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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Definition: Reduced Electricity Theft | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Theft Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Theft Smart meters can typically detect tampering. Moreover, a meter data management system can analyze...

2

Wikipedia vandalism detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia that anyone can access and edit. It has become one of the most important sources of knowledge online and many third party projects rely on it for a wide-range of purposes. The open model of Wikipedia allows pranksters, ... Keywords: Wikipedia vandalism detection, machine learning, natural language processing, reputation

Santiago M. Mola-Velasco

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Integrated optical tamper sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of an monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tamper-indicating seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a tamper-indicating seal that permits in the field inspection and detection of tampering. Said seal comprises a shrinkable tube having a visible pattern of markings which is shrunk over th item to be sealed, and a second transparent tube, having a second visible marking pattern, which is shrunk over the item and the first tube. The relationship between the first and second set of markings produces a pattern so that the seal may not be removed without detection. The seal is particularly applicable to UF/sub 6/ cylinder valves.

Fiarman, S.; Degen, M.F.; Peters, H.F.

1982-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tamper resistant choke cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A carburetor improvement is described for inhibiting tampering with a thermostatic choke coil after carburetor manufacture. A cover (3) fits over a choke coil housing (H) to enclose a choke lever, the thermostatic coil being mounted inside the cover. The cover has a circumferential flange (5) which abuts the outer surface of the housing, the flange having a notch (9) formed therein and the cover being rotatable about the outer surface of the housing to position one end of the coil relative to the choke lever. A retainer (7) locks the cover in a fixed position once the one end of the coil is located with respect to the choke lever. The retainer has a tab (11) insertable in the notch to prevent further rotation of the cover. A screw (15) having a detachable head (17) unremovably secures the retainer to the carburetor whereby once the retainer is secured, further movement of the cover is prevented.

Kneipkamp, L.E.

1981-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ceramic tamper-revealing seals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tamper resistant seal is made of a brittle material with internal defects internally arranged in a random pattern to form a unique fingerprint characteristic of the seal which may be identified by ultrasonic scanning to determine whether tampering has occurred. It comprises a flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends or a U-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or Zr, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting. Part of the binding element is cast with NiO{sub 2} particles, which allows ultrasonic scanning and the resulting fingerprint. 7 figs.

Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Behavior based software theft detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with the burst of open source projects, software theft (or plagiarism) has become a very serious threat to the healthiness of software industry. Software birthmark, which represents the unique characteristics of a program, can be used for software ... Keywords: dynamic analysis, software birthmark, software plagiarism, software theft

Xinran Wang; Yoon-Chan Jhi; Sencun Zhu; Peng Liu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Preventing Theft of Anhydrous Ammonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anhydrous ammonia is widely used as a fertilizer. The theft of anhydrous ammonia for use in producing illegal drugs is a growing problem. This publication describes how thieves operate and how farmers and agricultural dealers can protect themselves from thieves.

Smith, David

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reusable, tamper-indicating seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable, tamper-indicating seal comprises a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body -- visible from outside the seal -- adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same position. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Towards better tamper&intrusion detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses in generic terms some of the work of the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the area of tamper and intrusion detection. Novel security approaches are discussed. We also present preliminary results for a crude prototype of a high security ('Town Crier') monitoring system for securing moving cargo or stationary assets.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Developing Novel Approaches to Tamper & Intrusion Detection - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Novel Approaches to Developing Novel Approaches to Tamper & Intrusion Detection VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Tamper & Intrusion Detection Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers Demo video Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers

14

Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals - Vulnerability Assessment Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Common Myths about Tamper Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

15

Tamper detection for ubiquitous RFID-Enabled supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security and privacy are two primary concerns in RFID adoption. In this paper we focus on security issues in general and data tampering in particular. Here we present a conceptual framework to detect and identify data tampering in RFID tags. The paper ...

Vidyasagar Potdar; Chen Wu; Elizabeth Chang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Protecting your good name: identity theft and its prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identity theft is becoming one of the most common forms of theft in the United States. It has affected millions of Americans in the past few years. This type of crime is devastating to the victim. This paper will discuss what is identity theft, how does ... Keywords: Better Business Bureau (BBB), Federal Trade Commission (FTC), US Department of Justice (DOJ), US Postal Inspection Service (USPIS), business record theft, consumer privacy, credit card fraud, dumpster diving, identity theft, mail fraud, phishing, social security fraud

Abdul-Kareem Abdullah

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosures Incorporating Embedded Optical Fibre  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AWE and PNNL are engaged in a technical collaboration investigating techniques to enhance continuity of knowledge over Accountable Items within a verified nuclear weapons dismantlement process. Tamper Indicating Enclosures (TIE) will likely be deployed as part of a chain of custody regime to indicate an unauthorised attempt to access an Accountable Item. This paper looks at the use of passive TIEs incorporating embedded optical fibre; concepts relating to deployment, tamper indication and unique identification will be discussed.

Wynn, Paul; White, Helen; Allen, Keir; Simmons, Kevin L.; Sliva, Paul; Benz, Jacob M.; Tanner, Jennifer E.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluating electricity theft detectors in smart grid networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity theft is estimated to cost billions of dollars per year in many countries. To reduce electricity theft, electric utilities are leveraging data collected by the new Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and using data analytics to identify ...

Daisuke Mashima; Alvaro A. Crdenas

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

University of Connecticut IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or customer, such as: a. A recent and significant increase in the volume of inquiries; b. An unusual number by an unusually large number of other persons opening accounts or other customers. 16. The person opening students, faculty, staff, patients, constituents or customers from identity theft. II. PURPOSE AND SCOPE

Kim, Duck O.

20

Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure Stephen McLaughlin, Dmitry Podkuiko of the smart grid is an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI replaces the analog meters, but that current AMI devices introduce a myriad of new vectors for achieving it. Key words: AMI, Smart meter

McDaniel, Patrick Drew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Non-contact tamper sensing by electronic means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tamper-sensing system for an electronic tag 10 which is to be fixed to a surface 11 of an article 12, the tamper-sensing system comprising a capacitor having two non-contacting, capacitively-coupled elements 16, 19. Fixing of the body to the article will establish a precise location of the capacitor elements 16 and 19 relative to each other. When interrogated, the tag will generate a tamper-sensing signal having a value which is a function of the amount of capacity of the capacitor elements. The precise relative location of the capacitor elements cannot be duplicated if the tag is removed and affixed to a surrogate article having a fiducial capacitor element 19 fixed thereto. A very small displacement, in the order of 2-10 microns, of the capacitor elements relative to each other if the tag body is removed and fixed to a surrogate article will result in the tamper-sensing signal having a different, and detectable, value when the tag is interrogated.

Gritton, Dale G. (Pleasanton, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Non-contact tamper sensing by electronic means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a tamper-sensing system for an electronic tag which is to be fixed to a surface of an article, the tamper-sensing system comprising a capacitor having two non- contacting, capacitively-coupled elements. Fixing of the body to the article will establish a precise location of the capacitor elements and relative to each other. When interrogated, the tag will generate a tamper-sensing signal having a value which is a function of the amount of capacity of the capacitor elements. The precise relative location of the capacitor elements cannot be duplicated if the tag is removed and affixed to a surrogate article having a fiducial capacitor element fixed thereto. A very small displacement, in the order of 2-10 microns, of the capacitor elements relative to each other if the tag body is removed and fixed to a surrogate article will result in the tamper-sensing signal having a different, and detectable, value when the tag is interrogated.

Gritton, D.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric utilities, lawmakers, scrap metal...

24

Impact of Copper Thefts on the Department of Energy (OIG Case...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trends We have recently seen a troubling increase in the number of cases involving the theft of copper from Departmental facilities. Although some of the reported thefts...

25

Common Information Model Meter Tamper Detection Interoperability Test Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Common Information Model (CIM) Meter Tamper Detection Interoperability Test Procedure is one in a series of EPRI Interoperability Test Procedures (ETIPs) created by EPRI whose purpose is to thoroughly document the actors, interfaces, and test steps for the interoperability testing of specific parts of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Common Information Model (CIM) standard. The Test Procedures are initially being used for EPRI demonstration tests and are intended, over time, to for...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Identity Theft: What You Need To Know | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identity Theft: What You Need To Know Identity Theft: What You Need To Know Identity Theft: What You Need To Know December 17, 2013 9:00AM to 11:00AM EST Registration link: CHRIS 002664/0001 Course Type: Classroom/Auditorium Course Location: Germantown Auditorium Course Description: The Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) is pleased to present an informative session to learn about identity theft and how to detect and defend against it. Steven Toporoff, (Attorney, Identity Protection Program Coordinator), and Peter Miller (Chief Privacy Officer) from the Federal Trade Commission will provide expert insight on such topics as reducing the risk, prevention, and steps to take should you encounter identity theft. Audience: The Privacy Awareness Training Event is available for all Headquarters DOE Federal employees and contractors.

27

Optical-based smart structures for tamper-indicating applications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of several related projects performed from 1991 through 1996 concerning the design, construction, and application of optical-based smart structure to tamper-indicating and sensing secure containers. Due to several influences, the projects were carried through to varying degrees of completion. Cancellation of the overall project at the client level motivated the authors to gather all of the technology and ideas about smart structures developed during these several projects, whether completed or just conceptualized, into one document. Although each section individually discusses a specific project, the overall document is written chronologically with each successive section showing how increased smart structure complexity was integrated into the container.

Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Simmons, K.L.; Undem, H.A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Four-scanning attack on hierarchical digital watermarking method for image tamper detection and recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent paper presented by Lin et al., a block-based hierarchical watermarking algorithm for digital images is proposed. It adopts parity check and the intensity-relation check to conduct the experiment of image tamper detection. Their experimental ... Keywords: Fragile watermarking, Image authentication, Tamper detection

Chin-Chen Chang; Yi-Hsuan Fan; Wei-Liang Tai

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Guardians at the Gates of Hell : estimating the risk of nuclear theft and terrorism -- and identifying the highest-priority risks of nuclear theft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods are presented to assess the global risk of nuclear theft and nuclear terrorism, to identify the nuclear facilities and transport legs that pose the highest-priority risks of nuclear theft, and to evaluate policy ...

Bunn, Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric utilities, lawmakers, scrap metal dealers, and local law enforcement have succeeded in reducing the problem. Updated Assessment-Copper-Final October 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Investigation Letter Report: I11IG002 Semiannual Report to Congress: for the first half of Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010

31

An Updated Assessment of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of this report that these three sources reasonably represent copper theft, if not in terms of absolute numbers, at least in terms of trends. It is significant that although...

32

Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Apparatus and method for detecting tampering in flexible structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring or detecting tampering in a flexible structure includes taking electrical measurements on a sensing cable coupled to the structure, performing spectral analysis on the measured data, and comparing the spectral characteristics of the event to those of known benign and/or known suspicious events. A threshold or trigger value may used to identify an event of interest and initiate data collection. Alternatively, the system may be triggered at preset intervals, triggered manually, or triggered by a signal from another sensing device such as a motion detector. The system may be used to monitor electrical cables and conduits, hoses and flexible ducts, fences and other perimeter control devices, structural cables, flexible fabrics, and other flexible structures.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Knoxville, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The other side of identity theft: not just a financial concern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With identity theft on the rise and the past history of legislation pertaining to it, it is important to look at recent updates and efforts to battle and handle this threat to society. Society needs to understand all realms of identity theft, how they ... Keywords: identity theft, information security

Kim Luong

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Guardians at the Gates of Hell Estimating the Risk of Nuclear Theft and Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear theft in Russia, Pakistan, and from HEU-fueled research reactors are highlighted. SecondGuardians at the Gates of Hell Estimating the Risk of Nuclear Theft and Terrorism ­ and Identifying the Highest-Priority Risks of Nuclear Theft by Matthew Bunn SB and SM, Political Science, MIT, 1985 SUBMITTED

de Weck, Olivier L.

36

Non-contact tamper sensing by electronic means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tamper-sensing tag is described comprising: a tag body adapted to be fixed against movement relative to a surface of an article, a capacitor having at least one variable-capacity section with first and second elements, said first element being positionable relative to said second element at various positions, displaced from each other, said one variable-capacity section having different amounts of capacity when said first element is in its various positions, respectively, relative to said second element, means for generating a first signal which is a function of the amount of capacity of said one variable-capacity section, said first signal having various values distinguishable from each other when said first element is in its various positions, respectively, relative to said second element, one of said first and second elements being fixed against movement relative to said tag body, and the other of said first and second elements being adapted to be fixed against movement relative to said surface of said article and with said first element being in a first position relative to said second element, said tag body and said other of said first and second elements being positionable relative to each other on said article prior to said tag body's being fixed to said article so as to enable said elements to be fixed to said article in said first position relative to each other, means in said tag for generating a second signal having a value unrelated to the amount of capacity of said one variable-capacity section, means in said tag for combining said first and second signals, means in said tag for encrypting said combined signals, means in said tag responsive to external interrogation of said tag for sending from said tag the encrypted combined signals in digital form, and wherein said means for generating said second signal has the function of changing the value of said second signal for each interrogation of said tag.

Gritton, D.G.

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Impact of Copper Thefts on the Department of Energy (OIG Case No.: I11IG002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 17, 2011 August 17, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Impact of Copper Thefts on the Department of Energy (OIG Case No.: I11IG002) A series of news articles during the last several months have reported increased thefts of copper nationally, including several that have interrupted electrical distribution and telephone service in communities across the country. These thefts have also adversely impacted new construction projects, irrigation systems and other infrastructure projects. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation reported in an unclassified intelligence assessment that copper thefts threaten the critical infrastructure of the United States.

38

Secrets Stolen, Fortunes Lost: Preventing Intellectual Property Theft and Economic Espionage in the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The threats of economic espionage and intellectual property (IP) theft are global, stealthy, insidious, and increasingly common. According to the U.S. Commerce Department, IP theft is estimated to top $250 billion annually and also costs the United States ... Keywords: Security

Christopher Burgess; Richard Power

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Client-Side Defense Against Web-Based Identity Theft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web spoofing is a significant problem involving fraudulent email and web sites that trick unsuspecting users into revealing private information. We discuss some aspects of common attacks and propose a framework for client-side defense: a browser plug-in that examines web pages and warns the user when requests for data may be part of a spoof attack. While the plugin, SpoofGuard, has been tested using actual sites obtained through government agencies concerned about the problem, we expect that web spoofing and other forms of identity theft will be continuing problems in coming years. 1

Neil Chou; Robert Ledesma; Yuka Teraguchi; John C. Mitchell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ENHANCED SAFEGUARDS: THE ROLE OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS FOR TAMPER INDICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the synthesis of smart functional coatings (SFC) using chemical solution deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition methods have recently received attention in the materials research community due to several unique advantages that include low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products, the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures, and the ease of dopant incorporation in controlled concentrations. The optical properties of thin films were investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman, SEM and EDS, with the aim of developing a protective transparent coating for a ceramic surface as a first line of defense for tamper indication. The signature produced by the addition of rare earth dopants will be employed as an additional tamper indicating feature. The integration of SFC's as part of a broader verification system such as an electronic seals can provide additional functionality and defense in depth. SFC's can improve the timeliness of detection by providing a robust, in-situ verifiable tamper indication framework.

Mendez-Torres, A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Brinkman, K.; Krementz, D.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method and apparatus for active tamper indicating device using optical time-domain reflectometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) launches pulses of light into a link or a system of multiplexed links and records the waveform of pulses reflected by the seals in the link(s). If a seal is opened, the link of cables will become a discontinuous transmitter of the light pulses and the OTDR can immediately detect that a seal has been opened. By analyzing the waveform, the OTDR can also quickly determine which seal(s) were opened. In this way the invention functions as a system of active seals. The invention is intended for applications that require long-term surveillance of a large number of closures. It provides immediate tamper detection, allows for periodic access to secured closures, and can be configured for many different distributions of closures. It can monitor closures in indoor and outdoor locations and it can monitor containers or groups of containers located many kilometers apart.

Smith, D. Barton (Oak Ridge, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Pickett, Chris A. (Clinton, TN); Earl, D. Duncan (Knoxville, TX)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A defence scheme against Identity Theft Attack based on multiple social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, on-line social networking sites become more and more popular. People like to share their personal information such as their name, birthday and photos on these public sites. However, personal information could be misused by attackers. One kind ... Keywords: Identity Theft Attack, Multi-dimensional social network, Social networks

Bing-Zhe He, Chien-Ming Chen, Yi-Ping Su, Hung-Min Sun

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Linking the Popularity of Online Trading with Consumers' Concerns for Reputation and Identity Theft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although online trading has its benefits, such as convenience and the ability to compare prices online, there are still many concerns about the integrity of the buyer, the seller and/or the online action service provider OASP. This paper investigates ... Keywords: Business Strategy, Identity Theft, Online Auction Service Providers, Reputation, Service Operations

Alan D. Smith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

October 28, 2009, Fraud and Theft in the Information Age - Companion Book  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fraud and Theft in the Information Age Fraud and Theft in the Information Age Frank W. Abagnale Author, Lecturer, Consultant Office of Health, Safety and Security Visiting Speaker Program Event October 28, 2009 Washington, DC Office of Health, Safety and Security ; shareholders and stakeholders. The HSS Focus Group HSS believes an Glenn S. Podonsky The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) corporate organization responsible for health, safety, environment, and security providing corporate leadership and strategic vision to coordinate and integrate these vital programs. HSS is responsible for policy development and technical assistance; corporate analysis; corporate safety and security programs; education and training; complex-wide independent oversight; and enforcement. The Chief Health,

45

Oct. 4, 2007 Additional Responses to the GAO Report on Smithsonian Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

days a year. The rate of vandalism, therefore, is extremely low. Thefts--Two thefts of artifacts- 2007 a new contract was awarded to a construction company to replace part of the copper roof

Mathis, Wayne N.

