National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tandem differential mobility

  1. An Overview of the SGP Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Overview of the SGP Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Collins, Don Texas A&M University Spencer, Chance Texas A&M University Category: Instruments A differential mobility...

  2. Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer/Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, D

    2010-06-18

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) is a single instrument that cycles through a series of complementary measurements of the physical properties of size-resolved submicron particles. In 2008, the TDMA was augmented through the addition of an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), which extends the upper limit of the measured size distribution into the supermicron range. These two instruments are operated in parallel, but because they are controlled by a common computer and because the size distributions measured by the two are integrated in the produced datastreams, they are described together here. Throughout the day, the TDMA sequentially measures submicron aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopic growth distributions. More specifically, the instrument is operated as a scanning DMA to measure size distributions and as a TDMA to measure size-resolved hygroscopicity. A typical measurement sequence requires roughly 45 minutes. Each morning additional measurements are made of the relative humidity (RH) dependent hygroscopicity and temperature-dependent volatility of size-resolved particles. When the outside temperature and RH are within acceptable ranges, the hydration state of size-resolved particles is also characterized. The measured aerosol distributions complement the array of aerosol instruments in the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) and provide additional details of the light-scattering and cloud-nucleating characteristics of the aerosol.

  3. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  4. Tandem robot control system and method for controlling mobile robots in tandem

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A control system for controlling mobile robots provides a way to control mobile robots, connected in tandem with coupling devices, to navigate across difficult terrain or in closed spaces. The mobile robots can be controlled cooperatively as a coupled system in linked mode or controlled individually as separate robots.

  5. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Chen, Da-Ren

    2007-05-08

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

  6. Hooked differential mobility spectrometry apparatus and method therefore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A [Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-02-17

    Disclosed are a device and method for improved interfacing of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzers of substantially planar geometry to subsequent or preceding instrument stages. Interfacing is achieved using curved DMS elements, where a thick ion beam emitted by planar DMS analyzers or injected into them for ion filtering is compressed to the gap median by DMS ion focusing effect in a spatially inhomogeneous electric field. Resulting thinner beams are more effectively transmitted through necessarily constrained conductance limit apertures to subsequent instrument stages operated at a pressure lower than DMS, and/or more effectively injected into planar DMS analyzers. The technology is synergetic with slit apertures, slit aperture/ion funnels, and high-pressure ion funnel interfaces known in the art which allow for increasing cross-sectional area of MS inlets. The invention may be used in integrated analytical platforms, including, e.g., DMS/MS, LC/DMS/MS, and DMS/IMS/MS that could replace and/or enhance current LC/MS methods, e.g., for proteomics research.

  7. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are moremore » spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).« less

  8. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).

  9. New Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F e eE F drag 6R p V C slip ( R p ) CPC Q a Q s Steady or Scanned Voltage Migration Velocity * Mobility * Peclet number for migration v E Z p E Z p n p e k B T D Pe...

  10. Tandem betatron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keinigs, Rhonald K. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1992-01-01

    Two betatrons are provided in tandem for alternately accelerating an electron beam to avoid the single flux swing limitation of conventional betatrons and to accelerate the electron beam to high energies. The electron beam is accelerated in a first betatron during a period of increasing magnetic flux. The eletron beam is extracted from the first betatron as a peak magnetic flux is reached and then injected into a second betatron at a time of minimum magnetic flux in the second betatron. The cycle may be repeated until the desired electron beam energy is obtained. In one embodiment, the second betatron is axially offset from the first betatron to provide for electron beam injection directly at the axial location of the beam orbit in the second betatron.

  11. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  12. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer HTDMA : Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem...

  13. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  14. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  15. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  16. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  17. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  18. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ritsche, Argonne National Laboratory. Figure 3. The dynamic rain gauge calibrator. Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer The Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (Figure 4)...

  20. Fueling of tandem mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorker, G.E.; Logan, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the fueling requirements for experimental and demonstration tandem mirror reactors (TMRs), reviews the status of conventional pellet injectors, and identifies some candidate accelerators that may be needed for fueling tandem mirror reactors. Characteristics and limitations of three types of accelerators are described; neutral beam injectors, electromagnetic rail guns, and laser beam drivers. Based on these characteristics and limitations, a computer module was developed for the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC) to select the pellet injector/accelerator combination which most nearly satisfies the fueling requirements for a given machine design.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 3 2.4 Aerosol Observing System Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (AOS- HTDMA) ......

  2. ARM - Measurement - Hygroscopic growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AOS : Aerosol Observing System SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing...

  3. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility...

  4. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  5. PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $999,999 Tandem cell architectures present a path toward higher module efficiencies over single junction designs. This project will develop a gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) on silicon mechanically stacked voltage-matched

  6. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  7. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - ISDAC / RISCAM - Humidified Tandem Differential...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) 2008.04.01, Ghan, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a...

  9. Mobile Apps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobile Apps Mobile Apps Los Alamos mobile apps: info you need . . . anywhere, anytime Group Leader Evelyn Maes Institutional Visits and Events Email Our latest app New Employee Intro: First Look The New Employee Intro: First Look app gives each newly hired Los Alamos National Laboratory employee basic info to meet security, payroll, healthcare, and other benefits enrollment requirements. Great overview before onsite orientation! Featured categories Employees Beyond the Classroom: Exploring

  10. MOBILITY AGREEMENT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MOBILITY AGREEMENT I hereby acknowledge that, as a condition of my employment as a Criminal Investigator with the Department of Energy, Office of Inspector General, I may be...

  11. Mobile Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    app for iPhone and iPod. Primo No Yes Non-LANL device must use Library Remote Access. Proquest No Mobile Devices When using a tablet use this site. PubMed PubMed Lite,...

  12. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  13. Mobile Devices (phones and tablets)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobile Devices (phones and tablets)

  14. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  15. ARM - Measurement - Particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing...

  16. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Nephelometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer RL : Raman Lidar TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AMT : Aerosol Modeling...

  17. ARM - VAP Process - tdmadap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurements (TDMADAP) Instrument Categories Aerosols Output Products tdmaccncoll : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer: Cloud Condensation Nuclei -- D. Collins Primary...

  18. Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    1999-01-01

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  19. Cold Climate Heat Pumps Using Tandem Compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2016-01-01

    In cold climate zones, e.g. ASHRAE climate regions IV and V, conventional electric air-source heat pumps (ASHP) do not work well, due to high compressor discharge temperatures, large pressure ratios and inadequate heating capacities at low ambient temperatures. Consequently, significant use of auxiliary strip heating is required to meet the building heating load. We introduce innovative ASHP technologies as part of continuing efforts to eliminate auxiliary strip heat use and maximize heating COP with acceptable cost-effectiveness and reliability. These innovative ASHP were developed using tandem compressors, which are capable of augmenting heating capacity at low temperatures and maintain superior part-load operation efficiency at moderate temperatures. Two options of tandem compressors were studied; the first employs two identical, single-speed compressors, and the second employs two identical, vapor-injection compressors. The investigations were based on system modeling and laboratory evaluation. Both designs have successfully met the performance criteria. Laboratory evaluation showed that the tandem, single-speed compressor ASHP system is able to achieve heating COP = 4.2 at 47 F (8.3 C), COP = 2.9 at 17 F (-8.3 C), and 76% rated capacity and COP = 1.9 at -13 F (-25 C). This yields a HSPF = 11.0 (per AHRI 210/240). The tandem, vapor-injection ASHP is able to reach heating COP = 4.4 at 47 F, COP = 3.1 at 17 F, and 88% rated capacity and COP = 2.0 at -13 F. This yields a HSPF = 12.0. The system modeling and further laboratory evaluation are presented in the paper.

  20. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  1. Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    higher than those of simple multi or single crystalline silicon cells. While three junction non-silicon tandem solar cells have achieved unconcentrated efficiencies of up to...

  2. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  3. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  4. A tandem-based compact dual-energy gamma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.N.; Ludewigt, B.; Tanaka, N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A.J.; Morse, D.H.; Raber, T.

    2009-11-11

    A dual-energy tandem-type gamma generator has been developed at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The tandem accelerator geometry allows higher energy nuclear reactions to be reached, thereby allowing more flexible generation of MeV-energy gammas for active interrogation applications.

  5. MobileMatch App

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MobileMatch VolunteerMatch Mobile App MobileMatch is a mobile extension (app) to LANL's VolunteerMatch site that allows volunteers to search, sign up and track hours. Contact Giving Campaigns & Volunteering Debbi Wersonick Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 667-7870 Email Engage anytime, anywhere with this easy and intuitive tool! Using MobileMatch app is easy mobilematch-app Now LANL volunteers can search, sign up and track hours right on their mobile device. Get on the Volunteer

  6. Engineering problems of tandem-mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-10-22

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability. This paper discusses some of the many engineering problems facing the designer. We estimated the direct cost to be 2$/W/sub e/. Assuming total (direct and indirect) costs to be twice this number, we need to reduce total costs by factors between 1.7 and 2.3 to compete with future LWRs levelized cost of electricity. These reductions may be possible by designing magnets producing over 20T made possible by use of combinations of superconducting and normal conducting coils as well as improvements in performance and cost of neutral beam and microwave power systems. Scientific and technological understanding and innovation are needed in the area of thermal barrier pumping - a process by which unwanted particles are removed (pumped) from certain regions of velocity and real space in the end plug. Removal of exhaust fuel ions, fusion ash and impurities by action of a halo plasma and plasma dump in the mirror end region is another challenging engineering problem discussed in this paper.

  7. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-05-15

    The order establishes requirements, assigns responsibilities, and provides guidance for federal mobile technology management and employee use of both government furnished and personally-owned mobile devices within DOE and NNSA. Establishes requirements for use of User Agreements to govern mobile devices used for official duties. Does not cancel other directives.

  8. Ion mobility sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  9. Energize Mobile | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Application Link: www.tendrilinc.comenergy-providersapplicationenergize Cost: Free Energize Mobile Screenshot References: Tendril1 Logo: Energize Mobile This...

  10. Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Perry

    2009-04-30

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than that of slim holes. As a result, the research team decided to complete the project, document the tested designs and seek further support for the concept outside of the DOE.

  11. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-21

    The directive will ensure that federal organizations and employees within the Department can use mobile technology to support mission requirements in a safe and secure manner.

  12. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  13. ARM Mobile Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2010-12-13

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Silicon-Based Tandem Solar Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT PROFILE: Silicon-Based Tandem Solar Cells PROJECT PROFILE: Silicon-Based Tandem Solar Cells Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $1,500,000 The project will demonstrate bonded gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) on silicon tandem cells, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of this method of forming higher-efficiency tandem cells, and compare two- and three-terminal device

  15. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  16. ARM - Measurement - Particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer...

  17. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    condensation nuclei counter (CCNc) Size-resolved activation efficiency at multiple S Tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) Size-resolved hygroscopicity distributions...

  18. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter HTDMA : Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)...

  19. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data Single installation TDMA Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Aerosols Not Online TSI Total Sky Imager Cloud...

  20. Available Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCN instrument Collins (Texas A&M) Aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) Collins (Texas A&M) Cloud drop size distribution...

  1. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol composition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments PILS : Particle Into Liquid Sampler TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass...

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2010 Data Announcements, Facility News Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) Data Available at the ARM Data Archive Bookmark and Share Dry samples are collected...

  3. ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AMT : Aerosol Modeling...

  4. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information updated on April 8, 2010, 9:05 pm GMT General Data Description The Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) is an instrument to measure dry size...

  5. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPLATT-II : Single Particle Laser Ablasion Time flown on Aircraft TDMA-AIR : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer- Airborne UW-CONVAIR580 : University of Washington...

  6. Future Mobility in Maryland

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FUTURE MOBILITY IN NEVADA: Meeting the State's Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility October 2009 Prepared by: TRIP 1726 M Street, NW, Suite 401 Washington, D.C. 20036 202-466-6706 (voice) 202-785-4722 (fax) www.tripnet.org Founded in 1971, TRIP ® of Washington, DC, is a nonprofit organization that researches, evaluates and distributes economic and technical data on highway transportation issues. TRIP is sponsored by insurance companies, equipment manufacturers, distributors and suppliers;

  7. Summary of results from the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonen, T.C.

    1981-02-26

    This report summarizes results from the successful experimental operation of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) over the period October 1978 through September 1980. The experimental program, summarized by the DOE milestones given in Table 1-1, had three basic phases: (1) an 8-month checkout period, October 1978 through May 1979; (2) a 6-month initial period of operation, June through November 1979, during which the basic principles of the tandem configuration were demonstrated (i.e., plasma confinement was improved over that of a single-cell mirror); and (3) a 10-month period, December 1979 through September 1980, during which the initial TMX results were corroborated by additional diagnostic measurements and many detailed physics investigations were carried out. This report summarizes the early results, presents results of recent data analysis, and outlines areas of ongoing research and data analysis which will be reported in future journal publications.

  8. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  9. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Ager, III, Joel W. (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  10. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  11. New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) Light, combined with a novel rhodium catalyst, enables greener production of chemical feedstocks from biorenewables. A key...

  12. Structure and Ca[superscript 2+]-Binding Properties of the Tandem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Casuperscript 2+-Binding Properties of the Tandem Csubscript 2 Domains of E-Syt2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Casuperscript 2+-Binding ...

  13. Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (August 2006) | Department of Energy Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (August 2006) Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United

  14. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  15. Current- and lattice-matched tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.

    1985-10-21

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga/sub x/In/sub 1-x/P (0.505 equal to or less than x equal to or less than 0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice-matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low resistance heterojunction, preferably a p/sup +//n/sup +/ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice-matched and current-matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  16. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  17. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

  18. ASSESSMENT OF MARKER PROTEINS IDENTIFIED IN WHOLE CELL EXTRACTS FOR BACTERIAL SPECIATION USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooken, Jennifer M.; Fox, Karen F.; Fox, Alvin; Wunschel, David S.

    2014-02-02

    ASSESSMENT OF MARKER PROTEINS IDENTIFIED IN WHOLE CELL EXTRACTS FOR BACTERIAL SPECIATION USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

  19. Status of High Performance PV: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Tandems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symko-Davies, M.

    2005-02-01

    The High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment. The HiPerf PV Project aims at exploring the ultimate performance limits of existing PV technologies, approximately doubling their sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies during its course. This work includes bringing thin-film cells and modules toward 25% and 20% efficiencies, respectively, and developing multijunction concentrator cells and modules able to convert more than one-third of the sun's energy to electricity (i.e., 33% efficiency). This paper will address recent accomplishments of the NREL in-house research effort involving polycrystalline thin-film tandems, as well as the research efforts under way in the subcontracted area.

  20. Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and mobile substations (MTS) to rapidly restore electrical service to areas subjected to blackouts as a result of equipment failure, natural disasters, acts of terrorism, or war. ...

  1. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; et al

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-costmore » and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.« less

  2. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grtzel, Michael; Noufi, Rommel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  3. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  4. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Project Development Isotope Program Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of

  5. Photo of the Week: Inside the Tandem Mirror Experiment | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Tandem Mirror Experiment Photo of the Week: Inside the Tandem Mirror Experiment December 28, 2012 - 2:22pm Addthis This 1978 photo shows two workers inside the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, a magnetic confinement fusion device designed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In this experiment, magnetic mirrors are placed at both ends of a central magnetic tube. Very hot and dense plasmas inside each mirror enhanced the confinement of another plasma inside the central

  6. Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric Vehicles to Students and Public Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric Vehicles to Students and...

  7. Thin Film Si Bottom Cells for Tandem Device Structures: Final Technical Report, 15 December 2003 - 15 October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelundur, V.; Hegedus, S.; Rohatgi, A.; Birkmire, R.

    2008-11-01

    GIT and IEC developed thin-film Si bottom cell and showed that deposition of top cell in tandem device did not reduce bottom cell performance.

  8. Laser processing technique for fabricating series-connected and tandem junction series-connected solar cells into a solar battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating series-connected and tandem junction series-connected solar cells into a solar battery with laser scribing.

  9. Structure and Ca[superscript 2+]-Binding Properties of the Tandem

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C[subscript 2] Domains of E-Syt2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect and Ca[superscript 2+]-Binding Properties of the Tandem C[subscript 2] Domains of E-Syt2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Ca[superscript 2+]-Binding Properties of the Tandem C[subscript 2] Domains of E-Syt2 Authors: Xu, Junjie ; Bacaj, Taulant ; Zhou, Amy ; Tomchick, Diana R. ; Südhof, Thomas C. ; Rizo, Josep [1] ; UTSMC) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Stanford-MED) ( Publication Date: 2014-12-23

  10. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  11. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibby, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Lawrence, Leo A. (Kennewick, WA); Woodley, Robert E. (Richland, WA); Wilson, Charles N. (Richland, WA); Weber, Edward T. (Kennewick, WA); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

  12. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  13. NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases Mobile Apps to Users NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users Job Status, MOTD and Pilot of VASP Submission Available with More to Come April 23, 2012 In an effort to make...

  14. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  15. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dabala, Dana [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Neamtu, Camelia, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Vasile, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  16. ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011

  17. Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has created codes that ensure that a robot will come to a stop at a precise, specified distance from any obstacle regardless of the robot's initial speed, its physical characteristics, and the responsiveness of the low-level motor control schema. This Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots system iteratively adjusts the robot's action in response to information about the robot's environment.

  18. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tdma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) Instrument Categories...

  19. ARM - Datastreams - tdmahyg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : TDMAHYG Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer: hygroscopic growth rates Active Dates 2005.10.07 -...

  20. ARM - Instrument - htdma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) Instrument Categories Aerosols This instrument...

  1. ARM - Instrument - tdma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) Instrument Categories Aerosols Picture of the...

  2. ARM - VAP Product - tdmaccncoll

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : TDMACCNCOLL Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer: Cloud Condensation Nuclei -- D. Collins Active Dates...

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - tdma-air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer- Airborne (TDMA-AIR) Instrument Categories Aerosols,...

  4. ARM - Datastreams - tdmasize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : TDMASIZE Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer: size-resolved concentrations Active Dates 2005.10.07 -...

  5. Differential comparator cirucit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickling, Ronald M. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A differential comparator circuit for an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) or other application includes a plurality of differential comparators and a plurality of offset voltage generators. Each comparator includes first and second differentially connected transistor pairs having equal and opposite voltage offsets. First and second offset control transistors are connected in series with the transistor pairs respectively. The offset voltage generators generate offset voltages corresponding to reference voltages which are compared with a differential input voltage by the comparators. Each offset voltage is applied to the offset control transistors of at least one comparator to set the overall voltage offset of the comparator to a value corresponding to the respective reference voltage. The number of offset voltage generators required in an ADC application can be reduced by a factor of approximately two by applying the offset voltage from each offset voltage generator to two comparators with opposite logical sense such that positive and negative offset voltages are produced by each offset voltage generator.

  6. ARM - Datastreams - aoshtdma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsaoshtdma Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095581 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSHTDMA AOS Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Active Dates 2012.11.16 - 2016.02.13 Measurement Categories Aerosols Originating Instrument Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) Measurements Only

  7. Sputtered II-VI Alloys and Structures forTandem PV: Final Subcontract Report, 9 December 2003 - 30 July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A. D.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Giolando, D.

    2008-09-01

    This report elaborates on Phase 3 and provides summaries of the first two Phases. Phase 3 research work was divided into five task areas covering different aspects of the II-VI tandem cell.

  8. Progress towards a 30% efficient GaInP/Si tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essig, Stephanie; Ward, Scott; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.; Stradins, Paul; Young, David L.

    2015-08-28

    The performance of dual-junction solar cells with a Si bottom cell has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Simulations show that adding a top junction with an energy bandgap of 1.6 -1.9 eV to a standard silicon solar cell enables efficiencies over 38%. Currently, top junctions of GaInP (1.8 eV) are the most promising as they can achieve 1-sun efficiencies of 20.8% [1]. We fabricated mechanically stacked, four terminal GaInP/Si tandem solar cells using a transparent adhesive between the subcells. These tandem devices achieved an efficiency of 27% under AM1.5 g spectral conditions. Furthermore, higher efficiencies can be achieved by using an improved Si-bottom cell and by optimizing the dual-junction device for long-wavelength light and luminescent coupling between the two junctions.

  9. Progress towards a 30% efficient GaInP/Si tandem solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Essig, Stephanie; Ward, Scott; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.; Stradins, Paul; Young, David L.

    2015-08-28

    The performance of dual-junction solar cells with a Si bottom cell has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Simulations show that adding a top junction with an energy bandgap of 1.6 -1.9 eV to a standard silicon solar cell enables efficiencies over 38%. Currently, top junctions of GaInP (1.8 eV) are the most promising as they can achieve 1-sun efficiencies of 20.8% [1]. We fabricated mechanically stacked, four terminal GaInP/Si tandem solar cells using a transparent adhesive between the subcells. These tandem devices achieved an efficiency of 27% under AM1.5 g spectral conditions. Furthermore, higher efficiencies can be achieved bymore » using an improved Si-bottom cell and by optimizing the dual-junction device for long-wavelength light and luminescent coupling between the two junctions.« less

  10. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malmros, Mark K.; Gulbinski, III, Julian

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods.

