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1

Image Fusion schemes using ICA bases Nikolaos Mitianoudis, Tania Stathaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image Fusion schemes using ICA bases Nikolaos Mitianoudis, Tania Stathaki Communications and Signal Processing group, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ London, UK Abstract Image fusion as analysis and synthesis tools for image fusion by the fusion community. Using various fusion rules, one can

Mitianoudis, Nikolaos

2

Image Fusion Using Optimization of Statistical Measurements Laurent Oudre Tania Stathaki and Nikolaos Mitianoudis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image Fusion Using Optimization of Statistical Measurements Laurent Oudre Tania Stathaki and Nikolaos Mitianoudis Imperial College London Abstract The purpose of image fusion is to create to describe we do not a priori know the ground truth image: these are blind fusion methods. There are mainly

Mitianoudis, Nikos

3

ADAPTIVE IMAGE FUSION USING ICA BASES Nikolaos Mitianoudis and Tania Stathaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTIVE IMAGE FUSION USING ICA BASES Nikolaos Mitianoudis and Tania Stathaki Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ London, UK ABSTRACT Image fusion can be viewed as a process trained using Independent Component Analysis (ICA) for image fusion has been high- lighted recently

Mitianoudis, Nikos

4

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

5

Tania N. Ullah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the measurement science to provide real-time energy data for various end-uses within residential buildings, including optimization of sensing ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Usina Sao Joao | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sao Joao Sao Joao Jump to: navigation, search Name Usina Sao Joao Place Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Ethanol and biomass eletricity producer References Usina Sao Joao[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Usina Sao Joao is a company located in Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil . References ↑ "Usina Sao Joao" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Usina_Sao_Joao&oldid=352671" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

7

Sao Pedro Energia S A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energia S A Jump to: navigation, search Name Sao Pedro Energia S.A. Place Brazil Sector Hydro Product Brasil PCH's special purpose vehicle for Sao Pedro Small Hydro Plant....

8

Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger: Energy Resources Niger: Energy Resources (Redirected from ECOWAS Gateway-Niger) Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":16,"lon":8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

AMF Deployment, Niamey, Niger, West Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Africa West Africa Niamey Deployment AMF Home Niamey Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments RADAGAST Website Rainfall Record (PDF) Publications List, (PDF) Experiment Planning RADAGAST Proposal Outreach Fact Sheets RADAGAST (PDF) Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa (PDF) Posters AMF Poster, French Version We're Going to Sample the Sky in Africa! News Campaign Images AMMA International News AMF Deployment, Niamey, Niger, West Africa In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility is collecting cloud and atmospheric property measurements from a location near the airport in Niamey, Niger, West Africa. Main Site: 13° 28' 39.15" N, 2° 10' 27.62" E Altitude: 205 meters Ancillary Site: 13° 31' 19.14" N, 2° 37' 56.46" E Altitude: 228.29 meters In January 2006, the second deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF)

10

Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger: Energy Resources Niger: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":16,"lon":8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Agro Industrias do Vale do Sao Francisco | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale do Sao Francisco Place Juazeiro, Bahia, Brazil Zip 48903-970 Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Juazeiro, Bahia. Coordinates -9.439989, -40.504429 Loading...

12

PRESSURE PREDICTION AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING IN THE DEEPWATER NIGER DELTA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mechanisms that cause overpressure can be broadly classified into two categories: loading and unloading. This study looks at eight wells from the deepwater Niger (more)

GOODWYNE, OLAR,KAMAL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Niger - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Africa World. Rank . Niger: Production: 0.0220 , 0.0331 , 0.0496 , 0.1433 , 0.1653 , 0.1664 , 0.1367 ...

14

Sao Tome and Principe: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sao Tome and Principe: Energy Resources Sao Tome and Principe: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":1,"lon":7,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

SBAC-PAD'2000 12th Symposium on Computer Architecture and High Performance Computing -S~ao Pedro -SP 83  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SBAC-PAD'2000 12th Symposium on Computer Architecture and High Performance Computing - S~ao Pedro Architecture and High Performance Computing - S~ao Pedro - SP -hard optimization problems

Cruz, Frederico

16

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 9 Niger Seed Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 9 Niger Seed Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Niger Seed Oil from the b

17

Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.  

SciTech Connect

Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Gladden, John Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Records Annual Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses, or AMMA, project. During the 12-month experiment at the airport in Niamey, researchers used a portable atmospheric laboratory, airplanes, and satellites to collect information about clouds, aerosols, and solar and terrestrial energy in the skies above the site. Measurements obtained

19

Oil enclave economy and sexual liaisons in Nigeria's Niger Delta region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the intersection of oil enclave economy and the phenomenon of sexual liaisons in Nigerias Niger Delta region. The particular focus of this (more)

Gandu, Yohanna Kagoro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bill Healy & Tania Ullah Energy and Environment Division ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Combined Solar/Geothermal Heat Pump Systems; Multisplit heat pump with minimal duct system; ... 34. Slinky geothermal loop. Questions?

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expression profiles. Mol. Genet. Genomics 279:Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus2006. Aspergillusnigergenomics:past,presentandinto

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Niger UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

23

Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

Sparks, Donald L.

24

Intentional Islanded Operation of Converter Fed Microgrids Charles K. Sao, Student Member, IEEE, and Peter W. Lehn, Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Intentional Islanded Operation of Converter Fed Microgrids Charles K. Sao, Student Member, IEEE microgrid and proposes a control scheme to regulate its voltage and frequency. The model, which is formulated in an instantaneously synchro- nized reference frame, shows that the microgrid voltage depends

Lehn, Peter W.

25

SAO network analysis of patents for technology trends identification: a case study of polymer electrolyte membrane technology in proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper suggests a method for Subject---Action---Object (SAO) network analysis of patents for technology trends identification by using the concept of function. The proposed method solves the shortcoming of the keyword-based approach to identification ... Keywords: Actor network theory, C63, C82, Co-word analysis, Function, Patent analysis, Patent mining, Technology Subject-Action-Object (SAO), Technology trends analysis

Sungchul Choi; Janghyeok Yoon; Kwangsoo Kim; Jae Yeol Lee; Cheol-Han Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

27

Identifying rapidly evolving technological trends for R&D planning using SAO-based semantic patent networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patents constitute an up-to-date source of competitive intelligence in technological development; thus, patent analysis has been a vital tool for identifying technological trends. Patent citation analysis is easy to use, but fundamentally has two main ... Keywords: C63, C82, Natural language processing (NLP), Patent mining, Patent network, Research and development (R&D) trend, Semantic patent similarity, Subject-action-object (SAO) structures

Janghyeok Yoon; Kwangsoo Kim

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

An Economic Analysis of Research and Technology Transfer of Millet, Sorghum, and Cowpeas in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper has primarily been funded by the Food Security in Africa Cooperative Agreement (DAN-1190-A-00-4092-00) between Michigan State University and the United States Agency for International Development and has received supplementary funding from the Government of Belgium. The work was carried out by the International Service for National Agricultural Research and the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique du Niger under contracts with Michigan State University with the supervision of Philip Pardey and Eric Crawford. * Research Policies and System Strategies Program, ISNAR ** Dpartement de Recherches en Economie Rurale, INRAN ii

Cowpeas In Niger; Valentina Mazzucato; Samba Ly; Carl Liedholm; Michael T. Weber

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Characterization of a polyketide synthase in Aspergillus niger whose product is a precursor for both dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin and naphtho-?-pyrone.  

SciTech Connect

The genome sequencing of the fungus Aspergillus niger, an industrial workhorse, uncovered a large cache of genes encoding enzymes thought to be involved in the production of secondary metabolites yet to be identified. Identification and structural characterization of many of these predicted secondary metabolites are hampered by their low concentration relative to the known A. niger metabolites such as the naphtho-?-pyrone family of polyketides. We deleted a nonreducing PKS gene in A. niger strain ATCC 11414, a daughter strain of A. niger ATCC strain 1015 whose genome was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. This PKS encoding gene is a predicted ortholog of alb1 from Aspergillus fumigatus which is responsible for production of YWA1, a precursor of fungal DHN melanin. Our results show that the A. niger alb1 PKS is responsible for the production of the polyketide precursor for DHN melanin biosynthesis. Deletion of alb1 elimnates the production of major metabolites, naphtho-?-pyrones. The generation of an A. niger strain devoid of naphtho-?-pyrones will greatly facilitate the elucidation of cryptic biosynthetic pathways in this organism.

Chiang, Yi Ming; Meyer, Kristen M.; Praseuth , Michael; Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mauritius Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Reunion Rwanda Saint Helena Sao Tome and Principe ...

32

On farm yield and water use response of pearl millet to different management practices in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R.Br.] production under subsistence farmer management on the sandy soils of southwestern Niger is faced with many challenges, including declining soil fertility, highly variable and scarce rainfall and poor resource base of the peasant farmers in the region. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of management to increase yield and water use efficiency of pearl millet grown on two farmers fields in Niger during two growing seasons, 2003 and 2004. The management practices tested were: 1) Five manure treatments (no manure, transported manure, current corralling, a year after corralling, and two years after corralling); 2) The microdose technology (20 kg di-ammonium phosphate ha-1, and 20 kg di-ammonium phosphate ha-1 + 10 kg urea ha-1); and lastly, 3) Three different pearl millet cultivars (Heini Kirei, Zatib, and ICMV IS 89305). In both growing seasons, manure had the greatest effect on the yield and water use of pearl millet at both sites. In 2003 grain yields were 389 kg ha-1 in the NM treatment and 1495 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment at Banizoumbou whereas at Bagoua, the NM treatment had 423 kg ha-1 vs. 995 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment. In 2004, the NM treatment at Banizoumbou had 123 kg ha-1 grain yield and the C0 treatment had 957 kg ha-1 whereas at Bagoua the NM treatment had 506 kg ha-1 vs. 1152 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment. Residual effects of manure led to grain yields in the C1 and C2 treatments which were more than twice as high as in the NM treatment. The improved cultivars were generally superior for grain yields, whereas the local landrace was superior for straw yields at both sites. Root zone drainage was decreased by between 50 to 100 mm, and water use increased by the same amount in the current corrals at the two sites during the two growing seasons. Increased water use under corralling and presence of residual profile moisture at the end of each of the two seasons suggested that water did not limit pearl millet production at the two sites.

Manyame, Comfort

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger: Meteorology and thermodynamic variables  

SciTech Connect

An overview is presented of the meteorological and thermodynamic data obtained during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. RADAGAST (Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB data and AMMA STations), combined data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport with broadband satellite data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on Meteosat-8. The experiment was conducted in collaboration with the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. The focus in this paper is on the variations through the year of key surface and atmospheric variables. The seasonal advance and retreat of the InterTropical Front (ITF) and the seasonal changes in near-surface variables and precipitation in 2006 are discussed and contrasted with the behavior in 2005 and with long-term averages. Observations from the AMF at Niamey airport are used to document the evolution of near-surface variables and of the atmosphere above the site. There are large seasonal changes in these variables, from the arid and dusty conditions typical of the dry season to the much moister and more cloudy wet season accompanying the arrival and intensification of the West African monsoon. Back trajectories show the origin of the air sampled at Niamey and profiles for selected case studies from rawinsondes and from a MicroPulse Lidar at the AMF site reveal details of typical atmospheric structures. Radiative fluxes and divergences are discussed in the second part of this overview and the subsequent papers in this special section explore other aspects of the measurements and of the associated modeling.

Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Settle, Jeff; Allan, R. P.; White, H. E.; Lamb, Peter J.; Lele, M.; Turner, David D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Miller, Mark

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earths radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Programs Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences  

SciTech Connect

Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

REGION-BASED IMAGE FUSION USING A COMBINATORY CHEBYSHEV-ICA METHOD Zaid Omar, Nikolaos Mitianoudis and Tania Stathaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGION-BASED IMAGE FUSION USING A COMBINATORY CHEBYSHEV-ICA METHOD Zaid Omar, Nikolaos Mitianoudis7 2AZ United Kingdom ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to provide an algorithm for image fusion important features in the input image and subsequently apply the different fusion meth- ods according

Mitianoudis, Nikolaos

38

High resolution sequence stratigraphic and reservoir characterization studies of D-07, D-08 and E-01 sands, Block 2 Meren field, offshore Niger Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meren field, located offshore Niger Delta, is one of the most prolific oil-producing fields in the Niger Delta. The upper Miocene D-07, D-08 and E-01 oil sands comprise a series of stacked hydrocarbon reservoirs in Block 2 of Meren field. These reservoir sandstones were deposited in offshore to upper shoreface environments. Seven depositional facies were identified in the studied interval, each with distinct lithology, sedimentary structures, trace fossils, and wire-line log character. The dominant lithofacies are (1) locally calcite-cemented highly-bioturbated, fine-grained sandstones, (middle to lower shoreface facies); (2) cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained well-sorted sandstones (upper shoreface facies); (3) horizontal to sub-horizontal laminated, very-fine- to fine-grained sandstone (delta front facies); (4) massive very-fine- to fine-grained poorly-sorted sandstone (delta front facies); (5) muddy silt- to fine-grained wavy-bedded sandstone (lower shoreface facies); (6) very-fine- to fine-grained sandy mudstone (lower shoreface facies); and (7) massive, silty shales (offshore marine facies). Lithofacies have distinct mean petrophysical properties, although there is overlap in the range of values. The highest quality reservoir deposits are cross-bedded sands that were deposited in high-energy upper shoreface environments. Calcite cements in lower shoreface facies significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Integration of core and wire-line log data allowed porosity and permeability to be empirically determined from bulk density. The derived equation indicated that bulk density values could predict 80% of the variance in core porosity and permeability values. Three parasequence sets were interpreted, including one lower progradational and two upper retrogradational parasequence sets. The progradational parasequence set consists of upward-coarsening delta front to upper shoreface facies, whereas the upward-fining retrogradational parasequence sets are composed of middle to lower shoreface deposits overlain by offshore marine shales. The limited amount of core data and the relatively small area of investigation place serious constraints on stratigraphic interpretations. Two possible sequence stratigraphic interpretations are presented. The first interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a highstand systems tract overlain by a transgressive systems tract. A lowstand systems tract is restricted to an incised valley fill at the southeastern end of the study area. The alternate interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a falling stage systems tract overlain by transgressive systems tract.