46

DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

Sexton, L.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TrakLok Corporation TrakLok Corporation Oak Ridge National Laboratory 463 likes TrakLok, Inc., based in Knoxville, Tenn., intends to use an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)-developed, technology for tagging, tracking, locating and communicating with cargo containers and trailers in transit. The ORNL technology provides an avenue to meet increasing requirements for shipping containers to be "smart boxes" that can be tracked electronically. TrakLok uses GPS technology and satellite communications as part of its tracking and warning capability and international container locking technology to protect against container tampering, theft, vandalism and smuggling. Shipments can be tracked through a web-accessible, information technology-based global tracking system to provide real time visibility of

48

Impact of Information and Communications Technologies on Residential Customer Energy Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outage detection and handling - Remote/automated meterRemote connect/disconnect Theft/tamper detection Outage detection and handling

Goldman, C.; Kempton, W.; Eide, A.; Iyer, M.; Farber, M.; Scheer, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Attractiveness of Materials in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Various Proliferation and Theft Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an extension to earlier studies1,2 that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) and alternate nuclear materials (ANM) associated with the PUREX, UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study extends the figure of merit (FOM) for evaluating attractiveness to cover a broad range of proliferant state and sub-national group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this study is that all fissile material needs to be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by sub-national groups; no silver bullet has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. This series of studies has been performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities.3 The expanded methodology and updated findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security are discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FOR VARIOUS PROLIFERATION AND THEFT SCENARIOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We must anticipate that the day is approaching when details of nuclear weapons design and fabrication will become common knowledge. On that day we must be particularly certain that all special nuclear materials (SNM) are adequately accounted for and protected and that we have a clear understanding of the utility of nuclear materials to potential adversaries. To this end, this paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing SNM and alternate nuclear materials associated with the plutonium-uranium reduction extraction (Purex), uranium extraction (UREX), coextraction (COEX), thorium extraction (THOREX), and PYROX (an electrochemical refining method) reprocessing schemes. This paper provides a set of figures of merit for evaluating material attractiveness that covers a broad range of proliferant state and subnational group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this paper is that all fissile material must be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and must be provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by subnational groups; no 'silver bullet' fuel cycle has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. The work reported herein has been performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for, the nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security is discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Collins, Brian A.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Wallace, R. K.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

Safeguards and security by design (SSBD) for the domestic threat - theft and sabotage  

SciTech Connect

Safeguards by Design (SBD) is receiving significant interest with respect to international safeguards objectives. However, less attention has been focused on the equally important topic of domestic Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD), which addresses requirements such as those of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the United States. While international safeguards are concerned with detecting State diversion of nuclear material from peaceful to nuclear explosives purposes, domestic Material Protection, Control and Accounting measures (MPC&A) are focused on non-State theft and sabotage. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has described the Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' This same concept is equally applicable to SSBD for domestic requirements. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a project through its Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and more specifically its Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, to develop a domestic SSBD discipline and methodology in parallel with similar efforts sponsored by the DOE Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the IAEA for international safeguards. This activity includes the participation of industry (through DOE-sponsored contracts) and DOE National Laboratories. This paper will identify the key domestic safeguards and security requirements (i.e. MC&A and physical protection) and explain how and why Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) is important and beneficial for the design of future US nuclear energy systems.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mullen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Safeguards and security by design (SSBD) for the domestic threat - theft and sabotage  

SciTech Connect

Safeguards by Design (SBD) is receiving significant interest with respect to international safeguards objectives. However, less attention has been focused on the equally important topic of domestic Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD), which addresses requirements such as those of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the United States. While international safeguards are concerned with detecting State diversion of nuclear material from peaceful to nuclear explosives purposes, domestic Material Protection, Control and Accounting measures (MPC&A) are focused on non-State theft and sabotage. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has described the Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' This same concept is equally applicable to SSBD for domestic requirements. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a project through its Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and more specifically its Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, to develop a domestic SSBD discipline and methodology in parallel with similar efforts sponsored by the DOE Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the IAEA for international safeguards. This activity includes the participation of industry (through DOE-sponsored contracts) and DOE National Laboratories. This paper will identify the key domestic safeguards and security requirements (i.e. MC&A and physical protection) and explain how and why Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) is important and beneficial for the design of future US nuclear energy systems.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mullen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tamper resistant magnetic stripes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a magnetic stripe comprising a medium in which magnetized particles are suspended and in which the encoded information is recorded by actual physical rotation or alignment of the previously magnetized particles within the flux reversals of the stripe which are 180.degree. opposed in their magnetic polarity. The magnetized particles are suspended in a medium which is solid, or physically rigid, at ambient temperatures but which at moderately elevated temperatures, such as 40.degree. C., is thinable to a viscosity permissive of rotation of the particles therein under applications of moderate external magnetic field strengths within acceptable time limits.

Naylor, Richard Brian (Albuquerque, NM); Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Tamper indicating seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Seals have a flexible wire that can be looped through a hasp-like device. The seals include a body having a recess, a plug insertable into the recess and a snap ring for fastening the plug to the body. The plug and/or body can have access holes for inserting the wire into the recess. "Teeth" on the outer diameter and through-holes through the thickness of the snap ring allow for passing the ends of the flexible wire from the recess through the snap ring. The ends of the wire can be folded back over the snap ring and into engagement with the teeth. Assembly of the seal causes the ends of the wire to be securely fastened between the teeth of the snap ring and the sidewall of the recess. Seals can include a plug and/or body made of a frangible material such as glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic or brittle polymer.

Romero, Juan A. (Albuquerque, NM); Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Bodmer, Connie C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tampering with Drug Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Problem "%&'()*+,-+&+.-+0(1+.'(*+2(234-,3,5) +*+5)6%5-4*-)&75+*-,-*8+(+-'2,95+.:5);43&5)6+.(* 3*&<8>?:(:-)&*2(,+*-3+.(,5+5*@ ...

56

BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE Safety on Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and acquaintance rape), Rohypnol abuse, theft, and vandalism, as well as educational sessions on personal safety fine of $182.00 and lose their license for one year. 2. Persons convicted of buying alcohol through

Spence, Harlan Ernest

57

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and acquaintance rape), Rohypnol abuse, theft, and vandalism, as well as educational sessions on personal safety fine of $182.00 and lose their license for one year. 2. Persons convicted of buying alcohol through

Ghajar, Afshin J.

58

The 2011 OSU Clery Act Report The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and acquaintance rape), Rohypnol abuse, theft, and vandalism, as well as educational sessions on personal safety fine of $182.00 and lose their license for one year. 2. Persons convicted of buying alcohol through

Escher, Christine

59

Ceramic tamper-revealing seals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible metal or ceramic cable is described with composite ceramic ends, or a U-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting. 7 figs.

Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Sheen, S.H.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

18 WAAC Newsletter Volume 35 Number 2 May 2013 The Role of Exhibition Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protect- ing them from accidental damage, theft, vandalism, dust, ultraviolet light, environmental in 1973 (Oddy 1973, 27-28), places coupons of silver, copper, and lead inside airtight glass jars tarnished by sulfur and carbonyl sulfides off-gassed from wood, and copper coupons are susceptible

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laser speckle photography for surface tampering detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often desirable to detect whether a surface has been touched, even when the changes made to that surface are too subtle to see in a pair of before and after images. To address this challenge, we introduce a new imaging ...

Shih, YiChang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF AUTOMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintenance Management System Manufacturing Execution Control Process Control Enterprise Resource Planning ERP activities are supported by Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS), which are basically database management. Because of its database centered nature, maintenance information system can easily be integrated

63

Tampere University of Technology at TREC 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and arranging the books and pamphlets of a library. ... Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing ... Proceedings of AeroSense 2001, SPIE 15th Annual ...

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

Crime and the Nations Households, 2000 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experienced 1 or more violent or property crimes in 2000, according to data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). About 4.3 million households had members who experienced 1 or more nonfatal violent crimes, including rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated or simple assault. About 14.8 million households experienced 1 or more property crimes household burglary, motor vehicle theft, or theft. Vandalism, presented for the first time in a Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) report, victimized about 6.1 million households. The households that sustained vandalism were counted separately from those experiencing other crimes. Because vandalism is included for the first time, findings are presented in a box on page 4. Beginning in 2001, NCVS victimizations will be measured both with and without vandalism. Measuring the extent to which households are victimized by crime One measure of the impact of crime throughout the Nation is gained through estimating the number and percentage of households victimized Highlights During 2000, 16 % of U.S. households had a member who experienced a crime, with 4 % having a member victimized by violent crime. During 1994, 25 % of households experienced at least one crime; 7 % a violent crime.

Patsy A. Klaus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Intellectual Property Theft by Departing Insiders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This material is based upon work funded and supported by the United States Department of Defense under Contract No.

Andrew P. Moore; Michael Hanley; David Mundie; Andrew P. Moore; Michael Hanley; David Mundie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Studying LSI Tamper Resistance with Respect to Techniques ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... physical phenomena are those induced in LSI chips by some physical stimulation. ... areas in nMOSFETs, which are formed in a p-well, is always ...

67

Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure) The (In)Security of Drug Testing VAT in...

68

Tampering detection system using quantum-mechanical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of quantum-mechanically entangled photons for monitoring the integrity of a physical border or a communication link is described. The no-cloning principle of quantum information science is used as protection against an intruder's ability to spoof a sensor receiver using a `classical` intercept-resend attack. Correlated measurement outcomes from polarization-entangled photons are used to protect against quantum intercept-resend attacks, i.e., attacks using quantum teleportation.

Humble, Travis S. (Knoxville, TN); Bennink, Ryan S. (Knoxville, TN); Grice, Warren P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tamper-indicating Quantum Seals | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers have developed a new technology for the technical verification of non-proliferation treaties. With support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the...

70

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue security is a major concern for utilities. Theft of electric service in the United States is widespread. In 2006, the revenue estimate for non-technical losses was 6.5 billion. Non-technical losses are associated with unidentified and uncollected revenue from pilferage, tampering with meters, defective meters, and errors in meter reading. In this report, revenue security describes the use of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) technology to minimize non-technical losses.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Theft of Trade Secrets is a Federal Crime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, a trade secret may consist of commercial or technical information that is used in a business and offers an advantage over competitors who do not...

72

Transgressing the Law: Karma, Theft and Its Punishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is described as: Having introduced laws where there had been no southern laws and fixed handles where there had been no handles on pots, he [the Zhabdrung] constrained by means of the religious laws like a silken know and pressed down with state laws... taking place within the Bhutanese judiciary. Reflecting a wider appreciation of the need to educate the public at large and an awareness of the increasing complexity of modern Bhutanese law, small workshops and even mini-expeditions to remoter...

Whitecross, Richard W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Enterprise Digital Rights Management: Solutions against Information Theft by Insiders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management (E-DRM) protects sensitive information by managing and enforcing access and usage rights to the information throughout its lifecycle, no matter where the information is distributed. However, the self-protection authorities to read/write the protected information. The DOFS architecture ensures that bits of a sensitive

Chiueh, Tzi-cker

74

Preventing Theft of Quality of Service on Open Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As multiple types of traffic converge onto one network, frequently wireless, enterprises face a tradeoff between effectiveness and security. Some types of traffic, such as voice-over-IP (VoIP), require certain quality of service (QoS) guarantees to be effective. The end client platform is in the best position to know which packets deserve this special handling. In many environments (such as universities), end users relish having control over their own machines. However, if end users administer their own machines, nothing stops dishonest ones from marking undeserving traffic for high QoS. How can an enterprise ensure that only appropriate traffic receives high QoS, while also allowing end users to retain control over their own machines? In this paper, we present the design and prototype of a solution, using SELinux, TCPA/TCG hardware, Diffserv, 802.1x, and EAP-TLS.

Kwang-Hyun Baek; Sean W. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Data:C5fb4943-64b9-4054-abd3-85968efe96ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb4943-64b9-4054-abd3-85968efe96ae fb4943-64b9-4054-abd3-85968efe96ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kerrville Public Utility Board Effective date: 2000/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: tampering charge Sector: Commercial Description: made for unauthorized reconnection or other tampering with KPUB metering facilities or any theft of electric service by any person on customer's premises or any evidence thereof by whomsoever done at customer's premises. An additional charge for any costs of repairs and/or replacement of damaged facilities, installing protective facilities, and the estimated amount of electric service not recorded by the meter, if any, is also made.

76

Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Safeguards summary event list (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 4, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, rough December 31, 1995. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microsoft Word - DUR 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Durango, Colorado Durango, Colorado Page 4-1 4.0 Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site 4.1 Compliance Summary The Durango, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 28, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in good condition and functioning as designed. The water level in the disposal cell has dropped which satisfies criteria for permanent closure of the transient drainage water collection and treatment system. However, DOE is evaluating an increase in the downgradient uranium concentration before decommissioning the treatment system. Vandalism, primarily theft and damage to signs, continues at the site. The bases of perimeter signs P41 and P44 have been undercut by erosion but remain stable. Infestations of

79

DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft | Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Molecular Fossil Ultrafast Imaging of Electron Waves in Graphene When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth A Boring...

80

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY IDENTITY THEFT PREVENTION PROGRAM Iowa State University of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security number, or tax identification number that is the same as one given by another customer. 2 for the customer such as university identification number, social security number, or tax identification number. 3 Account ­ A covered account is a consumer account used by customers of ISU primarily for personal, family

Lin, Zhiqun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fraud and Theft in the Information Age by Frank W. Abagnale Jr...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and "Stealing Your Life". Documents Available for Download Event Slideshow Companion Book More Documents & Publications PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists...

82

The development of a curb valve flow meter for gas theft detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the supply of natural gas continues to dwindle, and government decontrol of pricing progresses, the rising cost of this essential natural resource will drive more individuals to consider various forms of pilferage as a ...

Fitzgerald, Kevin Francis

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Client-side defense against web-based identity theft Neil Chou Robert Ledesma Yuka Teraguchi John C. Mitchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are class li- braries like MFC, ACE, and AWT that encapsulate native OS C APIs, such as sockets, pthreads data into classes. In our logging example, for instance, we can leverage the following Guard class of how the program's flow of control exits a scope: template class Guard { public: Guard

Mitchell, John C.

84

Intelligent System for Detection of Abnormalities and Theft of Electricity using Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) analysis in electric utilities using Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The main identification and voting scheme. Among these, load profiling is one of the most widely used [6], which effectiveness of their operation in reducing NTLs, and detecting fraudulent consumers based on load profiles

Ducatelle, Frederick

85

Bayesian networks Chapter 14.13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skill MakeModel DrivingHist DrivQuality Antilock Airbag CarValue HomeBase AntiTheft Theft OwnDamage Property

Huber, Manfred

86

DOE F 1440.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agent in Charge describing a theft at a Department of Energy office. LETTER REPORTING THEFT OF PROPERTY ON NON-GSA SITE More Documents & Publications Correspondence Style Guide...

87

Before the  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the long-distance network microwave replaced copper, ... in the same category as mobile handset thefts. ... the rate of personal theft is substantially ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Microsoft Word - FCT-2012_Final.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Opening this road makes the site more susceptible to potential trespass and vandalism. Oil and gas exploration has increased significantly in the area. New underground pipelines...

89

DoD X.509 CP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... violation of authorization, human error, and communications monitoring or tampering. ... equipment shall occur prior to leaving the facility unattended. ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Network Security Framework: Robustness Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effective Key Length Key Management Anti- Tamper TEMPEST TRANSEC Cover & Deception SML1 ... TEMPEST design and analysis ...

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

Essays in Public Economics and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and data Electricity distribution in Brazil Thecapture electricity theft (distribution losses unexplainedyear, electricity load, total distribution losses,

Gerard, Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report... http:energy.govoedownloadsupdated-assessement-copper-wire-thefts-electric-utilities-october-2010 Download Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference...

93

INET 2000 Anderson, Camp The Telecom Road Less Traveled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not uncommon ­ Copper subject to theft INET 2000 Anderson, Camp Grameen Phone Goals · Alternative international

Camp, L. Jean

94

Questioning mantle plumes Don L. Anderson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce adequate electrical copper wires. In the following years, Meucci re- lentlessly sought investors and intellectual theft.

Anderson, Don L.

95

Photonics Technologies:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Reduced product counterfeiting and identity theft through low-cost optical ... Replace aluminum with copper interconnect metal, in combination with ...

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

UNINTENTIONAL OVERSHARING OF INFORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... criminal abuse contributed to Facebook such as identity theft, ... Mail revealed that crimes facilitated through the use of Facebook have ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

1 / 17 7/1/2007 9:57 AM UICE_EPRINT_IACR.doc UICE: A High-Performance Cryptographic Module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicle security systems, also known as immobilizers, are required due to increased vehicle theft.1 Background Due to worldwide increases in automobile theft, there is a rapidly growing demand for less in 1993 theft numbers are decreasing again [12]. A second segment needing secure transactions

98

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4280 7/1/2011 12:02 Kentucky Hall Fire Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theatre Theft Copper Wiring Sheriff responded 4293 7/14/2011 16:59 Campus Vehicle Immobilized Unpaid Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded 4281 7/2/2011 9:30 James Hall Theft Glade Property Damage Hand rail FM notified 4285 7/6/2011 10:10 Draper Building Theft Sony DVD

Baltisberger, Jay H.

99

Information flow control for secure web sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sometimes Web sites fail in the worst ways. They can reveal private data that can never be retracted [60, 72, 78, 79]. Or they can succumb to vandalism, and subsequently show corrupt data to users [27]. Blame can fall on ...

Krohn, Maxwell N. (Maxwell Norman)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Beacon Project - Unpredictable Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or undetected tampering), with the random number generator used for sampling can lead to erroneous estimates of the percentage of faulty parts. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FIPS 140-2 Security Policy CEP100, CEP100 VSE, CEP100 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Copyright 2012, Certes Networks Inc. All rights reserved. ... 2. Clean the CEP of any grease, dirt or oil before applying the tamper evident labels. . ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

FIPS 140-2 Security Policy CEP10 VSE, CEP10-R, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Copyright 2012, CipherOptics Inc. All rights reserved. ... 2. Clean the CEP of any grease, dirt or oil before applying the tamper evident labels. . ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

NISTIR 7206, Smart Cards and Mobile Device Authentication ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the first line of defense against unauthorized use of an unattended, lost, or ... Smart cards are designed to resist tampering and monitoring of the card ...

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy Efficiency - Assessment and Analysis of Energy Consumption at TAMK Kuntokatu 3 Campus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy efficiency assessment, implemented at Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Kuntokatu 3 campus, investigated the efficiency performance of the campus buildings. Facility Assessment is (more)

Emuraishe, Irikefe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

More information - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We've devised fundamentally new approaches to tamper detection, intrusion detection, nuclear safeguards and cargo security. Team members have won numerous awards, including: 2013...