  11. Synfuels from fusion: using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, R.W.

    1982-11-01

    This study is concerned with the following area: (1) the tandem mirror reactor and its physics; (2) energy balance; (3) the lithium oxide canister blanket system; (4) high-temperature blanket; (5) energy transport system-reactor to process; (6) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (7) interfacing the GA cycle; (8) matching power and temperature demands; (9) preliminary cost estimates; (10) synfuels beyond hydrogen; and (11) thermodynamics of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O system. (MOW)

  12. High-efficiency, monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem, photovoltaic energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W

    2014-05-27

    A monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem solar photovoltaic converter has at least one, and preferably at least two, subcells grown lattice-matched on a substrate with a bandgap in medium to high energy portions of the solar spectrum and at least one subcell grown lattice-mismatched to the substrate with a bandgap in the low energy portion of the solar spectrum, for example, about 1 eV.

  13. High-efficiency, monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem photovoltaic energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    2011-11-29

    A monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem solar photovoltaic converter has at least one, and preferably at least two, subcells grown lattice-matched on a substrate with a bandgap in medium to high energy portions of the solar spectrum and at least one subcell grown lattice-mismatched to the substrate with a bandgap in the low energy portion of the solar spectrum, for example, about 1 eV.

  14. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  15. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  16. Mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, M.J.; Herndon, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of optimum mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators involves matching the criteria for emergency response with the available technology. This paper presents a general background to teleoperations, a potpourri of the manipulator systems available, and an argument for force reflecting manipulation. The theme presented is that the accomplishment of humanlike endeavors in hostile environments will be most successful when man model capabilities are utilized. The application of recent electronic technology to manipulator development has made new tools available to be applied to emergency response activities. The development activities described are products of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  18. Differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gresham, Christopher A. (Albuquerque, NM); Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger P. (Tucson, AZ)

    2008-07-22

    A differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification. The amplifier circuit increase electronic signal-to-noise ratios in charge detection circuits designed for the detection of very small quantities of electrical charge and/or very weak electromagnetic waves. A differential, integrating capacitive transimpedance amplifier integrated circuit comprising capacitor feedback loops performs time-correlated subtraction of noise.

  19. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  20. High-Efficiency GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Cramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved efficiencies between 25.7-30.2%, depending on illumination conditions. The efficiencies are the highest confirmed two-terminal values measured for any solar cell within each standard illumination category. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance.

  1. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  2. Computationally Enhanced Mobility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computationally Enhanced Mobility Argonne's new integrated transportation modeling ecosystem provides the unprecedented ability to explore the widespread real-world impact of intelligent transportation systems on mobility, energy and the environment. Argonne's new integrated transportation modeling ecosystem provides the unprecedented ability to explore the widespread real-world impact of intelligent transportation systems on mobility, energy and the environment. The U.S. Department of Energy's

  3. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_elion.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Mobile Source Rule Update Efficient Use of Natural Gas Based Fuels in Heavy-Duty Engines The California Demonstration Program for Control of PM from Diesel

  4. Mobile Business Innovation Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Innovation Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mobile Business Innovation Center Place: United States Product: Government & NGO ( Government Public sector ) References:...

  5. Mobile Power Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    laboratory focused on United NationsDepartment of Transportation compliance and battery performance testing. References: Mobile Power Solutions1 This article is a stub....

  6. Mobile Energy Products Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Mobile Energy Products Inc Place: Colorado Springs, Colorado Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Manufacturing subsidiary, which produces nickel sintered plaque for...

  7. Clean Mobile AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AG Place: Munich, Bavaria, Germany Sector: Vehicles Product: Manufacturer of fuel cell-powered drives for small vehicles. References: Clean Mobile AG1 This article is a...

  8. Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO 2 neutral Reduce consumption of fossil fuels and noise Environmental Mobility Unique battery subsidy as benefit Enjoy free charging exclusively at SAP's charging spots...

  9. Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP 5.000 Electric Vehicles in 2020 Ashok R, Horst Terhalle, Marcus Wagner November 14th 2014 © 2014 SAP SE or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 2 Public Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP AGENDA Why is e-Mobility important Marcus Wagner Our strategy "20% e-cars by 2020" Marcus Wagner Regional highlights Ashok R. E-Mobility Service Provider Solution Horst Terhalle FAQ all © 2014 SAP SE or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 3

  10. Public Transport: Moving towards Sustainable Mobility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Transport: Moving towards Sustainable Mobility AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme...

  11. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (1 Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will perform preventative, predictive, and corrective maintenance on Bonneville Power Administration (BPA's) light and heavy mobile equipment in maintenance and filed...

  12. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malmros, M.K.; Gulbinski, J. III.

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing the analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods. 12 figs.

  13. Sour gas dehydration in Mobile Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, F.C. Jr.; Lay, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    An evaluation of Mobil`s different methods of sour gas development utilized offshore and processes selected are presented with the maintenance history. The conclusions are based on field data showing past performance with a correlation made for future development and the selection criteria for dehydration.

  14. Interdigitated Electrical Contacts for Low Electronic Mobility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Semiconductor Photovoltaic Devices - Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Interdigitated Electrical Contacts for Low Electronic Mobility Semiconductor Photovoltaic Devices Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Structures useful for forming contacts to materials having low charge carrier mobility are described. Methods for their formation and use are also described. These

  15. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the computer as possible, the users ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Googles Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile devices operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nations critical infrastructure.

  17. Enhancement of efficiencies for tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices with a p-type charge generation layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Byung Soo; Jeon, Young Pyo; Lee, Dae Uk; Kim, Tae Whan

    2014-10-15

    The operating voltage of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was improved by 3% over that of the organic light-emitting device with a molybdenum trioxide layer. The maximum brightness of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device at 21.9 V was 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}. The dominant peak of the electroluminescence spectra for the devices was related to the fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium emission. - Highlights: Tandem OLEDs with CGL were fabricated to enhance their efficiency. The operating voltage of the tandem OLED with a HAT-CN layer was improved by 3%. The efficiency and brightness of the tandem OLED were 13.9 cd/A and 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}. Efficiency of the OLED with a HAT-CN layer was lower than that with a MoO{sub 3} layer. - Abstract: Tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile or a molybdenum trioxide charge generation layer were fabricated to enhance their efficiency. Current densityvoltage curves showed that the operating voltage of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was improved by 3% over that of the corresponding organic light-emitting device with a molybdenum trioxide layer. The efficiency and the brightness of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device were 13.9 cd/A and 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. The current efficiency of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was lower by 1.1 times compared to that of the corresponding organic light-emitting device with molybdenum trioxide layer due to the decreased charge generation and transport in the 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer resulting from triplettriplet exciton annihilation.

  18. Acid–base bifunctional shell cross-linked micelle nanoreactor for one-pot tandem reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Li -Chen; Lu, Jie; Weck, Marcus; Jones, Christopher W.

    2015-12-29

    Shell cross-linked micelles (SCMs) containing acid sites in the shell and base sites in the core are prepared from amphiphilic poly(2-oxazoline) triblock copolymers. The materials are utilized as two-chamber nanoreactors for a prototypical acid-base bifunctional tandem deacetalization-nitroaldol reaction. Furthermore, the acid and base sites are localized in different regions of the micelle, allowing the two steps in the reaction sequence to largely proceed in separate compartments, akin to the compartmentalization that occurs in biological systems.

  19. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces Prev Next Title: Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural ...

  20. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility ...

  1. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Using...

  2. MHK Technologies/Mobil Stabilized Energy Conversion Platform...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mobil Stabilized Energy Conversion Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Mobil Stabilized Energy Conversion Platform.jpg...

  3. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity Download the presentation slides...

  4. Persu Mobility was Venture Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Persu Mobility was Venture Vehicles Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Persu Mobility (was Venture Vehicles Inc) Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90067 Product: Los Angeles...

  5. And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... ...

  6. Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mobilize Investment in Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

  7. How Would You Use Your Mobile Device to Save Energy?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More and more, people are using their phones and mobile devices to find information -- tell us how you would use your mobile device to save energy.

  8. Fuel Economy.gov - Mobile | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economy.gov - Mobile Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Economy.gov - Mobile AgencyCompany Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector:...

  9. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone ...

  10. NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases Mobile Apps to Users NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users Job Status, MOTD and Pilot of VASP Submission Available with More to Come April 23, 2012 In an effort to make NERSC resources more accessible to its users, the facility is rolling out a number of applications that allow researchers to access scientific data on their web browsers, tablets and smart phones. This month, NERSC announced two new applications now available to its users: The NERSC mobile user portal (http://m.nersc.gov)

  11. Tandem catalysis by palladium nanoclusters encapsulated in metal–organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinle; Guo, Zhiyong; Xiao, Chaoxian; Goh, Tian Wei; Tesfagaber, Daniel; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-08-25

    A bifunctional Zr-MOF catalyst containing palladium nanoclusters (NCs) has been developed. The formation of Pd NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Combining the oxidation activity of Pd NCs and the acetalization activity of the Lewis acid sites in UiO-66-NH2, this catalyst (Pd@UiO-66-NH2) exhibits excellent catalytic activity and selectivity in a one-pot tandem oxidation-acetalization reaction. This catalyst shows 99.9% selectivity to benzaldehyde ethylene acetal in the tandem reaction of benzyl alcohol and ethylene glycol at 99.9% conversion of benzyl alcohol. We also examined various substituted benzyl alcohols and found that alcohols with electron-donating groups showed better conversion and selectivity compared to those with electron-withdrawing groups. As a result, we further proved that there was no leaching of active catalytic species during the reaction and the catalyst can be recycled at least five times without significant deactivation.

  12. Tandem catalysis by palladium nanoclusters encapsulated in metal–organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xinle; Guo, Zhiyong; Xiao, Chaoxian; Goh, Tian Wei; Tesfagaber, Daniel; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-08-25

    A bifunctional Zr-MOF catalyst containing palladium nanoclusters (NCs) has been developed. The formation of Pd NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Combining the oxidation activity of Pd NCs and the acetalization activity of the Lewis acid sites in UiO-66-NH2, this catalyst (Pd@UiO-66-NH2) exhibits excellent catalytic activity and selectivity in a one-pot tandem oxidation-acetalization reaction. This catalyst shows 99.9% selectivity to benzaldehyde ethylene acetal in the tandem reaction of benzyl alcohol and ethylene glycol at 99.9% conversion of benzyl alcohol. We also examined various substituted benzyl alcohols and found that alcohols withmore » electron-donating groups showed better conversion and selectivity compared to those with electron-withdrawing groups. As a result, we further proved that there was no leaching of active catalytic species during the reaction and the catalyst can be recycled at least five times without significant deactivation.« less

  13. Tandem Microwire Solar Cells for Flexible High Efficiency Low Cost Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-03-10

    This project has developed components of a waferless, flexible, low-cost tandem multijunction III-V/Si microwire array solar cell technology which combines the efficiency of wafered III-V photovoltaic technologies with the process designed to meet the Sunshot object. The project focused on design of lattice-matched GaAsP/SiGe two junction cell design and lattice-mismatched GaInP/Si tandem cell design. Combined electromagnetic simulation/device physics models using realistic microwire tandem structures were developed that predict >22% conversion efficiency for known material parameters, such as tunnel junction structure, window layer structure, absorber lifetimes and optical absorption and these model indicate a clear path to 30% efficiency for high quality III-V heterostructures. SiGe microwire arrays were synthesized via Cu-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth with inexpensive chlorosilane and chlorogermance precursors in an atmospheric pressure reactor. SiGe alloy composition in microwires was found to be limited to a maximum of 12% Ge incorporation during chlorogermane growth, due to the melting of the alloy near the solidus composition. Lattice mismatched InGaP double heterostructures were grown by selective epitaxy with a thermal oxide mask on Si microwire substrates using metallorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirms the growth of individual step graded layers and a high density of defects near the wire/III-V interface. Selective epitaxy was initiated with a low temperature nucleation scheme under “atomic layer epitaxy” or “flow mediated epitaxy” conditions whereby the Ga and P containing precursors are alternately introduced into the reactor to promote layer-bylayer growth. In parallel to our efforts on conformal GaInP heteroepitaxy on selectively masked Si microwires, we explored direct, axial growth of GaAs on Si wire arrays as another route to a tandem junction architecture. We proposed axial, lattice-mismatched growth of a GaAs segment that extrude out of a Si wire via a self-aligned SiO2 hollow cylindrical mask. With this growth strategy, misfit dislocations that would normally form at the GaAs/Si interface during thin film epitaxy may bend over to and thus terminate at the sidewall of the SiO2 tube. A reactive-ion etching technique was employed 1) to remove Si to form a hollow, self-aligned SiO2 cylindrical tube as a growth template for GaAs epitaxy using a vertical, showerhead, low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition reactor that was operated at 0.1 atm. Successful epitaxy of axial GaAs wires on non-polar, <111>-oriented Si wire substrates was found at temperatures of ~850C. This and the other III-V/Si heterojunction wire synthesis strategies described here are promising approaches to realize future III-V/Si tandem solar cell designs.

  14. Radiation detection system using semiconductor detector with differential carrier trapping and mobility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whited, Richard C. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in relatively thick semiconductor radiation detectors, such as HgI.sub.2, which exhibit significant hole trapping. Two amplifiers are used: the first measures the charge collected and the second the contribution of the electrons to the charge collected. The outputs of the two amplifiers are utilized to unfold the total charge generated within the detector in response to a radiation event.

  15. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  16. Effective Protocols for Mobile Communications and Networking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinoza, J.; Sholander, P.; Van Leeuwen, B,

    1998-12-01

    This report examines methods of mobile communications with an emphasis on mobile computing and wireless communications. Many of the advances in communications involve the use of Internet Protocol (IP), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ad hoc network protocols. However, many of the advances in these protocols have been focused on wired communications. Recently much focus has been directed at advancing communication technology in the area of mobile wireless networks. This report discusses various protocols used in mobile communications and proposes a number of extensions to existing protocols. A detailed discussion is also included on desirable protocol characteristics and evaluation criteria. In addition, the report includes a discussion on several network simulation tools that maybe used to evaluate network protocols.

  17. Oak Ridge Mobile Agent Community (ORMAC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-06-30

    The Oak Ridge Mobile Agent Community (ORMAC) framework software facilitates the execution of a collection of mobile software agents across a heterogeneous collection of computer systems. ORMAC provides the software agents with the ability to communicate with each other in a synchronous and asynchronous manner. Also, ORMAC allows the software agents to move to any computer system in the community and continue execution there. ORMAC is intended to aid programmers in solving a very generalmoreset of distributed software problems.less

  18. New app takes Lab's volunteer efforts mobile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New app takes Lab's volunteer efforts mobile Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit New app takes Lab's volunteer efforts mobile Lab volunteers now can enter hours on the go April 1, 2014 Chemistry Day volunteer shrinks a balloon using liquid nitrogen. Chemistry Day volunteer shrinks a balloon using liquid nitrogen. Contact Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor

  19. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Isaac, Georgis; Schrom, Brian T.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Wang, Luning; Tan, Li; Lewis, Robert R.; Miller, John H.

    2012-05-15

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance in the life sciences, yet it is not supported by software tools for high throughput identification of metabolites based on their fragmentation spectra. An algorithm (ISIS: in silico identification software) and its implementation are presented and show great promise in generating in silico spectra of lipids for the purpose of structural identification. Instead of using chemical reaction rate equations or rules-based fragmentation libraries, the algorithm uses machine learning to find accurate bond cleavage rates in a mass spectrometer employing collision-induced dissocia-tion tandem mass spectrometry. A preliminary test of the algorithm with 45 lipids from a subset of lipid classes shows both high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Toward a Monolithic Lattice-Matched III-V on Silicon Tandem Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Olson, J. M.; Friedman, D. J.

    2004-09-01

    A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated some of the key components toward realizing such a cell, including GaNPAs top cells grown on silicon substrates, GaP-based tunnel junctions grown on silicon substrates, and diffused silicon junctions formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on silicon. These components have required the development of techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

  1. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  2. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-24

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  3. The effects of mobile ATM switches on PNNI peer group operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-04-01

    This contribution discusses why, and how, mobile networks and mobile switches might be discussed during Phase 1 of the WATM standards process. Next, it reviews mobile routers within Mobile IP. That IP mobility architecture may not apply to the proposed mobile ATM switches. Finally, it discusses problems with PNNI peer group formation and operation when mobile ATM switches are present.

  4. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  5. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  6. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Byrne, Raymond H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Jon R. (Edgewood, NM); Harrington, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gladwell, T. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  7. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian E. Hardin, Stephen T. Connor, Craig H. Peters

    2012-06-11

    Tandem solar cells (TSCs), which use two or more materials to absorb sunlight, have achieved power conversion efficiencies of >25% versus 11-20% for commercialized single junction solar cell modules. The key to widespread commercialization of TSCs is to develop the wide-band, top solar cell that is both cheap to fabricate and has a high open-circuit voltage (i.e. >1V). Previous work in TSCs has generally focused on using expensive processing techniques with slow growth rates resulting in costs that are two orders of magnitude too expensive to be used in conventional solar cell modules. The objective of the PLANT PV proposal was to investigate the feasibility of using Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) as the wide-bandgap absorber in the top cell of a thin film tandem solar cell (TSC). Despite being studied by very few in the solar community, AIGS solar cells have achieved one of the highest open-circuit voltages within the chalcogenide material family with a Voc of 949mV when grown with an expensive processing technique (i.e. Molecular Beam Epitaxy). PLANT PVâ??s goal in Phase I of the DOE SBIR was to 1) develop the chemistry to grow AIGS thin films via solution processing techniques to reduce costs and 2) fabricate new device architectures with high open-circuit voltage to produce full tandem solar cells in Phase II. PLANT PV attempted to translate solution processing chemistries that were successful in producing >12% efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by replacing copper compounds with silver. The main thrust of the research was to determine if it was possible to make high quality AIGS thin films using solution processing and to fully characterize the materials properties. PLANT PV developed several different types of silver compounds in an attempt to fabricate high quality thin films from solution. We found that silver compounds that were similar to the copper based system did not result in high quality thin films. PLANT PV was able to deposit AIGS thin films using a mixture of solution and physical vapor deposition processing, but these films lacked the p-type doping levels that are required to make decent solar cells. Over the course of the project PLANT PV was able to fabricate efficient CIGS solar cells (8.7%) but could not achieve equivalent performance using AIGS. During the nine-month grant PLANT PV set up a variety of thin film characterization tools (e.g. drive-level capacitance profiling) at the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy User Facility, that are now available to both industrial and academic researchers via the grant process. PLANT PV was also able to develop the back end processing of thin film solar cells at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to achieve 8.7% efficient CIGS solar cells. This processing development will be applied to other types of thin film PV cells at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. While PLANT PV was able to study AIGS film growth and optoelectronic properties we concluded that AIGS produced using these methods would have a limited efficiency and would not be commercially feasible. PLANT PV did not apply for the Phase II of this grant.

  8. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell efficiency.

  9. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  10. Conceptual design study FY 1981: synfuels from fusion - using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian, O.H. (ed.)

    1982-02-09

    This report represents the second year's effort of a scoping and conceptual design study being conducted for the express purpose of evaluating the engineering potential of producing hydrogen by thermochemical cycles using a tandem mirror fusion driver. The hydrogen thus produced may then be used as a feedstock to produce fuels such as methane, methanol, or gasoline. The main objective of this second year's study has been to obtain some approximate cost figures for hydrogen production through a conceptual design study.

  11. Ordinary Differential Equation System Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-05

    LSODE is a package of subroutines for the numerical solution of the initial value problem for systems of first order ordinary differential equations. The package is suitable for either stiff or nonstiff systems. For stiff systems the Jacobian matrix may be treated in either full or banded form. LSODE can also be used when the Jacobian can be approximated by a band matrix.

  12. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion ... Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Composite ...

  13. WPN 93-5: Recommended Installation Standards for Mobile Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide technical assistance to the states on recommended installation techniques for weatherization materials installed on mobile homes.

  14. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists PDF icon 2004_deer_sloan.pdf More Documents & Publications Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES

  15. GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ti022_rizzoni_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility Vehicle Technologies

  16. Comments on: Texas Tech University mobile doppler radars provide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    texas-tech-university-mobile-doppler-radars-provide-unique-wind-measurements-to-multi-instrument-doe-field-campaign...