Esan, Adegbenga Oluwafemi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Pages that link to "Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

links) Agrenco Bio Energia A B E ( links) Agroerg Agroenergia ( links) Algae Biotecnologia ( links) Alupar Investimento S A formerly known as Alusa...

40

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_2-22_Waste_Management_Symposium_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asset Revitalization Initiative Goals, Task Force, and Deliverables Tania Smith, DOE-EM ARI Task Force Leader February 2013 ARI Mission The Asset Revitalization Initiative (ARI) is...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Novel Effects on the Fracture Strength of Silicon Wafers for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Novel Effects on the Fracture Strength of Silicon Wafers for the Photovoltaic Industry. Author(s), Tania...

42

Science Afternoon Topic Areas - Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Focus on Color and Perception. NIST scientist: Maritoni Litorja. Focus on Solar Energy. NIST scientists: William Healey; Tania Ullah; Brian Dougherty ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Study of Nanocrystalline -Al2O3 Produced by High-Pressure Compaction Tania M. H. Costa,, Marcia R. Gallas,*, Edilson V. Benvenutti, and Joa~o A. H. da Jornada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing trapped water and hydroxylated internal surfaces, which confirms a proposed model for "cold trapped water. It was clear from this model that the adsorbed water plays an important role spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was conducted

Gallas, Márcia Russman

44

SAO/NASA ADS Help Pages December 22, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in them. When you enter multiple search terms, the default query will look for all terms. The scoring Searching The search software recognizes a year when entered as YYYY in the search terms. You can use- liographic record will fulfill a query only if the search term(s) entered in the field are found

Liske, Jochen

45

Niger - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

46

Maa-Bara : catalyzing change in Nigeria's Niger delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can architecture catalyze economic growth? This thesis serves as a design contribution to the war against poverty by proving that small-scale architectural interventions can propagate large-scale economic growth. It ...

Okiomah, Ogheneruno E. (Ogheneruno Elo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Agro Industrial Taruma | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Agro Industrial Taruma Place Sao Pedro do Turvo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 18940-000 Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Sao Pedro do Turvo, Sao...

48

HQ Human Resources - Points of Contact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HQ Human Resources - Points of Contact HQ Human Resources - Points of Contact HQ Human Resources - Points of Contact Name Division Phone Room # Email Address ARPA-E Burkley, Tania Executive Resources 202-586-7657 4E-084 Tania.Burkley@hq.doe.gov Powell, NiCole HR Operations 202-287-5252 4E-084 Nicole.Powell@hq.doe.gov Adams, Shelia HR Operations (Benefits,Retirement, OWCP) 202-586-3097 GM-169 Sheila.Adams@hq.doe.gov Peggy Robinson Labor and Employee Relations 202-586-2591 8E-092 Peggy.Robinson@hq.doe.gov ARRA Burkey Tania Executive Resources 202-586-7657 4E-084 Tania.Burkley@hq.doe.gov Coates, Ina HR Operations 202-586-6618 4E-084 Ina.Coates@hq.doe.gov Hawkins, Renee HR Operations (Benefits,Retirement, OWCP) 202-586-2163 GM-169 Renee.Hawkins@hq.doe.gov BPA Matthews-Williams, Kimberly Executive Resources 202-586-9844 4E-084 Kimberly.Matthews-Williams@hq.doe.gov

49

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 01 au 07 octobre 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

businesses get their start. A new school of thought in China (By Austin Ramzy) : Science and engineering aren Graham Snowdon) : Can Spain survive austerity; Chávez faces Venezuela's voters; when the drugs don't work. International news Mooncakes, China's traditional festive gift, are getting a makeover (by Tania Branigan

Rennes, Université de

50

Israel Journal of Chemistry Vol. 41 2001 pp. 105110 *Authortowhomcorrespondenceshouldbeaddressed.E-mail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal removed from a mine in Illinois (No. 6 coal) with a L2 MS spectrum obtained from the analysis Distributions on Harbor Sediments and Coals J. SEB GILLETTE,a UPAL GHOSH,b TANIA B. MAHAJAN,a RICHARD N. ZARE are largely associated with coal-derived particles and other carbonaceous environments. PAH distributions

Zare, Richard N.

51

og Ris Report No. 388 Ris National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN GREENLAND IN 1977 A. Aarkrog and J. Lippert ABSTRACT Measurements of fallout radioactivity in Greenland, Denmark #12;INK DESCRIPTORS [0] DEER DIET ENVIRONMENT FISHES FOOD CHAINS GLOBAL FALLOUT GREENLAND PLANTS and the Faroes the fallout levels increased similarly from 1976 to 1977. #12;- 7 - Tania i . i . l . stroatiaw-90

52

MATERIALS PROCESSING FUNDAMENTALS: II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Deodoro Trani Capocchi, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politecnica de Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo SP-

53

USAID West Africa Climate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Africa Climate Program West Africa Climate Program Jump to: navigation, search Name USAID West Africa Climate Program Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Background analysis Website http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/ Country Ghana, Togo, Benin, Senegal, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Liberia, Gambia, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone, Mauritania, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Chad, Sao Tome and Principe, Cape Verde Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Western Africa

54

External costs of oil and gas exploration in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to investigate the phenomenal impact of oil and gas exploration on the host communities, with a central focus (more)

Amaefule, Ezewuchi Fidelis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Impact of Launching Surgery at the District Level in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of this training program for generalist physiciansDescription of surgical training program Students chosen toSupervision of these training programs in the different

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dengue Virus Type 3 Adaptive Changes during Epidemics in Sao Jose de Rio Preto, Brazil, 20062007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global dengue virus spread in tropical and sub-tropical regions has become a major international public health concern. It is evident that DENV genetic diversity plays a significant role in the immunopathology of the disease ...

Villabona-Arenas, Christian Julian

57

Chemical and electrochemical properties of an OxisolUltisol transition in the state of Sa~o Paulo, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Brazil Aline R. Coscionea,*, Antonio C. Moniza,1 , Daniel Vidal Pe´rezb , Ma´rcia M.C. Ferreirac , Ota^mico de Campinas, 13001-970, Campinas-SP, Brazil b Centro Nacional de Pesquisas de Solos, EMBRAPA, 22460-000, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil c Instituto de Qui´mica-Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13084

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

58

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

59

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

60

BlueSol Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BlueSol Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name BlueSol - Solar Energy Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04551-060 Sector Solar Product Sao Paulo-based sole distributor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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61

Bio Energias Renov veis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renov veis Jump to: navigation, search Name Bio Energias Renovveis Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04551-060 Sector Biomass Product Brazilian-based biomass...

62

Abengoa Bioenergia Brasil | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brasil Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04551-060 Product Brazilian-based ethanol producer, subsidiary of Spanish Abengoa Bioenergia SL. References Abengoa Bioenergia...

63

Agua Paulista de Geracao de Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Agua Paulista de Geracao de Energia Place Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Hydro Product Sao Paulo-based subsidiary company of Grupo Bertin, developing small hydro...

64

IPE Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name IPE Energy Place Barueri, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Hydro, Services Product Sao Paulo-based hydro turbine and components, builderengineering...

65

Eolica Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Eolica Industrial Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 01020-901 Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind turbine steel towers and...

66

Alvorada do Oeste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Alvorada do Oeste Place Santo Anastacio, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Santo Anastacio, Sao Paulo....

67

ADM Cabrera JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name ADM Cabrera JV Place Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and Grupo Cabrera have formed a...

68

Agroindustrial Oeste Paulista | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Agroindustrial Oeste Paulista Place Monte Aprazivel, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 15150-000 Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Monte Aprazivel, Sao...

69

Geracao de Energia Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Geracao de Energia Ltda Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind project developer. References Geracao de...

70

Bioenergy Geradora de Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Bioenergy - Geradora de Energia Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 1456010 Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind project developer. References...

71

Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Algae Biotecnologia Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil-based 2nd generation ethanol producer. References Algae...

72

Eurus Campo dos Ventos Energias Renovaveis Ltda | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Eurus Campo dos Ventos Energias Renovaveis Ltda Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind project developer. References Eurus ...

73

Guia para a Avaliao do Risco Ambiental de Organismos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Flora faneroga^- mica da Ilha do Cardoso (Sa~o Paulo, Brasil). Champion Papel e Celulose, Sa~o Paulo, pp

Parrott, Wayne

74

DENUSA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name DENUSA Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Ethanol and biomass eletricity producer References DENUSA1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

75

Bioenergia do Brasil formerly Centralcool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Luclia, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 1780-000 Product Centralcool is a bioethanol producer and project developer located in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil....

76

ABEEolica | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ABEEolica Jump to: navigation, search Name ABEEolica Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 1136001 Sector Wind energy Product Brazil's wind energy association. References...

77

ERSA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name ERSA Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biomass, Hydro, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Company invests in small-hydro projects,...

78

Summit Ventures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Summit Ventures Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product Brazil based advisory and consulting company, focused on wind,...

79

Emulating the fast-start swimming performance of the Chain Pickerel (Esox niger) using a mechanical fish design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mean maximum start-up accelerations and velocities achieved by the fast-start specialist, northern pike, are reported at 120 ms-2 and 4 ms-1, respectively (Harper and Blake, 1990). In this thesis, a simple mechanical system ...

Watts, Matthew Nicholas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Characterization and space/time downscaling of the inundation extent over the Inner Niger Delta using GIEMS and MODIS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our objective is to develop downscaling methodologies to obtain long time record of inundation extent at high spatial resolution, based on the existing low spatial resolution results of the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellite dataset. In ...

Filipe Aires; Fabrice Papa; Catherine Prigent; Jean-Franois Crtaux; Muriel Berge-Nguyen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

82

A geospatial analysis of market integration: the case of the 2004/5 food crisis in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Market Information System (SIMA) of Nigerinfrastructure and information may inhibit market integra-the absence of information about how markets are related and

Shin, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Agrenco Bio Energia A B E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agrenco Bio Energia A B E Jump to: navigation, search Name Agrenco Bio-Energia(A.B.E) Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Agrenco Bio-Energia, Sau-Paulo-based, subsidiary of...

84

Effects of selective logging on tropical forest tree growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY 12203,Albany, New York, USA. CENA, University of Sao Paulo, SaoResearch Center, State University of New York at Albany,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Corona Bioenergia SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SA Jump to: navigation, search Name Corona Bioenergia SA Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04543-011 Sector Biomass Product Brazil based company which developed a biomass...

86

Areva Koblitz | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Koblitz Jump to: navigation, search Name Areva Koblitz Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 01419-001 Product The company operates as a generator and co-generator of energy with...

87

Renova Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Renova Energia Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04571-011 Sector Hydro, Wind energy Product Brazilian-based project developer company, formed by the fund...

88

Plan Your Day: Use Our Learning Neighborhoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

architect Lina Bo Bardi drew up the plans for what is now a paramount city landmark. 8 Sao Paulo Museum

Milchberg, Howard

89

Proceedings of IMAC XXXI Conference & Exposition on Structural Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Brennan Departamento de EngenhariaMecanica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Ilha Solteira, 15385-000 Sao Paulo, Brazil

90

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Dan Binkley Jose Luiz Stape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paulo, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil E. N. Takahashi Votorantim Celulose e Papel, P.O. Box 94, 12300

Binkley, Dan

91

A twin-plot approach to determine nutrient limitation and potential productivity in Eucalyptus plantations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Votorantim Celulose e Papel, Rod.SP 255, 14210-000 Luis Antonio, Sao Paulo, Brazil Received 6 July 2005

Binkley, Dan

92

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_2-22_Waste_Management_Symposium_-_T._Smith_ARI_Creating_a_2020_DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revitalization Initiative Revitalization Initiative Goals, Task Force, and Deliverables Tania Smith, DOE-EM ARI Task Force Leader February 2013 ARI Mission The Asset Revitalization Initiative (ARI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-wide effort to advance the beneficial reuse of its unique and diverse mix of assets, including land, facilities, infrastructure, equipment, technologies, natural resources, and a highly skilled workforce. ARI promotes a more efficient business environment to encourage collaboration between public and private resources. This will maximize benefits to achieve energy and environmental goals, as well as to stimulate and diversify regional economies. 4/4/2013 2 ARI Vision for the DOE Complex * Site operations are conducted in a sustainable manner, facilities and transit are powered by clean

93

Aut  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology enabling manufacturers to offer these models at the same price as gasoline-powered vehicles. Similarly, by mid-2008, the state of Sao Paulo expects to launch...

94

Comprehensive Comparison of Hardware Performance of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used as a part of a digital signature used ... low-level tool options; the same library of basic ... Y. Frankel, 5th International Conference, ISC 2002, Sao ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

"Os franciscanos da reconciliao e o ecumenismo na arquidiocese de So Paulo (1977-1994)".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the present work is to analyse the ecumenical task performed by Franciscan Friars and Sisters of Atonement in Sao Paulo City in (more)

Edison Minami

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Agroerg Agroenergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 01452 001 Product Investment vehicle for Brazilian sugar and ethanol projects, created by former Agriculture Minister Roberto Rodrigues. References...

97

DOE/EIS-0279-SA-01 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-06 Supplement Analysis Savannah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Savannah River Operations Office Aiken, South Carolina March 2013 DOEEIS-0279-SA-O 1 and DOEEIS-0218-SA-06 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SPENT...

98

Polo de Biocombustiveis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Polo de Biocombustiveis Place Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biofuels Product The Polo de biocombustiveis develops strategies to use alternatives sources...

