angeles area refineries. The potential bottleneck is occurring at a time when Outer Continental Shelf production is near capacity from Chevron Corp.'s Point Arguello project at the same time production is increasing from Exxon Corp.'s nearby Santa Ynex Unit (SYU) expansion. Both megaprojects must compete for pipeline space with onshore crude producers, notably in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Recent development limiting transportation options include: An indefinite shutdown of Four Corners Pipe Line Co.'s 50,000 b/d Line No. 1, damaged by the Jan. 17 earthquake; Loss of a tanker permit by Chevron and partners for offshore Point Arguello production; Permanent shutdown of Exxon's offshore storage and treatment (OST) facility, which since 1981 has used tankers to transport about 20,000 b/d of SYU production from the Santa Barbara Channel to Los Angeles. The OST, the first commercial floating production system in the US -- placed in the Santa Barbara Channel in 1981 after a decade of precedent setting legal and political battles -- was shut down Apr. 4. The paper discusses these production concerns, available options, the OST shutdown, and the troubled history of the OST.

  5. Technical and economical aspects of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage in deep oceans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarv, H.; John, J.

    2000-07-01

    The authors examined the technical and economical feasibility of two options for large-scale transportation and ocean sequestration of captured CO{sub 2} at depths of 3000 meters or greater. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through six parallel-laid subsea pipelines. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating platform or a barge for vertical injection through a large-diameter pipe to the ocean floor. Based on the preliminary technical and economic analyses, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a large-diameter, 3,000-meter vertical pipeline from a floating structure appears to be the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions for distances greater than 400 km. Other benefits of offshore injection are high payload capability and ease of relocation. For shorter distances (less than 400 km), CO{sub 2} delivery by subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines or tankers were under 2 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}. Their analyses also indicates that large-scale sequestration of captured CO{sub 2} in oceans is technologically feasible and has many commonalities with other strategies for deepsea natural gas and oil exploration installations.

  6. Deadline near for compliance with U. S. oil spill liability rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The petroleum industry is keeping a close watch on the approaching deadline for compliance with tough new US rules on fiscal liability for oil spills. Interim final rules scheduled to go into effect Dec. 28 stem from the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90). The designation of interim final'' rules leaves room for final adjustments on narrow issues. But in general, the rule swill stand as presently structured. OPA90 imposes liability for oil discharges from US and non-US flagged tankers, as well as ports, terminals, and offshore pipelines and other facilities. Tanker operators have voiced the most vigorous opposition to OPA90 because it could expose them to unlimited liability for damage caused by spills and will impose a phaseout on single hull tankers plying US waters. Scheduled to replace such takers are double hull vessels that carry a much bigger price tag. The paper describes provisions of OPA90, the current situation related to insurance coverage, pro and cons to the new rule, cost issues, oil firms, views, new insurers, and the mandatory excess insurance facility proposal.

  7. Gras Dowr joins world`s FPSO fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-05

    The Gras Dowr, a floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSD) for Amerada Hess Ltd.`s North Sea Durward and Dauntless fields, is one of the latest additions to the world`s growing FPSO fleet. The Gras Dowr, anchored in about 90 m of water, lies between the Durward (U.K. Block 21/16) and Dauntless (U.K. Block 21/11) fields, about 3.5 km from the subsea wellhead locations. The Gras Dowr`s main functions, according to Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., are to: receive fluids from well risers; process incoming fluids to separate the fluid into crude, water, and gas; store dry crude oil and maintain the required temperature; treat effluent to allow for water discharge to the sea; compress gas for gas lift as a future option; provide chemical injection skid for process chemical injection; use a part of the produced gas for fuel gas, and flare excess gas; inject treated seawater into the injection wells; house power generation for process and offloading operation and utilities; offload to a tandem moored shuttle tanker including receiving liquid fuel from the same tanker; provide accommodations for operating and maintenance crews; allow helicopters landings and takeoffs; allow handling and storage of goods transported by supply vessels; moor a shuttle tanker; and control the subsea wells.