  17. Mobility Agreement for Criminal Investigators | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mobility Agreement for Criminal Investigators Mobility Agreement for Criminal Investigators PDF icon Mobility Agreement More Documents & Publications Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999 Inspection Report: IG-0790 Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001

  18. Progress in High-Performance PV: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Tandem Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symko-Davies, M.

    2004-08-01

    The High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of PV for cost-competitive applications. The goal is that PV will contribute significantly to the U.S. and world energy supply and environmental enhancement in the 21st century. The HiPerf PV Project aims at exploring the ultimate performance limits of existing PV technologies, approximately doubling their sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies during its course, to accelerate and enhance their impact in the marketplace. To accomplish this, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. This paper will describe progress of the subcontractor and in-house R&D on critical pathways for a PV technology having a high potential to reach cost-competitiveness goals: 25%-efficient, low-cost polycrystalline thin-film tandems for large-area, flat-plate modules.

  19. Structural Insights into the Cooperative Binding of SeqA to a Tandem GATC Repeat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Y.; Brendler, T; Austin, S; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    SeqA is a negative regulator of DNA replication in Escherichia coli and related bacteria that functions by sequestering the origin of replication and facilitating its resetting after every initiation event. Inactivation of the seqA gene leads to unsynchronized rounds of replication, abnormal localization of nucleoids and increased negative superhelicity. Excess SeqA also disrupts replication synchrony and affects cell division. SeqA exerts its functions by binding clusters of transiently hemimethylated GATC sequences generated during replication. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger formation and disassembly of such complex are unclear. We present here the crystal structure of a dimeric mutant of SeqA [SeqA{Delta}(41-59)-A25R] bound to tandem hemimethylated GATC sites. The structure delineates how SeqA forms a high-affinity complex with DNA and it suggests why SeqA only recognizes GATC sites at certain spacings. The SeqA-DNA complex also unveils additional protein-protein interaction surfaces that mediate the formation of higher ordered complexes upon binding to newly replicated DNA. Based on this data, we propose a model describing how SeqA interacts with newly replicated DNA within the origin of replication and at the replication forks.

  20. Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

  1. Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Save the date: July 12–14 for Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation! This year, the conference is in July—same place, different month! Hear directly from leading bioenergy experts from the public and private sectors. You will hear from government agency officials, academic researchers, and members of Congress, industry, and the national laboratories. Click below to add it to your Outlook Calendar!

  2. EPA Mobile Source Enforcement Memo 1A

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND COMPLIANCE ASSURANCE September 4, 1997 Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A SUBJECT: Tampering Enforcement Policy for Alternative Fuel Aftermarket Conversions A. Purpose The purpose of this document is to clarify and revise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) "tampering" enforcement policy for motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines originally designed to

  3. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGVs and UAVs. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  4. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stappaerts, Eddy A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  5. Solid state cloaking for electrical charge carrier mobility control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, Bolin; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-07-07

    An electrical mobility-controlled material includes a solid state host material having a controllable Fermi energy level and electrical charge carriers with a charge carrier mobility. At least one Fermi level energy at which a peak in charge carrier mobility is to occur is prespecified for the host material. A plurality of particles are distributed in the host material, with at least one particle disposed with an effective mass and a radius that minimize scattering of the electrical charge carriers for the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy of peak charge carrier mobility. The minimized scattering of electrical charge carriers produces the peak charge carrier mobility only at the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy, set by the particle effective mass and radius, the charge carrier mobility being less than the peak charge carrier mobility at Fermi level energies other than the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy.

  6. Anisotropic charged impurity-limited carrier mobility in monolayer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2014-12-07

    The room temperature carrier mobility in atomically thin 2D materials is usually far below the intrinsic limit imposed by phonon scattering as a result of scattering by remote charged impurities in its environment. We simulate the charged impurity-limited carrier mobility ? in bare and encapsulated monolayer phosphorene. We find a significant temperature dependence in the carrier mobilities (? ? T{sup ??}) that results from the temperature variability of the charge screening and varies with the crystal orientation. The anisotropy in the effective mass leads to an anisotropic carrier mobility, with the mobility in the armchair direction about one order of magnitude larger than in the zigzag direction. In particular, this mobility anisotropy is enhanced at low temperatures and high carrier densities. Under encapsulation with a high-? overlayer, the mobility increases by up to an order of magnitude although its temperature dependence and its anisotropy are reduced.

  7. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  8. Numerical Differentiation of Noisy, Nonsmooth Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chartrand, Rick

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of differentiating a function specified by noisy data. Regularizing the differentiation process avoids the noise amplification of finite-difference methods. We use total-variation regularization, which allows for discontinuous solutions. The resulting simple algorithm accurately differentiates noisy functions, including those which have a discontinuous derivative.

  9. Voltage dependence of the differential capacitance of a p{sup +}-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhovtsov, N. A.

    2013-04-15

    The dependences of the differential capacitance and current of a p{sup +}-n junction with a uniformly doped n region on the voltage in the junction region are calculated. The p{sup +}-n junction capacitance controls the charge change in the junction region taking into account a change in the electric field of the quasi-neutral n region and a change in its bipolar drift mobility with increasing excess charge-carrier concentration. It is shown that the change in the sign of the p{sup +}-n junction capacitance with increasing injection level is caused by a decrease in the bipolar drift mobility as the electron-hole pair concentration in the n region increases. It is shown that the p{sup +}-n junction capacitance decreases with increasing reverse voltage and tends to a constant positive value.

  10. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  11. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  12. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  13. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Smiecinski, A.

    1996-04-30

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells.

  14. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to making a trip to that location. Some sites in our database have addresses that could not be located. This may result in the site appearing in the center of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at 800-254-6735. They will be able to assist

  15. Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology In February 2015 the third workshop in the CrossConnects series, with a focus on Improving Data Mobility & Management for International Cosmology, was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Scientists from fields including astrophysics, cosmology, and

  16. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 12, 2015. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Staged Upgrades as a

  17. Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation July 12-14, 2016 Bioenergy 2016 Conference Logo Walter E. Washington Convention Center 801 Mt. Vernon Place, NW Washington, D.C. 20001 On July 12-14, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its ninth annual conference-Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation. Partnering with the Clean

  18. Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Emission Credit Brokers PDF icon 2002_deer_sloan.pdf More Documents & Publications Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits An Experimental Study of PM Emission Characteristics of Commercial Diesel Engine with Urea-SCR System Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset

  19. DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Expo | Department of Energy Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy Expo DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy Expo October 9, 2009 - 12:54pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), along with Pratt & Whitney Power Systems, and Chena Power LLC demonstrated the PureCycle® mobile geothermal power generation unit at the 2009 Geothermal Energy

  20. Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App Graphic of the inside of a house, with table and chairs, and a window looking outside. Better Buildings Residential Network member Efficiency Nova Scotia recently released Spot it!-an energy efficiency game app for mobile devices. The app features 13 levels where players are challenged to spot the difference between efficient and inefficient rooms in a typical

  1. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator Now Available - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator Now Available Truck drivers can find idle reduction facilities using cell phones and PDAs September 15, 2009 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) expanded its suite of Web-based, fuel-efficiency tools by launching the Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator. This comprehensive mobile application helps truck drivers find public truck stops with idle reduction facilities using a cell phone,

  2. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Yellowstone National Park | Department of Energy Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Case study describes the performance of a mobile photovoltaic system installed in 2011 to provide power to Bechler Ranger Station in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. This small, remote outpost is not served by the electric utility grid and previously

  3. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Field Workers | Department of Energy Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants' (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC)

  4. Highly stable and efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices with intermediate connectors using lithium amide as n-type dopant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Aziz, Hany E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-25

    In this work, we report thermally decomposable lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}) feasible to function as an effective n-type dopant for intermediate connectors in tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Metallic lithium, which is released from the decomposition process of LiNH{sub 2}, is proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and responsible for n-type electrical doping of electron transporting materials. We demonstrate that tandem OLEDs using LiNH{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as n-type dopants, respectively, give a comparable electroluminescence efficiency and, moreover, the device with LiNH{sub 2} has far longer operational lifetime. The results therefore highlight the significance of selecting suitable n-type dopant in intermediate connectors to fabricate high-stability tandem OLEDs.

  5. EPA Climate Leaders Mobile Source Guidance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EPA Climate Leaders Mobile Source Guidance AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine...

  6. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge...

  7. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Mobile Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Mobile site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  8. A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring ... used to interrogate impedance-based sensors for structural health monitoring applications. ...

  9. V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users Login ... and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-076: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Bugs Let ...

  10. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear PowerPlant Field Workers ... for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for ...

  11. Sandia Energy - Patent Awarded for the Fuel Cell Mobile Light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patent Awarded for the Fuel Cell Mobile Light Home Energy CRF Facilities Partnership News Energy Efficiency News & Events Systems Engineering Center for Infrastructure Research and...

  12. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2016 Title: Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and...

  13. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Foam Mobility Control 1 st Annual Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: July 2003 Reporting Period End Date: June 2004 Principal Authors: George J. Hirasaki, Rice...

  14. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The following overarching hypothesis will drive our research: 'Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of ...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Application of the ARM Mobile Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Study the Aerosol Indirect Effects in China Campaign Links China Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to...

  16. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mobility of Supercooled liquid...

  17. Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company (SAMREF) Name: Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Address: P.O. Box 30078 Place: Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Sector: Oil and Gas Product: Crude Oil Refining Phone...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Condensation Nuclei Closure During CLASIC 2007 Jason Tomlinson and Don Collins PNNL Texas A&M University March 13 th , 2008 Acknowledgements: Ground crew, pilots, and flight planners. Work funded under DOE Grant #39495 * A major redesign of the Texas A&M Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) occurred in 2005/2006 - Simultaneous measurements of size distributions and the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol * For the CLASIC campaign, a Droplet

  19. Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

  20. Manufacturing of High-Efficiency Bi-Facial Tandem Concentrator Solar Cells: February 20, 2009--August 20, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtczuk , S.

    2011-06-01

    Spire Semiconductor made concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cells using a new bi-facial growth process and met both main program goals: a) 42.5% efficiency 500X (AM1.5D, 25C, 100mW/cm2); and b) Ready to supply at least 3MW/year of such cells at end of program. We explored a unique simple fabrication process to make a N/P 3-junction InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs tandem cells . First, the InGaAs bottom cell is grown on the back of a GaAs wafer. The wafers are then loaded into a cassette, spin-rinsed to remove particles, dipped in dilute NH4OH and spin-dried. The wafers are then removed from the cassette loaded the reactor for GaAs middle and InGaP top cell growth on the opposite wafer face (bi-facial growth). By making the epitaxial growth process a bit more complex, we are able to avoid more complex processing (such as large area wafer bonding or epitaxial liftoff) used in the inverted metamorphic (IMM) approach to make similar tandem stacks. We believe the yield is improved compared to an IMM process. After bi-facial epigrowth, standard III-V cell steps (back metal, photolithography for front grid, cap etch, AR coat, dice) are used in the remainder of the process.

  1. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  2. Checking out HUD`s proposed mobile home performance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.

    1993-11-01

    This article evaluates both the performance of two mobile homes built to meet recently proposed federal energy performance standards and the standards themselves. Topics include test methods, results, thermal exposure infrared scan results; regulators, thermal characteristics of test homes, real life conditions, factory observations, the future of mobile home energy efficiency.

  3. Automotive Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility Automotive Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility Overview of challenges and future fuel options PDF icon deer12_warnecke.pdf More Documents & Publications The Drive for Energy Independence and Fuels of the Future The Drive for Energy Independence and Fuels of the Future Verification of Shell GTL Fuel as CARB Alternative Diesel

  4. The relationship between polymer mobility and potential energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, John Dwane; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Budzien, Joanne L.

    2005-01-01

    The WLF equation is typically used to describe the dependence of polymer mobility on temperature at atmospheric pressure. Tests at different pressures would at least require different WLF parameterization. Completely different tests, for example, probing the temperature dependence of mobility at constant density, would require even greater modifications. By performing molecular dynamics simulations on simple chain molecules equilibrated at different thermodynamic states, we have shown that the mobility depends in a more general sense on the potential energy density of the system. That is, mobilities for any equilibrated state collapse onto one master curve when plotted against the potential energy density. Moreover, this relationship can be fit by either a 'generalized' WLF equation or by a power-law relationship observed in critical phenomena. When this mobility relationship is used within a rheologically simple, thermodynamically consistent, viscoelastic framework, quantitative agreement is seen between experimental data and theoretical predictions on a range of tests covering enthalpy relaxation to mechanical yield to physical aging.

  5. Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-12-14

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  6. Determining the risk of cardiovascular disease using ion mobility of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2010-05-11

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  7. Segregated tandem filter for enhanced conversion efficiency in a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, E.J.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Dziendziel, R.J.

    1997-12-23

    A filter system to transmit short wavelength radiation and reflect long wavelength radiation for a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion cell comprises an optically transparent substrate segregation layer with at least one coherent wavelength in optical thickness; a dielectric interference filter deposited on one side of the substrate segregation layer, the interference filter being disposed toward the source of radiation, the interference filter including a plurality of alternating layers of high and low optical index materials adapted to change from transmitting to reflecting at a nominal wavelength {lambda}{sub IF} approximately equal to the bandgap wavelength {lambda}{sub g} of the thermophotovoltaic cell, the interference filter being adapted to transmit incident radiation from about 0.5{lambda}{sub IF} to {lambda}{sub IF} and reflect from {lambda}{sub IF} to about 2{lambda}{sub IF}; and a high mobility plasma filter deposited on the opposite side of the substrate segregation layer, the plasma filter being adapted to start to become reflecting at a wavelength of about 1.5{lambda}{sub IF}. 10 figs.

  8. Segregated tandem filter for enhanced conversion efficiency in a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.J.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Dziendziel, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    A filter system to transmit short wavelength radiation and reflect long wavelength radiation for a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion cell comprises an optically transparent substrate segregation layer with at least one coherent wavelength in optical thickness; a dielectric interference filter deposited on one side of the substrate segregation layer, the interference filter being disposed toward the source of radiation, the interference filter including a plurality of alternating layers of high and low optical index materials adapted to change from transmitting to reflecting at a nominal wavelength {lambda}{sub IF} approximately equal to the bandgap wavelength {lambda}{sub g} of the thermophotovoltaic cell, the interference filter being adapted to transmit incident radiation from about 0.5{lambda}{sub IF} to {lambda}{sub IF} and reflect from {lambda}{sub IF} to about 2{lambda}{sub IF}; and a high mobility plasma filter deposited on the opposite side of the substrate segregation layer, the plasma filter being adapted to start to become reflecting at a wavelength of about 1.5{lambda}{sub IF}.

  9. Segregated tandem filter for enhanced conversion efficiency in a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Edward J. (Clifton Park, NY); Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY); Dziendziel, Randolph J. (Middlegrove, NY)

    1997-01-01

    A filter system to transmit short wavelength radiation and reflect long wavelength radiation for a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion cell comprises an optically transparent substrate segregation layer with at least one coherent wavelength in optical thickness; a dielectric interference filter deposited on one side of the substrate segregation layer, the interference filter being disposed toward the source of radiation, the interference filter including a plurality of alternating layers of high and low optical index materials adapted to change from transmitting to reflecting at a nominal wavelength .lambda..sub.IF approximately equal to the bandgap wavelength .lambda..sub.g of the thermophotovoltaic cell, the interference filter being adapted to transmit incident radiation from about 0.5.lambda..sub.IF to .lambda..sub.IF and reflect from .lambda..sub.IF to about 2.lambda..sub.IF ; and a high mobility plasma filter deposited on the opposite side of the substrate segregation layer, the plasma filter being adapted to start to become reflecting at a wavelength of about 1.5.lambda..sub.IF.

  10. Reactive triblock polymers from tandem ring-opening polymerization for nanostructured vinyl thermosets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amendt, Mark A.; Pitet, Louis M.; Moench, Sarah; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2013-03-07

    Multiply functional hydroxyl telechelic poly(cyclooctene-s-5-norbornene-2-methylene methacrylate) was synthesized by ring opening metathesis (co)polymerization of cis-cyclooctene and 5-norbornene-2-methylene methacrylate using the second generation Grubbs catalyst in combination with a symmetric chain transfer agent bearing hydroxyl functionality. The resulting hydroxyl-telechelic polymer was used as a macroinitiator for the ring opening transesterification polymerization of d,l-lactide to form reactive poly(lactide)-b-poly(cyclooctene-s-5-norbornene-2-methylene methacrylate)-b-poly(lactide) triblock polymers. Subsequently, the triblocks were crosslinked by free radical copolymerization with several vinyl monomers including styrene, divinylbenzene, methyl methacrylate, and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. Certain conditions led to optically transparent thermosets with mesoscale phase separation as evidenced by small angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy. Disordered, bicontinuous structures with nanoscopic domains were generated in several cases, rendering the samples attractive for size-selective membrane applications.

  11. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

    2011-03-28

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  12. De novo tandem duplication of chromosome segement 22q11-q12: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Carrozzo, R.

    1995-04-10

    We report on a case of duplication of the segment 22q11-q12 due to a de novo duplication. Molecular cytogenetics studies demonstrated this to be a tandem duplication, flanked proximally by the marker D22Z4, a centromeric alpha satellite DNA repeat, and distally by D22S260, an anonymous DNA marker proximal to the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint. The segment includes the regions responsible for the {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes}, Di George, and velo-cardio-facial syndromes and extends distal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). The clinical picture is dominated by the cardiac defects and includes findings reminiscent of {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes} syndrome. These findings reinforce the hypothesis that the proximal 22q region contains dosage-sensitive genes involved in development. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Impact of sub-cell internal luminescence yields on energy conversion efficiencies of tandem solar cells: A design principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Lin Kim, Changsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Chen, Shaoqiang; Sato, Shintaroh; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-20

    To develop a realistic design principle, we calculated the maximum conversion efficiency ?{sub sc} and optimized sub-cell band-gap energies E{sub g} in double-junction tandem solar cells via a detailed-balance theory, paying particular attention to their dependence on internal luminescence quantum yields y{sub int} of the top and bottom sub-cell materials. A strong drop in the maximum ?{sub sc} occurs when y{sub int} slightly drops from 1 to 0.9, where the drop in y{sub int} of the bottom cell causes a stronger effect than that of the top cell. For low values of y{sub int}, the maximum ?{sub sc} has a simple logarithmic dependence on the geometric mean of the two sub-cells'y{sub int}.

  14. Development of polarization-controlled multi-pass Thomson scattering system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Morimoto, M.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Kawahata, K.; Funaba, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Minami, T. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    In the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, the typical electron density is comparable to that of the peripheral plasma of torus-type fusion devices. Therefore, an effective method to increase Thomson scattering (TS) signals is required in order to improve signal quality. In GAMMA 10, the yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG)-TS system comprises a laser, incident optics, light collection optics, signal detection electronics, and a data recording system. We have been developing a multi-pass TS method for a polarization-based system based on the GAMMA 10 YAG TS. To evaluate the effectiveness of the polarization-based configuration, the multi-pass system was installed in the GAMMA 10 YAG-TS system, which is capable of double-pass scattering. We carried out a Rayleigh scattering experiment and applied this double-pass scattering system to the GAMMA 10 plasma. The integrated scattering signal was made about twice as large by the double-pass system.

  15. Monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem, ultra-thin, strain-counterbalanced, photovoltaic energy converters with optimal subcell bandgaps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO); Mascarenhas, Angelo (Lakewood, CO)

    2012-05-08

    Modeling a monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem, solar photovoltaic converter or thermophotovoltaic converter by constraining the bandgap value for the bottom subcell to no less than a particular value produces an optimum combination of subcell bandgaps that provide theoretical energy conversion efficiencies nearly as good as unconstrained maximum theoretical conversion efficiency models, but which are more conducive to actual fabrication to achieve such conversion efficiencies than unconstrained model optimum bandgap combinations. Achieving such constrained or unconstrained optimum bandgap combinations includes growth of a graded layer transition from larger lattice constant on the parent substrate to a smaller lattice constant to accommodate higher bandgap upper subcells and at least one graded layer that transitions back to a larger lattice constant to accommodate lower bandgap lower subcells and to counter-strain the epistructure to mitigate epistructure bowing.