99

Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the FIESP Energy Conference...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poneman FIESP Energy Conference Keynote Remarks Monday, August 15, 2011 Sao Paulo, Brazil Introduction Bom dia. Thank you, Mr. Xavier, for the kind introduction. And thank you,...

100

Proeng | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proeng Jump to: navigation, search Name Proeng Place Jaboticabal, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14870-280 Sector Biomass Product Jaboticabal based engineering company, which develops...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Determination of Mechanical and Optical Properties of Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp by NIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Associaca~o Brasileira Te´cnica de Celulose e Papel: Sa~o Paulo, Brazil, 535­545. P. Fardim et al.278 #12

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

102

Viralcool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Viralcool Place Brazil Product This company operates the 90m liter Viralcool I bioethanol plant located in Pitangueiras in the state of Sao Paulo. References Viralcool1...

103

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergia do Brasil (formerly Centralcool) + , Energy Company + , Centralcool is a bioethanol producer and project developer located in the state of Sao Paulo + , Brazil. + ,...

104

Reunion Engenharia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 06529-195 Sector Biomass Product Sao Paulo based engineering company, which develops ethanol ang biomass plants. References Reunion Engenharia1 LinkedIn Connections...

105

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

106

Uncertainty analysis of the mud infill prediction of the Olokola LNG terminal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For a proposed liquefied natural gas export facility, Olokola LNG (OKLNG), located at the western limits of the Niger Delta in Nigeria a 10 km (more)

Bakker, S.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Moving Images Against The Current: The Aesthetics and Geopolitics of (Im)mobility in Contemporary Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the labor force at the uranium mine in Arlit. 143 SimonesThe French built a uranium mine at Arlit in Niger during the

Bayraktar, Nilgun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nidulans , A. niger Soil, wood rot Cellulomonas fimi Soil Agaricus bisporus Compost Cellvibrio japonicus Soil Coprinus truncorum Soil, compost Cytophaga hutchinsonii ...

109

Die Jontophorese der mit medikamentö  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flora, 131. N.F. 31, 87--112, 1936. Die bevorzugte Aufnahme saurer Farbstoffe bei hoher Wasserstoffionen- konzentration der die Zellen yon Asperffillus niger...

110

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include extended operations in the diverse environments of Niamey, Niger and Germany's Black Forest. Capitalizing on the AMF's continuous record of vertically pointing 95 GHz...

111

DNN Cover(pg1).indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Namibia Nepal Netherlands Nicaragua Niger Nigeria North Korea Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal...

112

Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 647667 Retroflections of the North Brazil Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 647­667 Retroflections of the North Brazil Current during February, University of Sa~o Paulo, Prac-a do Oceanogra´fico, 191, Cidade Univerista´ria, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil Received 3 January 2005 Abstract Retroflections of the North Brazil Current (NBC) are examined using observational

113

Organisation of the soil mantle in tropical southeastern Brazil (Serra do Mar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Organisation of the soil mantle in tropical southeastern Brazil (Serra do Mar) in relation-900 Sao Paulo ­ SP, Brazil And INRA-ENSA. Laboratoire des sciences du sol 65 rue de St Brieuc 35042 RennesORSTOM - Instituto de geociencias - DGG ­ USP C.P. 11 348 Cep: 05 422-970 Sao Paulo ­ SP, Brazil Correspondence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

115

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil^ncias da Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, Rua do Lago 562, Cep: 05508-080, Sa~o Paulo, SP, Brazil b Laboratoire Geologia, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000, Ouro Pre^to, MG, Brazil Received 5 April 2001

Bascou, Jérôme

116

Energias Renovaveis do Brasil | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovaveis do Brasil Energias Renovaveis do Brasil Jump to: navigation, search Name Energias Renovaveis do Brasil Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 5433002 Sector Biomass Product Company intending to develop 10 integrated biomass/pellet manufacturing plants in Brazil with plans to develop more over the next five years. References Energias Renovaveis do Brasil[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Energias Renovaveis do Brasil is a company located in Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ ""opensource"+AND+subject%3A"brazil" Energias Renovaveis do Brasil" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energias_Renovaveis_do_Brasil&oldid=344797

117

Sykue Bioenergya | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sykue Bioenergya Sykue Bioenergya Jump to: navigation, search Name Sykue Bioenergya Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04536-001 Sector Biomass Product Sykue Bionergya is a company that invests in Biomass Generation using elephant grass/napier as feedstock. They plan to build 10 plants, producing 300MW by 2011. References Sykue Bioenergya[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sykue Bioenergya is a company located in Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "Sykue Bioenergya" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sykue_Bioenergya&oldid=351969" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

118

Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso ABPPM | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso ABPPM Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso ABPPM Jump to: navigation, search Name Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso (ABPPM) Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04635-020 Product Brazil-based jatropha producers association. References Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso (ABPPM)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso (ABPPM) is a company located in Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhao Manso (ABPPM)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Associacao_Brasileira_dos_Produtores_de_Pinhao_Manso_ABPPM&oldid=342380

119

Effects of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and Stratospheric Semiannual Oscillation on Tracer Transport in the Upper Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using satellite observations together with a chemistryclimate model (CCM), the effect of the stratospheric semiannual oscillation (SAO) and quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the equatorial double peak in observed CH4 and NO2 is reexamined. It ...

Jianchuan Shu; Wenshou Tian; Dingzhu Hu; Jiankai Zhang; Lin Shang; Hongying Tian; Fei Xie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Aralco | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aralco Jump to: navigation, search Name Aralco Place Santo Antnio, Brazil Zip 16130-000 SP Product Sao Paulo based ethanol producer. References Aralco1 LinkedIn Connections...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Effect of Parents' Occupation on Child Labor and School Attendance in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Child Work in Urban Brazil? Texto para Discussao no.and School Attendance in Brazil. University of Sao Paulo.Market Fluctuations in Urban Brazil, World Development 31(

Parikh, Anokhi; Sadoulet, Elisabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Porto Velho, RO 78900-000, Brazil. P. Artaxo, L. S. Borma,tropical forest to savanna in Brazil Humberto R. da Rocha, 1RIMA Editora, Sao Carlos, Brazil. Oliveira, R. , et al. (

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Material worlds : [de]constructing the ethos of concrete in Mumbai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What can a building material tell us about a city? As the most widely used structural building material in the world, reinforced cement concrete shapes the urban form of several of our largest megacities Sao Paulo, Cairo, ...

Shah, Priyanka (Priyanka Dinesh)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Santa Cruz S A Alcool e A ucar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14820-000 Sector Biomass Product Santa Cruz, producer of ethanol from sugarcane and energy from biomass. References Santa Cruz S.A. Alcool e...

125

Dreen Re Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Dreen Re-Energy Place So Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Hydro, Wind energy Product Brazil based operating company, Dreen is active as a developer...

126

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil ...

Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Anil Kumar; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Soil Moisture Modeling Based on Multiyear Observations in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple soil moisture models useful for drought monitoring and climate change studies were proposed, based on 4-yr ground observations of root-zone soil moisture in Sahelian Niger. One is a water balance model that calculates soil moisture ...

Y. Yamaguchi; M. Shinoda

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Comparison of the Water Budgets between Clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field campaigns, the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Tropical Warm PoolInternational Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), took place in 2006 near Niamey, Niger, and Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, providing extensive ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Paul Ciesielski; Nick Guy; Harold Pierce; Toshihisa Matsui

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities ...

Williams, Earle R.

131

ARM - Instrument - irt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Niger OLI M1 Browse Data Oliktok Point, Alaska PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA Contact(s) Victor Morris (509) 372-6144...

132

ARM - Instrument - mwrp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Niamey, Niger PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA...

133

Diurnal and Seasonal Cycles of Cloud Occurrences, Types, and Radiative Impact over West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the occurrence and type of clouds observed in West Africa, a subject that has been neither much documented nor quantified. It takes advantage of data collected above Niamey, Niger, in 2006 with the Atmospheric Radiation ...

Dominique Bouniol; Fleur Couvreux; Pierre-Honor Kamsu-Tamo; Madeleine Leplay; Franoise Guichard; Florence Favot; Ewan J. OConnor

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adieu to Niger, Guten Tag to Germany Bookmark and Share The AMF decommissioning team poses for a group photo at the AMF site near the airport in Niamey. The AMF decommissioning...

135

Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities (AMMA) 2006 special ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Thomas Rickenbach; Nick Guy; Earle Williams

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

PUBLICATIONS RECORD The University of British Columbia -Department of Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imparting substances in biologically treated pulp mill effluent using Aspergillus niger fungal biomass and requirements for jobs. Water Science and Technology, 59(4): 745-753. 61. Geng, Z., E.R. Hall and P. Bérubé

Froese, Thomas

137

Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from ...

Y. Fouquart; B. Bonnel; M. Chaoui Roquai; R. Santer; A. Cerf

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PU Kenya KE Lesotho LT Liberia LI Libya LY Madagascar MA Malawi MI Mali ML Mauritania MR Mauritius MP Morocco MO Mozambique MZ Namibia WA Niger NG Nigeria NI Reunion ...

139

Interactions between the Land Surface and Mesoscale Rainfall Variability during HAPEX-Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel (HAPEX-Sahel) was designed to investigate landatmosphere interactions in the semiarid conditions of southwest Niger. During the intensive observation period (IOP) in 1992, a pronounced ...

Christopher M. Taylor; Frdrique Sad; Thierry Lebel

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

ARM - Niamey News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RADAGAST Proposal Outreach Fact Sheets RADAGAST (PDF) Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa (PDF) Posters AMF Poster, French Version We're Going to Sample the Sky in Africa News...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Agrest Alcool Acucar e Levedura | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agrest Alcool Acucar e Levedura Agrest Alcool Acucar e Levedura Jump to: navigation, search Name Agrest Alcool, Acucar e Levedura Place Espirito Santo do Turvo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 18935 000 Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Espirito Santo do Turvo, Sao Paulo. References Agrest Alcool, Acucar e Levedura[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Agrest Alcool, Acucar e Levedura is a company located in Espirito Santo do Turvo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "[ Agrest Alcool, Acucar e Levedura]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Agrest_Alcool_Acucar_e_Levedura&oldid=341885" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

142

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (MMcf)" Working Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_sao_sak_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_sao_sak_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

143

Primer_Summer_2011_061011_v2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Volume 8 Issue 3 1 Volume 8 Issue 3 For decades, citric acid has been produced on a commercial- scale basis with the help of the fungus Aspergillus niger. Outside industry, A. niger is also known to be involved in the global carbon cycle, and its enzymes can be used to break down plant cell walls and get at the sugars that can in turn be fermented for use as biofuels. "Aspergillus niger is an industrial workhorse for enzymes and small molecules such as organic acids," said Scott Baker of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "We know that this single organism is used for production of organic acids and for enzymes, and it can degrade plant cell wall matter for sugar production. For biofuels it's a highly relevant organism since it's already been

144

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Same Fungus, Different Strains: A Comparative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2011 3, 2011 Same Fungus, Different Strains: A Comparative Genomics Approach for Improved "Green" Chemical Production WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Fungi play key roles in nature and are valued for their great importance in industry. Consider citric acid, a key additive in several foods and pharmaceuticals produced on a large-scale basis for decades with the help of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. While A. niger is an integral player in the carbon cycle, it possesses an arsenal of enzymes that can be deployed in breaking down plant cell walls to free up sugars that can then be fermented and distilled into biofuel, a process being optimized by U.S. Department of Energy researchers. Susannah Tringe Photo: Aspergillus niger conidiospore by Kathie T. Hodges, Cornell.

145

A Search for Earth-size Planets Detection of Transiting Planet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Search for Earth-size Planets STScI!SAO Detection of Transiting Planet Candidates in Kepler Mission Data Peter Tenenbaum For the Kepler Transiting Planet Search Team 2012-June-06 #12;A Search for Earth-size Planets The Kepler Mission A space-based photometer searching for Earth-size exoplanets Uses

Masci, Frank

146

O P I N I O N Ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil: a `midway' strategy for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sugarcane trash for its conversion to fermentable sugars. World Jour- nal Microbiological Biotechnology, 24 Bota^nica, Instituto de Biocie^ncias, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, SP, Brazil, Brazilian Bioethanol, land use, sugar- cane, sustainability Received 4 June 2011 and accepted 8 July 2011 Introduction

DeLucia, Evan H.

147

First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Brazil Eucalyptus Potential Productivity Project: Influence of water, nutrients and stand uniformity on wood production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA e Fibria Celulose, Aracruz, Espirito Santo, Brazil f Veracel Celulose, Eunapolis, Bahia, Brazil g International Paper do Brasil, Mogi Guacu, Sao Paulo, Brazil h Suzano Papel e Celulose, Teixeira de Freitas, Bahia, Brazil i CENIBRA, Ipatinga, Minas

Binkley, Dan

149

Anne Collin Delavaud octobre 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banco Bradesco 302 1 564 60 Osasco (Sao Paolo) Mexique Pemex 144 25 783 1906 Mexico Telefonos de Mexico atteindra, en 2003, 55 étages et 285 mètres de haut. Ce projet de 230 millions $ dépassera la tour Pemex

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

TANANA CHIEFS CONFERENCE 2012 Tribal Overview, Annual Delegate &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston, Texas www.nistm.org/PDF/2010HoustonRegistrationFormHSTNWS.pdf 21st World Energy Congress.wecmontreal2010.ca ARE Green 2010 International Green Energy Council & TDC Events September 15-17, 2010 Washington.eng.iastate.edu/ Biodiesel Congress F.O. Lichts September 22-24, 2010 Mercure Grant Hotel Sao Paulo, Brazil www.agra

Wagner, Diane

151

Control and Power Management of Converter Fed Microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Control and Power Management of Converter Fed Microgrids Charles K. Sao, Member, IEEE, and Peter in parallel in a VSC fed microgrid. Each current controlled VSC in such a microgrid has its own VPD/FQB controller that sets its current references to regulate the voltage and frequency of a common microgrid bus

Lehn, Peter W.