  8. Economic model for seaborne oil trade. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kian-Wah, H.

    1996-03-01

    This thesis aims to provide some insights as to how oil prices and oil flows might vary with the carrying capacity of the tanker fleet as affected by political events. It provides an econometric analysis of tanker freight rates in the modern era and proposes a mathematical (quadratic) programming economic model that links the crude oil market to the supply elasticity of the world oil tanker fleet based on a competitive economy. The economic model can be considered as a version of the Walras-Cassel general-equilibrium system which possesses an economically meaningful equilibrium solution in terms of oil prices, freight rates and the pattern of oil distribution. The implementation of the model is completed using the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). The study concludes with a scenario study showing how the model could be used to examine the importance of South East Asia`s sealanes in world seaborne oil trade. The model shows the economic vulnerability of oil importing nations, especially Japan, the United States, and Western Europe, to a possible closure of South East Asian sealanes.

  9. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  10. First Stabilization and Disposal of Radioactive Zinc Bromide at the SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denny, J.K.

    2003-02-12

    Facilities Disposition Projects (FDP) personnel at Savannah River Site (SRS) implement the Inactive Facility Risk Management Program to drive down risk and costs in SRS inactive facilities. The program includes cost-effective techniques to identify and dispose of hazardous chemicals and radioactive waste from inactive facilities, thereby ensuring adequate protection of the public, workers and the environment. In June 1998, FDP conducted an assessment of the inactive C-Reactor Facility to assure that chemical and radiological hazards had been identified and were being safely managed. The walkdown identified the need to mitigate a significant hazard associated with storing approximately 13,400 gallons of liquid radioactive Zinc Bromide in three aging railcar tankers outside of the facility. No preventive maintenance was being performed on the rusting tankers and a leak could send radioactive Zinc Bromide into an outfall and offsite to the Savannah River. In 2001, DOE-Savannah River (DOE- SR) funded the FDP to eliminate the identified hazard by disposing of the radioactive Zinc Bromide solution and the three contaminated railcar tankers. This paper describes the innovative, cost-effective approaches and technology used to perform the first stabilization and disposal of radioactive Zinc Bromide at SRS.

  11. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A.

    1997-06-02

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  12. Liuhua 11-1 development -- Design and fabrication considerations for the FPSO Nanhai Sheng Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.P.; Koster, T.E.; Yu, L.; Haire, W.M.; Shimamura, Yoshihide

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the development, design, and fabrication of the crude oil process facilities, and the conversion of an existing tanker for use at the Liuhua 11-1 Field. Over a 16-month period spanning 1994 and 1995, Amoco Orient Petroleum Company, and partners, China Offshore Oil Nanhai East Corporation (CONHE), and Kerr-McGee China Petroleum Ltd., converted a crude oil tanker originally built in 1975 to the Nanhai Sheng Li, the floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) facility for the Liuhua 11-1 Field. The FPSO will process up to 65,000 BOPD produced from 20 subsea wells located 1.7 miles away. In addition to the processing facilities for produced oil and water, the FPSO has a processed crude oil storage capacity of 715,000 bbls. The ship`s propulsion system was removed during the conversion, because the FPSO is permanently moored at site by means of a 10-point, ``soft`` mooring. The mooring system was designed to survive the 100-year-return-period typhoon. Several unique aspects of the ship`s conversion, process facility, and mooring system design are discussed. Process design aspects include the flexibility to accommodate wide variations in produced water-oil ratio and total volume, the design considerations of the large water and crude processing equipment, vessel motions during operation, and equipment survival during storms.The FPSO design discussion focuses on global hull strength for surviving a 100-year typhoon. Special design requirements for the mooring turret structural integration to the converted tanker are also discussed.

  13. A parable of oil and water: Revisiting Prince William Sound, four years after

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeble, J.