106

Query-Biased Combination of Evidence on the Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plachouras,V. Ounis,I. Workshop on Mathematical/Formal Methods in Information Retrieval, ACM SIGIR Conference, Tampere, Finland, 2002 ACM

Plachouras, V.; Ounis, I.

107

NIST SP 800-130, Comments Received on SP 800-130, A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Meta-Language the definition should be expanded to made it clear. Add: GOTS, Tempest and Tamper to the glossary. Page 10. 10 ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Joint HFP and STS Teleconference - February 9, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of audits (Sharon and Nelson) SI without innovation classes imply paper records. ... Tampering could occur with (a). Demanding SI for all voters may ...

109

Authentication and protection for e-finance consumers: the dichotomy of cost versus ease of use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multifactor authentication is a tool to combat identity theft and is mandated by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council. However, there are only a few US financial institutions that have implemented two-factor authentication. A goal for ... Keywords: biometrics, e-banking, e-finance, electronic banking, electronic finance, identity theft, internet, multifactor authentication, online ID theft, online banking, phishing, security token, web authentication

Seungjae Shin; Jerry Cunningham; Jungwoo Ryoo; Jack E. Tucci

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

An Evaluation Road Map for Summarization Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Americans are advising on how to secure plutonium at Russian naval bases against theft and loss. It is hoped that a deal ...

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

Draft NISTIR 7924, Reference Certificate Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... securely, each communicating part of the network may have ... modules, shall be protected from theft, loss, and 3 ... 5.1.3 Power and Air Conditioning 31 ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

Validated 140-1 and 140-2 Cryptographic Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to prevent data breaches due to loss or theft ... PCI accelerator cards (the same cards that power the acclaimed Luna SA Network HSM). ...

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

NERSC Cybersecurity Tutorial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Credential Theft Encrypting SSH Keys Social Engineering Managing Private Information Incident Response Disaster Recovery Resources Last edited: 2012-06-15 11:12:2...

114

Nigeria - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipeline sabotage from oil theft and poorly maintained, aging pipelines have caused oil spills. The oil spills have resulted in land, air, and water ...

115

Style Guide for Word Users for the NIST Special Publication ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Description: Located above lighting grid in the vicinity ... opened through horizontal grates to the street. ... effort to monitor employees and prevent theft; ...

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

116

Impact of inaccurate data on supply chain inventory performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research explores data inaccuracy and its impact on supply chain inventory performance. Theft and data entry error cause differences between the physical inventory levels (more)

Basinger, Karen Lynn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the California Institute of Technology. Read more In the News Construction brings metal theft From Kane County Chronicle, Feb. 17, 2008 The phenomenon of stealing large pieces of...

118

All NIST News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nanometer-thick magnetic film of a nickle-iron-copper-molybdenum alloy ... Thefts of personally identifiable information (PII), such as social security ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Le cuivre vaut de l'or. Les voleurs cument la Suisse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copper thefts multiply in some parts of Switzerland. Explanation about a phenomenon due to the rise of prices for this metal

Kauffmann, Anne

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

La mafia du cuivre a encore frapp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since some months, the thefts of metals multiply. A lucrative activity with the price increase of raw materials. Switzerland and France are concerned in the same way

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers - Vulnerability Assessment Team -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security > VAT > Current Projects > Rapid Sampling Tools > ... from Sealed Containers VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Tamper & Intrusion Detection Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers Demo video Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned

122

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

123

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

124

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

125

NUMBER: BUSF 4.12 SECTION: Finance and Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an unusually large number of other persons opening accounts or by other Customers. 16. The person opening1 NUMBER: BUSF 4.12 SECTION: Finance and Planning SUBJECT: University Identity Theft and Detection of the account. 3. "Customer" means a person that has a Covered Account with the University. 4. "Identity Theft

Almor, Amit

126

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5308 7/1/2013 0:41 Indian Fort Medical Emergency Hiker bit by snake on trail Report Filed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to unknown cause BFD Responded 5311 7/2/2013 13:15 Old Broom Craft Building Theft By Unlawful Taking Copper piping stolen from new construction BPD responded 5312 7/4/2013 13:45 James Hall Fire Alarm/6/2013 12:45 Visitor Center Theft By Unlawful Taking Older Huffy bicycle stolen from parking lot Report

Baltisberger, Jay H.

127

Dynamic virtual credit card numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce.We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate ... Keywords: credit card theft, e-commerce

Ian Molloy; Jiangtao Li; Ninghui Li

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PHS 2010-2 OMNIBUS SOLICITATION OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Fire Prevention Policies: · Fireworks or explosives are prohibited. · Unauthorized appliances, candles in a computer database and a tamper-resistant numbered registration sticker is affixed to the registered bicycle

129

Commonsense Computer Security, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:How important is your information? How much would it matter if your computer systems and their data were lost by accident?; tampered with maliciously?; destroyed by terrorist attack?; unavailable because of inefficient procedures?; ...

Martin R. Smith

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Conductive Fabric Seal - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

ORNL 2013-G00020/tcc 01.2013 Conductive Fabric Seal UT-B ID 201202823 Technology Summary The invention is a low cost tamper-resistant seal that allows for passive ...

131

User Safety Agreement for Hutch Authorization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the End Station Log Book as Responsible Person whenever I take possession of the Search Reset Key*. 4. I will not tamper with any hutch interlock or component. I will operate...

132

New cryptographic protocols With side-channel attack security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryptographic protocols implemented in real world devices are subject to tampering attacks, where adversaries can modify hardware or memory. This thesis studies the security of many different primitives in the Related-Key ...

Miller, Rachel A., S.M. (Rachel Ann). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

HPS replacement project drives garage costs down. [High-pressure sodium luminaires  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of energy had forced a four-story New York airport parking garage to turn off almost half its low bay lights, leaving it gloomy and vandal-prone. By replacing the original lamps with high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires, the garage brightened its image with 2400 fewer fixtures and netted an annual energy savings of $60,000.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Creating, destroying, and restoring value in wikipedia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wikipedia's brilliance and curse is that any user can edit any of the encyclopedia entries. We introduce the notion of the impact of an edit, measured by the number of times the edited version is viewed. Using several datasets, including recent logs ... Keywords: collaboration, damage, vandalism, wiki, wikipedia

Reid Priedhorsky; Jilin Chen; Shyong (Tony) K. Lam; Katherine Panciera; Loren Terveen; John Riedl

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

I. Building Policies & Procedures The Policies and Procedures are an extension of the Ohio Union Event Confirmation for events,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for recycling vegetable oil into bio-diesel used to fuel campus buses, water efficient landscaping, and storage/egress or access to fire exits, elevators or other thoroughfares. Panhandling or soliciting money or property of alcohol. Defacing, damaging, vandalizing, or destroying any real or personal property. Unauthorized

Jones, Michelle

136

11.18.2011 Version I. Building Policies & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative forms of transportation, a program for recycling vegetable oil into bio-diesel used to fuel campus to fire exits, elevators or other thoroughfares. Panhandling or soliciting money or property for personal of alcohol. Defacing, damaging, vandalizing, or destroying any real or personal property. Unauthorized

Jones, Michelle

137

Data:31d94db3-6c2b-472f-990d-9ee9a8ffef87 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

23.07 Cast Aluminum 28.98 Cast Iron 40.80 4) ACCESSORY CHARGE: a) Spot Light Glare Shield 2.66 b) Cobra HeadVandal Shield Up to 250 Watt 2.95 400 Watt 5.89 c) Twin...

138

On ancient coin classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illegal trade and theft of coins appears to be a major part of the illegal antiques market. Image based recognition of coins could substantially contribute to fight against it. Central component in the permanent identification and traceability of coins ...

M. Zaharieva; R. Huber-Moerk; M. Noelle; M. Kampel

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluating the Evidence on Electricity Reform: Lessons for the South East Europe (SEE) Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process but also in terms of physical security (from conflict or theft). Governments can work to reduce regulatory uncertainty and commit to cost reflect tariffs for electricity companies. Power purchase agreements can help offer a degree of certainty...

Pollitt, Michael G.

140

Microsoft PowerPoint - F_Abagnale_presentation_28Oct09.pps [Read...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the Information Age. October 28, 2009 "In the United States, the FBI ranks cyber crime and identity theft as the third highest threat, just after terrorism and espionage. In...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Resource Efficient Metal and Material Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Social - Licence to Operate (Legislation, consumer, policy, theft, manual labour ... Material and Energy Beneficiation of the Automobile Shredder Residues ... Sustainable Production of c-Si Solar Cell Materials A Competitive Advantage...

142

Will they buy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proliferation of inexpensive video recording hardware and enormous storage capacity has enabled the collection of retail customer behavior at an unprecedented scale. The vast majority of this data is used for theft ...

Kubat, Rony Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

Schlesinger, Adam Ian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gender, Truth & Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

raids, theft, security forces occupying homes, people beingver, shattering the security of the home space is not anThe loss of security in the family and home is a meta- phor

N Aolin, Pionnuala; Turner, Catherine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Enlightened shelf awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of RFID technology in libraries has increased to the point where it is now the centerpiece of emerging automated self-checkout, return, and theft detection systems. With the external borders of the library secure, ...

Ehrenberg, Isaac M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Concord: a secure mobile data authorization framework for regulatory compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing adoption of mobile computing devices that carry confidential data, organizations need to secure data in an ever-changing environment. Critical organizational data should be protected from a) a disgruntled user's access and b) a theft ...

Gautam Singaraju; Brent Hoon Kang

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Journal of Physical Security 6(1), 22-31 (2012) How to Choose and Use Seals*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are widely used for a variety of applications including cargo security, nuclear Journal of Physical Security 6(1), 22-31 (2012) 22 How safeguards, counter- intelligence, theft detection, loss prevention, records security

Kemner, Ken

148

From manual to automated optical recognition of ancient coins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illegal trade and theft of coins appears to be a major part of the illegal antiques market. Image based recognition of coins could substantially contribute to fight against it. Central component in the permanent identification and traceability of coins ...

Maia Zaharieva; Martin Kampel; Klaus Vondrovec

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CryptDB: Protecting confidentiality with encrypted query processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online applications are vulnerable to theft of sensitive information because adversaries can exploit software bugs to gain access to private data, and because curious or malicious administrators may capture and leak data. ...

Popa, Raluca Ada

150

8 CURA REPORTER Abstract: Like many cities across  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Minneapolis Police Department on solutions to the growth in property crime, including copper theft. According to the police depart- ment, thieves were entering primarily vacant homes and stripping them of copper, causing

Levinson, David M.

151

Security in Production IP Networks: Some Solutions and their Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including Spoofing identity Eavesdropping Traffic analysis Commerial gain: theft of service Denial · FDDI · WLAN · ISDN · POTS · GSM · Fiber · Copper · 155 / 622 Mb/s SMTP TELNET FTP LDAP RTSP SIP

Ott, Jörg

152

Millersville University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Violence Weapons Theft Use of University Equipment Section VII COMMUNICATIONS Guidelines for placing VIII EMPLOYEE SAFETY AND HEALTH Campus Emergency Procedures Threat Assessment Team Suspicious Leave Annual Leave #12; Section IX ATTENDANCE AND LEAVE continued Personal Leave Sick Leave Sick

Hardy, Christopher R.

153

Phase transitions in operational risk Kartik Anand* and Reimer Khn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indices, changes in interest rates, foreign exchange parities or commodity e.g., gold, oil, etc prices. CR or hardware errors, iv process design errors, v fraud and theft, and vi external damages. To quantify

Kühn, Reimer

154

VU Incident # Classification LocationReport Occurred on or Between Disposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People who were not supposed to be in the area were seen handling copper pipes. Burglary 08-30117 1203 17 Student Ipod was stolen from vehicle.Theft from Motor Vehicle 08-30124 Edgehill at 17th Ave S6/1/08 18, June 02, 2008 15:00 15:30 Inactive Other Vehicle immobilation boot was stolenTheft from Motor Vehicle

Palmeri, Thomas

155

Tags and seals to strengthen arms control verification  

SciTech Connect

Tags and seals have long been recognized as important tools in arms control. The trend in control of armaments is to limit militarily significant equipment that is capable of being verified through direct and cooperative means, chiefly on-site inspection or monitoring. Although this paper will focus on the CFE treaty, the role of tags and seals for other treaties will also be addressed. Published technology and concepts will be reviewed, based on open sources. Arms control verification tags are defined as unique identifiers designed to be tamper-revealing; in that respect, seals are similar, being used as indicators of unauthorized access. Tamper-revealing tags are intended as single-point markers, seals for two-point couplings, and nets for volume containment. Seals usually bind two separate components, such as a hatch or flange that provides access to a secure compartment or a valve that controls fluid flow. A tamper-revealing net might be comprised of a coupled fiberoptic bundle wrapped around an object. Sometimes the term ``seal`` is used to denote the tamper-revealing feature of a tag that is attached to a surface, but in this paper the tamper-indicating connection is considered to be part of the tag concept itself.

DeVolpi, A.

1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Help:Protected pages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protected pages Protected pages Jump to: navigation, search A protected page is a page where normal users are prevented from editing and/or moving at all. Only a user with sysop permissions can edit or move a protected page. Likewise only sysop users can protect a page in the first place, or unprotect the page to lift the restriction. There are several reasons why a particular page might be protected: On public wikis, pages may be protected because they have been repeatedly targeted with vandalism or moved to bad titles, or where it is believed that vandalism or page moves would have a unusually severe impact. On corporate wikis, pages may be protected when they contain statements which have been approved by management, and policy dictates that those statements can't be changed without following a certain approval

157

Help:Protecting and unprotecting pages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protecting and unprotecting pages Protecting and unprotecting pages Jump to: navigation, search Protecting and unprotecting pages is very straightforward, but these operations require sysop permissions. You can designate a page as a protected page by clicking the 'Protect page' tab, and supplying a comment (a brief textual description of why you are protecting the page). There are several reasons why a particular page might be protected. On public wikis, a protected page is usually one which has been repeatedly targeted with vandalism, or where it is believed that any vandalism would have an unusually severe impact. On corporate wikis, a page may be protected when the content has been frozen via an approval process. However there are also many good reasons for not protecting pages. As a sysop you

158

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012 Cold Finger Separation [9]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fission Fission Product Separation by Cold Finger Crystal Growth Fission Product Separation by Cold Finger Crystal Growth Joshua R. Versey* and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho, Idaho Falls Center for Advanced Energy Studies *vers4197@vandals.uidaho.edu Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory Joshua R. Versey* and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho, Idaho Falls Center for Advanced Energy Studies *vers4197@vandals.uidaho.edu Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory 2012 IPRC Fontana, Wisconsin 2012 IPRC Fontana, Wisconsin Outline * Background * Motivation & Goals * Cold Finger Theory * Cold Finger Design * Experimental Program * Results & Discussion * Summary & Future Work 2 Background Advanced Pyrochemical Technology Concept 3 Background 4 Advanced Pyrochemical Technology Concept Background 5 Oxide Reduction Process Cathode

159

Who wants to terminate the game? The role of vested interests and metaplayers in the ATOLLGAME experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low coral islands are heavily dependent on groundwater for freshwater supplies. The declaration by the government of Kiribati of water reserves over privately owned land has led to conflicts, illegal settlements, and vandalism. Also, the water consumption ... Keywords: ATOLLGAME, Pacific, Tarawa, companion modeling, contamination, coral islands, dialogue, entrenched agendas, freshwater reserves, groundwater, multi-agent system, participation, pollution, poverty alleviation, role-playing game, staged process, sustainable development, water demand, water management, water management strategies, water reserves

Anne Dray; Pascal Perez; Christophe Le Page; Patrick D'Aquino; Ian White

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Tools for Conductor Evaluation: State of the Art Review and Promising Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has investigated degradation modes and inspection and assessment methods for overhead lines. This report provides an overview of the findings of this investigation. Primary degradation modes that have been identified include broken strands due to vandalism or conductor motion, corrosion of steel shield wires and the steel core and adjacent aluminum strands on conductors, degradation of conductor joints from corrosion and high temperature operation, and loss of strength in conductors due to high temp...

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Need for and evaluation of hail protection devices for solar flat plate collectors. Final report, June 1978-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary of the hail risk work previously done under this contract is given, and a summary evaluation of hail impact resistance standards currently being developed is presented. Simulated hail impact test data, field data, and the impact resistance of commercially available glazings are discussed. The use of screens for protection against hail and the threat of vandalism to solar flat plate collectors are discussed. (WHK)

Armstrong, P R; Cox, M; de Winter, F

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Storing, Transporting, and Installing Polymer Insulators: A Practical Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the first use of polymer insulators, great strides have been made in understanding insulator design and application. Polymer insulatorsalso called composite or non-ceramic insulators (NCI)offer some distinct advantages compared to ceramic insulators, including the fact that they are lightweight, not easily vandalized, and resistant to contamination. However, the greatest concern still remains the question of life expectancy. During service life, polymer insulators insulate the line conductor from t...

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Definitions, Seals - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Definitions Definitions VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

165

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

166

Improved Security Via ''Town Crier'' Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste managers are increasingly expected to provide good security for the hazardous materials they marshal. Good security requires, among other things, effective tamper and intrusion detection. We have developed and demonstrated a new method for tamper and intrusion detection which we call the ''town crier method''. It avoids many of the problems and vulnerabilities associated with traditional approaches, and has significant advantages for hazardous waste transport. We constructed two rudimentary town crier prototype systems, and tested them for monitoring cargo inside a truck. Preliminary results are encouraging.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, A. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

New Seals - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Information More Information VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

168

Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop Insanely Fast Microprocessor Shop VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

169

Useful Resources- Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selected Publications Selected Publications VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

170

About Seals - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seals Seals VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

171

Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vulnerability Assessment Team Vulnerability Assessment Team VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

172

Findings and Lessons, Seals - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Findings and Lessons Learned Findings and Lessons Learned VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

173

Current Projects: Product Authenticity Tags - Vulnerability Assessment Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Authenticity Tags Product Authenticity Tags VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

174

EPA Mobile Source Enforcement Memo 1A  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND COMPLIANCE ASSURANCE September 4, 1997 Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A SUBJECT: Tampering Enforcement Policy for Alternative Fuel Aftermarket Conversions A. Purpose The purpose of this document is to clarify and revise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) "tampering" enforcement policy for motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines originally designed to operate on gasoline or diesel fuel and subsequently modified to operate exclusively or in conjunction with compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquified petroleum gas (LPG or propane), hereinafter referred to as "alternative fuels". The provisions of

175

Evaluation of SmartCard webserver as an application platform from a user's perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SmartCard Webserver (SCWS) is an application platform technology for services that runs within a tamper proof hardware, like in a smartcard chip. Due to upcoming application scenarios like using a mobile device as a contactless smartcard based on Near ...