  16. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  17. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, Aed M. (Dearborn, MI); Ward, Clyde R. (Aiken, SC); Jones, Joel D. (Aiken, SC); Mallet, William R. (Cowichan Bay, CA); Harpring, Larry J. (North Augusta, SC); Collins, Montenius X. (Blackville, SC); Anderson, Erin K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

  18. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

    1999-08-10

    A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

  19. Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  20. Alternative non-CFC mobile air conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.; Kyle, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Concern about the destruction of the global environment by chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) fluids has become an impetus in the search for alternative, non-CFC refrigerants and cooling methods for mobile air conditioning (MAC). While some alternative refrigerants have been identified, they are not considered a lasting solution because of their high global warming potential, which could result in their eventual phaseout. In view of this dilemma, environmentally acceptable alternative cooling methods have become important. This report, therefore, is aimed mainly at the study of alternative automotive cooling methodologies, although it briefly discusses the current status of alternative refrigerants. The alternative MACs can be divided into work-actuated and heat-actuated systems. Work-actuated systems include conventional MAC, reversed Brayton air cycle, rotary vane compressor air cycle, Stirling cycle, thermoelectric (TE) cooling, etc. Heat-actuated MACs include metal hydride cooling, adsorption cooling, ejector cooling, absorption cycle, etc. While we are better experienced with some work-actuated cycle systems, heat-actuated cycle systems have a high potential for energy savings with possible waste heat applications. In this study, each altemative cooling method is discussed for its advantages and its limits.

  1. Feedback Wanted: Help the Energy Department Go Mobile, Open Data! |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Feedback Wanted: Help the Energy Department Go Mobile, Open Data! Feedback Wanted: Help the Energy Department Go Mobile, Open Data! August 13, 2012 - 4:35pm Addthis The Energy Department’s main site, Energy.gov and its contents, are now available on the go. This allows users to access the Energy Departments’ resources over a variety of mobile devices such as smart phones and tablets. The Energy Department's main site, Energy.gov and its contents, are now

  2. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Mobile, Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mobile, Alabama FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Mobile, Alabama October 16-17, 2012 Hosted by Alabama Power Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:30 am Welcome Greg Reardon, Alabama Power Bob Chappelle, Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce 8:45 am Chairman's Corner David McAndrew, FEMP 9:00 am Washington Update Tim Unruh, FEMP 9:30 am Air Force Real Property Agency Enhanced Use Lease Program Brian Brown, Air Force Real Property Agency Strategic Asset Utilization Dave Swanson, Air Force Real Property Agency Strategic

  3. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2015-06-23

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  4. New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Future Energy for Mobility Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st...

  5. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2014-09-15

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  6. Mobile Torrefaction Machine" James, Joseph J. [President, ATP...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State University (NCSU), which ATP has licensed, could be feasibly deployed in a mobile unit. The study adds to the area investigated, by having ATP's STTR Phase I team give...

  7. Raymond Burns > Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile > Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alumni > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Raymond Burns Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile raymond.burns@gmail.com Formerly a member of the DiSalvo Group, Ray earned his PhD in August 2013

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The new mobile OSTI website http:m.osti.gov is ready to travel and provides the latest research, OSTI news, award-winning OSTIblog, as well as OSTI YouTube, Facebook & Twitter ...

  9. GE MEMS for LTE Advanced Mobile Devices | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMS Switch Technology Demonstrates Performance Which Could Meet Demands for Next-Generation "True 4G" Mobile Devices Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on...

  10. Sandia Energy - Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lights Tested, Proven...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and in other applications. (Photo by Dino Vournas) Mobile lighting systems powered by hydrogen (H2) fuel cells are cleaner, quieter, and now have a proven track record in...

  11. MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.govomsm6.htm Cost: Free References: http:www.epa.govomsm6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for...

  12. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  13. Aspects of Exxon Mobil Corporation's Acquisition of XTO Energy Inc

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    A summary presentation to inform discussion of the recently announced acquisition of XTO Energy Inc. by Exxon Mobil Corporation, a transaction which is reportedly $41 billion in value. "Aspects of Exxon Mobil Corporation's Acquisition of XTO Energy Inc" presents non-proprietary company-level oil and gas production and reserve data and the relevant U.S. aggregate data published by the Energy Information Administration.

  14. ARM Mobile Facility - Design and Schedule for Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobile Facility - Design and Schedule for Integration K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Abstract The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that can be deployed anywhere in the world for up to 12 months at a time. This system shall be modular so that it can meet the needs of ARM science objectives of each individual deployment. The design phase for developing the AMF has begun. A design review was held

  15. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multifunctional, antifouling surfaces (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces « Prev Next » Title: Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (PAGES). This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical

  16. Making Mobile Measurement Using an EEPS Spectrometer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making Mobile Measurement Using an EEPS Spectrometer Making Mobile Measurement Using an EEPS Spectrometer 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: TSI Incorporated PDF icon 2004_deer_johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements California's Efforts for Advancing Ultrafine Particle Number Measurements for Clean Diesel Exhaust Evaluation of the European PMP Methodologies

  17. WIPP Mobile Loading Unit Contract - 8-27-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile Loading Unit Services Cincinnati, Ohio, August 27, 2012 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business contract to Celeritex, LLC, (a Joint Venture between Project Services Group, LLC and DeNuke Contracting Services Inc.) of Suwanee, Georgia. The contract is to provide Mobile Loading Unit services in support of the National TRU Program and the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New

  18. NREL: Technology Deployment - Mobile App Puts Alternative Fueling Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations in the Palm of Your Hand Mobile App Puts Alternative Fueling Station Locations in the Palm of Your Hand News NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Using the Enhanced Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Stations Database Sponsors U.S. Department of Energy Related Stories Remote Shading Tool Has Potential to Reduce Solar Soft Costs by 17 Cents/Watt Contact

  19. EPA Mobile Source Rule Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mobile Source Rule Update EPA Mobile Source Rule Update 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program PDF icon deer_2003_charmley.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Diesel Update Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine

  20. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Webinar: Mobilizing Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy program will be hosting a webinar on Feb. 25, 2016 to present the findings of their “Mobilize Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains” project. Over the last three years, researchers have collaborated to examine the prospects for large-scale mobilization of bioenergy resources across the globe. Members of Bioenergy Technologies Office staff support the research and activities and IEA Bioenergy. Email to register to attend the webinar.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mobil Oil Corp. (VA.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation VA.01-1 Location: 818 Perry Street , Richmond , Virginia VA.01-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 VA.01-2 VA.01-3 Site Operations: Research/Development to recover Uranium as a byproduct of phosphate production; preparatory process for pilot plant scale operation at Nichols, Florida.

  2. Low-voltage differentially-signaled modulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.; Hsia, Alexander H.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    Photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes at least one modulator section and differential drive circuitry. The at least one modulator section includes a P-type layer and an N-type layer forming a PN junction in the modulator section. The differential drive circuitry is electrically coupled to the P-type layer and the N-type layer of the at least one modulator section.

  3. Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectroscopy (DEMS) > Analytical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources > Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Analytical Resources In This Section Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectroscopy (DEMS) Electron Microscopy X-Ray Diffraction Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectroscopy (DEMS) DEMS and in situ FTIR Direct alcohol fuel cells are those which utilize small organic molecules, such as methanol or ethanol, as fuels without first reforming them to hydrogen gas. These devices promise to be an efficient means of converting

  4. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination equipment Command and control equipment includes a data acquisition and handling system, two meteorological stations, video equipment, and multiple communication systems. The Phase II MMAS motor home also serves an as environmentally controlled on-site command post for the MMAS operators when deployed. The data developed by the MMAS will be used to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to transport, store, and dispose of agent-filled munitions in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner.

  5. DISCLAIMER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-TR-090 Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer/Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) Handbook Don Collins June 2010 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research D Collins, June 2010, DOE/SC-ARM-TR-090 ii Contents 1.0 General Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Contacts

  6. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation ...

  7. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge ... Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space ...

  8. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  9. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  10. Efficient enhancement of hydrogen production by Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Feng Chen, Chao; Liu, Chang; Xing, Zhuo; Liu, Dan; Xiao, Xiangheng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Yichao; Jiang, Changzhong; Shen, Shaohua; Fu, Yanming

    2015-03-23

    Highly efficient semiconductor photoelectrodes for solar hydrogen production through photocatalytic water splitting are a promising and challenge solution to solve the energy problems. In this work, Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrode was designed and prepared. An increase of 11 times of photocurrent is achieved in the Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO photoelectrode comparing to that of the Cu{sub 2}O film. The high performance of the Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO film is due to the optimized design of the tandem triple-junction structure, where the localized surface Plasmon resonance of Ag and the hetero-junctions efficiently absorb solar energy, produce, and separate electron-hole pairs in the photocathode.

  11. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  12. V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Login Anonymously | Department of Energy 5: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users Login Anonymously V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users Login Anonymously September 5, 2013 - 12:33am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Cisco Mobility Services Engine. A remote user can login anonymously. PLATFORM: Cisco Mobility Services Engine ABSTRACT: A vulnerability in Cisco Mobility Services Engine could allow an

  13. Troglitazone induces differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denninger, Viola; Figarella, Katherine; Schoenfeld, Caroline; Brems, Stefanie; Busold, Christian; Lang, Florian; Hoheisel, Joerg; Duszenko, Michael . E-mail: michael.duszenko@uni-tuebingen.de

    2007-05-15

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite causing sleeping sickness, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and undergoes a complex lifecycle including several defined stages within the insect vector and its mammalian host. In the latter, differentiation from the long slender to the short stumpy form is induced by a yet unknown factor of trypanosomal origin. Here we describe that some thiazolidinediones are also able to induce differentiation. In higher eukaryotes, thiazolidinediones are involved in metabolism and differentiation processes mainly by binding to the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma}. Our studies focus on the effects of troglitazone on bloodstream form trypanosomes. Differentiation was monitored using mitochondrial markers (membrane potential, succinate dehydrogenase activity, inhibition of oxygen uptake by KCN, amount of cytochrome transcripts), morphological changes (Transmission EM and light microscopy), and transformation experiments (loss of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein coat and increase of dihydroliponamide dehydrogenase activity). To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these changes, microarray analyses were performed, showing an upregulation of expression site associated gene 8 (ESAG8), a potential differentiation regulator.

  14. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  15. Passive millimeter wave differential interference contrast polarimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Kelly, James F; Sheen, David M; Tedeschi, Jonathan R; Hall, Thomas E; Hatchell, Brian K; Valdez, Patrick; McMakin, Douglas L

    2014-04-29

    Differential polarization imaging systems include an axicon configured to provide a displacement of ray bundles associated with different image patches. The displaced ray bundles are directed to antenna horns and orthomode transducers so as to provide outputs correspond to orthogonal linear states of polarization (SOPs). The outputs are directed to a differential radiometer so that Stokes parameter differences between image patches can be obtained. The ray bundle displacements can be selected to correspond to a mechanical spacing of antenna horns. In some examples, ray bundle displacement corresponds to a displacement less than the diffraction limit.

  16. New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuels - Future Energy for Mobility Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_simnick.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Well-to-Wheels Analysis of

  17. Method of multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2009-06-02

    A method for analyzing analytes from a sample introduced into a Spectrometer by generating a pseudo random sequence of a modulation bins, organizing each modulation bin as a series of submodulation bins, thereby forming an extended pseudo random sequence of submodulation bins, releasing the analytes in a series of analyte packets into a Spectrometer, thereby generating an unknown original ion signal vector, detecting the analytes at a detector, and characterizing the sample using the plurality of analyte signal subvectors. The method is advantageously applied to an Ion Mobility Spectrometer, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer interfaced with a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer.

  18. Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    On February 9, 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its MSAT2 rule, which will establish controls on gasoline, passenger vehicles, and portable fuel containers. The controls are designed to reduce emissions of benzene and other hazardous air pollutants. Benzene is a known carcinogen, and the EPA estimates that mobile sources produced more than 70% of all benzene emissions in 1999. Other mobile source air toxics, including 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and naphthalene, also are thought to increase cancer rates or contribute to other serious health problems.

  19. An Iterated, Multipoint Differential Transform Method for Numerically

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evolving Partial Differential Equation Initial-Value Problems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: An Iterated, Multipoint Differential Transform Method for Numerically Evolving Partial Differential Equation Initial-Value Problems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Iterated, Multipoint Differential Transform Method for Numerically Evolving Partial Differential Equation Initial-Value Problems Authors: Finkel, H. J. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (LCF) Publication

  20. Continuum Modeling and Control of Large Nonuniform Wireless Networks via Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chong, Edwin K. P.; Hannig, Jan; Estep, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We inmore » troduce a continuum modeling method to approximate a class of large wireless networks by nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). This method is based on the convergence of a sequence of underlying Markov chains of the network indexed by N , the number of nodes in the network. As N goes to infinity, the sequence converges to a continuum limit, which is the solution of a certain nonlinear PDE. We first describe PDE models for networks with uniformly located nodes and then generalize to networks with nonuniformly located, and possibly mobile, nodes. Based on the PDE models, we develop a method to control the transmissions in nonuniform networks so that the continuum limit is invariant under perturbations in node locations. This enables the networks to maintain stable global characteristics in the presence of varying node locations.« less

  1. Method for mobilization of hazardous metal ions in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugan, Patrick R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pfister, Robert M. (Powell, OH)

    1995-01-01

    A microbial process for removing heavy metals such as bismuth, cadmium, lead, thorium, uranium and other transuranics from soils and sediments, utilizing indigenous, or isolates of indigenous, microorganisms and reducing agents, such as cysteine or sodium thioglycollate, or complexing agents such as the amino acid glycine, to effect the mobilization or release of the metals from the soil particles.

  2. Energy Department Launches Mobile App for Energy Emergencies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, the Department of Energy launched a mobile app called Lantern Live that helps consumers quickly find and share critical information about nearby gas stations and power outages during energy emergencies. The app builds on the Obama Administration’s commitment to improve national energy preparedness in the face of extreme weather and other events that can result in power disruptions.

  3. Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Above is the video recording for the webinar, "Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting," originally held on November 13, 2012. In addition to this recording, you can access the presentation slides. A text version of this recording will be available soon

  4. Rail-to-rail differential input amplification stage with main and surrogate differential pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles Lanier; Smith, Stephen Fulton

    2007-03-06

    An operational amplifier input stage provides a symmetrical rail-to-rail input common-mode voltage without turning off either pair of complementary differential input transistors. Secondary, or surrogate, transistor pairs assume the function of the complementary differential transistors. The circuit also maintains essentially constant transconductance, constant slew rate, and constant signal-path supply current as it provides rail-to-rail operation.

  5. Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: University of ...

  6. MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED...

  7. Control Scheme Modifications Increase Efficiency of Steam Generation System at Exxon Mobil Gas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-01-01

    This case study highlights control scheme modifications made to the steam system at ExxonMobil's Mary Ann Gas Plant in Mobile, Alabama, which improved steam flow efficiency and reduced energy costs.

  8. Exxon Mobil QuestAir Plug Power Ben Gurion University Hydrogen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exxon Mobil QuestAir Plug Power Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Exxon Mobil, QuestAir, Plug Power , & Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV Place:...

  9. High Bandwidth Differential Amplifier for Shock Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P. W., Tran, V., Chau, R.

    2012-04-30

    We developed a high bandwidth differential amplifier for gas gun shock experiments/applications. The circuit has a bandwidth > 1 GHz, and is capable of measuring signals of ?1.5 V with a common mode rejection of 250 V. Conductivity measurements of gas gun targets are measured by flowing high currents through the targets. The voltage is measured across the target using a technique similar to a four-point probe. Because of the design of the current source and load, the target voltage is approximately 250 V relative to ground. Since the expected voltage change in the target is < 1 V, the differential amplifier must have a large common mode rejection. High pass filters suppress internal ringing of operational amplifiers. Results of bench tests are shown.

  10. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity Download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting," held on November 13, 2012. PDF icon Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications DOE/Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia Fuel Cell Product

  11. V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Users Gain Elevated Privileges | Department of Energy 4: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges April 15, 2013 - 1:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Cisco Secure Desktop ABSTRACT: Some vulnerabilities

  12. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos basedmore » on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.« less

  13. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos basedmoreon operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.less

  14. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minami, R., E-mail: minami@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  15. Feasibility of CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources Feasibility of CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources Presents integrated system for post-combustion CO2 capture from mobile sources PDF icon p-16_davis.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003442: Categorical Exclusion Determination EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  16. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  17. Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S.

    2009-11-15

    The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

  18. An iterative learning controller for nonholonomic mobile robots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oriolo, G.; Panzieri, S.; Ulivi, G.

    1998-09-01

    The authors present an iterative learning controller that applies to nonholonomic mobile robots, as well as other systems that can be put in chained form. The learning algorithm exploits the fact that chained-form. The learning algorithm exploits the fact that chained-form systems are linear under piecewise-constant inputs. The proposed control scheme requires the execution of a small number of experiments to drive the system to the desired state in finite time, with nice convergence and robustness properties with respect to modeling inaccuracies as well as disturbances. To avoid the necessity of exactly reinitializing the system at each iteration, the basic method is modified so as to obtain a cyclic controller, by which the system is cyclically steered through an arbitrary sequence of states. As a case study, a carlike mobile robot is considered. Both simulation and experimental results are reported to show the performance of the method.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method is provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine).

  20. Mobile Data Collection Applications: A Proof of Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J

    2006-09-20

    This project's goal is to provide a proof of concept for mobile data collection applications, and identify the best ways such applications could be implemented and used. Such an application should decrease the time and resources users now need to devote to redundant data processes, and provide an easy of locating and retrieving data at a later time. The two types of available mobile devices, Personal Digital Assistants and Tablet Personal Computers, each have their particular strengths that suggest themselves for certain types of applications. As such, parallel data collection applications have been developed, with a common web application for uploading information to the database. While these aspects have been developed and proven, it still remains to refine these applications, develop the tables to hold their data, and field-test with users for their feedback.

  1. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  2. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  3. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, S.J.; Butler, M.A.; Frye, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus and method are provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine). 6 figs.

  4. Composting in tandem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, K.

    1994-03-01

    A composting company, a county, and a waste company have formed a symbiotic public/private relationship that is helping to extend the life of the area's landfills, as well as produce a needed product. California state assembly bill 939, passed in 1989, directed local governments to reduce the amount of garbage being landfilled in order to curtail the need for new landfills. Cities and counties in California are now mandated to reduce the volume of their waste stream by 25% by 1995. By the year 2000, the waste stream must be reduced by 50%. And the law has teeth -- to ensure these percentages are met, a $10,000 fine can be imposed for each day a deadline is missed. According to 1990 figures, Sonoma County's well-established recycling programs have been successful at diverting 15% of the county's waste stream from the landfill. Paula Magyari, a waste management specialist with the county Public Works Department, says yard wastes account for 13% of the waste stream in Sonoma County; wood wastes for at least 15%. At 13% and 15%, they are two of the largest components of the waste stream, and, equally important, they represent the portion of the waste stream that is most readily reusable to meet the 25% goal.

  5. NREL Launches Sustainable Mobility Initiative, Joins CDOT Partnership -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Feature | NREL NREL Launches Sustainable Mobility Initiative, Joins CDOT Partnership January 22, 2016 NREL researchers look at colored map of the United States in 3D visualization room. Today, transportation operation and energy systems data are generated at an unprecedented scale. NREL's data experts and engineers analyze large sets of complex data-or "big data"-to develop solutions that support the research, development, and deployment of market-ready technologies that

  6. Texas Tech University mobile doppler radars provide unique wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements to multi-instrument DOE Field Campaign Tech University mobile doppler radars provide unique wind measurements to multi-instrument DOE Field Campaign - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure

  7. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

  8. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control 1 st Annual Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: July 2003 Reporting Period End Date: June 2004 Principal Authors: George J. Hirasaki, Rice University Clarence A. Miller, Rice University Gary A. Pope, The University of Texas Richard E. Jackson, INTERA Date Report was Issued: July 2004 DE-FC26-03NT15406 Rice University Department of Chemical Engineering, MS-362 6100 Main Street Houston, TX 77005-1892 The University of Texas

  9. Method for measuring the drift mobility in doped semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, Richard S. (Princeton, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    A method for measuring the drift mobility of majority carriers in semiconductors consists of measuring the current transient in a Schottky-barrier device following the termination of a forward bias pulse. An example is given using an amorphous silicon hydrogenated material doped with 0.2% phosphorous. The method is particularly useful with material in which the dielectric relaxation time is shorter than the carrier transit time. It is particularly useful in material useful in solar cells.

  10. NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Released - News Releases | NREL NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released New application for iPhone helps users find stations offering electricity, biodiesel, natural gas, and other alternative fuels. November 7, 2013 iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable

  11. Method for measuring the drift mobility in doped semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, R.S.

    1982-03-09

    A method for measuring the drift mobility of majority carriers in semiconductors consists of measuring the current transient in a Schottky-barrier device following the termination of a forward bias pulse. An example is given using an amorphous silicon hydrogenated material doped with 0.2% phosphorus. The method is particularly useful with material in which the dielectric relaxation time is shorter than the carrier transit time. It is particularly useful in material useful in solar cells. 10 figs.