    1993-12-31

    On Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon oil tanker Valdez foundered on Bligh Reef, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska`s Prince William Sound. To Alaskans, especially fishing people, this was a shocking but not entirely unanticipated event, as there had been several near misses in the twelve years since the opening of oil shipping from Valdez, Alaska. This article revisits Prince William sound to evaluate both the lingering environmental effects and the socio-economic effects of the spill and the huge monetary settlement from the spills.

  14. Chedabucto Bay 1992 shoreline oil conditions survey: Long-term fate of bunker C oil from the arrow spill in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, E.H.; McGuire, B.E.; Humphrey, B.

    1994-03-01

    The report presents a description of the activities related to and a summary of the information generated by a field survey carried out in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia, for Environment Canada from June to September 1992. The objective of the survey was to locate and document any residual oil on the shores of Chedabucto Bay. The grounding of the tanker Arrow in February 1970 resulted in the release of more than 11 million liters of Bunker C fuel oil. This oil was stranded over an estimated 305 km of shoreline in the Chedabucto Bay area.

  15. Enhanced removal of Exxon Valdez spilled oil Alaskan gravel by a microbial surfactant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, S.; Elashvili, I.; Valdes, J.J.; Kamely, D.; Chakrabarty, A.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Remediation efforts for the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez tanker in Alaska have focused on the use of pressurized water at high temperature to remove oil from the beaches. We have tested a biological surfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa for its ability to remove oil from contaminated Alaskan gravel samples under various conditions, including concentration of the surfactant, time of contact, temperature of the wash, and presence or absence of xanthan gum. The results demonstrate the ability of the microbial surfactant to release oil to a significantly greater extent (2 to 3 times) than water alone, particularly at temperatures of 30{degree}C and above.

  16. Water pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

  17. Adequacy of the regulatory oversight of the Trans-Alaska pipeline and terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Exxon Valdez spill abruptly brought to the nation's attention the risks of transporting crude oil. While oil tanker transportation received many of the headlines, the safety of pipelines carrying oil and the terminals that store it have also been called into question. GAO testified on the adequacy of regulatory oversight of the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline System and the terminal at Valdez, Alaska. This paper reports increased and coordinated regulatory oversight as a major component of an effective operational and emergency response strategy for the pipeline. The current lack of comprehensive and systematic oversight is of particular concern because of recent revelations of significant corrosion problems in the pipeline.

  18. AES Job Opening | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas,

  19. TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................................ 0 433 0 344 978 772 0 0 58,118 Petroleum Products ...................................... 8,045 76 0 3,328 6,928 2,885 0 100,331 23,625 Pentanes Plus ............................................ 0 0 0 0 159 0 0 0 549 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ........................ 0 0 0 1,093 5,010 262 0 3,644 4,920 Unfinished Oils

  20. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0, 2015 EIA rolls out monthly data on crude oil movements by rail For the first time, EIA is providing monthly data on rail movements of crude oil, which have significantly increased over the past five years. The new data on crude-by-rail (CBR) movements are fully integrated with EIA's existing monthly petroleum supply statistics, which already include crude oil movements by pipeline, tanker, and barge. "The new crude-by-rail data provides a clearer picture on a mode of oil transportation

  1. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 3,915 11,607 0 144,029 306,147 40,502 52,647 12,520 327,620 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 135,147 257 0 32,487 154,091 46,624 0 1,186,871 261,553 Pentanes Plus

  2. Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-03-09

    Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

  3. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  4. AEO Early Release 2013 - LNG exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas,

  5. Federal offshore statistics: leasing, exploration, production, revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essertier, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The statistics in this update of the Outer Continental Shelf Statistics publication document what has happened since federal leasing began on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1954. Highlights note that of the 29.8 million acres actually leased from 175.6 million acres offered for leasing, 20.1% were in frontier areas. Total revenues for the 1954-1982 period were $58.9 billion with about 13% received in 1982. The book is divided into six parts covering highlights, leasing, exploration and development, production and revenue, reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources, and pollution problems from well and tanker accidents. 5 figures, 59 tables.