152

Observation of the Diurnal Cycle in the Low Troposphere of West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors give an overview of the diurnal cycle of the low troposphere during 2006 at two different sites, Niamey (Niger) and Nangatchori (Benin). This study is partly based on the first observations of UHF wind profilers ever made in West ...

Marie Lothon; Frdrique Sad; Fabienne Lohou; Bernard Campistron

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Industrial Oil Products Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryIndustrial Oil Products Division2013 Members241 Members as of July 1, 2013Abend, SvenKolb Distribution LtdHedingen, SwitzerlandAbraham, TimothyCargill IncHopkins, MN, USAAkinrinade, FrancisNational Open University, Niger

154

Application of Evapoclimatonomy to Monthly Surface Water Balance Calculations at the HAPEX-Sahel Supersites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a revised verstion of Lettau's evapoclimatonomy model is used to simulate climate in West Africa. The model is applied specifically to the study sites of the HAPEX-Sahel region in Niger, an international regional experiment to study ...

JosA. Marengo; Sharon E. Nicholson; Andrew R. Lare; Bruno A. Monteny; Sylvie Galle

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Potential of Infrared Satellite Data for the Retrieval of Saharan-Dust Optical Depth over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depth of Saharan dust derived from photometric measurements made during the dry season at a Sahelian site (Niamey, Republic of Niger) is compared with METEOSAT-2 radiance in the 10.512.5 ?m channel for different times of the daily cycle. ...

M. Legrand; J. J. Bertrand; M. Desbois; L. Menenger; Y. Fouquart

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Political Ecology of Hydraulic Fracturing for Natural Gas in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[:] shale gas in the US, sand mines in Wisconsin, oil in the Ecuadoran Amazon, oil in the Niger Delta's Marcellus Shale Laura J. Stroup, Ph.D. Dept. of Geography, Texas State University Michael H. Finewood, Ph ! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Scott, Christopher

157

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deltas are the site of significant oil and gas accumulations and extraction as in the Niger, Magdalena rates of wetland loss resulting from ESLR are as high as 100 km2 /yr in the delta. Day et al., 2000 construction on the Volta River. Subsidence in the delta is attributed to the extraction of oil, which provides

New Hampshire, University of

158

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

License Exceptions Supplement No. 1 to Part 740 page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group Nuclear Suppliers Group Argentina X X X Australia X X X X Austria1 X X X Belgium X X X X Brazil X Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Group D [D: 1] [D: 2] [D: 3] [D: 4] Country National Nuclear Chemical & Missile Security Biological

Bernstein, Daniel

160

Tecsis Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecsis Wind Tecsis Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Tecsis Wind Place Sorocaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 18087-220 Sector Wind energy Product Wind blade producer located in Sorocaba, in the state of Sao Paulo. Coordinates -23.506059°, -47.455959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-23.506059,"lon":-47.455959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda. Place Chacara Santo Antonio, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04717-004 Product Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda. is AgCert's Brazilian subsidiary that has several developed CDM projects. References Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda. is a company located in Chacara Santo Antonio, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "Agcert do Brasil Solucoes Ambientais Ltda." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Agcert_do_Brasil_Solucoes_Ambientais_Ltda&oldid=34186

162

Acucar Guarani S A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guarani S A Guarani S A Jump to: navigation, search Name Acucar Guarani S.A. Place Olimpia, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 15400-000 Product Brazilian ethanol and sugar producer located in the city of Olimpia, in the state of Sao Paulo. Coordinates -20.737889°, -48.911159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-20.737889,"lon":-48.911159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

Bioenergia Cogeradora | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeradora Cogeradora Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioenergia Cogeradora Place Sertaozinho, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14.177-970 Sector Biomass Product The subsidiary controls the biomass part of the two sugarcane mills in Sertaozinho, Sao Paulo. Coordinates -21.14043°, -48.005154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.14043,"lon":-48.005154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Antonio Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name Antonio Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda Place ParaÃ-so, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 15825-000 Product Sao Paulo-based bioethanol and sugar producer. Coordinates 47.349857°, 7.987211° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.349857,"lon":7.987211,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Atena Tecnologias em Energia Natural | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atena Tecnologias em Energia Natural Atena Tecnologias em Energia Natural Jump to: navigation, search Name Atena Tecnologias em Energia Natural Place Martinopolis, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Martinopolis, Sao Paulo. Coordinates -22.148564°, -51.170459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.148564,"lon":-51.170459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Ativos T cnicos Ambientais ATA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ativos T cnicos Ambientais ATA Ativos T cnicos Ambientais ATA Jump to: navigation, search Name Ativos Técnicos Ambientais (ATA) Place São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 4575050 Sector Carbon Product The company have activities in the Carbon markets as project developer, project finance and PDD consultant and its located in São Paulo. References Ativos Técnicos Ambientais (ATA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ativos Técnicos Ambientais (ATA) is a company located in São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "[ Ativos Técnicos Ambientais (ATA)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ativos_T_cnicos_Ambientais_ATA&oldid=342405"

167

Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Secience and Technology Centre Secience and Technology Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre Place Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biofuels Product Brazil-based second generation biofuels research centre. References Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre is a company located in Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bioethanol_Secience_and_Technology_Centre&oldid=342806" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

168

Usina Mandu | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usina Mandu Usina Mandu Jump to: navigation, search Name Usina Mandu Place Guaira, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Sao Paulo based ethanol and biomass producer. Coordinates -24.079531°, -54.257519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-24.079531,"lon":-54.257519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Baldin Bioenergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baldin Bioenergia Baldin Bioenergia Jump to: navigation, search Name Baldin Bioenergia Place Pirassununga, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 13630-970 Sector Biomass Product Sao Paulo based ethanol and biomass producer. Coordinates -21.996338°, -47.426999° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.996338,"lon":-47.426999,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

170

Alcoazul | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alcoazul Alcoazul Jump to: navigation, search Name Alcoazul Place Aracatuba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil based ethanol producer located in Aracatuba, Sao Paulo. Coordinates -21.211824°, -50.425614° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.211824,"lon":-50.425614,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Biolins Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biolins Energia Biolins Energia Jump to: navigation, search Name Biolins Energia Place Lins, Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Sao Paulo-based biomass energy producer, part of Grupo Bertin. Coordinates -21.685419°, -49.743749° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.685419,"lon":-49.743749,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Wobben Windpower | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wobben Windpower Wobben Windpower Jump to: navigation, search Name Wobben Windpower Place Sorocaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip Cep 18087-149 Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind turbine producer located in Sorocaba, Sao Paulo Coordinates -23.506059°, -47.455959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-23.506059,"lon":-47.455959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

848 Brazilian Journal of Physics, vol. 33, no. 4, December, 2003 Spherical Tokamak Development in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Brazil G.O. Ludwig, E. Del Bosco, J.G. Ferreira, L.A. Berni, R.M. Oliveira, M.C.R. Andrade, C.S. Shibata 12227-010, S~ao Jos´e dos Campos, SP, Brazil Received on 18 March, 2003. Revised version received on 19 Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. Figure 1. An overall

174

West African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo SWERA-thumb.jpg The SWERA landing page allows for the quick browsing of global data layers.

175

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 [Facility News] 8, 2010 [Facility News] Europeans Keen to Hear About Effects of Dust Using Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. Researcher Xiaohong Liu from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was

176

ARM - Datastreams - rad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsrad Datastreamsrad Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAD Radiation measurements at AMF/Niamey, Niger/S1 Active Dates 2006.01.13 - 2008.12.13 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Radiation Measurements at AMF (RAD) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance Downwelling Longwave Hemispheric Irradiance, Pyrgeometer W/m^2 down_long_hemisp ( time ) Downwelling Pyrgeometer Case Thermistor Resistance Kohms down_long_hemisp_case_resist ( time )

177

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

178

Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resilience (PPCR) Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Tajikistan, Tonga, Yemen, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea

179

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Links | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Links Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo

180

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Background → Design → Implementation →

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-News | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

News News Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Regional News Renewable Energy News Today-West Africa Renewable Energy News Failed to load RSS feed from http://renewableenergy.einnews.com/xml/west-africa/: Error fetching URL: Operation timed out after 5000 milliseconds with 0 bytes received

182

Gateway:ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo West Africa Organizations, Programs, and Tools Countries (15)

183

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

184

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Introduction→ Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4

185

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo The ECOWAS Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) is

186

Energy System and Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo What analysis tools and methods can I use to study my country's energy system? Understanding approaches

187

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Registered Technical and Research Organizations

188

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MICHAEL LIEBREICH, Washington DC, 19 January 2013 TWITTER: @MLiebreich 1 MICHAEL LIEBREICH, Washington DC, 19 January 2013 TWITTER: @MLiebreich 1 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ENERGY ALL-STARS: "WHAT'S OUR ENERGY FUTURE" WASHINGTON DC 19 JANUARY 2013 Michael Liebreich, Chief Executive Bloomberg New Energy Finance Twitter: @MLiebreich MICHAEL LIEBREICH, Washington DC, 19 January 2013 TWITTER: @MLiebreich 2 / / / / ABOUT BLOOMBERG NEW ENERGY FINANCE San Francisco New York Washington DC Sao Paulo Cape Town Sydney Hong Kong New Delhi London Beijing Tokyo Zurich Singapore 200 people: world's leading provider of information on clean energy, water, power and carbon markets MICHAEL LIEBREICH, Washington DC, 19 January 2013 TWITTER: @MLiebreich 3

189

DOE/EIS-0287-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (June 2005)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 -SA-Ol SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS For The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement June 2005 United States Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 DOEÆIS-0287 -SA-O 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction......................................................................................................................... 4 Background......................................................................................................................... 4 Areas of Review.................................................................................................................. 6 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Proposed Waste Treatment Technology.......... .......................................................

190

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide05 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-08-22 14:11 FY2009-jordan Slide05 Science.gov Databases Agriculture & Food * AGRICOLA * Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN) Applied Science & Technologies * DefenseLINK Website * DOT National Transportation Library Integrated Search * DTIC S & T Database * National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway * U.S. Patent & Trademark Office Database Astronomy & Space * NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) * SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) Biology & Nature * NBII National Biological Information Infrastructure Earth & Ocean Sciences * NOAA Photo Library * USGS Publications Warehouse Energy &

191

Slide05 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide05 Slide05 Slide05 Science.gov Databases Agriculture & Food * AGRICOLA * Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN) Applied Science & Technologies * DefenseLINK Website * DOT National Transportation Library Integrated Search * DTIC S & T Database * National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway * U.S. Patent & Trademark Office Database Astronomy & Space * NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) * SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) Biology & Nature * NBII National Biological Information Infrastructure Earth & Ocean Sciences * NOAA Photo Library * USGS Publications Warehouse Energy & Energy Conservation * DOE Information Bridge * Energy Citations

192

Slide23 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide23 Slide23 Slide23 Developing Country Access Afghanistan Guatemala Nigeria Albania Guinea Pakistan Algeria Guinea-Bissau Palestinian Territories (West Bank/ Gaza) Angola Guyana Papua New Guinea Armenia Haiti Paraguay Azerbaijan Honduras Peru Bangladesh Indonesia Philippines Belize Iraq Rwanda Benin Jordan Samoa Bhutan Kenya Sao Tome and Principe Bolivia Kiribati Senegal Burkina Faso Kyrgyzstan Sierra Leone Burundi Lao People's Democratic Republic Solomon Islands Cambodia Lesotho Somalia Cameroon Liberia Sri Lanka Cape Verde Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Swaziland Central African Republic Madagascar Tajikistan Chad Malawi Tanzania, United Republic of Colombia Maldives Thailand Comoros Mali Timor-Leste Congo Marshall Islands Togo Congo, The Democratic Republic of Mauritania Tonga

193

H:\cindy_pratt\doe eis-0287-sa-01.tif  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-SA-Ol -SA-Ol SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS For The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement June 2005 United States Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 DOEÆIS-0287 -SA-O 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction......................................................................................................................... 4 Background......................................................................................................................... 4 Areas of Review.................................................................................................................. 6 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Proposed Waste Treatment Technology.......... .......................................................

194

African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Jump to: navigation, search Name African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Agency/Company /Organization African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Compnay (ABREC) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Website http://www.bidc-ebid.com/en/fo Country Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa References African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF)[1]

195

BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portfolio Portfolio Jump to: navigation, search Name BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://wbcarbonfinance.org/Rou Country Albania, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Honduras, India, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Nicaragua, Niger, Uganda Southern Europe, Eastern Asia, South America, Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, Southern Asia, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Europe, Central America, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References BioFund Projects[1] Background "The BioCarbon Fund provides carbon finance for projects that sequester or conserve greenhouse gases in forests, agro- and other ecosystems. Through

196

National Action Programmes on Desertification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmes on Desertification Programmes on Desertification Jump to: navigation, search Name National Action Programmes on Desertification Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unccd.int/actionpro Country Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

197

CCD drift-scan imaging lunar occultations: a feasible approach for sub-meter class telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A CCD drift-scanning technique for lunar occultation (LO) observations is presented. While this approach has been addressed before by Sturmann (1994) for the case of large telescopes, the technical validity has never been discussed for sub-meter class telescopes. In contrast to Sturmann's scheme, the proposed technique places the CCD in the image plane of the telescope. This does not represent a problem in the case of small telescopes, where the practical angular resolution attainable by LO is not limited by aperture smoothing. Photon-generated charge is read out at millisecond rate on a column-per-column basis, as the diffraction pattern of the occulted star is being tracked. Two LO events (SAO 79031 and SAO 77911) were observed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Data analysis was carried out and no angular diameter the observed stars were resolved. We show, however, that the technique could be useful for close binary detections with small telescopes. A discussion of the limiting resolution and magnitude imposed by our instrumentation is carried out, showing that drift-scanning technique could be extended to 1-2m telescopes for stellar diameter determination purposes. Finally, we point out that the technical demands required by this technique can be easily met by most small professional observatories and advanced amateurs.