  12. Geochemical Triggers of Arsenic Mobilization during Managed Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recharge | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Geochemical Triggers of Arsenic Mobilization during Managed Aquifer Recharge Monday, February 29, 2016 Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an increasingly used water enhancement strategy, which involves subsurface storage of water supplies in groundwater aquifers. While MAR projects have the potential to alleviate water deficits, they can also adversely impact groundwater quality by altering the native geochemistry of the aquifer and

  13. Literature Review of Mobility Control Methods for CO2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobility and Conformance Control for Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO 2 -EOR) via Thickeners, Foams, and Gels - A Detailed Literature Review of 40 Years of Research DOE/NETL-2012/1540 Activity 4003.200.01 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

  14. Method for mobilization of hazardous metal ions in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugan, P.R.; Pfister, R.M.

    1995-06-27

    A microbial process is revealed for removing heavy metals such as bismuth, cadmium, lead, thorium, uranium and other transuranics from soils and sediments. The method utilizes indigenous, or isolates of indigenous, microorganisms and reducing agents, such as cysteine or sodium thioglycollate, or complexing agents such as the amino acid glycine, to effect the mobilization or release of the metals from the soil particles. 5 figs.

  15. ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, Jimmy W

    2015-05-01

    This procedure exists to define the key milestones, necessary steps, and process rules required to commission and operate an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), with a specific focus toward on-time product delivery to the ARM Data Archive. The overall objective is to have the physical infrastructure, networking and communications, and instrument calibration, grooming, and alignment (CG&A) completed with data products available from the ARM Data Archive by the Operational Start Date milestone.

  16. Theoretical interpretation of the electron mobility behavior in InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, E. G. Ruiz, F. G. Godoy, A.; Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Martnez-Blanque, C.; Gmiz, F.

    2014-11-07

    This work studies the electron mobility in InAs nanowires (NWs), by solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation under the Momentum Relaxation Time approximation. The numerical solver takes into account the contribution of the main scattering mechanisms present in III-V compound semiconductors. It is validated against experimental field effect-mobility results, showing a very good agreement. The mobility dependence on the nanowire diameter and carrier density is analyzed. It is found that surface roughness and polar optical phonons are the scattering mechanisms that mainly limit the mobility behavior. Finally, we explain the origin of the oscillations observed in the mobility of small NWs at high electric fields.

  17. Reply Comments of T-Mobile USA, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    T-Mobile USA, Inc. Reply Comments of T-Mobile USA, Inc. T-Mobile USA, Inc. ("T-Mobile") hereby submits these reply comments in response to the above-captioned Request for Information ("RFI")1 issued by the Department of Energy ("DOE"). T-Mobile appreciates the opportunity to submit reply comments and commends the DOE for undertaking a comprehensive examination of the communications requirements necessary to deploy smart grid technology so consumers can experience

  18. Nightmares with Mobile Devices Are Just Around the Corner!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Derr

    2007-03-01

    Mobile Devices (MDs) such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), smart phones, handheld personal computers, and Tablet PCs, are proliferating in the marketplace. Cheap and ubiquitous mobile computing devices represent computings fifth wave [1], bringing about new opportunities in the marketplace. As MDs become more powerful and commonplace with ubiquitous connectivity, the line that currently divides these handheld devices from typical network computers will become very unclear. Mobile devices have become integrated into the business processes of both government and commercial institutions. MDs are small, portable, and able to store large amounts of information. The breadth of communication options (infrared, wireless, docking station) for MDs introduces many security risks. Some of the problems associated with MDs are: easy to loose, misplace, or have stolen, potential loss/comprise of company data (user ids, passwords, contacts, sensitive documentation, credit card numbers), increases the opportunity for a backdoor into an enterprises network, lack of authentication and limited logging capability. The use of these devices poses a risk to the security of an organization.

  19. AUTOMATIC DIFFERENTIATION OF AN EULERIAN HYDROCODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. HENNINGER; A. CARLE; P. MAUDLIN

    2000-11-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is applied to a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code (hydrocode) to provide gradients that will be used for design optimization and uncertainty analysis. We examine AD in both the forward and adjoint (reverse) mode using Automatic Differentiation of Fortran (ADIFOR, version 3.0). Setup time, accuracy, and run times are described for three problems. The test set consists of a one-dimensional shock-propagation problem, a two-dimensional metal-jet-formation problem and a two-dimensional shell-collapse problem. Setup time for ADIFOR was approximately one month starting from a simplified, fixed-dimension version of the original code. ADIFOR produced accurate (as compared to finite difference) gradients in both modes for all of the problems. These test problems had 17 independent variables. We find that the forward mode is up to 39% slower and the adjoint mode is at least 11% faster than finding the gradient by means of finite differences. Problems of real interest will certainly have more independent variables. The adjoint mode is thus favored since the computational time increases only slightly for additional independent variables.

  20. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  1. Partial Differential Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-15

    PDASAC solves stiff, nonlinear initial-boundary-value in a timelike dimension t and a space dimension x. Plane, circular cylindrical or spherical boundaries can be handled. Mixed-order systems of partial differential and algebraic equations can be analyzed with members of order or 0 or 1 in t, 0,1 or 2 in x. Parametric sensitivities of the calculated states are compted simultaneously on request, via the Jacobian of the state equations. Initial and boundary conditions are efficiently reconciled.more » Local error control (in the max-norm or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the parametric sensitivites if desired.« less

  2. Stirling cycle simulation without differential coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Organ, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    With a simple transformation, the gas processes in the Stirling machine are described for all time and location in an algebraic equation free of differential coefficients of the unknowns. Local instantaneous heat transfer and friction are represented in function of local instantaneous Reynolds number, N{sub re}. The method avoids problems of numerical discretization, stability, convergence, artificial dispersion and diffusion. The paper presents the algebra of the transformation. Specimen solutions cover the temperature field of the gas circuit (exchangers and regenerator) over a representative cycle. When programmed for workstation the core code occupies some 2 dozen lines, and processing calls for seconds of CPU time. Availability of the solution means that intimate details of the gas processes are susceptible to examination using the most basic of computing facilities.

  3. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Dechang (Metuchen, NJ); Senesac, Lawrence R. (Knoxville, TN); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-05

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  4. Mobilization of cohesive sludge in storage tanks using jet mixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.R.

    2000-02-04

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Savannah River Site and ITT Flygt Corporation conducted a joint mixer testing program sponsored by the DOE to evaluate the applicability of Flygt mixers to nuclear tank waste retrieval. Testing was carried out in three different tank sizes so that a scaling method could be evaluated and validated and the results could be used to make a full-scale mixer performance prediction. This presentation focuses on testing the mobilization of the sludge simulant composed of fine-grained particles cohesively bonded together by both colloidal and mechanical forces.

  5. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator Now Available - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator Now Available Drivers can now find alternative fueling stations using cell phones & PDAs February 4, 2009 Driving cross-country or even around town in an alternative fuel vehicle used to require drivers to do a little homework to find the nearest fueling station - but not anymore. Consumers on-the-go can now access the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Alternative Fueling Station Locator using their cell phone, BlackBerry, or other personal

  6. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and

  7. A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring applications A new wireless sensing network paradigm is presented for structural monitoring applications. In this approach, both power and data interrogation commands are conveyed via a mobile agent that is sent to sensor nodes to

  8. And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology | Department of Energy And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology September 30, 2014 - 1:12pm Addthis Developed by Sandia National Laboratories and several industry partners, the fuel cell mobile light (H2LT) offers a cleaner, quieter alternative to

  9. Mobile Gallery | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Information Mobile Gallery OSTI.gov Mobile Get full-text documents, citations, patents, green energy research results, and more. Narrow results by document type, download and email results. Get the OSTIblog, twitter, Facebook, videos, and news. Find science information and research results from 15 U.S. federal agencies. http://m.osti.gov WorldWideScience Mobile Search approximately 80 scientific databases and portals from leading libraries and information centers around the world.

  10. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible

  11. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation ... cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time, without bias. ...

  12. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins...

  13. Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance across nanoscale metal-dielectric interfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heat diode effect and...

  14. Differential pressure sensing system for airfoils usable in turbine engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Stampahar, Maria E.

    2005-09-13

    A detection system for identifying airfoils having a cooling systems with orifices that are plugged with contaminants or with showerheads having a portion burned off. The detection system measures pressures at different locations and calculates or measures a differential pressure. The differential pressure may be compared with a known benchmark value to determine whether the differential pressure has changed. Changes in the differential pressure may indicate that one or more of the orifices in a cooling system of an airfoil are plugged or that portions of, or all of, a showerhead has burned off.

  15. Software with Mobile Agents for Peer-to-Peer Information Sharing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of failure. To avoid potential sudden system collapse, researchers at ORNL developed a Java-based mobile agent information software called Knowledge Acquisition Ubiquitous Agent...

  16. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  17. Stochastic differential equations and numerical simulation for pedestrians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-07-27

    The mathematical foundation of the Ito interpretation of stochastic ordinary and partial differential equations is briefly explained. This provides the basis for a review of simple difference approximations to stochastic differential equations. An example arising in the theory of optical switching is discussed.

  18. A mobile computed tomographic unit for inspecting reinforced concrete columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumitra, T.; Srisatit, S.; Pattarasumunt, A.

    1994-12-31

    A mobile computed tomographic unit applicable in the inspection of reinforced concrete columns was designed, constructed and tested. A CT image reconstruction programme written in Quick Basic was first developed to be used on an IBM PC/AT microcomputer. It provided user friendly menus for data processing and displaying CT image. The prototype of a gamma-ray scanning system using a 1.11 GBq Cs-137 source and a NaI(T1) scintillation detector was also designed and constructed. The system was a microcomputer controlled, single-beam rotate-translate scanner used for collecting transmitted gamma-ray data in different angles. The CT unit was finally tested with a standard column and a column of an existing building. The cross sectional images of the columns could be clearly seen. The positions and sizes of the reinforced bars could be estimated.

  19. Nanolaminate microfluidic device for mobility selection of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Surh, Michael P. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, William D. (Pleasanton, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    2006-10-10

    A microfluidic device made from nanolaminate materials that are capable of electrophoretic selection of particles on the basis of their mobility. Nanolaminate materials are generally alternating layers of two materials (one conducting, one insulating) that are made by sputter coating a flat substrate with a large number of layers. Specific subsets of the conducting layers are coupled together to form a single, extended electrode, interleaved with other similar electrodes. Thereby, the subsets of conducting layers may be dynamically charged to create time-dependent potential fields that can trap or transport charge colloidal particles. The addition of time-dependence is applicable to all geometries of nanolaminate electrophoretic and electrochemical designs from sinusoidal to nearly step-like.

  20. LESSONS LEARNED Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition (Summer 2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of the lessons learned document for the BEOWulf Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition is to capture the project’s lessons learned in a formal document for use by other project managers on similar future projects. This document may be used as part of new project planning for similar projects in order to determine what problems occurred and how those problems were handled and may be avoided in the future. Additionally, this document details what went well with the project and why, so that other project managers may capitalize on these actions. Project managers may also use this document to determine who the project team members were in order to solicit feedback for planning their projects in the future. This document will be formally communicated with the organization and will become a part of the organizational assets and archives.

  1. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

    1998-12-08

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

  2. Dynamic multiplexed analysis method using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA

    2010-05-18

    A method for multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer in which the effectiveness and efficiency of the multiplexed method is optimized by automatically adjusting rates of passage of analyte materials through an IMS drift tube during operation of the system. This automatic adjustment is performed by the IMS instrument itself after determining the appropriate levels of adjustment according to the method of the present invention. In one example, the adjustment of the rates of passage for these materials is determined by quantifying the total number of analyte molecules delivered to the ion trap in a preselected period of time, comparing this number to the charge capacity of the ion trap, selecting a gate opening sequence; and implementing the selected gate opening sequence to obtain a preselected rate of analytes within said IMS drift tube.

  3. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

  4. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  5. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  6. A Unified Differential Evolution Algorithm for Global Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad

    2014-06-24

    Abstract?In this paper, we propose a new unified differential evolution (uDE) algorithm for single objective global optimization. Instead of selecting among multiple mutation strategies as in the conventional differential evolution algorithm, this algorithm employs a single equation as the mutation strategy. It has the virtue of mathematical simplicity and also provides users the flexbility for broader exploration of different mutation strategies. Numerical tests using twelve basic unimodal and multimodal functions show promising performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison to convential differential evolution algorithms.

  7. Differential geometry on Hopf algebras and quantum groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, P.

    1994-12-15

    The differential geometry on a Hopf algebra is constructed, by using the basic axioms of Hopf algebras and noncommutative differential geometry. The space of generalized derivations on a Hopf algebra of functions is presented via the smash product, and used to define and discuss quantum Lie algebras and their properties. The Cartan calculus of the exterior derivative, Lie derivative, and inner derivation is found for both the universal and general differential calculi of an arbitrary Hopf algebra, and, by restricting to the quasitriangular case and using the numerical R-matrix formalism, the aforementioned structures for quantum groups are determined.

  8. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Introduction This report describes the performance of a mobile photovoltaic (PV) system installed in 2011 to provide power to Bechler Ranger Station in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. This small, remote outpost is not served by the electric utility grid and previously relied on a propane generator as the only source of power. Mobile Photovoltaic Systems Mobile solar systems consist of photovoltaic (PV)

  9. Electrorecycling of Critical and Value Metals from Mobile Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Tedd E.; Wang, Peming; Anderko, Andre

    2014-09-01

    Mobile electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are a significant source of valuable metals that should be recycled. Each year over a billion devices are sold world-wide and the average life is only a couple years. Value metals in phones are gold, palladium, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel. Devices now contain increasing amounts of rare earth elements (REE). In recent years the supply chain for REE has moved almost exclusively to China. They are contained in displays, speakers and vibrators within the devices. By US Department of Energy (DOE) classification, specific REEs (Nd, Dy, Eu, Tb and Y) are considered critical while others (Ce, La and Pr) are deemed near critical. Effective recycling schemes should include the recovery of these critical materials. By including more value materials in a recovery scheme, more value can be obtained by product diversification and less waste metals remains to be disposed of. REEs are mined as a group such that when specific elements become critical significantly more ore must be processed to capture the dilute but valuable critical elements. Targeted recycling of items containing the more of the less available critical materials could address their future criticality. This presentation will describe work in developing aqueous electrochemistry-based schemes for recycling metals from scrap mobile electronics. The electrorecycling process generates oxidizing agents at an anode while reducing dissolved metals at the cathode. E vs pH diagrams and metals dissolution experiments are used to assess effectiveness of various solution chemistries. Although several schemes were envisioned, a two stages process has been the focus of work: 1) initial dissolution of Cu, Sn, Ag and magnet materials using Fe+3 generated in acidic sulfate and 2) final dissolution of Pd and Au using Cl2 generated in an HCl solution. Experiments were performed using simulated metal mixtures. Both Cu and Ag were recovered at ~ 97% using Fe+3 while leaving Au and Ag intact. REE were extracted from the dissolved mixture using conventional methods. A discussion of future research directions will be discussed.

  10. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Niedermuller, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the benefit side of the analysisas opposed to the cost sideand how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the benefits side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are harvestable, meaning they result in an actual reduction in headcount and/or cost. The report describes the specific activities conducted with a partner utility to examine the various work activities associated with mobile work packages to determine what time savings and error rate reductions are available. The report summarizes these findings in the form of a business case for the technology.

  11. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a drive fluid for ASP flooding. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability produced by surfactant injection.

  12. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows us to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.

  13. Design scoping study of the 12T Yin-Yang magnet system for the Tandem Mirror Next Step (TMNS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The overall objective of this engineering study was to determine the feasibility of designing a Yin-Yang magnet capable of producing a peak field in the windings of 12T for the Tandem Mirror Next Step (TMNS) program. As part of this technical study, a rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost estimate of the winding for this magnet was undertaken. The preferred approach to the winding design of the TMNS plug coil utilizes innovative design concepts to meet the structural, electrical and thermodynamic requirements of the magnet system. Structurally, the coil is radially partitioned into four sections, preventing the accumulation of the radial loads and reacting them into the structural case. To safely dissipate the 13.34 GJ of energy stored in each Yin-Yang magnet, the winding has been electrically subdivided into parallel or nested coils, each having its own power supply and protection circuitry. This arrangement effectively divides the total stored energy of the coils into manageable subsystems. The windings are cooled with superfluid helium II, operated at 1.8K and 1.2 atmospheres. The superior cooling capabilities of helium II have enabled the overall winding envelope to be minimized, providing a current density of 2367 A/CM/sup 2/, excluding substructure.

  14. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows usmore » to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.« less

  15. Lightweight Integrated Optical Sensor for Atmospheric Measurements on Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parameswaran, Krishnan R.

    2013-12-02

    The goal of the Phase I program was to develop a novel open path sensor platform technology based on integration of semiconductor waveguides with efficient optoelectronic components on a monolithic platform. The successful Phase I effort resulted in demonstration of a novel optical resonator structure based on semiconductor high contrast gratings (HCGs) that will enable implementation of an ultra-compact, low-power gas sensor suitable for use on mobile platforms. Extensive numerical modeling was performed to design a device optimized for measuring CO2 at a wavelength for which a laser was available for proof of concept. Devices were fabricated and tested to match the target wavelength, angle, and operating temperature. This demonstration is the first implementation of HCGs at the wavelengths of interest and shows the flexibility of the proposed architecture for gas sensing applications. The measured cavity Q was lower than anticipated due to fabrication process challenges. The PSI and UC Berkeley team has identified solutions to these challenges and will produce optimized devices in a Phase II program where a prototype sensor will be fabricated and tested.

  16. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative “passive water recovery” MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the DOE 2013 Technical Goals, the operation time was increased from 10 hours to 14.3 hours. Under these conditions, the DP4 closely approached or surpassed the technical targets; for example, the DP4 achieved 468 Whr/l versus the goal of 500 Whr/l. Thus, UNF has successfully met the project goals. A fully-operational, 20-watt DMFC power supply was developed based on the UNF passive water recovery MEA. The power supply meets the project performance goals and advances portable power technology towards the commercialization targets set by the DOE.

  17. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  18. Gating of high-mobility InAs metamorphic heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabani, J.; McFadden, A. P.; Shojaei, B.; Palmstrm, C. J.

    2014-12-29

    We investigate the performance of gate-defined devices fabricated on high mobility InAs metamorphic heterostructures. We find that heterostructures capped with In{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}As often show signs of parallel conduction due to proximity of their surface Fermi level to the conduction band minimum. Here, we introduce a technique that can be used to estimate the density of this surface charge that involves cool-downs from room temperature under gate bias. We have been able to remove the parallel conduction under high positive bias, but achieving full depletion has proven difficult. We find that by using In{sub 0.75}Al{sub 0.25}As as the barrier without an In{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}As capping, a drastic reduction in parallel conduction can be achieved. Our studies show that this does not change the transport properties of the quantum well significantly. We achieved full depletion in InAlAs capped heterostructures with non-hysteretic gating response suitable for fabrication of gate-defined mesoscopic devices.

  19. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  20. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  1. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  2. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  3. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins responsible for many cell functions ranging from cell proliferation to differentiation to metabolism to signaling, and even programmed cell death. This chemical process has been studied intensively, but until now it has been impossible to watch phosphorylation at the molecular level without damaging cells or interfering with

  4. Differential form of the Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pen'kov, F. M.; Sandhas, W.

    2005-12-15

    The Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan three-boson integral equations in momentum space are transformed into differential equations. This allows us to take into account quite directly the Danilov condition providing self-adjointness of the underlying three-body Hamiltonian with zero-range pair interactions. For the helium trimer the numerical solutions of the resulting differential equations are compared with those of the Faddeev-type AGS equations.

  5. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2016 Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation Coulomb

  6. Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    random input data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with random input data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stochastic finite element methods for partial differential equations with random input data Authors: Gunzburger, Max D [1] ; Webster, Clayton G [1] ; Zhang, Guannan [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1159494 DOE Contract Number:

  7. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2016 Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a

  8. T-635: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Lets Remote Users Execute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges | Department of Energy 5: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges T-635: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges June 2, 2011 - 4:38pm Addthis PROBLEM: The Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client is the Cisco next-generation VPN client, which provides remote users with secure

  9. Temperature dependence of diffusion length, lifetime and minority electron mobility in GaInP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultes, F. J.; Haegel, N. M.; Christian, T.; Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Jones-Albertus, R.; Pickett, E.; Liu, T.; Misra, P.; Sukiasyan, A.; Yuen, H.