  6. Unique Kutubu export system complete; production flowing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGovern, R.; Miller, G. )

    1992-08-03

    First oil from near Lake Kutubu in Papua New Guinea began flowing in June through pipelines and marine facilities recently installed by Chevron Niugini Pty. Ltd. Production facilities were built near Lake Kutubu. The export pipeline was laid form the central production facility to landfall on the Kikori River - approximately 171 km (106 miles) away - and then another 56 miles to a platform in 66 ft of water in the gulf. From the platform, an oilspading line extends about 2.4 miles to the SPM in 83 ft of water where tankers will load oil at an initial design flowrate of 157,000 b/d.

  7. Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orphan, Victor J.

    2011-06-01

    SAIC's development of VACIS provides useful 'lessons learned' in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify ''lessons learned'' useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

  8. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was speci#12;cally developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  9. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from (Near) Disaster In 1966, a B-52 collided with a tanker over Palomares, Spain, while refueling. Three of its four hydrogen bombs fell on land, and the fourth fell into the sea, where it was recovered after a lengthy search (see photo on page 17). Two bombs were destroyed when their conventional high explosives detonated; the surviving two bomb casings are on display at the National Atomic Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The incident helped prompt the initiative at Los Alamos to

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.PDF Table 36. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 243 970 0 9,854 19,641 2,664 3,204 775 27,762 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 8,629 40 0 3,003 11,633 3,419 0 103,987 16,778 Pentanes Plus

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 June 2016 Table 57. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 73 38 0 4,536 29,329 7,264 3,824 1,318 26,217 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 13,851 0 0 10,621 25,885 6,904 4,101 98,009 24,877 Pentanes Plus

  12. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage & Liquid Delivery Jacob Leachman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor DOE H 2 Transmission & Delivery Workshop 2/26/2014 H Y P E R H drogen roperties for nergy esearch This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Jacob Leachman * DOE H 2 Transmission & Distribution Workshop * 2/25/2014 H Y P E R Why Cryogenic Hydrogen? * LH 2 tanker trucks delivered 80-90 % of total small merchant H 2 in 2010. 1 * Cryo-H

  13. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  14. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 30, 2015 EIA rolls out monthly data on crude oil movements by rail For the first time, EIA is providing monthly data on rail movements of crude oil, which have significantly increased over the past five years. The new data on crude-by-rail (CBR) movements are fully integrated with EIA's existing monthly petroleum supply statistics, which already include crude oil movements by pipeline, tanker, and barge. "The new crude-by-rail data provides a clearer picture on a mode of oil

  15. Regenerative fuel cell systems R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

    1998-08-01

    Regenerative fuel cell (RFC) systems produce power and electrolytically regenerate their reactants using stacks of electrochemical cells. Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (> 400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight pressure vessels to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Progress is reported on the development, integration, and operation of rechargeable energy storage systems with such high specific energy. Lightweight pressure vessels that enable high specific energies have been designed with performance factors (burst pressure/internal volume/tank weight) > 50 km (2.0 million inches), and a vessel with performance factor of 40 km (1.6 million inches) was fabricated. New generations of both advanced and industry-supplied hydrogen tankage are under development. A primary fuel cell test rig with a single cell (46 cm{sup 2} active area) has been modified and operated reversibly as a URFC (for up to 2010 cycles on a single cell). This URFC uses bifunctional electrodes (oxidation and reduction electrodes reverse roles when switching from charge to discharge, as with a rechargeable battery) and cathode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the hydrogen side of the cell). Recent modifications also enable anode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the oxygen side of the cell). Hydrogen/halogen URFCs, capable of higher round-trip efficiency than hydrogen/oxygen URFCs, have been considered, and will be significantly heavier. Progress is reported on higher performance hydrogen/oxygen URFC operation with reduced catalyst loading.