Gerald Madlmayr; Dominik Brandlberger; Josef Langer; Josef Scharinger

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Why we need to stick with uniform-price auctions in electricity markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arguments that the uniform-price auction yields electricity prices that are systematically too high are incorrect. Tampering with the spot price would cause inefficiency and raise long-term costs. The proper way to dampen the impact of spot price fluctuations is with long-term hedging. (author)

Cramton, Peter; Stoft, Steven

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Analysis and evaluation of Secos, a protocol for energy efficient and secure communication in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks are increasingly being used in applications where the communication between nodes needs to be protected from eavesdropping and tampering. Such protection is typically provided using techniques from symmetric key cryptography. ... Keywords: Energy efficient key distribution, Key management, Key refreshment, Sensor network security, Symmetric cryptography

Issa Khalil; Saurabh Bagchi; Ness Shroff

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Proceedings of the 8th international interactive conference on Interactive TV&Video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 8th European Conference on Interactive TV and Video -- EuroITV 2010 in Tampere, Finland. TV and video service undergo a tremendous change in recent years. The media systems are transforming into a ...

Artur Lugmayr; Petri Vuorimaa; Pertti Naranen; Clia Quico; Gunnar Harboe

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Critical Dimensions of Water-tamped Slabs and Spheres of Active Material  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The magnitude and distribution of the fission rate per unit area produced by three energy groups of moderated neutrons reflected from a water tamper into one side of an infinite slab of active material is calculated approximately in section II. This rate is directly proportional to the current density of fast neutrons from the active material incident on the water tamper. The critical slab thickness is obtained in section III by solving an inhomogeneous transport integral equation for the fast-neutron current density into the tamper. Extensive use is made of the formulae derived in "The Mathematical Development of the End-Point Method" by Frankel and Goldberg. In section IV slight alterations in the theory outlined in sections II and III were made so that one could approximately compute the critical radius of a water-tamper sphere of active material. The derived formulae were applied to calculate the critical dimensions of water-tamped slabs and spheres of solid UF{sub 6} leaving various (25) isotope enrichment fractions. Decl. Dec. 16, 1955.

Greuling, E.; Argo, H.: Chew, G.; Frankel, M. E.; Konopinski, E.J.; Marvin, C.; Teller, E.

1946-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Look In the Mirror: Attacks on Package Managers Author Names Removed for Anonymous Submission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for security. There is no protection of package metadata or the root metadata. Package Metadata An attacker can of the package in the package meta- data protects the package from tampering. Packages Resistance to metadata, the package metadata is protected from tam- pering. Packages The signature on the root metadata prevents

Hartman, John H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An Auditable Metering Scheme for Web Advertisement Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a cryptographic scheme for metering the duration and/or the number of instances of running a process. This scheme has the following property: knowing a secret, one can validate a piece of metering evidence in constant units of time ... Keywords: auditable metering, lightweight security, software, tamper-resistant, web advertisement

Liqun Chen; Wenbo Mao

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges: building bridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NordiCHI is the main forum for human-computer interaction research in the Nordic countries. It is a biannual event. The first four were held in Stockholm (2000), Aarhus (2002), Tampere (2004) and Oslo (2006). This year's conference in Lund is hosted ...

Konrad Tollmar; Bodil Jnsson

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems This paper studies the security requirements for remote authentication and communication in smart grid to smart grid systems. For example, in order to unlock the credentials stored in tamper

Wang, Yongge

184

Investigation Letter Report: I11IG002 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter Report: I11IG002 Letter Report: I11IG002 Investigation Letter Report: I11IG002 August 17, 2011 Impact of Copper Thefts on the Department of Energy A series of news articles during the last several months have reported increased thefts of copper nationally, including several that have interrupted electrical distribution and telephone service in communities across the country. The Department of Energy's laboratories, environmental remediation sites, generating stations and other facilities have not been immune to this problem. Over the last few years, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) has successfully investigated numerous reports of copper thefts from Department sites nationwide. The OIG believes that there are several practical, cost-effective steps that the Department can

185

Transducer Signal Noise Analysis for Sensor Authentication  

SciTech Connect

The abstract is being passed through STIMS for submision to the conference. International safeguards organizations charged with promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy employ unattended and remote monitoring systems supplemented with onsite inspections to ensure nuclear materials are not diverted for weaponization purposes. These systems are left unattended for periods of several months between inspections. During these periods physical security means are the main deterrent used to detect intentional monitoring system tampering. The information gathering components are locked in secure and sealed rooms. The sensor components (i.e. neutron and gamma detectors) are located throughout the plant in unsecure areas where sensor tampering could take place during the periods between inspections. Sensor tampering could allow the diversion of nuclear materials from the accepted and intended use to uses not consistent with the peaceful use of nuclear energy. A method and an apparatus is presented that address the detection of sensor tampering during the periods between inspections. It was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the IAEA. The method is based on the detailed analysis of the sensor noise floor after the sensor signal is removed. The apparatus consists of a 2.1 x 2.6 electronic circuit board containing all signal conditioning and processing components and a laptop computer running an application that acquires and stores the analysis results between inspection periods. The sensors do not require any modification and are remotely located in their normal high radiation zones. The apparatus interfaces with the sensor signal conductors using a simple pass through connector at the normal sensor electronics interface package located in the already secure and sealed rooms. The apparatus does not require hardening against the effects of radiation due to its location. Presented is the apparatus design, the analysis method, and the test results as applied to tamper detection using three HE3 neutron sensors and two gamma sensors designed and built for safeguards monitoring.

John M. Svoboda (043887); Mark J. Schanfein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

portfolioJan2006_final_v2.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterize Characterize problem and prioritize program actions to reduce the threat to U.S. national security from radiological materials being used in "dirty bombs." Approach Argonne is working with the DOE National Nuclear Safety Administration, NA-25, to compile information from diverse sources into a comprehensive database, analyze and model information, and communicate results. Benefits Increased understanding of radionuclide sources and their locations, theft and diversion activities, and the ability to direct resources in the International Radiological Threat Reduction program where they will be most effective. POC: Roy Lindley, lindley@anl.gov Argonne National Laboratory Analysis of Radionuclide Theft and Diversions Geospatial Science Program

187

New affordable options for infrastructure and asset protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Securitas is one of the leaders evolving with technology and delivering new forms of affordable security for mining facilities. It was called in to protect a large mothballed coal mine in the central USA, the victim of repeated thefts. First, Mobile Surveillance Units (MSUs) were installed but thefts continued. Later, a new wireless video security system called Videofied which used MotionViewers which use infrared detectors to detect movement and send a 10 second clip of the intrusion to an operator. This led to the thieves being caught. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

SSRL HEADLINES July 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July, 2009 July, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: SSRL Initiates 200-mA Beam Line Operations Science Highlight - Molecular Mixing in Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - Understanding Nature's Assembly of Molecules to Improve Tomorrow's Electronics New BL5 Branch Line Funded by DOE X-ray/VUV Beam Time Requests Due August 1 Register to Participate in the SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference - October 18-21, 2009 Submit Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards Call for User Science Posters and Outstanding Student Poster Competition SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School - September 8-11, 2009 Vandalism at SSRL Provide Feedback Using User Portal __________________________________________________________________________

189

Site handbook: data acquisition system information, passive solar retrofit Automobile Maintenance Facility, City of Philadelphia  

SciTech Connect

Data were collected at the City of Philadelphia's Auto Maintenance Facility using an Aeoloan Kinetics PDL-24 data acquisition system. Instantaneous data readings were recorded each 15 seconds by the microprocessor. These channel readings were then averaged to produce hourly values which were then stored on an audio cassette. The energy saving strategies include: styrofoam and concrete roof coverings; weatherstripping; replacement of north windows with combination insulation and view glazing; PVC strips between heated and unheated areas; gas fired radiant heaters at individual work stations; reduction of the number of light fixtures; and the installation of retrofit window units for radiant solar heating, daylighting, ventilation, glare control and vandalism protection.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Photovoltaic lighting system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of 21 PV-powered low pressure sodium lighting systems on a multi-use has been documented in this paper. Specific areas for evaluation include the vandal resistant PV modules, constant voltage and on/off PV charge controllers, flooded deep-cycle lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VLRA) gel batteries, and low pressure sodium ballasts and lights. The PV lighting system maintenance intervals and lessons learned have been documented over the past 2.5 years. The above performance data has shown that with careful hardware selection, installation, and maintenance intervals the PV lighting systems will operate reliably.

Harrington, S.R.; Hund, T.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Poligon Phase 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

After a brief description of W.H. Porter, Inc., the development of a passive solar, vandal resistant building for a northern climate with much cloud cover is described. Six concepts are illustrated, five of which involved water walls and were rejected, and the sixth, which was selected, consisting of an insulated mass wall which is insulated to the outside and uses a thermosiphon collector. The design of the Thermosiphon Solar Wall and of a Michigan nature center of hexagonal form employing the concept are illustrated, and project worksheets and the project budget are included. Also included are comments on marketing such buildings. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Standards Development Australia & IEC (2003) Page 1 Current state of play with Australian and IEC standards for PV & RE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for photovoltaic generator 1. Job profile. The breakthrough of photovoltaic energy as a renewable of theft. - Multi-source coupling: in many case, the use of photovoltaic as a unique source of energy, in the way to optimize energy production from photovoltaic generators and storage organs, - To modelise

193

Know your enemy: the risk of unauthorized access in smartphones by insiders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smartphones store large amounts of sensitive data, such as SMS messages, photos, or email. In this paper, we report the results of a study investigating users' concerns about unauthorized data access on their smartphones (22 interviewed and 724 surveyed ... Keywords: insider, loss, physical threats, smartphone, stranger, theft, user study

Ildar Muslukhov; Yazan Boshmaf; Cynthia Kuo; Jonathan Lester; Konstantin Beznosov

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

UMS-dev-sec: a proposed framework to address security concerns of UMS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USB Mass Storage (UMS) devices are affordable, convenient, practical, and have the ability to interface easily with a number of operating systems, and various hardware systems. UMS devices are found among virtually any person in the workplace today. ... Keywords: UMS, USB, information loss, information security, information theft, malware, security awareness, security framework

Kegomoditswe Molotsi, Bobby L. Tait

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Using Author Topic to detect insider threats from email traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One means of preventing insider theft is by stopping potential insiders from becoming actual thieves. This article discusses an approach to assist managers in identifying potential insider threats. By using the Author Topic [Rosen-Zvi Michal, Griffiths ... Keywords: Author Topic (AT), Datamining, Insider threat, Large data set, Social networks

James S. Okolica; Gilbert L. Peterson; Robert F. Mills

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Is RFID technology secure and private?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been used in a variety of applications, such as inventory management, anti-theft monitoring of consumer merchandise, and the tagging of livestock. With previous applications, it is difficult to link information ... Keywords: RFID security, backend attacks, middleware attacks, nSpeedPass

Rand A. Mahmood; Wasim A. Al-Hamdani

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

198

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

199

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

200

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

202

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

203

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

204

CLEANING OF MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATOR FLUE GAS IN EUROPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/07/11 2015 Narcotics Violation Towers Hall A resident admitted to smoking marijuana and turned over arrested. 04/21/11 1417 04/21/11 1200- 1405 Theft Towers A credit card was stolen. Report taken. 04 The bus shelter was spray-painted on north and west sides. Report taken. 04/09/11 1047 04/09/11 1047

Columbia University

205

Neutralization theory and online software piracy: An empirical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accompanying the explosive growth of information technology is the increasing frequency of antisocial and criminal behavior on the Internet. Online software piracy is one such behavior, and this study approaches the phenomenon through the theoretical ... Keywords: Internet, computer crime, cybercrime, intellectual property theft, neutralization theory, software piracy

Sameer Hinduja

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

If you think your identity has been stolen, here's what to do  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the telephone numbers of customer service and fraud departments. Keep the list in a secure place (not your of the three consumer reporting companies to place a "fraud alert" or a "credit freeze" on your credit report where the identity theft took place. Get a copy of the report or at the very least, the number

Roy, Subrata

207

Harvard University Police Department 1033 Massachusetts Avenue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occurred 2013 6/4/2013 SEELY MUDD BUILDING 6/4/13 6/3/13 2:00 PM -THEFT REPORT 250 LONGWOOD AVE CLOSED 8:04 AM 6/4/13 6:00 AM BOSTON Officer dispatched to take a report that a bundle of copper valued at $600

Gunawardena, Jeremy

208

IEEE International Conference on Power and Energy (PECon 08), December 1-3, 2008, Johor Bahru, Malaysia. Abstract--Electricity consumer dishonesty is a problem faced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electricity theft, non-technical loss, load profile. I. INTRODUCTION LECTRIC utilities lose large amounts in recent years. This paper presents a new approach towards Non-Technical Loss (NTL) analysis for electric uses customer load profile information to expose abnormal behavior that is known to be highly

Ducatelle, Frederick

209

IMPROVING ELECTRIC FRAUD DETECTION USING CLASS IMBALANCE STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Analysis over consumers historical kWh load profile data from Uruguayan Elec- tric Company (UTE) showsIMPROVING ELECTRIC FRAUD DETECTION USING CLASS IMBALANCE STRATEGIES Mat´ias Di Martino, Federico, jmolinelli}@gmail.com Keywords: Electricity theft, Support vector machine, Optimum path forest, Unbalance

210

Learning stateful models for network honeypots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attacks like call fraud and identity theft often involve sophisticated stateful attack patterns which, on top of normal communication, try to harm systems on a higher semantic level than usual attack scenarios. To detect these kind of threats via specially ... Keywords: clustering, honeypots, markov models, non-negative matrix factorization, state machine inference

Tammo Krueger; Hugo Gascon; Nicole Krmer; Konrad Rieck

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

BotMiner: clustering analysis of network traffic for protocol- and structure-independent botnet detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Botnets are now the key platform for many Internet attacks, such as spam, distributed denial-of-service (DDoS), identity theft, and phishing. Most of the current botnet detection approaches work only on specific botnet command and control (C&C) protocols ...

Guofei Gu; Roberto Perdisci; Junjie Zhang; Wenke Lee

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An internet-based IP protection scheme for circuit designs using linear feedback shift register (LFSR)-based locking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP reuse is rapidly proliferating recent automated circuit design. It is facing serious challenges like forgery, theft and misappropriation of intellectual property (IP) of the design. Thus, protection of design IP is a matter of ... Keywords: decryption, encryption, intellectual property protection (IPP), watermarking

Raju Halder; Parthasarathi Dasgupta; Saptarshi Naskar; Samar Sen Sarma

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Novel Scheme for Encoding and Watermark Embedding in VLSI Physical Design for IP Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emerging trend of design reuse in VLSI circuits poses the threat of theft and misappropriation of intellectual property (IP) of the design. Protection of design IP is a matter of prime concern today. Here we propose a scheme SECURE IP, which tackles ...

Debasri Saha; Parthasarathi Dasgupta; Susmita Sur-Kolay; Samar Sen-Sarma

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

HOT WORK PERMIT STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Hot Work Permit Page 1 of 3 Adopted 11/22/2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

Papautsky, Ian

215

Pay Bands and Grade Pays for faculty and staff members of IIT Madras S.No. VI CPC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

Sivalingam, Krishna M.

216

Audit of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Fiscal Year 2012 Financial Statements (IG-13-003, November 15, 2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

217

Of Frogs & Herds: Title of Presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!of!data!breach!notification!laws!on!identity!theft!(WEIS! 8)2008)... · Impact!of!gun!owners!DB!publication!on!crime!(work!in!progress)... · Impact ( ) · Billions in lost e-tail sales... (Jupiter Research) · Significant reason for Internet users to avoid

Sadeh, Norman M.

218

LLNL Contribution to Sandia Used Fuel Disposition - Security March 2011 Deliverable  

SciTech Connect

Cleary [2007] divides the proliferation pathway into stages: diversion, facility misuse, transportation, transformation, and weapons fabrication. King [2010], using Cleary's methodology, compares a deepburn fusion-driven blanket containing weapons-grade plutonium with a PWR burning MOX fuel enrichments of 5-9%. King considers the stages of theft, transportation, transformation, and nuclear explosive fabrication. In the current study of used fuel storage security, a similar approach is appropriate. First, one must consider the adversary's objective, which can be categorized as on-site radionuclide dispersion, theft of material for later radionuclide dispersion, and theft of material for later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive. For on-site radionuclide dispersion, only a single proliferation pathway stage is appropriate: dispersion. That situation will be addressed in future reports. For later radionuclide dispersion, the stages are theft, transportation, and transformation (from oxide spent fuel containing both fission products and actinides to a material size and shape suitable for dispersion). For later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive, the stages are theft (by an outsider or by facility misuse by an insider), transportation, transformation (from oxide spent fuel containing both fission products and actinides to a metal alloy), and fabrication (of the alloy into a weapon). It should be noted that the theft and transportation stages are similar, and possibly identical, for later radionuclide dispersion and later processing and fabrication into a nuclear explosive. Each stage can be evaluated separately, and the methodology can vary for each stage. For example, King starts with the methodology of Cleary for the theft, transportation, transformation, and fabrication stages. Then, for each stage, King assembles and modifies the attributes and inputs suggested by Cleary. In the theft (also known as diversion) stage, Cleary has five high-level categories (material handling during diversion, difficulty of evading detection by the accounting system, difficulty of evading detection by the material control system, difficulty of conducting undeclared facility modifications for the purpose of diverting nuclear material, and difficulty of evading detection of the facility modifications for the purposes of diverting nuclear material). Each category has one or more subcategories. For example, the first category includes mass per significant quantity (SQ) of nuclear material, volume/SQ of nuclear material, number of items/SQ, material form (solid, liquid, powder, gas), radiation level in terms of dose, chemical reactivity, heat load, and process temperature. King adds the following two subcategories to that list: SQs available for theft, and interruptions/changes (normal and unexpected) in material stocks and flows. For the situation of an orphaned surface storage facility, this approach is applicable, with some of the categories and subcategories being modified to reflect the static situation (no additions or removals of fuel or containers). In addition, theft would require opening a large overpack and either removing a full container or opening that sealed container and then removing one or more spent nuclear fuel assemblies. These activities would require time without observation (detection), heavy-duty equipment, and some degree of protection of the thieves from radiological dose. In the transportation stage, Cleary has two high-level categories (difficulty of handling material during transportation, and difficulty of evading detection during transport). Each category has a number of subcategories. For the situation of an orphaned surface storage facility, these categories are applicable. The transformation stage of Cleary has three high-level categories (facilities and equipment needed to process diverted materials; knowledge, skills, and workforce needed to process diverted materials; and difficulty of evading detection of transformation activities). Again, there are subcategories. King [2007

Blink, J A

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Journal of Physical Security - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Projects > The Journal of Physical Current Projects > The Journal of Physical Security VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms

220

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Reduce the city's energy use by 40 percent over the next 15 years. Engineers able to research more efficient lighting techniques.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An Auditable Metering Scheme for Web Advertisement Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a cryptographic mechanism for metering the duration and/or the number of instances of running a data process. This mechanism has the following property: knowing a secret, one can validate a piece of metering evidence in constant units of time while without the secret the job of generating a valid piece of evidence requires time indicated by a value in the evidence. Because the mechanism utilises a well-known computational complexity problem, the meter based on it can be implemented in software yet is tamper-resistant. We will address the use of this mechanism in building an auditable metering scheme for finding the popularity of web sites. The scheme is suitable for rapidly increasing web advertisement applications. We will also discuss the related security issues and mention some other applications, which can benefit by using the mechanism. Keywords: Auditable metering, Web advertisement, Tamper-resistant software, Lightweight security. 1

Liqun Chen; Wenbo Mao

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Reduce the city's energy use by 40 percent over the next 15 years. Engineers able to research more efficient lighting techniques.