    2013-12-09

    The mobility of electrons in double heterostructures of p-type Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P has been determined by measuring minority carrier diffusion length and lifetime. The minority electron mobility increases monotonically from 300?K to 5?K, limited primarily by optical phonon and alloy scattering. Comparison to majority electron mobility over the same temperature range in comparably doped samples shows a significant reduction in ionized impurity scattering at lower temperatures, due to differences in interaction of repulsive versus attractive carriers with ionized dopant sites. These results should be useful in modeling and optimization for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Pipeline integrity design for differential settlement in discontinuous permafrost areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Z.J.; Boivin, R.P.; Glover, A.G.; Kormann, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    The NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL) gas pipeline system is expanding northwards as the producers search for and find new gas reserves. This growth has taken the system into the discontinuous permafrost zone, and also into new design problems. One such problem is the structural integrity of a pipeline subjected to the settlement differentials that occur between frozen and unfrozen soils. Adequate integrity design for differential settlement is required by design codes, such as CSA Z662, but the procedures and criteria must be established by the pipeline designers. This paper presents the methodology of pipeline integrity design for differential settlements used on a number of pipeline projects in Northwest Alberta. Outlined in the paper are the procedures, rationales and models used to: (a) locate discontinuous permafrost; (b) quantify the potential differential settlement; (c) predict pipeline stresses and strains; (d) establish strain limits; and (e) determine the pipe wall thickness to withstand those potential differential settlements. Several design options are available and are briefly discussed. For the projects mentioned, the heavy wall pipe option was identified as a cost effective design for medium to large differential settlements.

  11. MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT ...

  12. V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain ... AnyConnect VPN Client Two Vulnerabilities V-066: Adobe AcrobatReader Multiple Flaws ...

  13. Discursive Deployments: Mobilizing Support for Municipal and Community Wireless Networks in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Rosio; Rodriguez, Juana Maria

    2008-08-16

    This paper examines Municipal Wireless (MW) deployments in the United States. In particular, the interest is in understanding how discourse has worked to mobilize widespread support for MW networks. We explore how local governments discursively deploy the language of social movements to create a shared understanding of the networking needs of communities. Through the process of"framing" local governments assign meaning to the MW networks in ways intended to mobilize support anddemobilize opposition. The mobilizing potential of a frame varies and is dependent on its centrality and cultural resonance. We examine the framing efforts of MW networks by using a sample of Request for Proposals for community wireless networks, semi-structured interviews and local media sources. Prominent values that are central to a majority of the projects and others that are culturally specific are identified and analyzed for their mobilizing potency.

  14. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  15. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

    1991-06-01

    From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope

    2005-07-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A combination of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT is more challenging since the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the interdependence of the various components for oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability. Simulated case studies demonstrate the effects of wettability.

  17. AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS Naval Research Laboratory Contact NRL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed materials growth and fabrication technology for the manufacture of high-speed, low power AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) that exhibit state-of-the-art low-power

  18. A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine SCR/DPF Applications/Data-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition | Department of Energy A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCR/DPF Applications/Data-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCR/DPF Applications/Data-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition This project describes a novel system of sensors that continuously monitor emissions in real time and a data

  19. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will

  20. In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sulfate-reducing conditions (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following sulfate-reducing conditions « Prev Next » Title: In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following sulfate-reducing conditions Authors: Paradis, Charles J. ; Jagadamma, Sindhu ; Watson, David B. ; McKay, Larry D. ; Hazen, Terry C. ; Park, Melora ; Istok, Jonathan D. Publication Date: 2016-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1237977 Grant/Contract

  1. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Authors: Pelliccione, M. ; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Barbara ; Bartel, J. ; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ; Sciambi, A. ; /Stanford U.,

  2. A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A mobile-agent based wireless sensing network for structural monitoring applications × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit

  3. ORISE: CDC Travelers' Health Mobile App, Designed by ORISE, Gains Attention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Multiple Websites Can I Eat This? Mobile App Helps International Travelers Make Safe Dining Choices CDC Travelers' Health app, designed by ORISE, gains attention on multiple websites How ORISE is Making a Difference The Can I Eat This? mobile app, which ORISE staff helped develop for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has been receiving positive feedback from food and travel experts. The app, recently released by the CDC's Travelers' Health Branch, earned a positive

  4. SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_leprince.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report The Development and

  5. Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: University of California, Riverside PDF icon 2002_deer_miller.pdf More Documents & Publications The California Demonstration Program for Control of PM from Diesel Backup Generators (BUGs) The California Demonstration Program for Control of PM from Diesel Backup Generators = Recent

  6. Signal-to-noise and resolution enhancement in ion mobility spectrometry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using correlation gating techniques : barker codes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Signal-to-noise and resolution enhancement in ion mobility spectrometry using correlation gating techniques : barker codes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Signal-to-noise and resolution enhancement in ion mobility spectrometry using correlation gating techniques : barker codes. No abstract prepared. Authors: Rohde, Steven Barney ; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant Publication Date:

  7. Cooperative system and method using mobile robots for testing a cooperative search controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Raymond H. (Albuquerque, NM); Harrington, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Eskridge, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hurtado, John E. (College Station, TX)

    2002-01-01

    A test system for testing a controller provides a way to use large numbers of miniature mobile robots to test a cooperative search controller in a test area, where each mobile robot has a sensor, a communication device, a processor, and a memory. A method of using a test system provides a way for testing a cooperative search controller using multiple robots sharing information and communicating over a communication network.

  8. The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: South Coast Air Quality Management District PDF icon 2004_deer_liu.pdf More Documents & Publications South Coast AQMD Clean Transportation Programs Overview of South Coast AQMD Incentive Programs and Their Funding Structure Cleaning Up Diesel Engines

  9. Mobilizing $4 Billion in Private-Sector Support for Clean Energy Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Mobilizing $4 Billion in Private-Sector Support for Clean Energy Innovation Mobilizing $4 Billion in Private-Sector Support for Clean Energy Innovation June 16, 2015 - 9:00am Addthis Innovations in clean energy like wind power are a crucial part of fighting climate change. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy Loan Programs Office. Innovations in clean energy like wind power are a crucial part of fighting climate change. | Photo courtesy of the Department of

  10. Mobile source emission control cost-effectiveness: Issues, uncertainties, and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1994-12-01

    Emissions from mobile sources undoubtedly contribute to US urban air pollution problems. Consequently, mobile source control measures, ranging from vehicle emission standards to reducing vehicle travel, have been adopted or proposed to help attain air quality standards. To rank various mobile source control measures, various government agencies and private organizations calculate cost-effectiveness in dollars per ton of emissions reduced. Arguments for or against certain control measures are often made on the basis of the calculated cost-effectiveness. Yet, different studies may yield significantly different cost-effectiveness results, because of the various methodologies used and assumptions regarding the values of costs and emission reductions. Because of the methodological differences, the cost-effectiveness results may not be comparable between studies. Use of incomparable cost-effectiveness results may result in adoption of ineffective control measures. This paper first discusses some important methodological issues involved in cost-effectiveness calculation for mobile sources and proposes appropriate, systematic methods for dealing with these issues. Various studies have been completed recently to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of mobile source emission control measures. These studies resulted in wide variations in the cost-effectiveness for same control measures. Methodological assumptions used in each study are presented and, based on the proposed methods for cost-effectiveness calculation, adjustments are applied to the original estimates in each study to correct inappropriate methodological assumptions and to make the studies comparable. Finally, mobile source control measures are ranked on the basis of the adjusted cost-effectiveness estimates.

  11. MOBILE4. 1: Highway-vehicle mobile-source emission-factor model (Apple MacIntosh version) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    MOBILE4.1 is the latest revision to EPA's highway vehicle mobile source emission factor model. Relative to MOBILE4, it contains numerous revisions and provides the user with additional options for modeling highway vehicle emission factors. it will calculate emission factors for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide, (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from highway motor vehicles. It calculates emission factors for eight individual vehicle types, in two regions of the country (low and high altitude). The emission factors depend on various conditions such as ambient temperature, fuel volatility, speed, and mileage accrual rates. It will estimate emission factors for any calendar year between 1960 and 2020 inclusive. The 25 most recent model years are considered in operation in each calendar year. EPA is requiring that states and others preparing emission inventories for nonattainment areas for CO and ozone to use MOBILE4.1 in the development of the base year 1990 emission inventories required under the Clean Air Act of 1990.

  12. An Adaptive Unified Differential Evolution Algorithm for Global Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad

    2014-11-03

    In this paper, we propose a new adaptive unified differential evolution algorithm for single-objective global optimization. Instead of the multiple mutation strate- gies proposed in conventional differential evolution algorithms, this algorithm employs a single equation unifying multiple strategies into one expression. It has the virtue of mathematical simplicity and also provides users the flexibility for broader exploration of the space of mutation operators. By making all control parameters in the proposed algorithm self-adaptively evolve during the process of optimization, it frees the application users from the burden of choosing appro- priate control parameters and also improves the performance of the algorithm. In numerical tests using thirteen basic unimodal and multimodal functions, the proposed adaptive unified algorithm shows promising performance in compari- son to several conventional differential evolution algorithms.

  13. D-Cycle - 4-Differential -Stroke Cycle | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D-Cycle - 4-Differential -Stroke Cycle D-Cycle - 4-Differential -Stroke Cycle The D-Cycle offers the opportunity to use less fuel and gain more power while being able to be retrofit to an OEM and aftermarket engines PDF icon deer09_conti.pdf More Documents & Publications Improving Diesel Engine Sweet-spot Efficiency and Adapting it to Improve Duty-cycle MPG - plus Increasing Propulsion and Reducing Cost Two-Stroke Engines: New Frontier in Engine Efficiency Building America Technology

  14. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  15. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, Dana A. (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT)

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  16. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  17. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-03-13

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus,more »sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary.« less

  18. Transportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Huei; Mi, Chris; Gover, James

    2013-04-30

    This collaborative educational project between the University of MichiganAnn Arbor, University of MichiganDearborn and the Kettering University successfully executed almost all the elements we proposed to do. In the original proposal, we proposed to develop four graduate courses, six undergraduate courses, four professional short courses, a K?12 electric vehicle education kit, a Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material to support the advancement of transportation electrification. The first four deliverables were all successfully developed and offered. When we held the kick?off meeting in NETL in Morgantown back in early 2010 with all the ten ARRA education teams, however, it quickly became clear that among the ten ARRA education grantee teams, our proposed consume education activities are not better or with the potential to create bigger impact than some of activities proposed in other teams. For example, the Odyssey 2010 event held by the West Virginia University team had planned and successfully reached to more than 230,000 attendees, which is way more than what our proposed 100k event could ever reach. It was under the suggestion of Joseph Quaranta, the ARRA education Program Director at that time, that we should coordinate and eliminate redundancy. The resources should then be focused on activities that have less overlap. Therefore, the originally proposed activities: Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material were dropped from our scope. We expanded the scope of our education kit activity to include some educational materials, mainly in the form of videos. The target audience also changed from general public to K?12 students. The majority of the project cost (~70%) goes toward the establishment of three undergraduate laboratories, which provides critically needed hands?on learning experience for next?generation green mobility engineers. We are very proud that the ARRA money, which was distributed as part of the economy stimulus package back in 2009, was used to invest in laboratories which are already impacting the learning experience of our undergraduate and graduate students, and will continue to do so in the coming decades. The offering and enrollments of the ten undergraduate and graduate courses developed under the support of this educational grant is summarized in the table below. The grant was finalized in September 2009, and four new courses were developed and offered soon after in Winter 2010. The other six courses were developed thereafter. The total number of students who took these new courses over the duration of this grant is just over 1,000. In the first 2 years, under the DOE funding, the courses are offered more regularly. After that, the courses were considered together with other existing courses in the planning of teaching schedule and may not be offered each year. Almost all of the 10 courses have healthy enrollments and we do expect them to be offered continuously in the future. The graduate courses perhaps will be offered every 2?3 years, and the undergraduate courses most likely on a yearly basis.

  19. T-670: Skype Input Validation Flaw in 'mobile phone' Profile Entry Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input in the The "mobile phone" profile entry before displaying the input.

  20. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Doehle, Joel R.; Toomey, Christopher M.

    2014-09-30

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  1. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: A flat architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-12-01

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Form Contribution 97-0766. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. This contribution covers the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all reside at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. Future contributions will cover the general case where those top-most LGNs reside at different hierarchy levels. This contribution considers a flat ad hoc network architecture--in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the preconfigured level of its top-most LGN.

  2. Influence of interface mobility on the evolution of Austenite-Martensite grain assemblies during annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Amy J; Santofimia, Maria J; Speer, John G; Zhao, L; Sietsma, Jilt

    2009-01-01

    The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process is a new heat treatment for the creation of advanced high-strength steels. This treatment consists of an initial partial or full austenitization, followed by a quench to form a controlled amount of martensite and an annealing step to partition carbon atoms from the martensite to the austenite. In this work, the microstructural evolution during annealing of martensite-austenite grain assemblies has been analyzed by means of a modeling approach that considers the influence of martensite-austenite interface migration on the kinetics of carbon partitioning. Carbide precipitation is precluded in the model, and three different assumptions about interface mobility are considered, ranging from a completely immobile interface to the relatively high mobility of an incoherent ferrite-austenite interface. Simulations indicate that different interface mobilities lead to profound differences in the evolution of microstructure that is predicted during annealing.

  3. Method for tracking the location of mobile agents using stand-off detection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Bender, Susan Fae Ann (Tijeras, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Mark S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26

    A method for tracking the movement and position of mobile agents using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) as a stand-off optical detection technique. The positions of the agents are tracked by analyzing the time-history of a series of optical measurements made over the field of view of the optical system. This provides a (time+3-D) or (time+2-D) mapping of the location of the mobile agents. Repeated pulses of a laser beam impinge on a mobile agent, such as a bee, and are backscattered from the agent into a LIDAR detection system. Alternatively, the incident laser pulses excite fluorescence or phosphorescence from the agent, which is detected using a LIDAR system. Analysis of the spatial location of signals from the agents produced by repeated pulses generates a multidimensional map of agent location.

  4. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (FAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (FAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The FAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by chemical noise and other interfering peaks.

  5. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  6. Dye Sensitized Tandem Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Greg D.

    2009-12-21

    This work provided a new way to look at photoelectrochemical cells and their performance. Although thought of as low efficiency, a the internal efficiency of a 9% global efficiency dye sensitized solar cell is approximately equal to an 18% efficient silicon cell when each is compared to their useful spectral range. Other work undertaken with this contract also reported the first growth oriented titania and perovskite columns on a transparent conducting oxide. Other work has shown than significant performance enhancement in the performance of dye sensitized solar cells can be obtained through the use of coupling inverse opal photonic crystals to the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell. Lastly, a quick efficient method was developed to bond titanium foils to transparent conducting oxide substrates for anodization.

  7. Measuring charge carrier mobility in photovoltaic devices with micron-scale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashraf, A.; Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2015-03-16

    We present a charge-extraction technique, micron-scale charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage, which enables simultaneous spatially resolved measurements of charge carrier mobility and photocurrent in thin-film photovoltaic devices with micron-scale resolution. An intensity-modulated laser with beam diameter near the optical diffraction limit is scanned over the device, while a linear voltage ramp in reverse bias is applied at each position of illumination. We calculate the majority carrier mobility, photocurrent, and number of photogenerated charge carriers from the resulting current transient. We demonstrate this technique on an organic photovoltaic device, but it is applicable to a wide range of photovoltaic materials.

  8. "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters "Lantern Live" Mobile App Lights Way for Citizens Impacted by Disasters November 24, 2014 - 5:06pm Addthis (Editor's Note: the following was originally posted on the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy blog on November 21, 2014.) By Brian Forde, Denice Ross and Derek Frempong In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, seemingly simple tasks such as refueling your car were

  9. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites

  10. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and

  11. Observation of the Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Record High-Mobility

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uniform Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene Films Grown on the Si-Face of 6H-SiC(0001). (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Observation of the Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Record High-Mobility Uniform Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene Films Grown on the Si-Face of 6H-SiC(0001). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of the Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Record High-Mobility Uniform Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene Films Grown on the Si-Face of 6H-SiC(0001). Abstract not provided.

  12. MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS (Conference) | SciTech Connect MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Authors: Ezzedine, S ; Kanarska, Y ; Lomov, I ; Antoun, T ; Glascoe, L Publication Date: 2011-07-29 OSTI Identifier: 1093897 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-491853 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type:

  13. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of α - and β -decay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    products in liquid xenon using the EXO-200 detector (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of α - and β -decay products in liquid xenon using the EXO-200 detector Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 27, 2016 Title: Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of α - and β -decay products in liquid xenon using the EXO-200 detector Authors: Albert, J. B. ; Auty, D. J. ; Barbeau, P. S. ; Beck,

  14. Mobile computing device configured to compute irradiance, glint, and glare of the sun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vipin P; Ho, Clifford K; Khalsa, Siri Sahib

    2014-03-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. A mobile computing device includes at least one camera that captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed by the mobile computing device.

  15. The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application | Department of Energy The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application Selective catalytic reduction studies with ammonia/NO model gas mixtures were used to screen mixed FeVO4/titania powders for activity in both fresh and aged conditions; reaction of ammonia in the absence of NO was also used as measure of ammonia oxidation tendency at elevated reaction

  16. Title Plutonium Mobility in Soil and Uptake in Plants: A Review Copyright Issue

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mobility in Soil and Uptake in Plants: A Review Copyright Issue Author Francis, C. W. 101670 Document Date 1/1/73 Document Type Published Article (scientific or technical journals) Recipients Public ERC Index number 05.09.714 Box Number 1651-1 U . N . R . ILL DEPT. : THIS MATERIAL MAY HB CTED BY OOEXRIGHT LAH <jnue w u.s. coral ^ UNLV-ILL.^.^. £ ADMTWSTR* n v RECORD £,002/005 Plutonium Mobility in Soil and Uptake in Plants: A Review 1 NTSEIS ADMINISTRATWE RECORD C. W. Francis 1 ABSTRACT A

  17. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  18. Controlled differential pressure system for an enhanced fluid blending apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-02-24

    A system and method for producing a controlled blend of two or more fluids. Thermally-induced permeation through a permeable tube is used to mix a first fluid from outside the tube with a second fluid flowing through the tube. Mixture ratios may be controlled by adjusting the temperature of the first fluid or by adjusting the pressure drop through the permeable tube. The combination of a back pressure control valve and a differential regulator is used to control the output pressure of the blended fluid. The combination of the back pressure control valve and differential regulator provides superior flow control of the second dry gas. A valve manifold system may be used to mix multiple fluids, and to adjust the volume of blended fluid produced, and to further modify the mixture ratio.

  19. Numerical solution of three-dimensional magnetic differential equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1987-02-01

    A computer code is described that solves differential equations of the form B . del f = h for a single-valued solution f, given a toroidal three-dimensional divergence-free field B and a single-valued function h. The code uses a new algorithm that Fourier decomposes a given function in a set of flux coordinates in which the field lines are straight. The algorithm automatically adjusts the required integration lengths to compensate for proximity to low order rational surfaces. Applying this algorithm to the Cartesian coordinates defines a transformation to magnetic coordinates, in which the magnetic differential equation can be accurately solved. Our method is illustrated by calculating the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents for a stellarator.

  20. Local random potentials of high differentiability to model the Landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battefeld, T.; Modi, C.

    2015-03-09

    We generate random functions locally via a novel generalization of Dyson Brownian motion, such that the functions are in a desired differentiability class C{sup k}, while ensuring that the Hessian is a member of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (other ensembles might be chosen if desired). Potentials in such higher differentiability classes (k≥2) are required/desirable to model string theoretical landscapes, for instance to compute cosmological perturbations (e.g., k=2 for the power-spectrum) or to search for minima (e.g., suitable de Sitter vacua for our universe). Since potentials are created locally, numerical studies become feasible even if the dimension of field space is large (D∼100). In addition to the theoretical prescription, we provide some numerical examples to highlight properties of such potentials; concrete cosmological applications will be discussed in companion publications.

  1. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  2. Differentiable but exact formulation of density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvaal, Simen Ekstrm, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M.; School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD

    2014-05-14

    The universal density functional F of density-functional theory is a complicated and ill-behaved function of the densityin particular, F is not differentiable, making many formal manipulations more complicated. While F has been well characterized in terms of convex analysis as forming a conjugate pair (E, F) with the ground-state energy E via the HohenbergKohn and Lieb variation principles, F is nondifferentiable and subdifferentiable only on a small (but dense) subset of its domain. In this article, we apply a tool from convex analysis, MoreauYosida regularization, to construct, for any ? > 0, pairs of conjugate functionals ({sup ?}E, {sup ?}F) that converge to (E, F) pointwise everywhere as ? ? 0{sup +}, and such that {sup ?}F is (Frchet) differentiable. For technical reasons, we limit our attention to molecular electronic systems in a finite but large box. It is noteworthy that no information is lost in the MoreauYosida regularization: the physical ground-state energy E(v) is exactly recoverable from the regularized ground-state energy {sup ?}E(v) in a simple way. All concepts and results pertaining to the original (E, F) pair have direct counterparts in results for ({sup ?}E, {sup ?}F). The MoreauYosida regularization therefore allows for an exact, differentiable formulation of density-functional theory. In particular, taking advantage of the differentiability of {sup ?}F, a rigorous formulation of KohnSham theory is presented that does not suffer from the noninteracting representability problem in standard KohnSham theory.