  16. FUNGIBLE AND COMPATIBLE BIOFUELS: LITERATURE SEARCH, SUMMARY, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G; Bunce, Michael; Barone, Teresa L; Storey, John Morse

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study described in this report is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of bio-fuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of bio-fuels, in support of a renewable fuels standard and possible future low-carbon fuel standards. These barriers can be classified into several categories, including operating practice, regulatory, technical, and acceptability barriers. Possible solutions to these issues are discussed; including compatibility evaluation, changes to bio-fuels, regulatory changes, and changes in the distribution system or distribution practices. No actual experimental research has been conducted in the writing of this report, but results are used to develop recommendations for future research and additional study as appropriate. This project addresses recognized barriers to the wider use of bio-fuels in the areas of development of codes and standards, industrial and consumer awareness, and materials compatibility issues.

  17. Heavy oil processing utilizing the dynacracking process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    1983-01-01

    This report covers preliminary design of a heavy oil conversion unit based on HRI's Dynacracking Process. The unit is designed for operation in any of the six cases described in this report. The six cases presented demonstrate the versatility of the unit to process three different feedstocks with different product objectives and at various process conditions while keeping the reactor configuration and design fixed. The reactor incorporated in the design is identical to the one proposed for a plant to be built in Pittsburg, CA., with California Synfuels Research Corporation as the operator. An evaluative study is presented of the product qualities and possible alternatives for product utilization and upgrading. An indicative summary is made of the quality of effluents from the unit. Estimated utilities and operating requirements are presented. Overall plant material balances are included for each of the six cases. Process equipment duty specifications and offsite tankage requirements are provided and a preliminary cost estimate presented. Basic operating principles (outside the reactor) for smooth plant operation are included. Suggestions plants arrangement and layout are provided. 18 tables.

  18. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS Consolidation Program: flushing and blowdown system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-01-01

    The flushing and blowdown system of an EDS plant provides the means of removing viscous coal products and slurry streams from plant vessels and lines. In addition, it provides the flushing oil needed during normal operations for purging instruments in slurry service, for flushing slurry pump and slurry agitator seals, and for flushing slurry safety valve inlet lines. It contains a blowdown system for collecting material from washing operations, including the transport of the collected material to slop tankage. The rerun options for depleting the inventory of collected slop are a related aspect of the flushing and blowdown system design although specific equipment for handling slop is not part of the flushing and blowdown system facilities. This report documents the results of a study which evaluates the flushing and blowdown requirements for a commercial-scale EDS plant. The work was conducted as part of the EDS Consolidation Program. The design recommendations represent a consolidation of learnings accrued during previous phases of the EDS Project including results obtained from ECLP operations, from the ECLP Test Program, and from past EDS Study Design preparations. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Structural integrity, NDE, risk and material performance for petroleum, process and power. PVP-Volume 336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, M.; Bagnoli, D.L.; Warke, W.R.; Anyewuenyi, O.A.; Smith, J.P.; Chen, M.; DePadova, T.A.; Weingart, L.J.

    1996-12-01

    This volume continues a series at the 1996 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference on the theme Service Experience in the Petroleum Industry. There is much to be gained from evaluating the performance of components after service in hostile environments. The lessons learned relate to the adequacy of design margins. Where deterioration is attributed to wet hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen attack of high temperature, the suitability of degraded materials for continuing service must be closely monitored and or life prediction tools enhanced. This volume provides numerous case histories, strategies, practical examples and theoretical approaches. For example, work on elevated temperature behavior herein discloses principles for establishing design margins and also, how off-nominal conditions in tubes and piping may shorten life. Papers in this volume are arranged under the following topics: service experience in petrochemical plants; risk-based inspection; NDE issues in the petroleum industry; high temperature service in the petroleum industry; tankage analysis and standards; and finite element analysis applications for the process industries. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Offshore refrigerated LPG loading/unloading terminal using a CALM buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonjour, E.L.; Simon, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    In existing Liquefied Petroleum Gases terminals, the transfer of liquefied gases to the tanker is performed via articulated loading arms or flexible hoses, working under quasistatic conditions. The tanker has to be firmly moored alongside a jetty or a process barge in a protected area (such as a harbour in most cases). This paper gives the main results of the development of an offshore refrigerated LPG (-48/sup 0/C) loading/unloading system, using a CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses working under dynamic conditions. The aim of this new concept is to replace the standard harbour structure for loading/unloading refrigerated LPG and to provide a considerable reduction in investments and a greater flexibility regarding the terminal location. The main components of that terminal have been designed so as to enable the loading of a 75 000 cubic meter LPG carrier in 15 hours. The results of static and dynamic low temperature tests on a LPG swivel joint for CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses show that such a SPM terminal is now a realistic solution.