223

Technologies for Remote Monitoring of Substation Assets: Physical Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the benefits of including remote monitoring with the various security technologies used for providing physical security to substation facilities and equipment. This remote monitoring provides near-real-time security information on the access points to substation facilities as well as the status and health of equipment to determine if the equipment has been tampered with or is otherwise not functioning correctly. The types of security technologies include locks at gates and doors, vid...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

224

Argonne Team Challenges Physical Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering & Systems Analysis Engineering & Systems Analysis Success Stories For further information, contact Roger Johnston, rogerj@anl.gov "Real security is thinking like the bad guys," maintains Roger Johnston, head of Argonne's VAT. Argonne Team Challenges Physical Security Physical security-the art of protecting tangible assets-is the counterpart to cyber security. Physical security can take the form of locks, tamper-indicating seals, guards who stand watch

225

Security seal. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to fingerprints are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

Gobeli, G.W.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessing and Enhancing the Security of Transmission Assets From International Physical Attack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential intentional attacks against electric power systems include sabotage; physical assault; disruption of sensors, information systems, computer networks, and fail-safe systems; tampering with process safety; and indirect attacks such as disruption of water, fuel, or key personnel. While outages from intentional attacks on the physical security of utility assets are rare, such outages can adversely impact the economy, the environment, public safety, and national security. This white paper ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

Security seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

Gobeli, Garth W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Audit Letter Report: INS-L-07-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE February 2, 2007 REPLY TO A T ~ N O F IG-40 SUBJECT: Letter Report on "Alleged Loss or Theft of Personally Identifiable Infonnation at Pantex," INS-L-07-05 (S06IS037) TO. Manager, Pailtex Site Office This is to advise you of the results of an Office of Inspector General (OIG) inspection of an alleged loss or theft of personally identifiable information at the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Pantex Plant. BACKGROUND Under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, as amended by the Immigration and Nationality Act, all United States (U.S.) employers are required to obtain and retain information concerning each employee's eligibility to work in the U.S. The information to be collected generally consists of the employee's social security number, address, date of

229

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs - SEA-2010-01 July 16, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, related to the Theft of Classified Matter from the East Tennessee Technology Park The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's, Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation of Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) with respect to the theft of classified matter at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in October 2006. Based on the on-site investigation and evaluation of the evidence in this matter, and in consideration of information you and your associates provided during an enforcement conference on August 18, 2009, I am issuing the enclosed Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) in accordance with 10 C.F.R. §

230

Cost of Crime: A Review of the Research Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sed to conduct the research; a House Research Department August 1999 Cost of Crime: A Review of the Research Studies Page 2 summary of the study's main findings; and, where appropriate, additional comments on the research. Additionally, Appendix B (page 27) contains a bibliography of the research studies. Most "cost of crime" research studies focus on Part I (serious) crimes and use similar data bases. The majority of research studies assessing the cost of crime to victims and society limit their scope to crimes classified as serious Part I crimes by the FBI. These crimes include homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Additionally, a handful of studies focuses on the costs of particular crimes, such as driving while intoxicated or child abuse. These studies tend to be based on targeted, customized surveys and data collection efforts rather than on pre-existing, general crime data

Emily Shapiro

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Qualitative Assessment of Diversion Scenarios for an Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using the GEN IV PR&PP Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FAST REACTORS;NUCLEAR ENERGY;NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT;PROLIFERATION;SAFEGUARDS;THEFT; A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Therios, Ike

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Alternative Materials for Ground Electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power utility companies struggle with issues resulting from copper theftespecially on transmission line support structures accessible to the public and fitted with copper grounding conductors. It is increasingly important to identify alternative materials that can be used to provide a durable grounding system yet not be targeted for theft. In response, EPRI is investigating the use of alternative materials for electrode designsexamining life expectancy, corrosion, material compatibility and current handl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Power sector reform, private investment and regional co-operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Europe and stimulated FDI in the power sector, and might have similarly stimulative effects in South Asia, quite apart from creating profitable trade opportunities and increasing regional security of supply and greater resilience against external oil... of the Electricity Reforms Act in 1997 setting up the Regulatory Commission. The state government has directed district administrators and police officials to support the distribution companies for curtailing frauds, theft, etc., but the actual implementation...

Newbery, David

234

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Why is the insider a concern? There are many documented cases of nuclear material available for sale - there are more insider diversions than outsider attacks and more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. Insider attributes are: have access, has authority, possesses knowledge, works with absence of timeline, can test system, and may act alone or support a team. Material control and accountability (MC&A) is an essential part of an integrated safeguards system. Objectives of MC&A are: (1) Ongoing confirmation of the presence of special nuclear material (SNM) in assigned locations; (2) Prompt investigation of anomalies that may indicate a loss of SNM; (3) Timely and localized detection of loss, diversion, or theft of a goal quantity; (4) Rapid assessment and response to detection alarms; and (5) Timely generation of information to aid in the recovery of SNM in the event of an actual loss, diversion, or theft from the purview of the MC&A system. Control and accountability of material, equipment, and data are essential to minimizing insider threats.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Audit Report: IG-0750 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IG-0750 IG-0750 Audit Report: IG-0750 December 18, 2006 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Program to Oversee Hydroelectric Dams Pursuant to the Federal Power Act, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulates certain aspects of non-Federal hydroelectric dams. FERC is required to ensure the safety, stability. and integrity of these dams with the goal of protecting life, health, and property from, among other things, instances of sabotage and vandalism. To meet these requirements, FERC developed its Dam Safety and Security Programs to inspect and review safety and security efforts for about 2,600 dams. Of this number, over 900 are considered so significant or high hazard that if breached, loss of life and substantial economic and energy production disruption could result.

236

Data:9a6b1c4c-e734-4985-b082-6df7e1ad233d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b1c4c-e734-4985-b082-6df7e1ad233d b1c4c-e734-4985-b082-6df7e1ad233d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2000/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: YARD AND PROTECTIVE LIGHTING Sector: Lighting Description: Conditions for Service: Facilities involved are owned by the Association. The Association will provide at its expense all necessary labor and materials for repair and maintenance, except in the case of vandalism. The Association will perform necessary repair or maintenance at its earliest convenience and during normal working hours.

237

EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, 65: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona Overview Western plans to rebuild a 26.6-mile-long portion of the existing 27.3-mile-long Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line within the existing ROW in order to improve the reliability of the transmission service. The line has been in service well beyond its projected service life, customer load on the line has increased considerably over the years, and reliability has decreased due to natural aging, extreme weather exposure, vandalism, and lightning strikes. The western-most 0.7 mile of the existing line was rebuilt as part of the Davis Dam Switchyard in 2010. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

238

Data:284dda37-5b0f-4e74-92d3-d3f39618888e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dda37-5b0f-4e74-92d3-d3f39618888e dda37-5b0f-4e74-92d3-d3f39618888e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2000/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-Mercury Vapor-ASSOCIATION-OWNED SYSTEM 250W Sector: Lighting Description: Service includes energy, maintenance, lamp and glassware replacements. Lamps will be controlled to operate from dusk to dawn. Any damage resulting from vandalism shall be charged to the Consumer at cost of repair. Source or reference: http://www.moonlakeelectric.com/rates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability

239

Microsoft Word - HAT 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat, Utah Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 29, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in excellent condition and functioning as designed. Runoff from storm events continues to transport sediment into the west diversion channel, resulting in low-density vegetation growth within the entire length of the channel; however, the performance of the diversion channel has not been impaired. Vandalism continues at the site as indicated by new bullets holes in several perimeter signs. The seismic monitoring station installed on site in 2007 as part of the EarthScope USArray Project continues to collect data.

240

Data:42d5826d-2149-4d2c-900b-e4061f5e75f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-2149-4d2c-900b-e4061f5e75f4 d-2149-4d2c-900b-e4061f5e75f4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2000/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-High Pressure Sodium-ASSOCIATION-OWNED SYSTEM 150W Sector: Lighting Description: Service includes energy, maintenance, lamp and glassware replacements. Lamps will be controlled to operate from dusk to dawn. Any damage resulting from vandalism shall be charged to the Consumer at cost of repair. Source or reference: http://www.mleainc.com/pdf/rates/rate_sch_sl.pdf Source Parent: Comments

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Data:6009861a-e0e2-4cf3-b6c4-a6fa69100cac | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1a-e0e2-4cf3-b6c4-a6fa69100cac 1a-e0e2-4cf3-b6c4-a6fa69100cac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2000/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-Mercury Vapor-ASSOCIATION-OWNED SYSTEM 400W Sector: Lighting Description: Service includes energy, maintenance, lamp and glassware replacements. Lamps will be controlled to operate from dusk to dawn. Any damage resulting from vandalism shall be charged to the Consumer at cost of repair. Source or reference: http://www.moonlakeelectric.com/rates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability

242

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2010 4, 2010 Community members install the New Bohemia solar project in 2005 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. | Photo courtesy of Rich Dana Solar equipment ravaged by floods gets new life Mounting the electrical equipment for a solar array 12 feet off the ground on the side of an art studio building seemed like a safe height at first: it would be well above the 100-year-flood mark and out of reach of vandals. May 24, 2010 Each classroom has a geothermal unit installed. Although large, the units blend into surroundings and don't produce excess noise. | Photo Courtesy of Sterling Public Schools Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District "Once we began researching possibilities, it didn't take us long to realize that our best option was geothermal energy."

243

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 8790 of 31,917 results. 81 - 8790 of 31,917 results. Article Solar equipment ravaged by floods gets new life Mounting the electrical equipment for a solar array 12 feet off the ground on the side of an art studio building seemed like a safe height at first: it would be well above the 100-year-flood mark and out of reach of vandals. http://energy.gov/articles/solar-equipment-ravaged-floods-gets-new-life Article Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Geothermal Development with Recovery Act Funds Conditional Commitment to John Hancock Financial Services for Financing of NGP Blue Mountain Geothermal Project is First to Use DOE's Financial Institution Partnership Program http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-offers-conditional-commitment-support-nevada-geothermal-development

244

Data:41922f37-7eba-470f-90ce-65ef7d896711 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-7eba-470f-90ce-65ef7d896711 -7eba-470f-90ce-65ef7d896711 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc Effective date: 2000/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting-High Pressure Sodium-ASSOCIATION-OWNED SYSTEM 250W Sector: Lighting Description: Service includes energy, maintenance, lamp and glassware replacements. Lamps will be controlled to operate from dusk to dawn. Any damage resulting from vandalism shall be charged to the Consumer at cost of repair Source or reference: http://www.moonlakeelectric.com/rates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability

245

Audit Report: IG-0750  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Regulatory Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Program to Oversee Hydroelectric Dams DOE/IG-0750 December 2006 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 18, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL ENERGY FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Program to Oversee Hydroelectric Dams" BACKGROUND Pursuant to the Federal Power Act, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulates certain aspects of non-Federal hydroelectric dams. FERC is required to ensure the safety, stability. and integrity of these dams with the goal of protecting life, health, and property from, among other things, instances of sabotage and vandalism. To meet these requirements, FERC developed its Dam Safety and Security Programs to inspect and review

246

the Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex, September 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations resume Operations resume (pg. 2) Y-12 resumes nuclear operations Aug. 15. Phased Array (pg. 5) A Y-12 project brings sweet success to weld inspections. September 2012 Visit us! Whether you've been a Y-12 employee for one year or 40 years, the events of July 28 had an effect on your time here. Y-12ers have always considered themselves a family, and like family, we must work together to regain the confidence of interested groups. We know three people cut through fences and vandalized the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility July 28. As a result, B&W Y-12 ordered a temporary security stand-down. The National Nuclear Security Administration fully supported this step to ensure continued confidence in safe and secure operations. Nuclear operations resumed Aug. 15 (see pg. 2).

247

Microsoft Word - TR06-06.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois June 2008 Page 1 2008 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 25, 2008. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, is in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. The historic monument at Plot M has been vandalized, as noted during previous inspections, but remains functional. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is in the process of decommissioning several monitor wells, and will provide a list and decommissioning documentation of the decommissioned monitor wells to DOE-LM. The need to label the outer surface of the protective casing of monitor wells with a well number

248

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning -- -- -- -- 1.00 -- -- -- 1.00 Lightning -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Environmental -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Contamination 1.00 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 Foreign Interference -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed AC Substation Equipment 3.00 1.00 -- 1.00 5.00 -- -- 4.00 14.00 Failed AC/DC Terminal Equipment -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed Protection System Equipment -- 1.00 -- -- 3.00 -- -- -- 4.00

249

Data:8fd9d4ef-688a-48e0-88fb-3e93108c11d1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd9d4ef-688a-48e0-88fb-3e93108c11d1 fd9d4ef-688a-48e0-88fb-3e93108c11d1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/03/18 End date if known: Rate name: AUTOMATIC YARD LIGHT SERVICE Sector: Lighting Description: The consumer shall be responsible for the reasonable care of the light, including repair of vandalism, damage or breakage. Moving or reinstalling of an existing light will be on a time and material basis with a minimum charge of $40.00. Posts and fixtures for ornamental installations will be paid for or provided by the consumer.

250

Choosing and Using Seals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appeared in Army Sustainment 44, 54-58 (2012) Appeared in Army Sustainment 44, 54-58 (2012) How to Choose and Use Seals Roger G. Jo rner, Ph.D. h a Vulnerabilit nston, Ph.D., CPP and Jon S. W y Assessment Team Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave, Building 206 Argonne, IL 60439-4840 630-252-6168, rogerj@anl.gov Introduction Tamper-indicating seals have been in use for well over 7,000 years.[1,2] Today, seals are widely used for a variety of applications including cargo security, nuclear safeguards, counter-

251

Idaho National Laboratory Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Intrusion Detection System (SCADA IDS)  

SciTech Connect

Current Intrusion Detection System (IDS) technology is not suited to be widely deployed inside a Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) environment. Anomaly- and signature-based IDS technologies have developed methods to cover information technology-based networks activity and protocols effectively. However, these IDS technologies do not include the fine protocol granularity required to ensure network security inside an environment with weak protocols lacking authentication and encryption. By implementing a more specific and more intelligent packet inspection mechanism, tailored traffic flow analysis, and unique packet tampering detection, IDS technology developed specifically for SCADA environments can be deployed with confidence in detecting malicious activity.

Jared Verba; Michael Milvich

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Rotary mechanical latch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rotary mechanical latch for positive latching and unlatching of a rotary device with a latchable rotating assembly having a latching gear that can be driven to latched and unlatched states by a drive mechanism such as an electric motor. A cam arm affixed to the latching gear interfaces with leading and trailing latch cams affixed to a flange within the drive mechanism. The interaction of the cam arm with leading and trailing latch cams prevents rotation of the rotating assembly by external forces such as those due to vibration or tampering.

Spletzer, Barry L.; Martinez, Michael A.; Marron, Lisa C.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory (CSSL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Containment and Surveillance Systems Laboratory is an arm of the highly acclaimed ORNL Safeguards Technology Integration Center. This lab is used to evaluate and develop custom technology, as well as integrate, mock up, and stage equipment for evaluation deployments for a variety of containment and surveillance applications. Activities in this lab focus on integrating technology for sealing, monitoring, and tracking nuclear material in a variety of environments. It is well suited for developing, integrating, and deploying active and passive tamper-indicating devices and enclosures, unattended and remote monitoring systems, and wired and wireless attribute-monitoring systems. Applications

254

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a seal system for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials, which is tamper-indicating, which indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to by-pass the seal, which is unique and cost effective, said seal system comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, Sidney (Port Jefferson, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal system is disclosed for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials. The seal is tamper-indicating, indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to bypass the seal, is unique and cost effective. The seal system is comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, S.

1982-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Creating and detecting doctored and virtual images: Implications to the child pornography prevention act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1996 Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) extended the existing federal criminal laws against child pornography to include certain types of virtual porn. In 2002, the United States Supreme Court found that portions of the CPPA, being overly broad and restrictive, violated First Amendment rights. The Court ruled that images containing an actual minor or portions of a minor are not protected, while computer generated images depicting a fictitious computer generated minor are constitutionally protected. In this report I outline various forms of digital tampering, placing them in the context of this recent ruling. I also review computational techniques for detecting doctored and virtual (computer generated)

Hany Farid

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-type Equipment, IG-0385  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 1, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-Type Equipment" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy is responsible for over 50 major facilities across the United States, many of which use and store nuclear and other sensitive materials. The Department maintains a large inventory of arms and military-type equipment to use in protecting its nuclear weapons, materials, facilities, and classified information against theft, sabotage, espionage, and terrorist activity. The Department's inventory of arms and military-type equipment included handguns, rifles, submachine guns, grenade

259

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comprehensive comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and  The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other acts of terrorism Protect high priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage These efforts result in threat reduction by improving security on the bomb material remaining at civilian sites - each vulnerable building that is protected reduces the risk until a permanent threat reduction solution can be implemented.