O. Fors; J. Nunez; A. Richichi

2001-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and MFRSR Measurements ARM STM 2008 Norfolk, VA Connor Flynn 1 , Annette Koontz 1 , Anne Jefferson 2 , Jim Barnard 1 , Sally McFarlane 1 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder Progress towards ARM DOE 2008 Performance Metric 3 & 4 * Produce and make available new continuous time series of aerosol total column depth, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. * Produce and make available new continuous time series of retrieved dust properties, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. 0 100 200 300 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 ITF movement and surface RH % RH day of year (2006) 0 100 200 300 400 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 day of year wind direction (N = 0, E = 90) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Wind speed m/s 0 100 200 300 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 MFRSR Vo for filter2, Niamey

199

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: cenbio.iee.usp.br/download/publicacoes/SAE_BEST_2010.pdf This paper presents the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project in Brazil, its partners, and the results from the demonstration tests performed in field, as well as the proposals of public policies that were elaborated and are being implemented. The BEST project was implemented in Sao Paulo as well as eight other cities located in Europe and Asia. How to Use This Tool

200

NREL: Technology Transfer - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 December 3, 2008 DOE to Award $14.55 Million for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Ford Motor Company has received funds from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop an energy-efficient way to cool, heat, and ventilate cars. NREL will serve on Ford's project team. November 20, 2008 NREL, Brazilian Energy Company to Collaborate on Bioenergy The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Petróleo Brasileiro S.A. (Petrobras) announced today that they have signed an agreement that could accelerate the development and international commercialization of biofuels. The announcement was made at the International Biofuels Conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil. November 13, 2008 NREL and Private Industry Begin Nationwide Solar Measuring Network

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201

Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

930 930 July 2009 Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation Paul Schwabe, Karlynn Cory, and James Newcomb National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-44930 July 2009 Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation Paul Schwabe, Karlynn Cory, and James Newcomb Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9B30 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

202

BP Biofuels Brasil | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brasil Brasil Jump to: navigation, search Name BP Biofuels Brasil Place Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 13025-320 Sector Biofuels Product Brazil based BP subsidiary focused in the biofuels sector. Coordinates -22.909049°, -47.064594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.909049,"lon":-47.064594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Project Improvement Act - Restoration Fund (CVPRF) Authority for Power Payments * Public Law 102-575, Sections 3407(c) and (d) - Imposes on Secretary a collection amount for Restoration Fund of $50,000,000 per year on a three-year rolling average in Fiscal Year 1998 and each fiscal year thereafter - Establishes mitigation and restoration payments and imposes cap of $30,000,000 on three-year rolling average - Requires water and power contractors to make mitigation and restoration payments Authority for Power Payments * February 11, 1994, Letter of Agreement 93-SAO- 10156 - Notify WAPA annually of restoration payment obligation - Shortfall assessed in following FY * April 21, 1995, Letter Established Bi-Annual Notification Process - Notify WAPA of mid-year adjustment to restoration payment

204

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

205

Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Brief: Status of the Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data) Jenny Heeter, Philip Armstrong, and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56128 September 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data) Jenny Heeter, Philip Armstrong, and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task Nos. SAO9.3110 and SA12 0324

206

Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the FIESP Energy Conference - As  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIESP Energy Conference - FIESP Energy Conference - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the FIESP Energy Conference - As Prepared for Delivery August 15, 2011 - 6:21pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman FIESP Energy Conference Keynote Remarks Monday, August 15, 2011 Sao Paulo, Brazil Introduction Bom dia. Thank you, Mr. Xavier, for the kind introduction. And thank you, FIESP, for the opportunity to speak here today at this important conference. Before I begin, I'd like to take a moment to recognize my colleagues joining me on stage: Carlos Henrique de Abreu e Silva, the Director of U.S., Canada and Inter-American Affairs for Brazil's Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Steven Bipes, the Executive Director of the U.S. Section of the Brazil-U.S. Business Council; and Luiz Gabriel Rico, the CEO of the

207

Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

449 449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46449 September 2009 Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance Barry Friedman and Mackay Miller Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3003 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

208

The Hydrogen Laboratory and The Brazilian Reference Center for Hydrogen Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Laboratory Hydrogen Laboratory & The Brazilian Reference Center for Hydrogen Energy December 09 th , 2009 Dr. Newton Pimenta Cristiano Pinto LH2 & CENEH The State University of Campinas UNICAMP Founded in 1966 5 campuses (4 cities) 72 units 24 libraries 4 hospitals 1,750 professors 16,500 undergraduate students 11,450 graduate students (5,250 PhD students) The State University of Campinas UNICAMP UNICAMP is the site for 3 energy centers: The Hydrogen Laboratory (LH2) at the Physics Institute The Interdisciplinary Center for Energy Resources Planning (NIPE) The Brazilian Reference Center for Hydrogen Energy (CENEH) The Brazilian Reference Center for Hydrogen Energy Ministry of Science & Tech. State University of Campinas University of Sao Paulo

209

Innovations in Voluntary Renewable Energy Procurement: Methods for Expanding Access and Lowering Cost for Communities, Governments, and Businesses (Technical Report), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations in Voluntary Innovations in Voluntary Renewable Energy Procurement: Methods for Expanding Access and Lowering Cost for Communities, Governments, and Businesses 2 Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), prepared under task number SAO9.3110. The authors wish to thank Steven Lindenberg, Linda Silverman, and the EERE technology programs for their support of this work. For their thoughtful review of the document, the authors thank Blaine Collison of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Lisa Daniels of Windustry; and Lynn Billman, Jason Coughlin, Robin Newmark, and Bethany Speer of NREL. The authors thank Mary Lukkonen of NREL for her editorial support and Anthony Castellano of NREL for his design work.

210

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream molecules. These include members of the JAK family of non-receptor kinases and a latent transcription factor, acute phase response factor or signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (APRF/STAT 3) (9, 10). The gp130 signal transducer mediates biological effects exerted not only by IL-11, but also IL-6, oncostatin M (OSM), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) (11, 12). Several lines of evidence suggest that IL-11 is an important osteotropic factor. IL-11 receptor transcripts are present in chondroblastic and osteoblastic progenitor cells during mouse embryogenesis (13). IL-11 itself is produced by human osteosarcoma SaOs-2 cells (14), and Girasole et al. (15) showed that IL-11 dose-dependently stimulated osteoclastlike multinucleated cell (OCL) formation in cocultures of

unknown authors

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The State Architect's Office of Energy Services (SAO-ES) was created within the Department of Administrative Services (DAS) to assist in this process and develop rules governing energy efficiency in new construction and the purchase of equipment. October 16, 2013 Interconnection Standards '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) opened a docket ([http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2051&x=0&y=0 Case

212

Alfa Agroenergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alfa Agroenergia Alfa Agroenergia Jump to: navigation, search Name Alfa Agroenergia Place Pirassununga, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil based ethanol producer. Coordinates -21.996338°, -47.426999° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.996338,"lon":-47.426999,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Central African Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Environment (CARPE) the Environment (CARPE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Central African Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE) Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, University of Maryland Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools Website http://carpe.umd.edu/ Country Gabon, Rwanda, Burundi, Sao Tome and Principe, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon Middle Africa, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa References Central African Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE)[1]

214

Grupo Balbo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balbo Balbo Jump to: navigation, search Name Grupo Balbo Place Sertãozinho, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14160-000 Sector Biomass Product Brazil based ethanol and biomass producer, located in São Paulo. Coordinates 39.804699°, -8.09956° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.804699,"lon":-8.09956,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

LBA-ECO Data Sets Released, January 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

announces the release of two data sets associated with the announces the release of two data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The data set entitled "LBA-ECO TG-07 Forest Structure Measurements for GLAS Validation: Santarem 2004" provides the results of GLAS (the Geoscience Laser Altimer System) forest structure validation surveys conducted along transects at the Santarem and Sao Jorge forest sites. The data set entitled "LBA-ECO LC-23 ASTER and MODIS Fire Data Comparison for Brazil: 2003-2004" provides data associated with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire maps generated using two different algorithms and compared against fire maps produced by ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer). One

216

Andritz Hydro Inepar do Brasil S A AHI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Andritz Hydro Inepar do Brasil S A AHI Andritz Hydro Inepar do Brasil S A AHI Jump to: navigation, search Name Andritz Hydro Inepar do Brasil S/A (AHI) Place Barueri, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 06454-040 Sector Hydro Product Brazilian subsidiary of Austrian Andritz Hydro company, hydro turbines manufacturer. Coordinates -23.504259°, -46.844619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-23.504259,"lon":-46.844619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

217

Biocapital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biocapital Biocapital Jump to: navigation, search Name Biocapital Place Charqueada/SP, Brazil Sector Biofuels Product Brazilian biodiesel producer which operates as a biofuels distributor and storage solutions located in the state of Sao Paulo. Coordinates -22.51115°, -47.77742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.51115,"lon":-47.77742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

218

Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Trends in U.S. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

219

Sucral Bioenergia Participacoes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sucral Bioenergia Participacoes Sucral Bioenergia Participacoes Jump to: navigation, search Name Sucral Bioenergia Participacoes Place Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 13416-060 Sector Biomass Product Brazilian ethanol producer. Economic feasibility of ethanol and biomass projects. Coordinates -22.725369°, -47.647784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.725369,"lon":-47.647784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Amyris do Brasil | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brasil Brasil Jump to: navigation, search Name Amyris do Brasil Place Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 13069-380 Product Brazil based next-generation biofuel producer. Coordinates -22.909049°, -47.064594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.909049,"lon":-47.064594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Sucral Engenheria | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Engenheria Engenheria Jump to: navigation, search Name Sucral Engenheria Place Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 13416-060 Sector Biomass Product Piracicaba based engineering company, which develops ethanol ang biomass plants. Coordinates -22.725369°, -47.647784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-22.725369,"lon":-47.647784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Comparative Review of a Dozen National Energy Plans: Focus on Renewable and Efficient Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

046 046 March 2009 A Comparative Review of a Dozen National Energy Plans: Focus on Renewable and Efficient Energy Jeffrey Logan and Ted L. James National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45046 March 2009 A Comparative Review of a Dozen National Energy Plans: Focus on Renewable and Efficient Energy Jeffrey Logan and Ted L. James Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

223

Arakaki Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arakaki Group Arakaki Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Arakaki Group Place Fernandopolis, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil based agriculture company, which owns 50% of an ethanol plant. Coordinates -20.284244°, -50.246359° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-20.284244,"lon":-50.246359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Acucar e Alcool Oswaldo Ribeiro de Mendonca Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alcool Oswaldo Ribeiro de Mendonca Ltda Alcool Oswaldo Ribeiro de Mendonca Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name Acucar e Alcool Oswaldo Ribeiro de Mendonca Ltda Place Guaira, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14790 - 000 Sector Biomass Product Brazil based ethanol and biomass project developer. Coordinates -24.079531°, -54.257519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-24.079531,"lon":-54.257519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

77 77 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45877 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

226

La Sabina SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabina SA Sabina SA Jump to: navigation, search Name La Sabina SA Place Estoril, Portugal Zip 2765-495 Sector Solar Product Mining company branching out into solar development. Redeveloping the Mina Sao Domingos area. Coordinates 38.703499°, -9.39741° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.703499,"lon":-9.39741,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Tax Issues in Financing Renewable Energy Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BEI BEI JI N G FRAN K FU RT H O N G K O N G L O N D O N LO S AN G EL ES M U N I C H N EW YO RK SAO PAU L O SI N G APO RE T O K YO W ASH I N G T O N , D C Tax Issues in Financing Renewable Energy Projects Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Spring 2012 Mark Regante April 12, 2012 About Milbank's Renewable Energy Practice * Global law firm with 30+ years of experience in renewable energy * Over 180 successful deals closed, totaling more than 9,000 MW of renewable power developed * Named "Top Clean Energy Project Finance Legal Advisor to Lenders" by Bloomberg New Energy Finance in 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 * Recipient of "Energy/Projects Award for Excellence" in 2009 & 2007 by Chambers USA * 2011 "Global Law Firm of the Year in Project Finance" by

228

Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Made with Renewable Energy: Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products Deborah Baker Brannan, Jenny Heeter, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53764 March 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Made with Renewable Energy: How and Why Companies are Labeling Consumer Products Deborah Baker Brannan, Jenny Heeter, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53764

229

Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

161 161 February 2009 Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard Jeffrey Logan, Patrick Sullivan, Walter Short, Lori Bird, Ted L. James, and Monisha R. Shah National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45161 February 2009 Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard Jeffrey Logan, Patrick Sullivan, Walter Short, Lori Bird, Ted L. James, and Monisha R. Shah Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

230

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2011 7, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Thursday, July 7 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Pedro Machado, University of Sao Paulo / CEA Saclay Title: Probing LED with Neutrino Oscillations 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - One West Speaker: Veysel Demir, Northern Illinois University Title: Scientific Computing on Graphics Processor Units: An Application in Time-Domain Electromagnetic Simulations Friday, July 8 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speaker: Tom Wright, University of Michigan Title: Search for Higgs Bosons Produced in Association with b-Quarks at CDF

231

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide23 Submitted by gibsone on Fri, 2013-08-30 06:22 FY2011-hitson Slide23 Developing Country Access Afghanistan Guatemala Nigeria Albania Guinea Pakistan Algeria Guinea-Bissau Palestinian Territories (West Bank/ Gaza) Angola Guyana Papua New Guinea Armenia Haiti Paraguay Azerbaijan Honduras Peru Bangladesh Indonesia Philippines Belize Iraq Rwanda Benin Jordan Samoa Bhutan Kenya Sao Tome and Principe Bolivia Kiribati Senegal Burkina Faso Kyrgyzstan Sierra Leone Burundi Lao People's Democratic Republic Solomon Islands Cambodia Lesotho Somalia Cameroon Liberia Sri Lanka Cape Verde Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Swaziland Central African Republic Madagascar Tajikistan Chad Malawi Tanzania, United Republic of Colombia Maldives Thailand Comoros Mali Timor-Leste