  1. Ship-borne oil dispersant procedure and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.A.

    1981-11-17

    A method and system are disclosed for dispersing oil in the event of an oil leak into a body of water from an oil tanker or an oil drilling platform. There is provided structure for detecting the existence of a leak from a container of oil generally surrounded by a body of water into which the oil is leaking; structure for storing an oil dispersant at the site of the leak; and structure responsive to the occurrence of the leak, for automatically causing the dispersant to be released from the containment structure into the leaking oil. In an oil tanker, the system and method may be implemented by providing structure for detecting a leak in the oil tank wall, suspending a container of dispersant inside the oil tank, and providing structure for rupturing the dispersant container in response to the detection of a leak so that dispersant is caused to mix with the oil in the tank before the oil leaks therefrom. In the case of an offshore oil drilling platform, the system and method may be implemented by leak detection devices mounted to the drill casings or on buoys in the water body, one or more dispersant containers with release chutes directed toward the water body mounted to the side of the platform, and structure responsive to the detection devices for opening the dispersant containers in response to the detection of an oil leak.

  2. Final report on development and testing of the microwave oil-water monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, C.

    1991-06-15

    The oil-water monitor is a device invented by Dr. Claude Swanson of Applied Physics Technology to respond to the petroleum-loss problem in crude oil transfers. It is a device which measures water content in crude oil and other petroleum products, in a flowing pipe such as a pipeline or tanker manifold. It is capable of accurately measuring the water contamination levels in crude oil shipments, in real time as the crude oil flows through the loading manifold into the tanker, or at the receiving point as the oil is off-loaded. The oil-water monitor has application in the verification of oil volumes and concentration of contaminants at petroleum transfer points. The industry-estimated level of water loss at transfer points due to inadequate monitoring technology amounts to several billion dollars per year, so there is a definite perceived need within the petroleum community for this type of accurate water monitoring technology. News articles indicating the importance of this problem are shown. The microwave oil-water monitor measures the water content in the oil, whether in the form of small droplets or large globules. Therefore it can be applied to the crude oil as it flows through crude oil pipes into the ship, or at transfer points in a crude oil distribution system. 4 refs., 18 figs.

  3. Exxon Valdez controversy revived

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-26

    Four years after its occurrence rocked the petroleum industry and revitalized the US environmental movement, the Exxon Valdez tanker oil spill off Alaska continues to stir controversy. Conflicting reports abound over whether there is long term damage to the Prince William Sound ecosystem resulting from the March 24, 1989, spill. Government scientists at recent conferences disclosed studies they contend show long term, significant damage to the sound. Exxon this month launched a counteroffensive, disclosing results of studies it funded that it claims show no credible scientific evidence of long term damage. At the same time, the company blasted as flawed the government's data on assessing environmental damage to the sound and charged that test samples from the sound were mishandled. Meantime, Prince William Sound still shows lingering effects from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. But recovery has been so rapid that there is more controversy over how to use $900 million in natural resource recovery funds that Exxon paid than over how badly species are suffering. The paper describes Exxon's studies; faulty data; lingering damage; and an update on tanker safety.