260

Inspection Report: IG-0660 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 60 Inspection Report: IG-0660 August 30, 2004 Inspection Report on "Internal Controls Over the Accountability of Computers at Sandia National Laboratory, New Mexico The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine the adequacy of internal controls over the extensive inventory of laptop and desktop computers at Sandia National Laboratory, New Mexico. Computers are used in the full range of operations at Sandia, to include processing classified information. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia property policies identify computers as "sensitive property," due largely to their susceptibility to theft and misappropriation. Inspection Report: IG-0660 More Documents & Publications Inspection Report: IG-0597 Inspection Report: IG-0455

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Criminal Investigator | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criminal Investigator Criminal Investigator Criminal Investigator Special Agent Responsibilities The Office of Investigations conducts investigations of DOE personnel, contractors, and others receiving DOE funds concerning alleged violations of law that impact DOE programs, operations, facilities, and personnel. Examples of issues investigated by the OIG include soliciting and/or accepting a bribe, overcharging the Government on contracts and grants, providing false data and information, supplying defective or inferior products, committing environmental violations, theft and/or destruction of government property, misuse of Government computers, serious employee misconduct, and ethical and conflict of interest violations. As a Special Agent, you will have authority to conduct criminal, civil, and

262

Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Safeguards and Security Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge: The international safeguards and security system is being challenged by evolving proliferation and terrorism threats, expanding International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) responsibilities, a retiring safeguards workforce, and the need for better technologies to detect and deter proliferation, theft, and sabotage. Response: Revitalize, strengthen, and sustain U.S. and international safeguards and security capabilities through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and International Nuclear Security programs that: * Support the development of safeguards and security policies, concepts and approaches * Develop human capital through training and education * Develop and implement new safeguards systems,

263

US-Russian Cooperation in Upgrading MC&A System at Rosatom Facilities: Measurement of Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

Improve protection of weapons-usable nuclear material from theft or diversion through the development and support of a nationwide sustainable and effective Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program based on material measurement. The material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) cooperation has yielded significant results in implementing MC&A measurements at Russian nuclear facilities: (1) Establishment of MEM WG and MEMS SP; (2) Infrastructure for development, certification, and distribution of RMs; and (3) Coordination on development and implementation of MMs.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Jensen, Bruce A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hybrid GPS-GSM Localization of Automobile Tracking System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated GPS-GSM system is proposed to track vehicles using Google Earth application. The remote module has a GPS mounted on the moving vehicle to identify its current position, and to be transferred by GSM with other parameters acquired by the automobile's data port as an SMS to a recipient station. The received GPS coordinates are filtered using a Kalman filter to enhance the accuracy of measured position. After data processing, Google Earth application is used to view the current location and status of each vehicle. This goal of this system is to manage fleet, police automobiles distribution and car theft cautions.

Al-Khedher, Mohammad A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

OIl removal from Blackfeet lease. Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, August 10, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Members of the Blackfeet Tribe, oil-industry representatives, and members of the US Geological Survey and the Bureau of Indian Affairs testified at a hearing in Great Falls, Montana on the ownership of oil moved from an Indian lease to a point of purchase. The purpose was to establish the procedure by which the Geological Survey monitors and traces oil movement in order to prevent and detect theft from the reservation. The hearing was the result of improper movement, with all the fifteen witnesses explaining their involvement in the incident.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Compact approach to monitored retrievable storage of spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent federal waste-management legislation has raised national interest in monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of unprocessed spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants. We have reviewed the current MRS design approaches, and we have examined an alternative concept that is extremely compact in terms of total land use. This approach may offer substantial advantages in the areas of monitoring and in safeguards against theft, as well as in reducing the chances of groundwater contamination. Total facility costs are roughly estimated and found to be generally competitive with other MRS concepts. 4 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Muir, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

LANL Safeguards and Security Assurance Program. Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards and Security (S and S) Assurance Program provides a continuous quality improvement approach to ensure effective, compliant S and S program implementation throughout the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Any issues identified through the various internal and external assessments are documented, tracked and closed using the Safeguards and Security Issue Management Program. The Laboratory utilizes an integrated S and S systems approach to protect US Department of Energy (DOE) interests from theft or diversion of special nuclear material (SNM), sabotage, espionage, loss or theft of classified/controlled matter or government property, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable impacts on national security, health and safety of employees and the public, and the environment. This document explains the basis, scope, and conduct of the S and S process to include: self-assessments, issue management, risk assessment, and root cause analysis. It also provides a discussion of S and S topical areas, roles and responsibilities, process flow charts, minimum requirements, methodology, terms, and forms.

NONE

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Risk analysis of nuclear safeguards regulations. [Aggregated Systems Model (ASM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aggregated Systems Model (ASM), a probabilisitic risk analysis tool for nuclear safeguards, was applied to determine benefits and costs of proposed amendments to NRC regulations governing nuclear material control and accounting systems. The objective of the amendments was to improve the ability to detect insiders attempting to steal large quantities of special nuclear material (SNM). Insider threats range from likely events with minor consequences to unlikely events with catastrophic consequences. Moreover, establishing safeguards regulations is complicated by uncertainties in threats, safeguards performance, and consequences, and by the subjective judgments and difficult trade-offs between risks and safeguards costs. The ASM systematically incorporates these factors in a comprehensive, analytical framework. The ASM was used to evaluate the effectiveness of current safeguards and to quantify the risk of SNM theft. Various modifications designed to meet the objectives of the proposed amendments to reduce that risk were analyzed. Safeguards effectiveness was judged in terms of the probability of detecting and preventing theft, the expected time to detection, and the expected quantity of SNM diverted in a year. Data were gathered in tours and interviews at NRC-licensed facilities. The assessment at each facility was begun by carefully selecting scenarios representing the range of potential insider threats. A team of analysts and facility managers assigned probabilities for detection and prevention events in each scenario. Using the ASM we computed the measures of system effectiveness and identified cost-effective safeguards modifications that met the objectives of the proposed amendments.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Altman, W.D.; Judd, B.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of Green Box sensor module technologies for rail applications  

SciTech Connect

Results of a joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work, supported by the New Mexico State Transportation Authority, examines a family of smart sensor products that can be tailored to the specific needs of the user. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. Advances in sensor microelectronics and digital signal processing permit us to produce a class of smart sensors that interpret raw data and transmit inferred information. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and consequence of hazardous materials incidents. The system would be capable of numerous activities including: monitoring cargo integrity, controlling system braking and vehicle acceleration, recognizing component failure conditions, and logging sensor data. A cost-benefit analysis examines the loss of revenue resulting from theft, hazardous materials incidents, and accidents. Customer survey data are combined with the cost benefit analysis and used to guide the product requirements definition for a series of specific applications. A common electrical architecture is developed to support the product line and permit rapid product realization. Results of a concept validation, which used commercial hardware and was conducted on a revenue-generating train, are also reported.

Rey, D.; Breeding, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hogan, J.; Mitchell, J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); McKeen, R.G. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brogan, J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

U V W X Y Z U V W X Y Z Tesfatsion, Leigh (Leigh Tesfatsion) - Departments of Economics & Mathematics, Iowa State University Tinsley, Matt (Matt Tinsley) - School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling Toor, Saqib (Saqib Toor) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Tsao, Tsu-Chin (Tsu-Chin Tsao) - Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles Tufte, Kristin (Kristin Tufte) - Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Portland State University Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Tampere University of Technology, Automation and Control Institute Texas A&M Transportation Institute, Southwest Region University

273

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Physics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Gabbouj, Moncef (Moncef Gabbouj) - Institute of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology Gaborski, Roger S. (Roger S. Gaborski) - Department of Computer Science, Rochester Institute of Technology Gabriel, Edgar (Edgar Gabriel) - Department of Computer Science, University of Houston Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed (Mohamed Gad-el-Hak) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University Gaeta, Alexander L. (Alexander L. Gaeta) - School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University Gajic, Zoran (Zoran Gajic) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers University Gales, Mark (Mark Gales) - Machine Intelligence Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge

274

A publication presented by the Electrical Safety Foundation International  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presented by the Electrical Safety Foundation International presented by the Electrical Safety Foundation International A guide to understanding and maintaining your home's electrical system Should You Do-It-Yourself? Is a Permit or Inspection Required? How Much Energy Does My Home Use? How Does My Electrical System Work? What's Inside My Service Panel? What Kind of Wiring System is in My Home? Does My Home Have Grounded Outlets? What is a Tamper-Resistant Outlet? What is a GFCI? What is Energy Efficient Lighting? How Do I Clean Up a Broken CFL? Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Everything you need to know What's Inside? Electrical Safety Foundation International The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI)

275

Radioactive material package closures with the use of shape memory alloys  

SciTech Connect

When heated from room temperature to 165 C, some shape memory metal alloys such as titanium-nickel alloys have the ability to return to a previously defined shape or size with dimensional changes up to 7%. In contrast, the thermal expansion of most metals over this temperature range is about 0.1 to 0.2%. The dimension change of shape memory alloys, which occurs during a martensite to austenite phase transition, can generate stresses as high as 700 MPa (100 kspi). These properties can be used to create a closure for radioactive materials packages that provides for easy robotic or manual operations and results in reproducible, tamper-proof seals. This paper describes some proposed closure methods with shape memory alloys for radioactive material packages. Properties of the shape memory alloys are first summarized, then some possible alternative sealing methods discussed, and, finally, results from an initial proof-of-concept experiment described.

Koski, J.A.; Bronowski, D.R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

2013 ORNL Story Tips | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 13 2013 ORNL Story Tips 1-10 of 56 Results Prev 12345 Next Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals December 05, 2013 - Using an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology, inspectors of containers of nuclear material will be able to know with unprecedented confidence whether an intruder has tampered with a seal. The system uses a light source of entangled photons to verify the continuity of a fiber-based seal, according to Travis Humble, who led the development team. Cybersecurity - Foiling attackers December 05, 2013 - By frequently changing the Internet addresses of protected servers, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Craig Shue has created a technology that thwarts attacks with just minor changes in infrastructure. Military - Tougher tanks December 05, 2013 - Improving welds of heavy and light armored fighting

277

Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE SHARE Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals Using an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology, inspectors of containers of nuclear material will be able to know with unprecedented confidence whether an intruder has tampered with a seal. The system uses a light source of entangled photons to verify the continuity of a fiber-based seal, according to Travis Humble, who led the development team. Entanglement is a feature of quantum physics that describes how two spatially disparate systems exhibit strong correlations in otherwise independent behaviors. The work, sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, is vital to ensure compliance with nonproliferation treaties because inspectors must confirm the uninterrupted containment and surveillance of any nuclear material.

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle Conversion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion It is unlawful to tamper with vehicle emissions control systems unless the

279

CX-005758: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58: Categorical Exclusion Determination 58: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005758: Categorical Exclusion Determination Testing of Son of SLITS (Secure Loop Inspectable Tag/Seal) Seal Designs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/04/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Son of SLITS (Secure Loop Inspectable Tag/Seal) is a new design of a tamper indicating seal. Its design includes two components composed of acrylic or another similar plastic that will be adhered together by a Ultra Violet (UV) cured adhesive. The seal is designed to mix the one-part adhesive with specular hematite, which is finely ground iron oxide. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005758.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003667: Categorical Exclusion Determination

280

Notice of Availability of the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Final Environmental Impact Statement, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0355) (08/05/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 150 / Friday, August 5, 2005 / Notices that is cross referenced by the individual's name on a separate list. SAFEGUARDS: All physical access to the Department's site, and the site of the Department's contractor where this system of records is maintained, is controlled and monitored by security personnel. The computer system employed by the Department offers a high degree of resistance to tampering and circumvention. This computer system limits data access to Department and contract staff on a ''need to know'' basis, and controls individual users'' ability to access and alter records within the system. The contractor, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR), has established a set of procedures to ensure confidentiality of data. The system

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced gas distribution research at IGT  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has made substantial progress on its multi-year program in demonstrating the technical feasibility of integrated, automated gas distribution systems. The objective of this program is to address automation of distribution as a total system, rather than automation of individual features. This work is geared towards developing a compatible, modular automation system to benefit gas utilities. The system must have an open architecture so that any manufacturer can produce equipment that will be compatible with all other system components. There are approximately 30 capabilities that the laboratory system will ultimately demonstrate, and 10 are now functional. These include: gas meter reading, bill calculation and printing, multiple rate billing, tamper detection, electronic reconfiguration, global commands, remote city gate station control, district meter reading, cathodic protection potential reading, and automatic differential pressure reading.

Rush, W.F. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downlending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA.

Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

P?~P; Cambridge journal of undergraduate philosophy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'ling that the number of test throws is sufficientl~.. large and that the dice ~las not been tampered ,,,j,th since, we say tha,t the antecedent py'obabiL,:ty of throwing a given number in one cast of the dice is 1/6 or 1.:5. Every throw of the ;~lce must be regarded... -value of the compounG is also given. 3ut the constitu'2nts of propositions to ;-hic';} jittgenstein refers, need not: be their apparent, linguJ_stic constituents. To ta:':;;o the COiTIInOil example "A believes that p~l, taking believes as an operator, this patently...

Griffiths, P E

284

Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Data:888bfe95-0df0-448d-9acb-571d263e39c2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bfe95-0df0-448d-9acb-571d263e39c2 bfe95-0df0-448d-9acb-571d263e39c2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W High Pressure Sodium, Flood -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

287

Data:D2feacd8-36c3-4655-b59c-579941a8eee4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

feacd8-36c3-4655-b59c-579941a8eee4 feacd8-36c3-4655-b59c-579941a8eee4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W High Pressure Sodium, Flood -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

288

Data:90d8a14a-f202-49a6-9479-1b4082c4c939 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a14a-f202-49a6-9479-1b4082c4c939 a14a-f202-49a6-9479-1b4082c4c939 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W High Pressure Sodium, Flood -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

289

Data:7db38318-eb0e-4353-a5ba-5bf16d3e63e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db38318-eb0e-4353-a5ba-5bf16d3e63e4 db38318-eb0e-4353-a5ba-5bf16d3e63e4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 175W Mercury Vapor -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

290

Data:Af3b1397-f479-491a-868a-c7767a15b987 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Af3b1397-f479-491a-868a-c7767a15b987 Af3b1397-f479-491a-868a-c7767a15b987 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W High Pressure Sodium -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

291

Data:B907a47a-2ebd-4252-a342-e22c259b938b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7a47a-2ebd-4252-a342-e22c259b938b 7a47a-2ebd-4252-a342-e22c259b938b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W Metal Halide, Flood -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

292

Data:1cab31fd-2325-43b6-a85b-617baee6ff66 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cab31fd-2325-43b6-a85b-617baee6ff66 cab31fd-2325-43b6-a85b-617baee6ff66 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W Metal Halide, Flood -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

293

Data:9a164f94-b9bb-4654-bc28-435c307feeca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4f94-b9bb-4654-bc28-435c307feeca 4f94-b9bb-4654-bc28-435c307feeca No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 100W High Pressure Sodium -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

294

Data:3bf8d2f5-7573-4b55-9b97-6996759ffaef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d2f5-7573-4b55-9b97-6996759ffaef d2f5-7573-4b55-9b97-6996759ffaef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W High Pressure Sodium, Flood -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

295

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 AC & DC Circuit Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning 6.00 27.00 3.00 30.00 63.00 12.00 -- 69.00 210.00 Lightning 5.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 31.00 16.00 13.00 57.00 145.00 Environmental -- 1.00 1.00 5.00 -- 1.00 -- -- 8.00 Contamination 14.00 -- -- -- 22.00 3.00 6.00 7.00 52.00 Foreign Interference 34.00 3.00 -- 4.00 13.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 71.00 Fire -- 2.00 -- 1.00 6.00 3.00 1.00 85.00 98.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- 1.00 3.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment 18.00 16.00 35.00 63.00 57.00 16.00 15.00 65.00 285.00

296

Data:98de151b-1d5d-4884-9580-551cb0d2045c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

51b-1d5d-4884-9580-551cb0d2045c 51b-1d5d-4884-9580-551cb0d2045c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W Metal Halide, Flood -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

297

Data:208f7ef3-cfb5-4748-a8d8-d569f0491c16 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f7ef3-cfb5-4748-a8d8-d569f0491c16 f7ef3-cfb5-4748-a8d8-d569f0491c16 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W Mercury Vapor -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

298

Data:Eb0ca68b-e5bc-4c3b-8301-737584d9ca18 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ca68b-e5bc-4c3b-8301-737584d9ca18 ca68b-e5bc-4c3b-8301-737584d9ca18 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W High Pressure Sodium -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

299

Data:2e1b1e4c-522d-4ba1-9ec3-c0d78cb0b47e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b1e4c-522d-4ba1-9ec3-c0d78cb0b47e b1e4c-522d-4ba1-9ec3-c0d78cb0b47e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 100W High Pressure Sodium -With Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

300

Data:A4986fcc-f75a-404f-9fdc-614db53a03f7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fcc-f75a-404f-9fdc-614db53a03f7 fcc-f75a-404f-9fdc-614db53a03f7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 250W Metal Halide, Flood -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

History of Ramjet and Scramjet Propulsion Development for U.S. Navy Missiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this article is to summarize the evolution and development of ramjet engines (and variants thereof) as propulsion systems for missiles flying at supersonic (or faster) flight speeds that have been supported by the U.S. Navy since World War II. Reference 1 provides a discussion on the details of the types of engines under discussion, along with their limitations, and a historical perspective on the evolutionary timescale of ramjets, scramjets, and mixed-cycle engines. Reference 2 presents a similar discussion for U.S. Air Force--developed systems. In this article we summarize programs to develop surface-launched and air-launched subsonic combustion ramjets and scramjets. Table 1 shows the evolutionary history of all of the ramjet and scramjet engine and vehicle concepts and systems included in these discussions. The names, engine types, dates, performance, system constraints, etc., for each are presented. (Some information is not given for reasons of security.) The U.S. Navy has supported and developed a substantial technology base, including a variety of ramjets. This technology base, however, is not nearly as substantial for scramjets and their derivatives. A number of these ramjet engines and ramjet-powered weapon concepts have been flight tested, but none at hypersonic speeds. Only one U.S. Navy ramjet system has ever become operational (the Talos), and it is still being used as a target today (Vandal). SURFACE-LAUNCHED RAMJET DEVELOPMENT

P. J. Waltrup; Michael E. White; Frederick Zarlingo; Edward S. Gravlin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Data:4ed3157d-7ba5-4c44-afbe-dbfad0390461 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

157d-7ba5-4c44-afbe-dbfad0390461 157d-7ba5-4c44-afbe-dbfad0390461 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 400W Mercury Vapor -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

303

Data:A720c823-97ef-4e50-8ed2-e8187e45df59 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c823-97ef-4e50-8ed2-e8187e45df59 c823-97ef-4e50-8ed2-e8187e45df59 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities Effective date: 1990/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Unmetered Outdoor Lighting- 175W Mercury Vapor -Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Dusk to dawn unmetered service is covered by charges set forth below which also cover initial installation of overhead lines, poles (where applicable), fixture assembly including four foot mounting hardware for standard luminaries and two foot mounting hardware for flood lights, and maintenance including lamp replacements due to burn outs. Such charges do not cover replacement of lamps, luminaries, brackets or overhead lines which are damaged or destroyed due to vandalism or any other cause beyond the Utility's control, such facilities damaged or destroyed under such circumstances to be replaced by the Utility at the Consumer's expense. Lamp renewals and required maintenance will be performed only during regular daytime working hours as soon as practical after notification by the Consumer of the necessity.