232

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Transportation Topics Finance, Background analysis Website http://web.worldbank.org/exter Country Brazil UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References World Bank Project Database-Brazil[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in Brazil 1.1 Sao Paulo Metro Line 5 Project 1.2 BR-GEF Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Project (STAQ) 1.3 First Programmatic Development Policy Loan for Sustainable Environmental Management 1.4 BR Nova Gerar Carbon Finance and Solid Waste Management Project II 1.5 BR Lages Woodwaste Cogeneration 1.6 PCF Sugar Bagasse Cogeneration Project 1.7 Nova Gerar Landfill Rio de Janeiro

233

Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

258 258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO9.2038 NOTICE

234

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Agencies Funding Agencies In addition to the operations funding received from the Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, RHIC experiments receive funding from a variety of sources PHENIX U.S. National Science Foundation Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan Japan Society for the Promotion of Science National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Brazil Research Supporting Foundation of the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil National Natural Science Foundation of China National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics of the National Center for Scientific Research of France Atomic Energy Commission of France ARMINES (France) Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany

235

TGM Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TGM Turbines TGM Turbines Jump to: navigation, search Name TGM Turbines Place Sertaozinho, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 14175-000 Sector Biomass Product Brazil based company who constructs and sells boilers for biomass plants. Coordinates -21.14043°, -48.005154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-21.14043,"lon":-48.005154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

The {sup 6}He Optical Potential at energies around the Coulomb barrier  

SciTech Connect

We present an Optical Model (OM) study of {sup 6}He on {sup 208}Pb elastic scattering data, measured at laboratory energies around the Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 14, 16, 18, 22, and 27 MeV)[1]. For the projectile-target bare interaction, we use the microscopic Sao Paulo Potential (SPP). This bare interaction is supplemented with a Coulomb Dipole Polarization (CDP) potential, as well as a diffuse complex Woods-Saxon potential. Four-body Continuum-Discretized-Coupled-Channels (CDCC) calculations have been performed in order to support the optical model analysis. We have also studied the alpha channel, which is the dominant reaction process. In the analysis of this channel, we compare the angular and energy distributions of the alpha particles measured at 22 MeV, with Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations.

Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G. [Dpto. de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); CNA, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Dpto. de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Moro, A. M. [Dpto. de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA  

SciTech Connect

In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242- 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lewgoy, H. R. [Universidade Anhanguera Bandeirante, UNIBAN R. Maria Candida, 1813, Bloco G / 6o andar - 02071-013 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Elastic scattering measurements for {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system at RIBRAS facility  

SciTech Connect

Elastic scattering angular distribution measurements of {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system were performed at the laboratory energy of 15.6 MeV. The {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced by the proton transfer reaction {sup 3}He({sup 6}Li,{sup 7}Be) and impinged on {sup 27}Al and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS. The elastic angular distribution was obtained within the angular range of 15{sup 0} - 80{sup 0} at the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using the Woods- Saxon form factors and the Sao Paulo potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

Morcelle, V. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and Depto de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lichtenthaeler, R.; Morais, M. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Gasques, L.; Pires, K. C. C.; Condori, R. P. [Depto de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C. P. 66318, 05389-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Barioni, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Bahia (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares- IPEN, 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Zamora, J. C. [Departament of Physics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

240

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

242

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

243

ARM - AMF2 Architecture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architecture Architecture AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF2 Architecture The core AMF2 instrumentation is designed to operate out of modules; small independent climate controlled systems that house instrument computers, data loggers and other support equipment. This design feature sets the AMF2 apart in its flexibility and mobility at deployment sites.

244

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

245

ARM - Facility News Article  

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Sunphotometer to Obtain Additional Aerosol Data in Niamey Sunphotometer to Obtain Additional Aerosol Data in Niamey Bookmark and Share Located nearby the AMF ground instruments, the sunphotometer, in the foreground, requires an unobstructed hemispheric view of the sky to obtain its measurements. Located nearby the AMF ground instruments, the sunphotometer, in the foreground, requires an unobstructed hemispheric view of the sky to obtain its measurements. In early August, a new Cimel sunphotometer (CSPHOT) was deployed at the ARM Mobile Facility site in Niamey, Niger, as part of the ongoing RADAGAST field campaign. The CSPHOT measures the solar and sky radiance at various wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum (340, 380, 440, 500, 670, 870, 936, 1020 nm). From these measurements, a number of aerosol

246

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Finance Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

247

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data in Niamey E. Kassianov, T. Ackerman, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction One of the key uncertainties in the earth's radiation balance is the effect of dust on radiative fluxes (aerosol radiative forcing), which in turn affects climatic processes on both planetary and local scales (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2001; Sokolik et al. 2001). Since Saharan dust is one of the main sources of dust over the globe, its radiative effect has long been the subject of intensive studies. Recently, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed to Niamey, Niger, to participate in a large field campaign directed at elucidating the radiative effect of Saharan dust

248

1  

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Background Climatology for the Atmospheric Background Climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mobile Facility Deployment in Niamey: Mean Annual Cycle and 2004-2005 Interannual Variability P.J. Lamb and M. Issa Lélé Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies The University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Abstract This study is comprised of two parts. The first part provides the long-term mean annual cycle context for the deployment of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) in Niamey, Niger, Africa, during the entire year of 2006. Documentation includes the annual cycles (calendar month basis) of the following surface meteorological variables that will be important for the ARM deployment-rainfall, visibility (proxy for atmospheric dust), vapor pressure (proxy for column

249

ARM_Overview_black_43.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- In and Out of Africa - In and Out of Africa Gary Robinson, Tony Slingo, Nazim Bharmal and Jeff Settle Environmental Systems Science Centre, Reading University, UK RADAGAST is a collaborative project, involving UK, US and European scientists, to investigate the radiative divergence across the atmosphere. West Africa was chosen as the study area because the combination of wide range of column water vapour, episodic wind-generated dust events and seasonal aerosols from biomass burning presents a particular challenge to radiative transfer models. The primary data inputs are top-of-atmosphere narrow and broad-band observations from METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) satellites and surface observations from the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), which was deployed throughout 2006 at Niamey, Niger, in support of RADAGAST.

250

ARM - Facility News Article  

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January 15, 2006 [Facility News] January 15, 2006 [Facility News] ARM Mobile Facility Begins Year-Long Deployment in Africa Bookmark and Share Beginning on January 9, the ARM Mobile Facility began officially collecting atmospheric data from a location at the airport in Niamey, Niger, Africa. As part of the RADAGAST field campaign, the AMF will measure the effects of absorbing aerosols from desert dust in the dry season, and the effects of deep convective clouds and associated moisture loadings on the transmission of atmospheric radiation during the summer monsoon. These measurements will be combined with associated satellite data to provide the first well-sampled direct estimates of the energy balance across the atmosphere. This dataset will provide valuable information to an ongoing effort called

251

Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Papau New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Papau New Guinea UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa

252

ARM - Datastreams - twrcam3m  

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Datastreamstwrcam3m Datastreamstwrcam3m Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025311 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : TWRCAM3M Three Meter Tower: video camera Active Dates 2002.03.25 - 2013.07.09 Measurement Categories Surface Properties Originating Instrument Tower Camera (TWRCAM) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Surface condition jpg Locations North Slope Alaska NSA C2 Browse Data Central Facility, Atqasuk AK ARM Mobile Facility FKB M1 Browse Data Black Forest, Germany GRW M1 Browse Data Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal NIM M1 Browse Data Niamey, Niger

253

Communications: NREL PowerPoint Presentation Template with Light Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: Moving the White CoolCell ARM Radiative Processes Working Group Analyses by Mary Anderberg & Tom Stoffel March 10, 2008 ACRF Upwelling Irradiances Infrared UIR Shortwave US Pt Reyes, CA Banizoumbou Niger AMF Upwelling Irradiances Warren et al. visits FKB... BCR 01402: Move 7 m before on 10 m Tower AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 14, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 15, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 1, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 5, 2007 UIR US Surface Albedo (AM) Surface Albedo (PM) Radiometer View Factors * * * 90% Irradiance Contribution Height (AGL) Effective Radius 3 m 9 m 10 m 29 m Radiometer Sensitivities Pyranometer +/- 10 Wm -2 vs 0.4% of 200 Wm-2 (0.8 Wm

254

American Goldfinch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Goldfinch American Goldfinch Name: Mary-Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I happened on an American Goldfinch in my yard last week who could not fly. I captured it and now have it living in a large box. I have been feeding it commericial wild finch seed, niger seed and some sunflower seed. I have also provided a small cup of fine sand and a dish of water. Am I missing anything in it's diet? I had hoped to find someone to take it and care for it until it could fly again but have been unsuccessful so I may end up caring for it. It's wing is not visibly injured, however it can only flutter. I have been caring for it for 6 days now and it appears OK. Have also provided it with a small perch (branch) which it seems to use most of the time. Any other suggestions?

255

West African Clean Energy Gateway-Software Analysis Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » West African Clean Energy Gateway-Software Analysis Tools Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

256

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Vincent and the Grenadines UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan

257

Microsoft PowerPoint - Lamb_et_al_Norfolk_Poster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMF 2006 Niamey Radiosonde AMF 2006 Niamey Radiosonde Data: Some Preliminary Results Peter J. Lamb 1 , Abdelkrim Ben Mohamed 2 , Mark Miller 3 , Ibrah Seidou Sanda 2 , Hamidou Hama 4 , Abebe Abdou Adam 5 1 University of Oklahoma-CIMMS, 2 Université Abdou Moumouni, 3 Rutgers University, 4 ASECNA-Niger, 5 ACMAD Introduction The 2006 ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Niamey in support of the RADAGAST component of the AMMA Programme brought out a more complete picture of the Sahelian atmospheric environment. This poster presents an analysis of the AMF rawinsonde soundings made in Niamey between January 07, 2006 and January 07, 2007. This is a comprehensive study of all soundings considered together and at the principal synoptic observation times (0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC). The analysis focuses on temperature, humidity,

258

ARM - AMF2 Organization and Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contact Information Organization and Contact Information AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF2 Organization and Contact Information The Argonne AMF2 Operations Office manages the operation of the second ARM mobile facility. Basic contact information, phone numbers, email, and shipping information to personnel in this office is available on this page.

259

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

260

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Few stop to consider the consequences Few stop to consider the consequences of their daily ablutions, the washing of clothes, the watering of lawns, and the flush of a toilet. However, wastewater treatment-one of the cornerstones of modern civilization-is inside this issue 2. Finishers Convene in NM Spot Awards 3. Termites in Costa Rica 4. Profile: Erika Lindquist 5. Plant Pathogens Decoded OPA Recipients 6. Young Investigator Winner 8. Spotlight on Safety 9. Hazards of Being a Microbiologist 10. All About Webfeeds 11. Eukaryotic Finishing at Stanford 12. Symbiotic Tree Fungus 17. New CSP Targets 19. Pichia stipitis 20. Aspergillus niger PRIMER the October 2006 Volume 3 Issue 2 First Tree Genome Is Published: Poplar Holds Promise as Renewable Bioenergy Resource Wood from a common tree may one day figure prominently in meeting trans-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2005 [Facility News] 31, 2005 [Facility News] Ancillary Site to Provide Key Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In January 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) begins a year-long field campaign in Africa as part of a multi-year international experiment called the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The AMF will be placed at the airport in Niamey, Niger, well within view of the Global Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) geostationary satellite. Cloud and radiative property measurements collected by the AMF will be used in conjunction with GERB data for a greater understanding of the atmosphere than could be gained from either dataset alone. While preparing for the campaign, the science team identified the need for instrumentation at an off-site location to compare radiative measurements from the natural environment of

262

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Help | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Help Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

263

nab-ARM_land2_v5.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corresponding result can be seen in the corresponding result can be seen in the top-of-atmosphere long-wave flux. Figure 3 shows the modelled OLR and that measured by the ARG product. The difference is postulated to be because the AMF ground measurements are not representative of the area within the ARG pixel. Figure 4 shows the SEVIRI 10.8μm-derived skin temperatures: over the region, the temperature variations can account for an upwelling flux variation of 70 Wm -2 . At the AMF, Niamey airport site itself, the November-averaged skin temperature is ~319K. Figure 2: 0.6μm SEVIRI radiances. Mean of all times during November 2006 without cloud-cover. The dark band is the Niger river. Figure 1: TOA SW fluxes via two products from satellite measurements: ARG and HR. Figure 5: Daily-averaged down-welling LW flux, from AMF

264

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 15, 2010 [Facility News] April 15, 2010 [Facility News] Second Phase of African Scientific Exchange Underway Bookmark and Share Left to right: Dr. Zewdu Segele and Hama Hamidou examine reflectivity measurements made by the W-band ARM cloud radar in Niamey during July 2006. Left to right: Dr. Zewdu Segele and Hama Hamidou examine reflectivity measurements made by the W-band ARM cloud radar in Niamey during July 2006. Continuing an international collaboration that began with the ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Niamey, Niger, in 2006, meteorologist Hama Hamidou from the University of Niamey recently arrived at the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies at the University of Oklahoma for a six-month scientific exchange. Under the guidance of Dr. Zewdu Segele, a

265

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Technology Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Technology Data Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

266

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

267

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

268

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status PopStefanija, Ivan ProSensing, Inc. Mead, James ProSensing Inc. Widener, Kevin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Instruments Two W-band ARM Cloud Radars (WACR) have been developed for the SGP and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) by ProSensing. The SGP WACR was successfully deployed in the same shelter as the MMCR in 2005. It is currently collecting co-polarization and cross-polarization spectral moments (reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and spectral width) along with spectra data. The AMF WACR will be deployed with the AMF in Niamey, Niger early in 2006. We will present ingested WACR data formats available from the ARM Archive, a selected comparisons of WACR and MMCR data at SGP, and data from

269

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2006 [Facility News] 15, 2006 [Facility News] Radar Wind Profiler Joins ARM Mobile Facility Instrument Suite Bookmark and Share This spring, a 915 MHz radar wind profiler (RWP) was successfully installed at the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) site in Niamey, Niger, West Africa, for the remainder of the 1-year RADAGAST field campaign which started in January. The RWP will provide information about wind speed, wind direction, and wind shear, and also enable measurements of the turbulence in the lower part of the troposphere. This may be a key variable in determining the vertical distribution of dust in the experimental domain. Gradients in the radar's reflectivity spectrum may also help to provide continuous identification of the depth of the boundary layer in the summer months, when refractive gradients are likely to be maximized by low-level moisture.