  4. Development of the oil-water monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, C.

    1990-04-02

    The oil-water monitor is a device invented by Dr. Claude Swanson of Applied Physics Technology to respond to the petroleum-loss problem in crude oil transfers. It is a device which measures water content in crude oil and other petroleum products, in a flowing pipe such as a pipeline or tanker manifold. It is capable of accurately measuring the water contamination levels in crude oil shipments, in real time as the crude oil flows through the loading manifold into the tanker, or at the receiving point as the oil is off-loaded It has application in the verification of oil volumes and concentration of contaminants at petroleum transfer points. The industry-estimated level of water loss at transfer points due to inadequate monitoring technology amounts to several billion dollars per year, so there is a definite perceived need within the petroleum community for this type of accurate water monitoring technology. The device has been patented, and initial feasibility experiments have been conducted. The present research is directed toward developing and demonstrating a bench model prototype of the oil-water monitor, complete with the computer software and automated microwave equipment and electronics which will demonstrate the performance of the invention, for implementation in full-scale fielded systems. 3 figs.

  5. Experience with offloading in the North Sea: Development of new cost efficient technology for marine storage and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breivik, K.G.

    1995-12-01

    Statoil has 15 years of experience with offshore loading -- or ``off loading`` -- in the North Sea. Initially, this operation was based on a rather complex articulated loading platform (ALP) and a few modified conventional tankers. The technique has developed into today`s simple but efficient submerged turret loading (STL) system and a significant fleet of highly specialized vessels. These include the multipurpose shuttle tanker (MST), the first of which was recently ordered. The efficiency and regularity of off loading operations match that of pipeline transport. Experience gained during 15 years of off loading has yielded a constant series of improvements in operational safety and developments in standardized operating procedures. Statoil ranks today as one of the world`s largest exporters of crude oil, and offshore loading plays a key role in the group`s operations. The recent development of integrated off loading and vessel technologies opens the way to an interesting and promising future for off loading as well as marine storage production.

  6. Floating oil production unit slated in small field off Gabon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-14

    This paper reports on the first U.S. tanker converted to a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) unit which takes up station in Gombe-Beta field off Gabon by Dec. 1. FPSO Ocean Producer will work under a 3 year, day rate contract let late in 1990 by Amoco-Gabon Bombe Marin co., a unit of Amoco Production Co. (OGJ, Dec. 24, 1990, p. 27). Gombe-Beta field is in the Atlantic Ocean about 70 miles south of Port Gentil, Gabon. Ocean Producer will be moored in 50 ft of water 3.7 miles off Gabon, with Bombe-Beta's unmanned production platform about 820 ft astern. The vessel will be held in position by a disconnectable, asymmetric, six point, spread mooring system, It is owned and operated by Oceaneering International Services Ltd. (OISL). Affiliate Oceaneering Production Systems (OPS) converted the 78,061 dwt oil tanker MT Baltimore Sea at a capital cost of $25 million at Gulf Copper Manufacturing Corp.'s Port Arthur, Tex., shipyard. Both companies are units of Oceaneering International Inc., Houston. OPS the Ocean Producer's use in Gombe-Beta field is the shallowest water FPSO application in the world. Amoco-Gabon chose an FPSO production system for Gombe-Beta because it expects the remote field to have a short economic life, and the oil requires extensive processing.

  7. The Canadian experience in frontier environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.H. )

    1991-03-01

    Early Canadian frontier exploration (from 1955 onshore and from 1966 for offshore drilling) caused insignificant public concern. The 1967-1968 Torrey Canyon Tanker and Santa Barbara disasters roused public opinion and governments. In Canada, 1969-1970 Arctic gas blowouts, a tanker disaster, and damage to the 'Manhattan' exacerbated concerns and resulted in new environmental regulatory constraints. From 1970, the Arctic Petroleum Operations Association learned to operate safely with environmental responsibility. It studied physical environment for design criteria, and the biological and human environment to ameliorate impact. APOA's research projects covered sea-ice, permafrost, sea-bottom, oil-spills, bird and mammal migration, fish habitat, food chains, oceanography, meteorology, hunters'/trappers' harvests, etc. In 1971 Eastcoast Petroleum Operators' Association and Alaska Oil and Gas Association followed APOA's cooperative research model. EPOA stressed icebergs and fisheries. Certain research was handled by the Canadian Offshore Oil Spill Research Association. By the mid-1980s these associations had undertaken $70,000,000 of environmental oriented research, with equivalent additional work by member companies on specific needs and similar sums by Federal agencies often working with industry on complementary research. The frontier associations then merged with the Canadian Petroleum Association, already active environmentally in western Canada. Working with government and informing environmental interest groups, the public, natives, and local groups, most Canadian frontier petroleum operations proceeded with minimal delay and environmental disturbance.