  3. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  4. DIFFERENTIAL GROUP-VELOCITY DETECTION OF FLUID PATHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leland Timothy Long

    2005-12-20

    For nearly 50 years, surface waves that propagate through near-surface soils have been utilized in engineering for the determination of the small-strain dynamic properties of soils. These techniques, although useful, have not been sufficiently precise to use in detecting the subtle changes in soil properties that accompany short-term changes in fluid content. The differential techniques developed in this research now make it possible to monitor small changes (less than 3 cm) in the water level of shallow soil aquifers. Using inversion techniques and tomography, differential seismic techniques could track the water level distribution in aquifers with water being pumped in or out. Differential surface wave analysis could lead to new ways to monitor reservoir levels and verify hydrologic models. Field data obtained during this investigation have measured changes in surface-wave phase and group velocity before and after major rain events, and have detected subtle changes associated with pumping water into an aquifer and pumping water out of an aquifer. This research has established analysis techniques for observing these changes. These techniques combine time domain measurements to isolate surface wave arrivals with frequency domain techniques to determine the effects as a function of frequency. Understanding the differences in response as a function of wave frequency facilitates the inversion of this data for soil velocity structure. These techniques have also quantified many aspects of data acquisition and analysis that are important for significant results. These include tight control on the character of the source and proper placement of the geophones. One important application is the possibility that surface waves could be used to monitor and/or track fluid movement during clean-up operations, verifying that the fluid reached all affected areas. Extending this to a larger scale could facilitate monitoring of water resources in basins without having to drill many expensive wells. The next step is to investigate the commercial applications of differential surface wave analysis.

  5. Fully Polarimetric Differential Intensity W-band Imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Kelly, James F.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Lechelt, Wayne M.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2013-05-31

    We present a novel architecture based upon a Dicke-switched heterodyne radiometer architecture employing two identical input sections consisting of horn and orthomode transducer to detect the difference between the H and V polarization states of two separate object patches imaged by the radiometer. We have constructed and described previously a fully polarimetric W-band passive millimeter wave imager constructed to study the phenomenology of anomaly detection using polarimetric image exploitation of the Stokes images. The heterodyne radiometer used a PIN diode switch between the input millimeter wave energy and that of a reference load in order to eliminate the effects of component drifts and reduce the effects of 1/f noise. The differential approach differs from our previous work by comparing H and V polarization states detected by each of the two input horns instead of a reference load to form signals delta H and delta V from closely adjacent paired object patches. This novel imaging approach reduces common mode noise and enhances detection of small changes between the H and V polarization states of two object patches, now given as difference terms of the fully polarimetric radiometer. We present the theory of operation, initial proof of concept experimental results, and extension of the differential radiometer to a system with a binocular fore optics that allow adjustment of the convergence or shear of the object patches viewed by the differential polarimetric imager.

  6. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  7. Organic thin film devices with stabilized threshold voltage and mobility, and method for preparing the devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nastasi, Michael Anthony; Wang, Yongqiang; Fraboni, Beatrice; Cosseddu, Piero; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2013-06-11

    Organic thin film devices that included an organic thin film subjected to a selected dose of a selected energy of ions exhibited a stabilized mobility (.mu.) and threshold voltage (VT), a decrease in contact resistance R.sub.C, and an extended operational lifetime that did not degrade after 2000 hours of operation in the air.

  8. Mobilization of dust and exfoliation of erosion product films in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martynenko, Yu. V.; Nagel, M. Yu.

    2012-04-15

    The mobilization of dust (i.e., detachment and removal of dust grains from a substrate) and the exfoliation of a film of erosion products in tokamaks have been studied theoretically. The following mechanisms of dust mobilization have been taken into account: (i) sharp heating (thermal shock) as a result of, e.g., plasma disruption and edge instabilities; (ii) substrate vibrations; and (iii) gas and plasma flow (wind) action. The most effective mobilization takes place under the action of sharp heating. Power fluxes that are characteristic of edge instabilities can mobilize dust grains with dimensions within or even greater than 0.1-1 {mu}m. The velocities of detached grains reach {nu} {approx} 100 m/s for heavy grains and up to {nu} {approx} 300 m/s for the light ones. Conditions favoring the exfoliation of a film of erosion products are determined. It is shown that exfoliation under the action of edge instabilities can take place at a film thickness of h > 1 {mu}m. Under the action of thermal-shock-induced stresses, the exfoliated film flakes with a size ranging from fractions of a millimeter to several centimeters break into pieces.

  9. WPN 93-14: 40 Percent Waiver Provisions for Multifamily and Mobile Home Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program notice provides guidance on multifamily and mobile home units weatherized by states, which adopt the approved 4.0 version of NEAT or other similar approved energy audits and receive a waiver of the 40 percent requirement from DOE.

  10. WPN 94-8: 40 Percent Waiver Provisions for Mobile Home Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program notice provides clarifying guidance previously issued under Weatherization Program Notice 93-14 on mobile home units weatherized by states which adopt the approved 4.0 version of NEAT or other similar approved energy audits and receive a waiver of the 40 percent requirement from DOE.

  11. Low-temperature high-mobility amorphous IZO for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morales-Masis, Monica; Martin De Nicolas, Silvia; Holovsky, Jakub; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-07-13

    Parasitic absorption in the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) front electrode is one of the limitations of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells efficiency. To avoid such absorption while retaining high conductivity, TCOs with high electron mobility are preferred over those with high carrier density. Here, we demonstrate improved SHJ solar cell efficiencies by applying high-mobility amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) as the front TCO. We sputtered a-IZO at low substrate temperature and low power density and investigated the optical and electrical properties, as well as subband tail formation-quantified by the Urbach energy (EU)-as a function of the sputtering oxygen partial pressure.more » We obtain an EU as low as 128 meV for films with the highest Hall mobility of 60 cm2/Vs. When comparing the performance of a-IZO films with indium tin oxide (ITO) and hydrogenated indium oxide (IO:H), we find that IO:H (115 cm2/Vs) exhibits a similar EU of 130 meV, while ITO (25 cm2/Vs) presents a much larger EU of up to 270 meV. The high film quality, indicated by the low EU, the high mobility, and low free carrier absorption of the developed a-IZO electrodes, result in a significant current improvement, achieving conversion efficiencies over 21.5%, outperforming those with standard ITO.« less

  12. Reconciling macro- with nano- carrier mobility measurements in organic photovoltaic blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, Yamila M.; Maragliano, Carlo; Chiesa, Matteo; Al Ghaferi, Amal; Stefancich, Marco

    2014-04-28

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) is a valuable tool for electrical characterization of organic photovoltaics. However, the quantitative interpretation of the data is complicated by an apparent disagreement between the carrier mobilities calculated by CAFM and those determined by macroscopic measurements, with no apparent physical explanation for the discrepancy. In the present work, the space charge limited current model (specifically Mott-Gurney law) and its assumptions are assessed, and a physical model reconciling this discrepancy is proposed. Its applicability on the tip-sample system used in CAFM measurements is discussed, by accounting for the high electric fields arising around the tip of the CAFM probe and affecting carrier mobility. Charge carrier mobility is calculated from current-voltage curves obtained from conductive atomic force microscopy spectroscopy scans done on Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): 95% PC{sub 70}BM ([6,6]-Phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester)/5% PC{sub 60}BM ([6,6]-Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) samples for different concentration ratios of donor and acceptor. We show that charge carrier mobilities obtained with this model are in satisfactory agreement with macroscopic measurements available in literature.

  13. Detection and differentiation of coxiella burnetii in biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazier, Marvin E. (Richland, WA); Mallavia, Louis P. (Moscow, ID); Samuel, James E. (Pullman, WA); Baca, Oswald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Methods for detecting the presence of Coxiella burenetii in biological samples, as well as a method for differentiating strains of C. burnetii that are capable of causing acute disease from those strains capable of causing chronic disease are disclosed. The methods generally comprise treating cells contained within the biological sample to expose cellular DNA, and hybridizing the cellular DNA (specifically rickettsial DNA) with a C. burnetii-specific labeled DNA probe. Radioisotope and biotin labels are preferred, allowing detection through autoradiography and colorimetric assays, respectively.

  14. Detection and differentiation of coxiella burnetii in biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazier, Marvin E. (Richland, WA); Mallavia, Louis P. (Moscow, ID); Samuel, James E. (Derwood, MD); Baca, Oswald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Methods for detecting the presence of Coxiella burnetii in biological samples, as well as a method for differentiating strains of C. burnetii that are capable of causing acute disease from those strains capable of causing chronic disease are disclosed. The methods generally comprise treating cells contained within the biological sample to expose cellular DNA, and hybridizing the cellular DNA with a DNA probe containing DNA sequences that specifically hybridize with C. burnetii DNA of strains associated with the capacity to cause acute or chronic disease.

  15. Detection and differentiation of coxiella burnetii in biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazier, Marvin E. (Richland, WA); Mallavia, Louis P. (Moscow, ID); Baca, Oswald G. (Albuquerque, NM); Samuel, James E. (Pullman, WA)

    1989-01-01

    Methods for detecting the presence of Coxiella burnetii in biological samples, as well as a method for differentiating strains of C. burnetii that are capable of causing acute disease from those strains capable of causing chronic disease are disclosed. The methods generally comprise treating cells contained within the biological sample to expose cellular DNA, and hybridizing the cellular DNA (specifically rickettsial DNA) with a C. burnetii-specific labeled DNA probe. Radioisotope and biotin labels are preferred, allowing detection through autoradiography and colorimetric assays, respectively.

  16. Double Precision Differential/Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-02

    DDASAC solves nonlinear initial-value problems involving stiff implicit systems of ordinary differential and algebraic equations. Purely algebraic nonlinear systems can also be solved, given an initial guess within the region of attraction of a solution. Options include automatic reconciliation of inconsistent initial states and derivatives, automatic initial step selection, direct concurrent parametric sensitivity analysis, and stopping at a prescribed value of any user-defined functional of the current solution vector. Local error control (in the max-normmore » or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the sensitivities on request.« less

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  1. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  2. Uranium vacancy mobility at the sigma 5 symmetric tilt grain boundary in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2012-05-02

    An important consequence of the fissioning process occurring during burnup is the formation of fission products. These fission products alter the thermo-mechanical properties of the fuel. They also lead to macroscopic changes in the fuel structure, including the formation of bubbles that are connected to swelling of the fuel. Subsequent release of fission gases increase the pressure in the plenum and can cause changes in the properties of the fuel pin itself. It is thus imperative to understand how fission products, and fission gases in particular, behave within the fuel in order to predict the performance of the fuel under operating conditions. Fission gas redistribution within the fuel is governed by mass transport and the presence of sinks such as impurities, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Thus, to understand how the distribution of fission gases evolves in the fuel, we must understand the underlying transport mechanisms, tied to the concentrations and mobilities of defects within the material, and how these gases interact with microstructural features that might act as sinks. Both of these issues have been addressed in previous work under NEAMS. However, once a fission product has reached a sink, such as a grain boundary, its mobility may be different there than in the grain interior and predicting how, for example, bubbles nucleate within grain boundaries necessitates an understanding of how fission gases diffuse within boundaries. That is the goal of the present work. In this report, we describe atomic level simulations of uranium vacancy diffusion in the pressence of a {Sigma}5 symmetric tilt boundary in urania (UO{sub 2}). This boundary was chosen as it is the simplest of the boundaries we considered in previous work on segregation and serves as a starting point for understanding defect mobility at boundaries. We use a combination of molecular statics calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine how the mobility of uranium vacancies is altered at this particular grain boundary. Given that the diffusion of fission gases such as Xe are tied to the mobility of uranium vacancies, these results given insight into how fission gas mobility differs at grain boundaries compared to bulk urania.

  3. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  4. Mobile treatment modules for the Rhode Island environmental training center. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herriot, D.

    1994-12-01

    Groundwater pollution can result from many activities, including leaching from landfills and abandoned dump sites, accidental spills of chemicals or waste materials, improper underground injection of liquids, and leakage from faulty septic systems or underground storage tanks. Discoveries of aquifer pollution from man`s waste disposal practices are increasing. A recent trend, is to fast track the remediation process by employing mobile units which can be quickly set up and put into operation to address the contamination problem with the speed and urgency it deserves. The traditional study, design, and construction of a site-specific treatment process simply takes too long. Mobile units can serve as an interim treatment system to expeditiously control migration, and address public health and safety concerns while time and technology work together for a permanent, cost-effective remediation plan.

  5. Record surface state mobility and quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films via interface engineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koirala, Nikesh; Han, Myung -Geun; Brahlek, Matthew; Salehi, Maryam; Wu, Liang; Dai, Jixia; Waugh, Justin; Nummy, Thomas; Moon, Jisoo; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-11-19

    Material defects remain as the main bottleneck to the progress of topological insulators (TIs). In particular, efforts to achieve thin TI samples with dominant surface transport have always led to increased defects and degraded mobilities, thus making it difficult to probe the quantum regime of the topological surface states. Here, by utilizing a novel buffer layer scheme composed of an In2Se3/(Bi0.5In0.5)2Se3 heterostructure, we introduce a quantum generation of Bi2Se3 films with an order of magnitude enhanced mobilities than before. Furthermore, this scheme has led to the first observation of the quantum Hall effect in Bi2Se3.

  6. Microbial transformations of uranium in wastes and implication on its mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki,Y.; Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.J.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2008-09-14

    Uranium exists in several chemical forms in mining and mill tailings and in nuclear and weapons production wastes. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of U in wastes by altering the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of U in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of U is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect nonenzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of U have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the mechanisms of microbial transformations of various chemical forms of U in the presence of electron donors and acceptors.

  7. Charge transfer and mobility enhancement at CdO/SnTe heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishitani, Junichi; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2014-09-29

    We report a study of the effects of charge transfer on electrical properties of CdO/SnTe heterostructures. A series of structures with variable SnTe thicknesses were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Because of an extreme type III band offset with the valence band edge of SnTe located at 1.5?eV above the conduction band edge of CdO, a large charge transfer is expected at the interface of the CdO/SnTe heterostructure. The electrical properties of the heterostructures are analyzed using a multilayer charge transport model. The analysis indicates a large 4-fold enhancement of the CdO electron mobility at the interface with SnTe. The mobility enhancement is attributed to reduction of the charge center scattering through neutralization of the donor-like defects responsible for the Fermi level pinning at the CdO/SnTe interface.

  8. Linear magnetoresistance caused by mobility fluctuations in n-doped Cd3As2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Narayanan, A.; Watson, M. D.; Blake, S. F.; Bruyant, N.; Drigo, L.; Chen, Y. L.; Prabhakaran, D.; Yan, B.; Felser, C.; Kong, T.; et al

    2015-03-19

    Cd3As2 is a candidate three-dimensional Dirac semimetal which has exceedingly high mobility and nonsaturating linear magnetoresistance that may be relevant for future practical applications. We report magnetotransport and tunnel diode oscillation measurements on Cd3As2, in magnetic fields up to 65 T and temperatures between 1.5 and 300 K. We find that the nonsaturating linear magnetoresistance persists up to 65 T and it is likely caused by disorder effects, as it scales with the high mobility rather than directly linked to Fermi surface changes even when approaching the quantum limit. As a result of the observed quantum oscillations, we determine themore » bulk three-dimensional Fermi surface having signatures of Dirac behavior with a nontrivial Berry phase shift, very light effective quasiparticle masses, and clear deviations from the band-structure predictions. In very high fields we also detect signatures of large Zeeman spin splitting (g~16).« less

  9. Effects on carbon monoxide levels in mobile homes using unvented kerosene heaters for residential heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.; Walsh, D.; White, J.; Jackson, M.; Mumford, J.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels were continuously monitored in 8 mobile trailer homes less than 10 years old. These homes were monitored in an US EPA study on indoor air quality as affected by unvented portable kerosene heaters. Respondents were asked to operate their heaters in a normal fashion. CO, air exchange and temperature values were measured during the study in each home. Results indicate that consumers using unvented kerosene heaters may be unknowingly exposed to high CO levels without taking proper precautions.

  10. Self-Assembly, Molecular Ordering, and Charge Mobility in Solution-Processed Ultrathin Oligothiophene Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,A.; Chang, P.; VanDyke, P.; Liu, J.; Frechet, J.; Subramanian, V.; Delongchamp, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2005-01-01

    Symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted quarter-(T4), penta-(T5), sexi-(T6), and heptathiophene (T7) oligomers containing thermally removable aliphatic ester solubilizing groups were synthesized, and their UV-vis and thermal characteristics were compared. Spun-cast thin films of each oligomer were examined with atomic force microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to evaluate the ability of the material to self-assemble from a solution-based process while maintaining complete surface coverage. Films of the T5-T7 oligomers self-assemble into crystalline terraces after thermal annealing with higher temperatures required to affect this transformation as the size of the oligomers increases. A symmetrical {alpha}, {omega}-substituted sexithiophene (T6-acid) that reveals carboxylic acids after thermolysis was also prepared to evaluate the effect of the presence of hydrogen-bonding moieties. The charge transport properties for these materials evaluated in top-contact thin film transistor devices were found to correlate with the observed morphology of the films. Therefore, the T4 and the T6-acid performed poorly because of incomplete surface coverage after thermolysis, while T5-T7 exhibited much higher performance as a result of molecular ordering. Increases in charge mobility correlated to increasing conjugation length with measured mobilities ranging from 0.02 to 0.06 cm2/(V{center_dot}s). The highest mobilities were measured when films of each oligomer had an average thickness between one and two monolayers, indicating that the molecules become exceptionally well-ordered during the thermolysis process. This unprecedented ordering of the solution-cast molecules results in efficient charge mobility rarely seen in such ultrathin films.

  11. Trapping of oil drops in a noncircular pore throat and mobilization upon contact with a surfactant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriola, A.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1983-02-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to study trapping and mobilization of oil drops in a capillary of square cross section (100 microns X 100 microns (100 ..mu..m X 100 ..mu..m)) having a constriction also approximately square in shape. Experiments to investigate trapping consisted of injecting a drop of nonwetting phase liquid (''oil'') into a flowing water stream (wetting phase). Pre-equilibrated alcohol/water systems were used to study effects of interfacial tension (IFT). A drop was displaced toward the constriction by the flowing water. The behavior of the drop as it approached and was trapped by the constriction or as it moved through the constriction was observed as a function of flow rate, drop length, and IFT between the water and nonwetting liquid. Mobilization by surfactants was investigated by conducting a series of displacement experiments in the capillary cell. Data from the mobilization experiments allowed two mechanisms to be identified. In Mechanism 1, minute quantities of the surfactant and/or cosurfactant were carried ahead of the main surfactant slug by brine that bypassed the slug. This reduced the IFT between the oil and brine. The oil drop moved further into the constriction and a snap-off process ensued. Mechanism 2 occurred when a sharp interface of the surfactant slug contacted the trailing edge of a nonane drop that was either trapped or in a snap-off process. A series of events that mobilized the drop occurred over a very short time period (< 4.0 seconds). The events included rupture of the drop interface, rolling motions inside the drop with resulting emulsification, and passage of the emulsified drop through the pore constriction without snap-off.

  12. Houdini{trademark}: Reconfigurable in-tank mobile robot. Final report, June 1995--January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, B.; Slifko, A.

    1998-12-31

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup system called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobilize waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  13. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy ARM Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As a scientific user facility with long-term and mobile sites across the globe, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is used by scientists to obtain measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation interactions, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. To collect these measurements geared toward improving climate models, long-term, continuously operating field sites in three regions-referred to as the

  14. Low-temperature high-mobility amorphous IZO for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales-Masis, Monica; Martin De Nicolas, Silvia; Holovsky, Jakub; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-07-13

    Parasitic absorption in the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) front electrode is one of the limitations of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells efficiency. To avoid such absorption while retaining high conductivity, TCOs with high electron mobility are preferred over those with high carrier density. Here, we demonstrate improved SHJ solar cell efficiencies by applying high-mobility amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) as the front TCO. We sputtered a-IZO at low substrate temperature and low power density and investigated the optical and electrical properties, as well as subband tail formation-quantified by the Urbach energy (EU)-as a function of the sputtering oxygen partial pressure. We obtain an EU as low as 128 meV for films with the highest Hall mobility of 60 cm2/Vs. When comparing the performance of a-IZO films with indium tin oxide (ITO) and hydrogenated indium oxide (IO:H), we find that IO:H (115 cm2/Vs) exhibits a similar EU of 130 meV, while ITO (25 cm2/Vs) presents a much larger EU of up to 270 meV. The high film quality, indicated by the low EU, the high mobility, and low free carrier absorption of the developed a-IZO electrodes, result in a significant current improvement, achieving conversion efficiencies over 21.5%, outperforming those with standard ITO.