270

JeffersonSTM09.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Cloud-forming Properties Cloud-forming Properties Anne Jefferson and John Ogren NOAA Environmental Science Research Laboratory CIRES, University of Colorado ARM STM 2009 Aerosol Observing Systems In-situ surface measurements of aerosol optical, chemical, size, hygroscopic and cloud-forming properties * SGP - ARM central facility Lamont, OK *AMF - Pt Reyes, CA 3/2005 - 9/2005 - Niamey, Niger 12/2005-1/2007 - Murg Valley, Germany 4/2007 -1/2008 - Shouxian China 5/2008 - 12/2008 - Graciosa Island, Azores 4/2009 *BRW/NSA - Barrow Alaska *AMF2 ? Darwin? - What instruments support the science? AMF deployment in Shouxian China, HFE HFE was located at a rural, agricultural area ~120 km from Hefei, ~200 km from Nanking

271

The AMMA mulid network for aerosol characterization in West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three ground based portable low power consumption microlidars (MULID) have been built and deployed at three remote sites in Banizoumbou (Niger), Cinzana (Mali) and M'Bour (Senegal) in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) project for the characterization of aerosols optical properties. A description of the instrument and a discussion of the data inversion method, including a careful analysis of measurement uncertainties (systematic and statistical errors) are presented. Some case studies of typical lidar profiles observed over the Banizoumbou site during 2006 are shown and discussed with respect to the AERONET 7-day back-trajectories and the biomass burning emissions from the Combustion Emission database for the AMMA campaign.

Cavalieri, Olga; Cairo, Francesco; Fierli, Federico; Snels, Marcel; Viterbini, Maurizio; Cardillo, Francesco; Chatenet, Bernadette; Formenti, Paola; Marticorena, Beatrice; Rajot, Jean Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Alcoholic fermentation of raw sweet potato by a nonconventional method using Endomycopsis fibuligera glucoamylase preparation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, alcoholic fermentation has received much attention as an alternative energy source. In conventional alcoholic fermentation from starchy materials, precooking is necessary for liquefaction and saccharification of the broth, which requires a large amount of heat energy - about 30-40% of all energy spent for alcohol production. Ueda and his co-workers have attempted to produce ethanol from raw starch in a single-step process, which combines liquefaction, saccharification, and yeast fermentation without cooking and autoclaving by using glucoamylase preparation from Aspergillus niger in order to save the cost of energy consumption by cooking. Ueda has also reported alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Rhizopus glucoamylase preparation. In the present communication, we report the effectiveness of alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Endomycopsis fibuligers glucoamylase preparation. (Refs. 5).

Saha, B.C.; Ueda, S.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sunny prospects for heat engines  

SciTech Connect

The world's largest solar power plant is being built at Amilly, France and will be installed next year in Dire, Mali. Its capacity will be 80,000 watts. Each day it will pump 300,000 cubic feet of water up 23 feet from the Niger River to irrigate 37 acres of land. From a well 60 feet deep, it will pump another 21,200 cubic feet daily to supply drinking water for 10,000 people in Dire. It will refrigerate a cold room for an agricultural cooperative and, finally, after sundown, will generate 5 kW of electrical power to light both the cooperative and a 40-room tourist hotel. Jean-Pierre Girardier developed the heat engine utilizing the temperature difference between the hot African sun overhead and the cold water under the ground. (MCW)

Behrman, D.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis (DOE/EIS-0337-SA-01) (06/07/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 7-SA-O1 West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis Revised Final U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley, New York June 7, 2006 WVDP Waste Management US - Supplement Analysis Table of Contents 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTIONS 1 3.0 WASTE TYPE DEFINITIONS 2 4.0 EXISTING NEPA ANALYSIS 3 5.0 NEW INFORMATION 3 6.0 IS A SUPPLEMENTAL EIS NEEDED~ 5 6.1 Glass Melter, CFMT, and MFHT 5 6.2 Increased LLW Volumes 11 7.0 CONCLUSION 17 8.0 DETERMINATION 177 9.0 REFERENCES 17 List of Tables Table 1. Radiation Doses for Involved and Noninvolved Workers Under Alternative A, Including the Glass Melter, CFMT, and MFHT 8 Table 2. Radiological Consequences of Accidents Using 50-Percent Atmospheric Conditions ...9 Table 3. Radiological Consequences of Accidents Using 95-Percent

277

Giant Molecular Magnetocapacitance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacitance of a nanoscale system is usually thought of having two contributions, a classical electrostatic contribution and a quantum contribution dependent on the density of states and/or molecular orbitals close to the Fermi energy. In this letter we demonstrate that in molecular nano-magnets and other magnetic nanoscale systems, the quantum part of the capacitance becomes spin-dependent, and is tunable by an external magnetic field. This molecular magnetocapacitance can be realized using single molecule nano-magnets and/or other nano-structures that have antiferromagnetic ground states. As a proof of principle, first-principles calculation of the nano-magnet [Mn3O(sao)3(O2CMe)(H2O)(py)3] shows that the charging energy of the high-spin state is 260 meV lower than that of the low-spin state, yielding a 6% difference in capacitance. A magnetic field of ~40T can switch the spin state, thus changing the molecular capacitance. A smaller switching field may be achieved using nanostructures with a larger moment. Molecular magnetocapacitance may lead to revolutionary device designs, e.g., by exploiting the Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance whereby a small change in capacitance can lead to a huge change in resistance.

Wu, Yuning [University of Florida, Gainesville; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Cheng, Hai-Ping [University of Florida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ionized gas velocity dispersion in nearby dwarf galaxies: looking at supersonic turbulent motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of ionized gas turbulent motions study in several nearby dwarf galaxies using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer with the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS. Combining the `intensity-velocity dispersion' diagrams (I-sigma) with two-dimensional maps of radial velocity dispersion we found a number of common patterns pointing to the relation between the value of chaotic ionized gas motions and processes of current star formation. In five out of the seven analysed galaxies we identified expanding shells of ionized gas with diameters of 80-350 pc and kinematic ages of 1-4 Myr. We also demonstrate that the I-sigma diagrams may be useful for the search of supernova remnants, other small expanding shells or unique stars in nearby galaxies. As an example, a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) was found in UGC 8508. We propose some additions to the interpretation, previously used by Munoz-Tunon et al. to explain the I-sigma diagrams for giant star formation regions. In the case of dwarf galaxies,...

Moiseev, Alexei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Assessment of oil-shale technology in Brazil. Final technical report, October 27, 1980-July 27, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The development of an oil shale industry in the United States will require the solution of a variety of technical, economic, environmental, and health and safety problems. This assessment investigates whether US oil shale developers might benefit from the experience gained by the Brazilians in the operation of their Usina Prototipo do Irati oil shale demonstration plant at Sao Mateus do Sul, and from the data generated from their oil shale research and development programs. A chapter providing background information on Brazil and the Brazilian oil shale deposits is followed by an examination of the potential recovery processes applicable to Brazilian oil shale. The evolution of the Brazilian retorting system is reviewed and compared with the mining and retorting proposed for US shales. Factors impacting on the economics of shale oil production in Brazil are reviewed and compared to economic analyses of oil shale production in the US. Chapters examining the consequences of shale development in terms of impact on the physical environment and the oil shale worker complete the report. Throughout the report, where data permits, similarities and differences are drawn between the oil shale programs underway in Brazil and the US. In addition, research areas in which technology or information transfer could benefit either or both countries' oil shale programs are identified.

1981-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

NN potentials from IR chiral EFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chiral perturbation theory is nowadays a well-established approach to incorporate the chiral constraints from QCD. Nevertheless, for systems involving one baryon, the power counting which dictates the chiral order of observables is not as simple and consensual as in the purely mesonic case. The heavy baryon approach, which relies on a non-relativistic expansion around the limit of infinitely heavy baryon, recovers the usual power counting but destroys some analytic properties of the scattering amplitude. Some years ago, Becher and Leutwyler proposed a Lorentz-invariant formulation of chiral perturbation theory that maintains the required analytic properties, but at the expense of a less intuitive power counting. Aware of the shortcomings of the heavy baryon formalism, the S\\~ao Paulo group derived the two-pion exchange component of the nucleon-nucleon potential in line with the works of Becher and Leutwyler. A striking result was that the long distance properties of the potential is determined by the specific low energy region of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude where the heavy baryon expansion fails. In this talk I will discuss the origin of such failure and how it reflects in the asymptotics of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Some results for phase shifts and deuteron properties will be shown, followed by a comparison with the heavy baryon predictions.

Renato Higa

2009-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Yemen UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

283

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Samoa UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

284

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

285

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Tajikistan UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

287

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bolivia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

288

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

289

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

290

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Jamaica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

291

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Haiti UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

292

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Lucia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

293

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Grenada UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

294

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Mozambique UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

295

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Dominica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

296

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

Use of solar generators in Africa for broadcasting equipment. [For powering educational tv receivers  

SciTech Connect

In Africa, solar cells were used for the first time in 1968 to provide power supply for the TV receivers in Niger. In that country, school television programs are essentially devised for the schools located in regions not provided with power mains. The transmissions are received by the means of TV sets that are especially devised to operate under warm and wet weather conditions. These receivers, model CATEL CI 17, are equipped with 61-cm screens, and are completely solid-state. They can be powered by a d.c. power supply, between 30 and 36 V. Their consumption, extremely modest, ranges around 32 W. The power supply for these receivers had, at the beginning, been provided by high-capacity alkaline electrolyte cells. In order to secure a more practical and less expensive source of energy, an experimental solar cell was installed in 1968. Following a satisfactory operation of this experimental solar cell, a careful study was conducted, after which some twenty installations were set up, using silicon cells and lead-acid batteries. A description of the installations is presented; and maintenance, reliability, and cost of the installations are discussed. (WHK)

Polgar, S.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including A. nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains twelve nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS), and fourteen NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in A. niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Mammeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R.; Wang, Clay C.

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion. To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength, reservoir property distribution, timing of the start of injection, and intra-reservoir shale thickness and continuity. Sensitivity analyses used to quantify the effects of these factors on condensate recovery indicate the need to acquire more production, pressure and log data to reduce the present large uncertainty on aquifer strength before proceeding on waterflooding this reservoir. The study also shows that the injection scheme should be implemented as soon as possible to avoid further loss of condensate recovery. The result of this study is applicable to other gas condensate reservoirs in the Niger delta with similar depositional environments.

Ajayi, Arashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm  

SciTech Connect

Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal KDEL were used. Transgenic plants were recovered in all four cases but no qualitative differences could be observed whether KDEL was added or not. Endo-xylanase activity in transgenic grains was increased between two and three fold relative to wild type. The grains were shriveled and had a 25-33% decrease in mass. Extensive analysis of the cell walls showed a 10-15% increase in arabinose to xylose ratio, a 50% increase in the proportion of water extractable arabinoxylan, and a shift in the MW of the water extractable arabinoxylan from being mainly larger than 85 kD to being between 2 kD and 85 kD. Ferulic acid esterase expressing grains were also shriveled and the seed weight was decreased by 20-50%. No ferulic acid esterase activity could be detected in wild type grains whereas ferulic acid esterase activity was detected in transgenic lines. The grain cell walls had 15-40% increase in water unextractable arabinoxylan and a decrease in monomeric ferulic acid between 13 and 34%. In all the plants the observed changes are consistent with a plant response that serves to minimize the effect of the heterologously expressed enzymes by increasing arabinoxylan biosynthesis and cross-linking.

Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga C; Lind-Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B.; Scheller, Henrik V.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Fourth Quarter 2008  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. The first quarter milestone was the initial formulation of the algorithm for retrieval of these properties. The second quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved cloud properties and a year-long CCPP control simulation. The third quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved aerosol optical depth and a three-year CCPP control simulation. This final fourth quarter milestone includes the time-series of aerosol and dust properties and a decade-long CCPP control simulation.

JH Mather; DA Randall; CJ Flynn

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Identifying and characterizing the most significant ?-glucosidase of the novel species Aspergillus saccharolyticus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly discovered fungal species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus, was found to produce a culture broth rich in beta-glucosidase activity. In this present work, the main beta-glucosidase of A. saccharolyticus responsible for the efficient hydrolytic activity was identified, isolated, and characterized. Ion exchange chromatography was used to fractionate the culture broth, yielding fractions with high beta-glucosidase activity and only one visible band on an SDS-PAGE gel. Mass spectrometry analysis of this band gave peptide matches to beta-glucosidases from aspergilli. Through a PCR approach using degenerate primers and genome walking, a 2919 base pair sequence encoding the 860 amino acid BGL1 polypeptide was determined. BGL1 of A. saccharolyticus has 91% and 82% identity with BGL1 from Aspergillus aculeatus and BGL1 from Aspergillus niger, respectively, both belonging to Glycoside hydrolase family 3. Homology modeling studies suggested beta-glucosidase activity with preserved retaining mechanism and a wider catalytic pocket compared to other beta-glucosidases. The bgl1 gene was heterologously expressed in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, purified, and characterized by enzyme kinetics studies. The enzyme can hydrolyze cellobiose, pNPG, and cellodextrins. The enzyme showed good thermostability, was stable at 50C, and at 60C it had a half-life of approximately 6 hours.