304

A "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Technologies for UF6 Cylinder Tracking at Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This effort describes how radio-frequency (RF) technology can be integrated into a uranium enrichment facility's nuclear materials accounting and control program to enhance uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder tracking and thus provide benefits to both domestic and international safeguards. Approved industry-standard cylinders are used to handle and store UF6 feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. In the international arena, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming manual cylinder inventory and tracking techniques to verify operator declarations and to detect potential diversion of UF6. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant process for tracking and monitoring UF6 cylinders would greatly reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a "proof-of concept" system that was designed show the feasibility of using RF based technologies to track individual UF6 cylinders throughout their entire life cycle, and thus ensure both increased domestic accountability of materials and a more effective and efficient method for application of IAEA international safeguards at the site level. The proposed system incorporates RF-based identification devices, which provide a mechanism for a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant tracking network. We explore how securely attached RF tags can be integrated with other safeguards technologies to better detect diversion of cylinders. The tracking system could also provide a foundation for integration of other types of safeguards that would further enhance detection of undeclared activities.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Dixon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Security and You, November 2912  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protecting Your Privacy Information Protecting Your Privacy Information Failure to protect Personally Identifiable Information (PII) can harm you. If your personal information falls into the wrong hands, your financial credit can be damaged, your bank account looted, and you may even find that you are the target of identity theft or worse. So, what exactly is PII? PII consists of information pertaining to an individual's education, financial information, medical history, criminal or employment background, or information which can be used to distinguish or trace their identity, such as their name associated with their social security number, date and place of birth, mother's maiden name, biometric records, etc. Examples of PII include but are not limited to: Name, such as full name, maiden name,

306

Audit Letter Report: INS-L-07-05 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Audit Letter Report: INS-L-07-05 February 2, 2007 Alleged Loss or Theft of Personally Identifiable Information at Pantex Under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, as amended by the Immigration and Nationality Act, all United States (U.S.) employers are required to obtain and retain information concerning each employee's eligibility to work in the U.S. The information to be collected generally consists of the employee's social security number, address, date of birth, and other personally identifiable information sufficient to make an eligibility determination. At the time of employment, the information is to be recorded on Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. Federal law requires that these forms be retained for three years after the date of

307

DOE-STD-1194-2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 02, 2013 October 02, 2013 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Change Notice 3 (October 2013) This document describes establishing and maintaining a Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program, where each MC&A program element is a part of a quality MC&A program. Each site/facility operator needs to establish a sustainable, effective graded safeguards program for the control and accounting of nuclear materials to detect and deter theft and diversion, and to prevent the unauthorized control of a weapon, test device, or materials that can be used to make an improvised nuclear device. The MC&A program implements a defense-in-depth system to ensure that all accountable nuclear materials are in their authorized location and being used for their

308

Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAS-M-12-03 OAS-M-12-03 Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 March 23, 2012 Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site In October 2011, the OIG received a complaint that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (Agriculture) Forest Service - Savannah River (Forest Service) had purchased a number of computers under its Interagency Agreement (Agreement) with the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Operations Office (SRO) that were not placed into use and were being stored in a manner that left them vulnerable to theft or misuse. We confirmed the existence of 17 Hewlett-Packard desktop computers that had been purchased in September 2010, by the Forest Service with SRO funds, with the intention of connecting the computers to the Savannah River Site

309

Office Of NONprOliferatiON  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Of NONprOliferatiON Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international nonproliferation and arms control treaties and agreements. NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and international Security (NiS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security and arms control

310

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Federal Register 0 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2011 / Notices CRA requirements. These requirements currently include transfer of data on lender interest benefits and special allowance payments, defaulted loan balances, and supplemental pre-claims assistance payments information. (13) Disclosure in the Course of Responding to Breach of Data. The Department may disclose records from this system to appropriate agencies, entities, and persons when: (a) The Department suspects or has confirmed that the security or confidentiality of information in the system of records has been compromised; (b) the Department has determined that as a result of the suspected or confirmed compromise there is a risk of harm to economic or property interests, identity theft or

311

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Threat Reduction Global Threat Reduction ... Global Threat Reduction Initiative The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Alarm Response Training provides training in the area of response for radiological events and provides an opportunity for the security forces, health and safety personnel, and other responsible parties such as the supporting local law enforcement to develop, discuss, and exercise their own tactics, techniques, procedures, and protocols when responding to a theft and/or sabotage event involving radioactive materials of significance. This voluntary program is free, and all expenses (travel, meals, etc.), other than the trainee's training time, will be paid by the GTRI Domestic Threat Reduction Program. Facilities participating in the Domestic Security Program are scheduled for

312

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

314

Special Inquiry: IG-0584 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IG-0584 IG-0584 Special Inquiry: IG-0584 January 28, 2003 Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory On November 18, 2002, the Office of Inspector General began a fact finding inquiry into allegations that senior management of the Los Alamos National Laboratory engaged in a deliberate cover-up of security breaches and illegal activities, in particular, with respect to reported instances of property loss and theft. The Acting Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration requested this inquiry based, in part, on media reports that Los Alamos employees had misused the Government purchase order system to buy millions of dollars worth of goods for personal use and that Los Alamos management had attempted to hide these events from the Department of Energy and the public.

315

Instrumented SSH on NERSC Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security » Instrumented SSH Security » Instrumented SSH Instrumented SSH on NERSC Systems NERSC uses a modified version of SSH on all of our systems that allows us to record and analyze the content of interactive SSH sessions. Why are We Doing This? Credential theft represents the single greatest threat to security here at NERSC. We are addressing this problem by analyzing user command activity and looking for behavior that is recognizably hostile. Until SSH came into widespread use, it was trivial to monitor login sessions and analyze them for mischievous activity. Furthermore, this kind of intrusion detection proved to be very effective with few "false positives". Using this version of SSH at NERSC, we are simply recovering that capability. However, we recognize the importance of being candid about

316

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SAFETY AND SECURITY COMPONENT INSTALLATION AND ALTERATION, PACIFIC NORTHWEST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SAFETY AND SECURITY COMPONENT INSTALLATION AND ALTERATION, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed Action: The u.s. Department ofBnergy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to install. alter, and/or maintain safety and security components to maintain an adequate protective planning stance. Loeation of Action: The proposed action would occur on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and in the vicinity ofPNNL facilities in the State of Washington. DacriptioD of the Proposed Action: DOE proposes to install, alter, and/or maintain safety and security systems to continue to provide appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access, theft, diversion, loss

317

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comprehensive comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and  The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other acts of terrorism Protect high priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage These efforts result in threat reduction by improving security on the bomb material remaining at civilian sites - each vulnerable building that is protected reduces the risk until a permanent threat reduction solution can be implemented. Protect Remove and dispose of

318

How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Switching under Pressure Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Velcro for Nanoparticles A Molecular Fossil Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells DECEMBER 8, 2010 Bookmark and Share This diagram depicts how the changing arrangement of proteins in a key structure enables viruses to invade and fuse with host cells. (Courtesy Purdue University Department of Biological Sciences image/Long Li) The atomic-scale arrangement of proteins in a structure that enables a virus to invade and fuse with host cells, showing precisely how the

319

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 15200 of 29,416 results. 91 - 15200 of 29,416 results. Rebate City of San Francisco- Green Building Code San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the... http://energy.gov/savings/city-san-francisco-green-building-code Download The First Five Years FY 2004-2008 Office of Legacy Management: The First Five Years FY 2004-2008 http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/first-five-years-fy-2004-2008 Download Operating Guidelines Appendix A B.DOC http://energy.gov/management/downloads/operating-guidelines-appendix-bdoc0 Download An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities- October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and

320

Security Operations, Laboratory Protection Division, Brookhaven National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Operations Security Operations Homepage Brookhaven ID Badges, Passes, & Vehicle Stickers Hours of Operation Points of Contact Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments: FAQs BNL Site Access Main Gate Access Forms Security Operations L. Butera, Manager Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg. 50 - P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 (631) 344-4691 E-mail: lbutera@bnl.gov Security Operations Mission Statement: To protect DOE special nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, and certain sensitive property against theft, diversion, or destruction; to prevent the sabotage of programs that could result in significant scientific or financial impact; to prevent the malevolent release of hazardous materials including radiological, chemical, and infectious agents or other criminal acts that would endanger employees, the public, and the environment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 190 of 28,905 results. 81 - 190 of 28,905 results. Article U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments Energy Department Releases Progress Update on Better Buildings, Better Plants Program http://energy.gov/articles/us-manufacturers-save-1-billion-11-million-tons-co2-through-energy-efficiency-investments Article Primus Power's Flow Battery Powered by $11 Million in Private Investment Investments in Primus Power's low-cost, distributed storage battery technology pave the way for increased integration of solar and wind technology into our nation's energy portfolio. http://energy.gov/articles/primus-power-s-flow-battery-powered-11-million-private-investment Download Investigation Letter Report: I11IG002 Impact of Copper Thefts on the Department of Energy

322

Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAS-M-12-03 OAS-M-12-03 Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 March 23, 2012 Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site In October 2011, the OIG received a complaint that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (Agriculture) Forest Service - Savannah River (Forest Service) had purchased a number of computers under its Interagency Agreement (Agreement) with the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Operations Office (SRO) that were not placed into use and were being stored in a manner that left them vulnerable to theft or misuse. We confirmed the existence of 17 Hewlett-Packard desktop computers that had been purchased in September 2010, by the Forest Service with SRO funds, with the intention of connecting the computers to the Savannah River Site

323

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Error message Error message The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query Flash2009 19. You are here Home » Page not found Page not found Oops! The page you are looking for doesn't seem to be available. Did you find a broken link? Tell us and we'll fix it. Or maybe you meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms Flash2009 19 Search Showing 461 - 470 of 9,640 results. Download Audit Letter Report: INS-L-07-05 Alleged Loss or Theft of Personally Identifiable Information at Pantex http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-letter-report-ins-l-07-05 Article Grouting Operation to Lead to First SRS Waste Tank Closures Since 1997 AIKEN, S.C. - April marked the start of work to close two massive

324

Case No. VWA-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 * The original of this document contains information which is subject to withholding from disclosure under 5 U.S.C. 552. Such material has been deleted from this copy and replaced with XXXXX's. DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners:Daniel L. Holsinger K-Ray Security, Inc. Date of Filing:December 6, 1995 Case Numbers: VWA-0005 VWA-0009 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Daniel L. Holsinger (Holsinger) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Holsinger contends that certain reprisals were taken against him after he raised concerns relating to the possible theft of government property from the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). These reprisals

325

Substance Abuse Testing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Program Substance Abuse Testing Program Executive Order 12564, Drug-Free Federal Workplace, states in part that "the use of illegal drugs or the use of legal drugs illegally by Federal employees impairs the efficiency of Federal Agencies, jeopardizes public health and safety, and violates the public trust." Substance abuse increases the burden on other employees who do not use illegal drugs and also is an economic problem due to lost productivity in the workplace, insurance claims, sick benefits, accidents, and theft. Abusers endanger all who rely on them for their well being and safety. The Department's Substance Abuse Testing Program covers all Federal employees of the Department of Energy. Authorization for this program comes

326

Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion DECEMBER 17, 2010 Bookmark and Share Mineralogy, percent arsenic bioaccessibility and total arsenic concentration of samples from Nova Scotia mine tailings. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples revealed up to seven arsenic species in individual samples (six shown here as major arsenic phases). Results of a physiologically based extraction test are for the < 150 µm

327

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-06_ Marra Pu solubility Tech Exchange - 1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Solubility and Homogeneity the Solubility and Homogeneity of Plutonium in an Alkali Borosilicate Glass Jim Marra, Charles Crawford and Kevin Fox Savannah River National Laboratory EM Tech Exchange - Atlanta, GA Print Close 2 Outline * Background * Glass composition options * Vitrification processes * Hf as a surrogate for Pu in borosilicate glasses * Lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass * Alkali borosilicate glass * Initial studies * Present study - Pu behavior in HLW glass * Pu behavior in the DWPF melter * Summary Print Close 3 Background * U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 1994 * U.S. and Russian surplus weapons Pu is a "clear and present danger" * U.S. to disposition up to 50 metric tons of surplus Pu * Protect surplus Pu from theft or diversion and reintroduction into nuclear arsenals * Bulk of U.S. material to be dispositioned by fabrication in

328

Inspection Report: IG-0597 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Inspection Report: IG-0597 April 24, 2003 Inspection of Internal Controls Over Personal Computers at Los Alamos National Laboratory Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including processing classified national security information. LANL reported an inventory of approximately 5,000 laptop and 30,000 desktop computers at the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. Department of Energy (DOE) and LANL property policies identify computers as "sensitive property," due in part to their susceptibility to theft and potential for conversion to cash. It is an expected practice that management controls over computers throughout the DOE complex remain robust and consistent. Inspection Report: IG-0597

329

Magnetic Switching under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Velcro for Nanoparticles A Molecular Fossil Ultrafast Imaging of Electron Waves in Graphene Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Magnetic Switching under Pressure DECEMBER 2, 2010 Bookmark and Share A schematic representation of the pressure-induced magnetic switching effect. The colored images highlight the direction of the magnetic orbital (grey plane) for the copper centers (green balls: copper, blue: nitrogen, red: oxygen/water, yellow: fluoride). A material's properties are a critical factor in the way that material

330

Audit Report: OAS-M-08-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Audit Report: OAS-M-08-01 October 1, 2007 Management Controls over the Bonneville Power Administration's Personal Property Accountability Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) did not have effective controls over its personal property tracked through the Sunflower system. Specifically, we found that (1) equipment susceptible to loss or theft was not always entered into accountability; (2) inventory location information was not always accurate; (3) the existence of personal property items was not always validated when being transferred from one custodian to another; and, (4) inconsistencies in records regarding lost or stolen property were not reconciled. Audit Report: OAS-M-08-01 More Documents & Publications Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008

331

Laboratory Protection Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Contact Points of Contact Organization Chart (pdf) Groups Emergency Services Emergency Management Security Operations BNL Site Access Main Gate Access Forms Welcome to the... Laboratory Protection Division (LP) Mission Statement: To serve and protect Brookhaven National Laboratory's staff, guests, and interests from the undesirable consequences of unwanted events by providing preparedness, assessment, engineering, and immediate response services for all types of security and non-security related emergencies. Protect DOE special nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, and property against theft, diversion, or destruction; prevent the sabotage of programs that could result in significant scientific or financial impact; prevent the malevolent release of hazardous materials including radiological, chemical, and infectious agents or other criminal acts protecting people, property, and national security, providing a safe and secure environment for employees, the public, and the environment.

332

Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers 7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers June 17, 2011 - 5:41pm Addthis Check out a short animation of a 3D plasmon ruler as it delivers optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein and read more below. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The discovery of a new property of glass offers new insight into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which are in products such as anti-theft tags and power transformers. A new ruler could help provide scientists with unprecedented details into a variety of biological events, including the interaction between DNA and enzymes, protein folding and cell membrane vibrations.

333

Conversion and standardization of US university reactor fuels using LEU, status 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the US Department of Energy initiated a program to change the fuel used in most of the US university research reactors using HEU (93%) to LEU({lt}20{percent}) in order to minimize the risk of theft or diversion of this weapons-useable material. An important consideration in the LEU conversion planning process has been the desire to standardize the fuels that are used and to enhance the performance and utilization of the reactors. This paper describes the current status of this conversion process and the plans and schedules to complete an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. To date, three university reactors have been converted to LEU fuel, completed safety documentation for three reactors is being evaluated by the USNRC, and work on the safety documentation for six reactors is in progress. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Online Social Networks: Threats and Solutions Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online social network users are unaware of the numerous security risks that exist in these networks, which can include privacy violations, identity theft, and sexual harassment, just to mention a few. According to recent studies, many online social network users readily expose personal and intimate details about themselves, such as relationship status, date of birth, school name, email, phone number, and even home addresses. This information, if fallen into the wrong hands, can be used to harm users, both in the virtual and in the real world. These risks become more severe when the users are children. In this paper we present a thorough survey on the different security and privacy risks which threaten the well-being of online social network users in general and children in particular. In addition, we present an overview of existing solutions that can provide better protection, security, and privacy for online social network users.

Fire, Michael; Elovici, Yuval

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Tiered Security System for Mobile Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed a tiered security system for mobile devices where each security tier holds user-defined security triggers and actions. It has a friendly interface that allows users to easily define and configure the different circumstances and actions they need according to context. The system can be set up and activated from any browser or directly on the mobile device itself. When the security system is operated from a Web site or server, its configuration can be readily shared across multiple devices. When operated directly from the mobile device, no server is needed for activation. Many different types of security circumstances and actions can be set up and employed from its tiers. Security circumstances can range from temporary misplacement of a mobile device at home to malicious theft in a hostile region. Security actions can range from ringing a simple alarm to automatically erasing, overwriting, and re-erasing drives.