  15. DOE/SC-ARM-14-016 ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup JW Voyles May 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  16. ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery

  17. Microsoft Word - NRAP_TRS_III_Mobilization_and_Transport_of_Organic_Compound_final.20150515.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 21 May 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2015 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  18. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project -- A DOE Market Transformation Activity-- Lennie Klebanoff Sandia National Laboratories Chris Radley Altergy Systems Torsten Erbel Multiquip Inc. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Webinar November 13, 2012 "Exceptional Service in the National Interest" 1 Boeing Interested in Bringing Fuel Cell Technology to Ground Support Equipment (GSE) 3/1/2008: "We (Boeing) would like Sandia to lead an effort with us to bring hydrogen fuel cell technology to airport

  19. ORNIJRASA-85/7 Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF TBE MOBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ORNIJRASA-85/7 Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF TBE MOBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN BERKELEY, BRIDGETON, AND HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI Jane 1985 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYACXVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05840R21400 -.... ORNL/RASA-85/7 Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF IBE MOBILEGAMMA SCANNING

  20. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses a parallel array of RF electrodes for ion confinement, spaced by an array of short DC electrodes to which a TW can be applied to drive ion motion. The ability of the TW-SLIM for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different RF and TW parameters is reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to allow transfers a wide mass range of ions (200-2500 Da) utilizing a confining RF waveform (1 MHz and 300 Vp-p), and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Also, the short module achieved an ion mobility peak capacity of 24 and a peak generation rate of 1014 s-1 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of RF and DC voltage parameters, and demonstrated robust performance. The combined attributes of flexible design and low voltage requirements for traveling wave IMS, provide a basis for SLIM devices incorporating extended series of ion manipulations.

  1. Mechanical flip-chip for ultra-high electron mobility devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennaceur, Keyan; Schmidt, Benjamin A.; Gaucher, Samuel; Laroche, Dominique; Sandia National Lab.; Lilly, Michael P.; Reno, John L.; West, Ken W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Gervais, Guillaume

    2015-09-22

    In this study, electrostatic gates are of paramount importance for the physics of devices based on high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) since they allow depletion of electrons in selected areas. This field-effect gating enables the fabrication of a wide range of devices such as, for example, quantum point contacts (QPC), electron interferometers and quantum dots. To fabricate these gates, processing is usually performed on the 2DEG material, which is in many cases detrimental to its electron mobility. Here we propose an alternative process which does not require any processing of the 2DEG material other than for the ohmic contacts. Thismore » approach relies on processing a separate wafer that is then mechanically mounted on the 2DEG material in a flip-chip fashion. This technique proved successful to fabricate quantum point contacts on both GaAs/AlGaAs materials with both moderate and ultra-high electron mobility.« less

  2. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Laroche, Dominique; Huang, S. -H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J. -Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-02-11

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned overmore » a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm–2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm–2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. Lastly, this result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential.« less

  3. Mobility of singly-charged lanthanide cations in rare gases: Theoretical assessment of the state specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Viehland, Larry A.

    2014-03-21

    High quality, ab initio calculations are reported for the potential energy curves governing the interactions of four singly-charged lanthanide ions (Yb{sup +}, Eu{sup +}, Lu{sup +}, and Gd{sup +}) with the rare gases (RG = HeXe). Scalar-relativistic coupled cluster calculations are used for the first three S-state ions, but for Gd{sup +}({sup 10}D) it is necessary to take the interaction anisotropy into account with the help of the multi-reference technique. The potential energy curves are used to determine the ion mobility and other transport properties describing the motion of the ions through the dilute RG, both as functions of the temperature, T, in the low-field limit, and at fixed T as functions of the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, E/N. The calculated mobilities are in good agreement with the very limited experimental data that have become available recently. The calculations show a pronounced dependence of the transport properties on the electronic configuration of the ion, as well as a significant effect of the spin-orbit coupling on the transport properties of the Gd{sup +} ion, and predict that state-specific mobilities could be detectable in Gd{sup +}RG experiments.

  4. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  5. Transport of Organic Contaminants Mobilized from Coal through Sandstone Overlying a Geological Carbon Sequestration Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-02-01

    Column experiments were conducted using a wetted sandstone rock installed in a tri-axial core holder to study the flow and transport of organic compounds mobilized by scCO2 under simulated geologic carbon storage (GCS) conditions. The sandstone rock was collected from a formation overlying a deep saline reservoir at a GCS demonstration site. Rock core effluent pressures were set at 0, 500, or 1000 psig and the core temperature was set at 20 or 50C to simulate the transport to different subsurface depths. The concentrations of the organic compounds in the column effluent and their distribution within the sandstone core were monitored. Results indicate that the mobility though the core sample was much higher for BTEX compounds than for naphthalene. Retention of organic compounds from the vapor phase to the core appeared to be primarily controlled by partitioning from the vapor phase to the aqueous phase. Adsorption to the surfaces of the wetted sandstone was also significant for naphthalene. Reduced temperature and elevated pressure resulted in greater partitioning of the mobilized organic contaminants into the water phase.

  6. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300 K to 77 K. This study shows great potential of Insub 0.41Gasub ...

  7. Triply differential (e,2e) studies of phenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, G. B. da; Neves, R. F. C.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Ali, E.; Madison, D. H.; Ning, C. G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-28

    We have measured (e,2e) triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the electron-impact ionisation of phenol with coplanar asymmetrical kinematics for an incident electron energy of 250 eV. Experimental measurements of the angular distribution of the slow outgoing electrons at 20 eV are obtained when the incident electron scatters through angles of ?5, ?10, and ?15, respectively. The TDCS data are compared with calculations performed within the molecular 3-body distorted wave model. In this case, a mixed level of agreement, that was dependent on the kinematical condition being probed, was observed between the theoretical and experimental results in the binary peak region. The experimental intensity of the recoil features under all kinematical conditions was relatively small, but was still largely underestimated by the theoretical calculations.

  8. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  9. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  10. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  11. Micron-Scale Differential Scanning Calorimeter on a Chip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cavicchi, Richard E.; Poirier, Gregory Ernest; Suehle, John S.; Gaitan, Michael; Tea, Nim H.

    1998-06-30

    A differential scanning microcalorimeter produced on a silicon chip enables microscopic scanning calorimetry measurements of small samples and thin films. The chip may be fabricated using standard CMOS processes. The microcalorimeter includes a reference zone and a sample zone. The reference and sample zones may be at opposite ends of a suspended platform or may reside on separate platforms. An integrated polysilicon heater provides heat to each zone. A thermopile consisting of a succession of thermocouple junctions generates a voltage representing the temperature difference between the reference and sample zones. Temperature differences between the zones provide information about the chemical reactions and phase transitions that occur in a sample placed in the sample zone.

  12. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

  13. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  14. Palmitate attenuates osteoblast differentiation of fetal rat calvarial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Lee-Chuan C.; Ford, Jeffery J.; Lee, John C.; Adamo, Martin L.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Palmitate inhibits osteoblast differentiation. • Fatty acid synthase. • PPARγ. • Acetyl Co-A carboxylase inhibitor TOFA. • Fetal rat calvarial cell culture. - Abstract: Aging is associated with the accumulation of ectopic lipid resulting in the inhibition of normal organ function, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Within the bone marrow microenvironment, elevation in fatty acid levels may produce an increase in osteoclast activity and a decrease in osteoblast number and function, thus contributing to age-related osteoporosis. However, little is known about lipotoxic mechanisms in intramembraneous bone. Previously we reported that the long chain saturated fatty acid palmitate inhibited the expression of the osteogenic markers RUNX2 and osteocalcin in fetal rat calvarial cell (FRC) cultures. Moreover, the acetyl CoA carboxylase inhibitor TOFA blocked the inhibitory effect of palmitate on expression of these two markers. In the current study we have extended these observations to show that palmitate inhibits spontaneous mineralized bone formation in FRC cultures in association with reduced mRNA expression of RUNX2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein and reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. The effects of palmitate on osteogenic marker expression were inhibited by TOFA. Palmitate also inhibited the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase and PPARγ in FRC cultures, and as with osteogenic markers, this effect was inhibited by TOFA. Palmitate had no effect on FRC cell proliferation or apoptosis, but inhibited BMP-7-induced alkaline phosphatase activity. We conclude that palmitate accumulation may lead to lipotoxic effects on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization and that increases in fatty acid oxidation may help to prevent these lipotoxic effects.

  15. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africas most successful mobile network operators, will talk about Mobile phones and Africa: a success story. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss Citizen Problem Solving. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africas most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continents population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Londons School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairmans Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greate

  16. Mobile 911

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerman, Dean

    2013-11-25

    It's everyone's first reaction when an emergency strikes: Dial 911. But what if no one picks up? That scenario isn't as unlikely as it sounds. During Hurricane Katrina, dozens of 911 call centers in the area were out of service due to flooding, evacuation and loss of power. Most landlines weren't working, and 70 percent of the cell phone towers in New Orleans had failed. "The communications infrastructure completely collapsed," says Curtis Papke, an engineer at Idaho National Laboratory. "Even if you had cell coverage, there was no one at the 911 centers to answer the call." Papke's group has partnered with the Idaho National Guard and the company Qualcomm Inc. to find a possible solution.

  17. Mobile 911

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hagerman, Dean

    2014-06-09

    It's everyone's first reaction when an emergency strikes: Dial 911. But what if no one picks up? That scenario isn't as unlikely as it sounds. During Hurricane Katrina, dozens of 911 call centers in the area were out of service due to flooding, evacuation and loss of power. Most landlines weren't working, and 70 percent of the cell phone towers in New Orleans had failed. "The communications infrastructure completely collapsed," says Curtis Papke, an engineer at Idaho National Laboratory. "Even if you had cell coverage, there was no one at the 911 centers to answer the call." Papke's group has partnered with the Idaho National Guard and the company Qualcomm Inc. to find a possible solution.

  18. Mobile Video

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals 3:3 Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals Installation of the Cielo...

  19. OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressedgenes in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bacterial microarray experiments (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressedgenes in bacterial microarray experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressedgenes in bacterial microarray experiments Differentially expressed genes are typically identified by analyzing the variation between replicate measurements. These procedures implicitly assume that there are no

  20. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  1. Low-frequency elastic waves alter pore-scale colloid mobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, Richard Edward; Abdel-fattah, Amr I; Roberts, Peter M; Ibrahim, Reem; Tarimala, Sownitri

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of water wells. TEe decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of elastic wave stimulations on the release of colloidal particles and investigates the microscopic mechanism of particle release during stimulation. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that low-frequency elastic wave stimulations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the intensity of the stimulations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical variations in effluent microsphere concentration during and after stimulations. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent variations coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data. This behavior can be attributed to flow pathways fouling and/or rearrangements of the beads in the column. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that the individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping off portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between soil grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles.

  2. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr; Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr

    2013-12-09

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  3. Speakers: Paul D. Holtberg, EIA John Conti, EIA Tom R. Eizember, Exxon Mobil Corporation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3: "EIA's 2010 Annual Energy Outlook Highlights" Speakers: Paul D. Holtberg, EIA John Conti, EIA Tom R. Eizember, Exxon Mobil Corporation Mary Novak, HIS Global Insight [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Paul: All right, now we're running a little bit late here after all, lunch, so let's get started if we could. Either way, my speakers will be cut down to only 10 minutes each and we'll just

  4. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  5. ORNL/RASA-85/l OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE MOBILE GAMMA SCANNING

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    d-I. 17-9 d &y-?-T /,' k~:" , q ORNL/RASA-85/l OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE MOBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK AREA ,. OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIEITA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES 'DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACCeSS t0 the information in this rePoti is limited (o those indicated on the distribution list and to Depanment of &ergy and Department of Energy Contractors Health and Safety Research Division EESULTS OFTBEMlBILEGAJMA SCANNING

  6. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, Amir [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); McTiernan, James M. [Space Sciences Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ?2 to ?50MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ?2-25MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ?10MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ?0.4-5nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  7. Post-mitotic role of nucleostemin as a promoter of skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Romanova, Liudmila; Kellner, Steven; Verma, Mayank; Rayner, Samuel; Asakura, Atsushi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2010-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a nucleolar protein abundantly expressed in a variety of proliferating cells and undifferentiated cells. Its known functions include cell cycle regulation and the control of pre-rRNA processing. It also has been proposed that NS has an additional role in undifferentiated cells due to its downregulation during stem cell differentiation and its upregulation during tissue regeneration. Here, however, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle cell differentiation has a unique expression profile of NS in that it is continuously expressed during differentiation. NS was expressed at similar levels in non-proliferating muscle stem cells (satellite cells), rapidly proliferating precursor cells (myoblasts) and post-mitotic terminally differentiated cells (myotubes and myofibers). The sustained expression of NS during terminal differentiation is necessary to support increased protein synthesis during this process. Downregulation of NS inhibited differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes, accompanied by striking downregulation of key myogenic transcription factors, such as myogenin and MyoD. In contrast, upregulation of NS inhibited proliferation and promoted muscle differentiation in a p53-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that NS has an unexpected role in post-mitotic terminal differentiation. Importantly, these findings also indicate that, contrary to suggestions in the literature, the expression of NS cannot always be used as a reliable indicator for undifferentiated cells or proliferating cells.

  8. Geometrical and band-structure effects on phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, H. Mori, S.; Morioka, N.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-12-21

    We calculated the phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional [001], [110], [111], and [112]-oriented germanium nanowires, and the hole transport characteristics were investigated. A tight-binding approximation was used for holes, and phonons were described by a valence force field model. Then, scattering probability of holes by phonons was calculated taking account of hole-phonon interaction atomistically, and the linearized Boltzmann's transport equation was solved to calculate the hole mobility at low longitudinal field. The dependence of the hole mobility on nanowire geometry was analyzed in terms of the valence band structure of germanium nanowires, and it was found that the dependence was qualitatively reproduced by considering an average effective mass and the density of states of holes. The calculation revealed that [110] germanium nanowires with large height along the [001] direction show high hole mobility. Germanium nanowires with this geometry are also expected to exhibit high electron mobility in our previous work, and thus they are promising for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications.

  9. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact on an Automated Mobility District: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Gonder, Jeff; Qi, Xuewei

    2015-12-11

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  10. Calculation of room temperature conductivity and mobility in tin-based topological insulator nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandenberghe, William G. Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2014-11-07

    Monolayers of tin (stannanane) functionalized with halogens have been shown to be topological insulators. Using density functional theory (DFT), we study the electronic properties and room-temperature transport of nanoribbons of iodine-functionalized stannanane showing that the overlap integral between the wavefunctions associated to edge-states at opposite ends of the ribbons decreases with increasing width of the ribbons. Obtaining the phonon spectra and the deformation potentials also from DFT, we calculate the conductivity of the ribbons using the Kubo-Greenwood formalism and show that their mobility is limited by inter-edge phonon backscattering. We show that wide stannanane ribbons have a mobility exceeding 10{sup 6} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Contrary to ordinary semiconductors, two-dimensional topological insulators exhibit a high conductivity at low charge density, decreasing with increasing carrier density. Furthermore, the conductivity of iodine-functionalized stannanane ribbons can be modulated over a range of three orders of magnitude, thus rendering this material extremely interesting for classical computing applications.

  11. Experimental and Modeling Characterization of PETN Mobilization Mechanisms During Recrystallization at Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A K; Gee, R; Maiti, A; Qiu, R; Rajasekar, P; Weeks, B; Zepeda-Ruiz, L

    2005-11-03

    Experimental measurements suggest that pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN) undergoes changes at the molecular level that cause macroscopic changes in the overall PETN powder characteristics over time. These changes have been attributed to the high molecular mobility of PETN, but the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for this redistribution are still uncertain. Two basic approaches have been implemented in the past year to provide insight into the nature of these underlying mechanisms. The first approach is of an experimental nature, utilizing both AFM and evaporation measurements, which address both surface mobility and evaporation. These data include AFM measurements performed at LLNL and evaporation rate measurements performed at Texas Tech. These results are compared to earlier vapor pressure measurements performed at SNL, and estimates of recrystallization time frames are given. The second approach utilizes first-principle calculations and simulations that will be used to compare directly to those experimental quantities measured. We are developing an accurate intermolecular potential for PETN, which via kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations would mimic real crystallite shapes. Once the basic theory is in place for the growth of single crystallites, we will be in a position to investigate realistic grain coarsening phenomena in multi-crystallite simulations. This will also enable us to study how to control the morphological evolution, e.g., through thermal cycling, or through the action of custom additives and impurities.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Mobile Real Time Radiography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Mendez, J.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.

    1997-01-01

    A 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph greater than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes. It has three independent X-Ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12 in. image intensifier, the second is a 36 in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53 ft long X 8 ft. wide X 14 ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only a easily obtainable overweight permit because it weighs approximately 38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  13. Uranium vacancy mobility at the ?5 symmetric tilt and ?5 twist grain boundaries in UO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered a simple tilt and a simple twist boundary the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.

  14. P-doping-free III-nitride high electron mobility light-emitting diodes and transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baikui; Tang, Xi; Chen, Kevin J.; Wang, Jiannong

    2014-07-21

    We report that a simple metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diode is capable of producing GaN band-edge ultraviolet emission at 3.4?eV at a small forward bias larger than ?2?V at room temperature. Based on the surface states distribution of AlGaN, a mature impact-ionization-induced Fermi-level de-pinning model is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of the electroluminescence (EL) process. By experimenting with different Schottky metals, Ni/Au and Pt/Au, we demonstrated that this EL phenomenon is a universal property of metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes. Since this light-emitting Schottky diode shares the same active structure and fabrication processes as the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, straight-forward and seamless integration of photonic and electronic functional devices has been demonstrated on doping-free III-nitride heterostructures. Using a semitransparent Schottky drain electrode, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility light-emitting transistor is demonstrated.

  15. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  16. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ - 8 TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60-120 GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 +/- 8 (exp) +/- 25 (theo) +/- 30 (lumi) pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section $d\\sigma/dm$ in the dilepton mass range 15 to 2000moreGeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section $d^2 \\sigma / d(m) d(abs(y))$ is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. The measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.less

  17. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the fullmore » phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.« less

  18. Measurements of differential and double-differential DrellYan cross sections in protonproton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Er, J.; Friedl, M.; Frhwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hrmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knnz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krtschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; DHondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perni, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Jnior, W. L. Ald; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custdio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Hrknen, J.; Karimki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampn, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindn, T.; Luukka, P.; Menp, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Min, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gel, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Gth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Ther, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flgge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Knsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krcker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. .; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schrder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Grner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Hing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrck, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Bser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Mller, T.; Mller, Th.; Nrnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Rcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; DAlessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; DallOsso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fan, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; DellOrso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Fo, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domnguez Vzquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernndez Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Prez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Whri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Doneg, M.; Dnser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Ngeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. 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R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Pirou, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Herv, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, The CMS

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential DrellYan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on protonproton collision data at ?s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 8 (exp) 25 (theo) 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section d?/dm in the dilepton mass range 152000GeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section d2?/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at ?s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  19. High mobility organic field-effect transistor based on water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid via spray coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng

    2015-01-26

    High mobility organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by inserting water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buffer layer between electrodes and pentacene film through spray coating process were fabricated. Compared with the OFETs incorporated with DNA in the conventional organic solvents of ethanol and methanol: water mixture, the water-soluble DNA based OFET exhibited an over four folds enhancement of field-effect mobility from 0.035 to 0.153?cm{sup 2}/Vs. By characterizing the surface morphology and the crystalline structure of pentacene active layer through atomic force microscope and X-ray diffraction, it was found that the adoption of water solvent in DNA solution, which played a key role in enhancing the field-effect mobility, was ascribed to both the elimination of the irreversible organic solvent-induced bulk-like phase transition of pentacene film and the diminution of a majority of charge trapping at interfaces in OFETs.

  20. Intrinsic carrier mobility of a single-layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dian; Shao, Zhi-Gang; Hao, Qing; Zhao, Hongbo

    2014-06-21

    We report intrinsic carrier mobility calculations of a two-dimensional nanostructure that consists of porous single layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes on both sides. We used first-principles calculation and found that the deformation potential of such system is about 25% of that of graphene, and the carrier mobility is about 5??10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} for both electrons and holes, about one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene. This nanostructure and its three-dimensional stacking could serve as novel organic electronic materials.