  8. Prepermit work starts on California crude line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-08

    This paper reports on preliminary work leading to permitting efforts for a 171 mile pipeline to move low gravity crude from giant fields of California to the Los Angeles area. The 20 in., unheated pipeline would cost $180-190 million and could go on stream in 3-3 1/2 years. The project has the backing of partners in development of giant Point Arguello field in the Santa Maria basin off Santa Barbara County, a project blocked from start-up for more than 3 years by permitting wrangles. Pipeline sponsors also have proposed moving oil production from development of Santa Ynez Unit in the Santa Barbara Channel. Point Arguello production is expected to start this year with flow limited to 20,000 b/d, moving moved by pipeline to refineries outside Los Angeles. Point Arguello partners want to ship full Arguello production of 80,000-100,00 b/d by tanker until the PPC project is complete, which the county opposes. The group has appealed the county's denial of an interim tankering permit to the California Coastal Commission, which is expected to hold a hearing on the matter this month. The controversy has been further complicated by other, competing projects designed to move Point Arguello crude to market.

  9. The Esso-Bernicia oil spill, Shetland, 1978-79: Experiences and lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, W. ); Kingham, L.V. )

    1991-03-01

    About 200 tons of Bunker C fuel oil escaped from a ruptured tank in a berthing incident in the winter of 1978-79. The worst weather conditions in a decade and failure of equipment led to widespread environmental damage. Local crofters also suffered some loss of sheep through oiling and subsequent drowning (sheep graze backshore beach areas of Shetland). The environmental response to the experiences of this accident produced reinforcement of baseline and operational monitoring of the physical and biological environments. SOTEAG (the Shetland Oil Terminal Environmental Group - a committee set up and funded jointly by industry (the terminal and pipeline operators) and Shetland Island Council and including the Port of Sullom Voe Harbour Authority) also commissioned special surveys to investigate other claims of environmental damage. At a managerial level, links between the Sullom Voe Oil Spills Advisory Committee (SVOSAC) and SOTEAG were reinforced. To prevent any recurrence of the widespread damage caused by 'Bernicia' a multimillion dollar engineering project was completed to build permanent spill booms to intercept oil moving along the coast at strategic points and to boom-off environmentally sensitive areas. Oil spill response equipment and deployment capacity were also increased substantially. Although not related directly to 'Bernicia,' other improvements over the last decade have included an 'area of avoidance' for the prescribed westerly, Atlantic, tanker approach to the terminal (effectively at least 10 mi away from land), aerial and video inspection of all inbound tankers, and the introduction of legislation relating to the amount and quality of ballast water.

  10. OCT (Offshore Technology Conference) accents deepwater action around the globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, P.; Scarborough, R.H.

    1980-05-12

    According to P. Yost (US Coast Guard) at the 12th Offshore Technology Conference (Houston 1980), the US Coast Guard's high-seas boom and skimmer equipment worked well with the strong constant currents and heavy crude involved in the Ixtoc blowout but due to a lighter crude and more variable currents, was not as successful in containing spills from the Burmah Agate tanker in the fall of 1989. Texas beaches will not remove any more oil from the Ixtoc blowout, but the long term effects of the spill remain unknown. Federal and state officials are examining options concerning the 17-19 tar mats deposited by the spill on the beaches; the only way to remove the tar mats might be by bulldozer at low tide. A Coast Guard study of tanker and freighter traffic off Galveston, Texas has been completed and recommendations, possibly involving earlier boarding by pilots of incoming vessels, will be made soon. Other papers presented at the OTC are discussed.