Sorensen, Anette; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Lubeck, Mette; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Culley, David E.; Lubeck, Peter S.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mean winds observed with Indian MST radar over tropical mesosphere and comparison with various techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Temporal variation of mean winds between the 65 to 85 km height region from the data collected over the course of approximately four years (199599), using the Indian MST radar located at Gadanki (13.5 ? N, 79.2 ? E), India is presented in this paper. Mesospheric mean winds and their seasonal variation in the horizontal and vertical components are presented in detail. Westward flows during each of the equinoxes and eastward flows during the solstices are observed in the zonal component. The features of the semiannual oscillation (SAO) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the zonal component are noted. In the meridional component, contours reveal a northward motion during the winter and a southward motion during the summer. Large inter-annual variability is found in the vertical component with magnitudes of the order of 2 ms ?1. The MST observed winds are also compared with the winds observed by the MF radar located at Tirunelveli (8.7 ? N, 77.8 ? E), India, the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) onboard the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS), and with the CIRA-86 model. A very good agreement is found between both the ground-based instruments (MST radar and MF radar) in the zonal component and there are few discrepancies in the meridional component. UARS/HRDI observed winds usually have larger magnitudes than the ground-based mean winds. Comparison of the MST derived winds with the CIRA-86 model in the zonal component shows that during the spring equinox and the summer, the winds agree fairly well, but there are a lot of discrepancies in the other seasons and the observed winds with the MST radar are less in magnitude, though the direction is same. The strengths and limitations in estimating reliable mesospheric mean winds using

M. Venkat Ratnam; D. Narayana Rao; T. Narayana Rao; S. Thulasiraman; J. B. Nee; S. Gurubaran; R. Rajaram

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aerosol-to-Hydrosol Transfer Stages for use in bioaerosol sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-Jet and Multi-Jet Aerosol to Hydrosol Transfer Stages (AHTS) with cutpoints of 2 and 0.8 []m AD, respectively, were designed and evaluated. Both devices operate at nominal air sampling flow rate of 1 L/min, 0.1% Tween20, and 0.3 mL/min. collection liquid flow rate. Both systems have an ideal air power consumption of 1.4 mW and 4.5 mW, respectively. The total electrical power consumption, including that needed to heat the airstream and a sampling enclosure, is approximately 55 W at -23C (-10F) outside air temperature. The AHTSs were tested using polystyrene solid and oleic acid liquid aerosol particles to determine the collection efficiencies. The effectiveness of the fractional collection efficiency for the Single-Jet and Multi-Jet are 91% over the size range of 2 to 10 []m AD, and 90% over the size range of 1 to 10 []m AD, respectively. The hydrosol collection efficiency of the Multi-Jet is 95% over the size of 1 to 3 []m AD. The influence of a cleaning solution that was comprised of distilled water and 0.1% Tween20 yielded an average collection efficiency of above 90% for the Single-Jet and 98% for the Multi-Jet. When the liquid flow rate is equal to or greater than 0.3 mL/min, the hydrosol collection efficiency is constant at 90%. The time responses for Single-Jet and Multi-Jet are 1.4 and 0.75 minutes, respectively. Preliminary results of bioaerosol testing with 0.7 []m AD single spores of Bacillus globigii var. niger show efficiencies over 100%. These discrepancies are probably due to the testing procedures at the U.S. Army Research Office, Chemical Biological Center, Edgewood, MD, facilities.

Phan, Huy Ngoc

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

308

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

309

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Australia 12,758 41.59 11,164 52.25 7,112 51.35 6,001 57.47 6,724 51.17 Brazil W W W W W W W W W W Canada 9,791 48.72 8,975 42.25 10,238 50.35 10,832 56.08 13,584 56.75 China 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- W W W W Czech Republic W W W W W W 0 -- 0 -- Germany 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Hungary 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Kazakhstan 3,818 60.61 4,985 43.41 6,830 47.81 9,728 53.71 6,234 51.69 Malawi 0 -- 0 -- W W 780 65.44 W W Namibia 3,880 54.79 5,732 47.30 4,913 47.90 6,199 56.74 5,986 54.56 Niger W W 2,001 47.55 587 49.00 1,744 54.38 2,133 50.45 Russia 12,080 27.64 7,938 37.98 10,544 50.28 10,199 56.57 7,643 54.40 South Africa 783 27.50 W W W W 1,524 53.62 1,243 56.45 Ukraine 0 -- 0 -- W W W W W W United Kingdom W W 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- Uzbekistan

310

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The artifact assemblage from the Pepper Wreck: an early seventeenth century Portuguese East-Indiaman that wrecked in the Tagus River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost four hundred years after the wrecking of the Portuguese East-Indiaman Nossa Senhora dos Martires in 1606, excavations were begun at Sao Juliao de Barra by the Centro Nacional de Arqueologia Nautica e Subaquatica (CNANS). The 1996-1998 field seasons yielded thousands of individual artifacts from the wreck that is almost certainly Martires, today known as the Pepper Wreck. These items represent the remains of one of the first archaeologically excavated Portuguese East Indiamen to date. Even after an immediate contemporary salvage effort and four hundred years in a heavy surge zone, the remains of the Pepper Wreck are extensive in their size (large portions of the ship's hull survived) and variety. The range of artifacts recovered includes some of the ship's navigational instruments, Asian trade goods such as pepper and porcelain dishes, and personal items. Other materials recovered include everything from modern signage and trash to hundreds of ceramic sherds and balls of lead shot. The collection was found in varying states of preservation, from pristine to unrecognizable, depending on the amount of protection received on the site. This thesis will focus on the artifacts that were originally carried aboard the Pepper Wreck. The area containing the wreck site is in a location that has been the site of numerous shipwrecks from all time periods. Subsequently, all manner of objects were collected from the bottom during the CNANS excavation. Therefore, the main portion of the thesis will only focus on artifacts that can be linked with the Pepper Wreck. This thesis contains a broad historical background of the trade routes traversed by the Portuguese, along with more specific historical and practical research concerning the particular artifacts themselves. These artifacts will be grouped into the following categories: navigational instruments, porcelains, pewter ware, and a miscellaneous category (for items ranging from Asian stonewares to a Japanese sword guard or tsuba). This thesis will strive to place this mix of trade and personal goods into the historical context of the Portuguese Empire at the turn of the seventeenth century.

Brigadier, Sara R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest rate and with substantial guarantee. A few of the projects might go ahead without the benefit of CERs, but most probably would not. Whether the projected revenue from CERs would be sufficient to induce sponsors to proceed with the projects is an important issue that requires further investigation. All of the projects contribute to economic development in Brazil. The forestry projects in particular would create a significant number of rural jobs, and contribute income to rural communities. Some of the carbon sequestration projects would provide environmental benefits with respect to protection of biodiversity and soil.

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tourism development, rural livelihoods, and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study analyzed changes in livelihoods before and after tourism development at Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo villages in the Okavango Delta. Specifically, it analyzed how people interacted with species like giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger) and thatching grass (Cymbopogon excavatus) before and after tourism development. This analysis was expected to measure the effectiveness of tourism development as a tool to improve livelihoods and conservation. The concept of social capital, sustainable livelihoods framework and the Community- Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) paradigm informed the study. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered through field-based research, using tools of participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and key informant interviews. Results indicate that local customs and institutions at Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo ensured the conservation of resources in pre-colonial Botswana. However, British colonial rule (1885-1966) affected traditional institutions of resource use hence the beginning of resource decline. The British colonial rule and the first 15-20 years after Botswanas independence from British rule saw an increase in resource degradation. Results also indicate that since CBNRM began in the 1990s, tourism development has positive and negative effects on rural livelihoods. On the positive side, tourism development in some ways is achieving its goals of improved livelihoods and conservation. Residents attitudes towards tourism development and conservation have also become positive compared to a decade ago when these communities were not involved in tourism development. On the negative side, tourism is emerging as the single livelihood option causing either a decline or abandonment of traditional options like hunting and gathering and agricultural production. Reliance on tourism alone as a livelihood option is risky in the event of a global social, economic and political instability especially in countries where most tourists that visit the Okavango originate or in Botswana itself. There is need, therefore, for communities to diversify into domestic tourism and small-scale enterprises. On the overall, tourism development through CBNRM indicates that it is a viable tool to achieve improved livelihoods and conservation in the Okavango Delta.

Mbaiwa, Joseph Elizeri

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Seasonal Contrasts in the Surface Energy Balance of the Sahel  

SciTech Connect

Over most of the world ocean, heating of the surface by sunlight is balanced predominately by evaporative cooling. Even over land, moisture for evaporation is available from vegetation or the soil reservoir. However, at the ARM Mobile Facility in Niamey, Niger, soil moisture is so depleted that evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only at the height of the rainy season, when precipitation has replenished the soil reservoir. Using observations at the Mobile Facility from late 2005 to early 2007, we describe how the surface balances radiative forcing. How the surface compensates time-averaged solar heating varies with seasonal changes in atmospheric water vapor, which modulates the greenhouse effect and the ability of the surface to radiate thermal energy directly to space. During the dry season, sunlight is balanced mainly by longwave radiation and the turbulent flux of sensible heat. The ability of longwave radiation to cool the surface drops after the onset of the West African summer monsoon, when moist, oceanic air flows onshore, increasing local column moisture and atmospheric opacity at these wavelengths. After the monsoon onset, but prior to significant rainfall, solar heating is compensated mainly by the sensible heat flux. During the rainy season, the magnitude of evaporation is initially controlled by the supply of moisture from precipitation. However, by the height of the rainy season, sufficient precipitation has accumulated at the surface that evaporation is related to the flux demanded by solar radiation, and radiative forcing of the surface is balanced comparably by the latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes. Radiative forcing of the surface also varies on a subseasonal time scale due to fluctuations in water vapor, clouds, and aerosol concentration. Except at the height of the rainy season, subseasonal forcing is balanced mainly by sensible heating and longwave anomalies. The efficacy of the sensible heat flux depends upon a positive feedback, where forcing changes mixing within the boundary layer and amplifies the sensible heating anomaly. How the surface responds to radiative forcing is fundamental to the climate response to dust and carbonaceous aerosols.

Miller, Ron; Slingo, A.; Barnard, James C.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) genotypes for adaptation to low soil-phosphorus conditions and to rock phosphate application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cowpea (Vigna ungiculata L. Walp) is a major food and fodder legume in poor countries, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa countries. It is generally produced in sandy, acid soils, deficient in phosphorus (P) which severely limits its production. Because processed phosphate fertilizers are expensive and poorly available to farmers, rock phosphate is viewed as a cheap alternative phosphate source. The present study evaluated 696 U.S Core Collection and IITA cowpea accessions for adaptation to low soil P environments and for response to rock phosphate application. Subsequently, organic acid exudation by selected cowpea genotypes as a mechanism for P acquisition from Fe-oxide and Ca bound P was investigated. A low P soil from Nacogdoches pine forest was used to grow plants. There were two P treatments: 0 and 300 mg P/kg of soil as Tahoua (Niger) rock phosphate. At harvest, plant height, shoot and root dry weights were determined and total biomass and shoot-to-root ratios were computed. Shoot P contents of 100 selected accessions were measured. Sixteen accessions reflecting the wide array of responses observed were selected for the organic acid study. Plants were grown in a growth chamber hydroponically with no P and +P nutrient solutions for 3 weeks. Organic acids were collected in a CaCl2-KCl solution. The nature and quantity of the collected organic acids was determined. Cowpea accessions were significantly different in their ability to adapt to Pdeficiency stress and to acquire P from rock phosphate. The parameters most effective in separating the accessions were shoot mass and total biomass. This data will be potentially useful in the selection of cowpea germplasm for (1) adaptation to West African soils of low P fertility, and (2) ability to utilize P from poorly soluble rock phosphate. The predominant organic acid exuded by cowpea roots was a tricarboxylic acid not yet identified. There was surprisingly more exudation of this acid under +P than under P conditions. Exudation was more highly correlated to roots than to shoots.

Mahamane, Sabiou

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and interactions occurring within the plasma, such as collisional energy transfer, that might be a factor in the reduction in neptunium emission lines. Neptunium has to be analyzed alone using LIBS to further understand the dynamics that may be occurring in the plasma of the mixed actinide fuel pellet sample. The LIBS data suggests that the emission spectrum for the mixed actinide fuel pellet is not simply the sum of the emission spectra of the pure samples but is dependent on the species present in the plasma and the interactions and reactions that occur within the plasma. Finally, many of the neptunium lines are in the near infrared region which is drastically reduced in intensity by the current optical setup and possibly the sensitivity of the emission detector in the spectral region. Once the optics are replaced and the optical collection system is modified and optimized, the probability of observing emission lines for neptunium might be increased significantly. The mixed actinide fuel pellet was analyzed under the experimental conditions listed in Table 1. The LIBS spectra of the fuel pellet are shown in Figures 1-49. The spectra are labeled with the observed wavelength and atomic species (both neutral (I) and ionic (II)). Table 2 is a complete list of the observed and literature based emission wavelengths. The literature wavelengths have references including NIST Atomic Spectra Database (NIST), B.A. Palmer et al. 'An Atlas of Uranium Emission Intensities in a Hollow Cathode Discharge' taken at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), R.L. Kurucz 1995 Atomic Line Data from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), J. Blaise et al. 'The Atomic Spectrum of Plutonium' from Argonne National Laboratory (BFG), and M. Fred and F.S. Tomkins, 'Preliminary Term Analysis of Am I and Am II Spectra' (FT). The dash (-) shown under Ionic State indicates that the ionic state of the transition was not available. In the spectra, the dash (-) is replaced with a question mark (?). Peaks that are not assigned are most likely real features and not noise but cannot be confidently assi

Judge, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

319

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

320

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tania niger sao" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

322

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

323

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

324

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

325

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

326

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

327

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

328

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

329

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

330

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

331

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.