Bardsley, Scott; Morris, R Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Standard guide for application of radiation monitors to the control and physical security of special nuclear material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide briefly describes the state-of-the-art of radiation monitors for detecting special nuclear material (SNM) (see 3.1.11) in order to establish the context in which to write performance standards for the monitors. This guide extracts information from technical documentation to provide information for selecting, calibrating, testing, and operating such radiation monitors when they are used for the control and protection of SNM. This guide offers an unobtrusive means of searching pedestrians, packages, and motor vehicles for concealed SNM as one part of a nuclear material control or security plan for nuclear materials. The radiation monitors can provide an efficient, sensitive, and reliable means of detecting the theft of small quantities of SNM while maintaining a low likelihood of nuisance alarms. 1.2 Dependable operation of SNM radiation monitors rests on selecting appropriate monitors for the task, operating them in a hospitable environment, and conducting an effective program to test, calibrat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

Dina Chernikova; Kare Axell

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

Standard Guide for Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance of Radiologically Contaminated Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide outlines a method for developing a Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) plan for inactive nuclear facilities. It describes the steps and activities necessary to prevent loss or release of radioactive or hazardous materials, and to minimize physical risks between the deactivation phase and the start of facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). 1.2 The primary concerns for S&M are related to (1) animal intrusion, (2) structural integrity degradation, (3) water in-leakage, (4) contamination migration, (5) unauthorized personnel entry, and (6) theft/intrusion. This document is intended to serve as a guide only, and is not intended to modify existing regulations.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

Chernikova, Dina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 5950 of 31,917 results. 41 - 5950 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public Scoping from the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Second Scoping Period) Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0403-blm-notice-availability-maps-and-additional-public-scoping-programmatic Article New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors Team Uses Supercomputers to Improve Reactor Design and Performance http://energy.gov/articles/new-research-center-increase-safety-and-power-output-us-nuclear-reactors Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs- SEA-2010-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, related to the Theft of Classified Matter from the East Tennessee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Secure Data Transfer Guidance for Industrial Control and SCADA Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document was developed to provide guidance for the implementation of secure data transfer in a complex computational infrastructure representative of the electric power and oil and natural gas enterprises and the control systems they implement. For the past 20 years the cyber security community has focused on preventative measures intended to keep systems secure by providing a hard outer shell that is difficult to penetrate. Over time, the hard exterior, soft interior focus changed to focus on defense-in-depth adding multiple layers of protection, introducing intrusion detection systems, more effective incident response and cleanup, and many other security measures. Despite much larger expenditures and more layers of defense, successful attacks have only increased in number and severity. Consequently, it is time to re-focus the conventional approach to cyber security. While it is still important to implement measures to keep intruders out, a new protection paradigm is warranted that is aimed at discovering attempted or real compromises as early as possible. Put simply, organizations should take as fact that they have been, are now, or will be compromised. These compromises may be intended to steal information for financial gain as in the theft of intellectual property or credentials that lead to the theft of financial resources, or to lie silent until instructed to cause physical or electronic damage and/or denial of services. This change in outlook has been recently confirmed by the National Security Agency [19]. The discovery of attempted and actual compromises requires an increased focus on monitoring events by manual and/or automated log monitoring, detecting unauthorized changes to a system's hardware and/or software, detecting intrusions, and/or discovering the exfiltration of sensitive information and/or attempts to send inappropriate commands to ICS/SCADA (Industrial Control System/Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems.

Mahan, Robert E.; Fluckiger, Jerry D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Tews, Cody W.; Burnette, John R.; Goranson, Craig A.; Kirkham, Harold

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preconceptual design for separation of plutonium and gallium by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of plutonium from decommissioned nuclear weapons, by incorporation into commercial UO{sub 2}-based nuclear reactor fuel, is a viable means to reduce the potential for theft of excess plutonium. This fuel, which would be a combination of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide, is referred to as a mixed oxide (MOX). Following power generation in commercial reactors with this fuel, the remaining plutonium would become mixed with highly radioactive fission products in a spent fuel assembly. The radioactivity, complex chemical composition, and large size of this spent fuel assembly, would make theft difficult with elaborate chemical processing required for plutonium recovery. In fabricating the MOX fuel, it is important to maintain current commercial fuel purity specifications. While impurities from the weapons plutonium may or may not have a detrimental affect on the fuel fabrication or fuel/cladding performance, certifying the effect as insignificant could be more costly than purification. Two primary concerns have been raised with regard to the gallium impurity: (1) gallium vaporization during fuel sintering may adversely affect the MOX fuel fabrication process, and (2) gallium vaporization during reactor operation may adversely affect the fuel cladding performance. Consequently, processes for the separation of plutonium from gallium are currently being developed and/or designed. In particular, two separation processes are being considered: (1) a developmental, potentially lower cost and lower waste, thermal vaporization process following PuO{sub 2} powder preparation, and (2) an off-the-shelf, potentially higher cost and higher waste, aqueous-based ion exchange (IX) process. While it is planned to use the thermal vaporization process should its development prove successful, IX has been recommended as a backup process. This report presents a preconceptual design with material balances for separation of plutonium from gallium by IX.

DeMuth, S.F.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Data:2881b5e7-01e8-4895-aeca-6ea1beaff90d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e7-01e8-4895-aeca-6ea1beaff90d e7-01e8-4895-aeca-6ea1beaff90d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Elkhorn Rural Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHT RENTAL 100-watt sodium Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABLE: To all customers. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: 1. The District will provide the yard light, install the same on Applicant's yard pole and will service and replace the lamp periodically and the yard light, when necessary, without cost to the Applicant. The District will maintain service and replace lamps only during normal working hours except in case of an emergency. If such services are required during times other than normal working hours, the Applicant agrees to pay for such services. 2. If the Applicant desires the farm yard light installed at a location other than the District's meter pole, the Applicant shall pay for or furnish all labor and all the necessary materials required to install the farm yard light on the Applicant's pole. In most cases, if not installed on meter pole and it is on an existing pole belonging to customer, there is no charge. 3. In the event the Applicant desires to have a second or third farm yard light installed at other locations than the District's meter or yard pole, the Applicant's obligations to the District are the same as outlined in paragraph 2. 4. Services and maintenance and replacements required and rendered by the District and which are free to the Applicant shall not be covered by this agreement if such services are necessitated by acts of vandalism. 5. All kwh will be run through the customer's meter and billed at the applicable rate.

345

Archaeological investigations on the Buckboard Mesa Road Project  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a new alignment for the Buckboard Mesa Road on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy (DOE). During this reconnaissance, several archaeological sites of National Register quality were discovered and recorded including a large quarry, site 26Ny4892, and a smaller lithic scatter, site 26Ny4894. Analysis of the debitage at 26Ny4892 indicates that this area was used primarily as a quarry for relatively small cobbles of obsidian found in the alluvium. Lithic reduction techniques used here are designed for efficiently reducing small pieces of toolstone and are oriented towards producing flake blanks from small cores and bifacially reducing exhausted cores. Projectile point cross references indicate that the area has seen at least casual use for about 10,000 years and more sustained use for the last 3,000 years. Initial obsidian hydration measurements indicate sustained use of the quarry for about the last 3,000 years although the loci of activities appear to change over time. Based on this study, the DRI recommends that quarrying activities in the area of 26Ny4892 are sufficiently sampled and that additional investigations into that aspect of prehistoric activity in the area are not necessary. This does not apply to other aspects of prehistoric use. DRI recommends that preconstruction surveys continue to identify nonquarrying, prehistoric utilization of the area. With the increased traffic on the Buckboard Mesa Road, there is a greater potential for vandalism to sites of National Register-quality located near the road. The DRI recommends that during the orientation briefing the workers at the Test Site be educated about the importance of cultural resources and the need for their protection. 202 refs., 41 figs., 52 tabs.

Amick, D.S.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Inspection Report on "Internal Controls over Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media at Oak Ridge National Laboratory"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts cutting edge scientific research. ORNL utilizes removable electronic media, such as computer hard drives, compact disks, data tapes, etc., to store vast amounts of classified information. Incidents involving breakdowns in controls over classified removable electronic media have been a continuous challenge for the Department. The loss of even one piece of such media can have serious national security implications. In 2004, the Department had a complex-wide 'stand-down' of all activities using classified removable electronic media, and such media containing Secret/Restricted Data or higher classified data was designated 'Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media' (ACREM). As part of the stand-down, sites were required to conduct a 100 percent physical inventory of all ACREM; enter it all into accountability; and conduct security procedure reviews and training. Further, the Department implemented a series of controls, including conducting periodic inventories, utilizing tamper proof devices on ACREM safes, and appointing trained custodians to be responsible for the material. After performance testing and validation that the required accountability systems were in place, ACREM operations at ORNL were approved for restart on August 10, 2004. We conducted a review at ORNL and associated facilities to determine whether ACREM is managed, protected, and controlled consistent with applicable requirements. We found that: (1) Eight pieces of Secret/Restricted Data media had not been identified as ACREM and placed into a system of accountability. Consequently, the items were not subject to all required protections and controls, such as periodic accountability inventories, oversight by a trained custodian, or storage in a designated ACREM safe. (However, the items were secured in safes approved for classified material.) (2) Other required ACREM protections and controls were not implemented as follows: a tamper indicating device was not being used on an ACREM safe; records documenting when a certain safe was opened did not support that a purported inventory had been conducted; and a safe inventory had not been completed in a timely manner. (3) A Personal Digital Assistant and a thumb drive, both capable of recording or transmitting data, were stored in a security area without an analysis to identify vulnerabilities and compensatory measures having been conducted, as required. We also found that an ORNL Cooperative Research and Development Agreement partner had not disabled classified computer ports at the partner's site that were capable of writing classified information to external or removable media, as required. We made several recommendations designed to enhance the security of ACREM, security areas, and computers.

None

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Report on the US Program of Technical Assistance to Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (POTAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done under the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), providing the US Government, IAEA, and others with a short review of the progress made in the program since its inception. Becaue of the size and complexity of the program, only major accomplishments are presented. These are grouped under the following categories: (1) equipment and standard which cover assay of irradiated and unirradiated nuclear materials, automatic data processing, and physical standards; (2) experts who are involved in technology transfer, training, system design, and safeguard information processing and analysis; (3) system studies which cover diversion hazard analysis, safeguards approaches and application, and inspection effort planning and forecasting; (4) techniques, procedures, and equipment evaluation; (5) training of IAEA inspectors and safeguards specialists from member states. The major achievement has been the provisions of safeguards equipment designed to be reliable, and tamper resistant, some of which have already been in use in the field by inspector or by IAEA staff members in Vienna. These are listed in a table. (AT)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS BY CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION METHODS  

SciTech Connect

New coating technology enables the fabrication of low cost structural health monitoring (SHM) and tamper indication devices that can be employed to strengthen national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such innovations could serve the safeguards community by improving both the timeliness of detection and confidence in verification and monitoring. This work investigates the synthesis of functional surface coatings using chemical solutions deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition has recently received attention in the materials research community due to its unique advantages such as low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products and the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures. The synthesis of functional coatings aimed at modifying the materials conductivity and optical properties was investigated by the incorporation of transition element (e.g. Cr{sup +3}) and rare earth (e.g. Er{sup +3}) serving as dopants in a polymer or gel matrix. The structural and morphological investigation of the as-deposited films was carried out using UV/Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The as deposited coating was further investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microscopy.

Mendez-Torres, A.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analog Video Authentication and Seal Verification Equipment Development  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to the US Department of Energy in support of arms control treaty verification activities, the Savannah River National Laboratory in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Idaho National Laboratory and Milagro Consulting, LLC developed equipment for use within a chain of custody regime. This paper discussed two specific devices, the Authentication Through the Lens (ATL) analog video authentication system and a photographic multi-seal reader. Both of these devices have been demonstrated in a field trial, and the experience gained throughout will also be discussed. Typically, cryptographic methods are used to prove the authenticity of digital images and video used in arms control chain of custody applications. However, in some applications analog cameras are used. Since cryptographic authentication methods will not work on analog video streams, a simple method of authenticating analog video was developed and tested. A photographic multi-seal reader was developed to image different types of visual unique identifiers for use in chain of custody and authentication activities. This seal reader is unique in its ability to image various types of seals including the Cobra Seal, Reflective Particle Tags, and adhesive seals. Flicker comparison is used to compare before and after images collected with the seal reader in order to detect tampering and verify the integrity of the seal.

Gregory Lancaster

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Demonstration plant for IGCC using the U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect

Tampella, Ltd., in cooperation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is developing the gasification technology for U-GAS{reg_sign} to produce electricity from coal using the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC). The concept of IGCC is to join the clean burning gasification island with a more efficient gas and stream turbine island to produce electric power with minimal environmental impact. IGT has developed the U-GAS process to produce a low- or medium-Btu gas from different types of coal feedstocks. The process uses a combination of fluidized=bed gasification and ash agglomeration in a single-stage reactor. A 30-tons/day-capacity pilot plant located in Chicago has been used to develop the process. Feedstocks ranging from relatively unreactive metallurgical coke to highly reactive peat have been gasified successfully in the this pilot plant, indicating its ability to handle a feedstock with widely varying properties. A new 10 megawatt pilot plant has been designed and is under construction in Tampere, Finland, as the first step toward the commercialization of this technology. Tampella is planning to design and deliver a commercial-scale IGCC demonstration plant by 1994. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Salo, K. [Tampella Power, Tampere (Finland)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Containment and Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The United States Support Program (USSP) priority for containment and surveillance (US) focuses on maintaining or improving the reliability and cost-effectiveness of C/S systems for IAEA safeguards, expanding the number of systems that are unattended and remotely monitored, and developing verification methods that help streamline the on-site inspection process. Existing IAEA C/S systems have evolved to become complex, integrated systems, which may include active seals, nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments, video cameras, and other sensors. These systems operate autonomously. They send analytical data to IAEA headquarters where it can be reviewed. These systems present challenges to the goals of improved system performance, standardization, reliability, maintainability, documentation, and cost effectiveness. One critical lesson from past experiences is the need for cooperation and common objectives among the IAEA, the developer, and the facility operator, to create a successful, cost effective system. Recent USSP C/S activities include Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant safeguard systems, production of a new shift register, numerous vulnerability assessments of C/S systems, a conduit monitoring system which identifies tampering of IAEA conduit deployed in the field, fiber optic seal upgrades, unattended monitoring system software upgrades, next generation surveillance system which will upgrade existing camera systems, and support of the IAEA's development of the universal nondestructive assay data acquisition platform.

Diaz,R.A.

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

AUTHENTICATED SENSOR INTERFACE DEVICE FOR JOINT USE SAFEGUARDS APPLICATIONS - CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss the key features of the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device that collectively provide the ability to share data among a number of parties while ensuring the authentication of data and protecting both the operators and the IAEAs interests. The paper will also discuss the development of the prototype, the initial testing with an accountancy scale, and future plans and challenges to implementation into the joint use and remote monitoring applications. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent throughout the world and the capacity of plants increases, limited resources of the IAEA are being stretched near a breaking point. A strategy is to increase efficiency in safeguards monitoring using joint use equipment that will provide the facility operator process data while also providing the IAEA key safeguards data. The data, however, must be authenticated and validated to ensure the data have not been tampered with. The Authenticated Sensor Interface Device provides the capability to share data and can be a valuable component in the IAEAs ability to collect accountancy data from scales in Uranium conversion and enrichment plants, as well as nuclear fuel fabrication plants. Likewise, the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device can be configured to accept a diverse array of input signals, ranging from analog voltage, to current, to digital interfaces and more. These modular capabilities provide the ability to collect authenticated, joint-use, data streams from various process monitoring sensors.

Poland, R.; Drayer, R.; Wilson, J.

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Containment and Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The United States Support Program (USSP) priority for containment and surveillance (US) focuses on maintaining or improving the reliability and cost-effectiveness of C/S systems for IAEA safeguards, expanding the number of systems that are unattended and remotely monitored, and developing verification methods that help streamline the on-site inspection process. Existing IAEA C/S systems have evolved to become complex, integrated systems, which may include active seals, nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments, video cameras, and other sensors. These systems operate autonomously. They send analytical data to IAEA headquarters where it can be reviewed. These systems present challenges to the goals of improved system performance, standardization, reliability, maintainability, documentation, and cost effectiveness. One critical lesson from past experiences is the need for cooperation and common objectives among the IAEA, the developer, and the facility operator, to create a successful, cost effective system. Recent USSP C/S activities include Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant safeguard systems, production of a new shift register, numerous vulnerability assessments of C/S systems, a conduit monitoring system which identifies tampering of IAEA conduit deployed in the field, fiber optic seal upgrades, unattended monitoring system software upgrades, next generation surveillance system which will upgrade existing camera systems, and support of the IAEA's development of the universal nondestructive assay data acquisition platform.

Diaz,R.A.

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

IAEA Verification Experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Report on the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant at Piketon, Ohio, and present the calibration and measurement results. The US government has offered excess fissile material that is no longer needed for defense purposes for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection. Measurement results provided by the CHEM were used by the IAEA in a verification experiment to provide confidence that the US successfully blended excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) down to low enriched uranium (LEU). The CHEM measured the uranium enrichment in two cascade header pipes, a 20.32-cm HEU pipe and a 7.62-cm product LEU pipe. The CHEM determines the amount of {sup 235}U from the 185.7-keV gamma-ray photopeak and the amount of total uranium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) of the 98.4-keV x-ray from uranium with a {sup 57}Co XRF source. The ratio yields the enrichment. The CHEM consists of a collimator assembly, an electromechanically cooled germanium detector, and a rack-mounted personal computer running commercial and custom software. The CHEM was installed in December 1997 and was used by the IAEA inspectors for announced and unannounced inspections on the HEU and LEU header pipes through October 1998. The equipment was sealed with tamper-indicating enclosures when the inspectors were not present.

P. L. Kerr; D. A. Close; W. S. Johnson; R. M. Kandarian; C. E. Moss; C. D. Romero

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Battery venting system and method  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Honkamaa, T.; Rosenberg, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Sealing of process valves for the HEU downblending verification experiment at Portsmouth  

SciTech Connect

At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, USA, excess inventory of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) from US defense programs is being diluted to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for commercial use. The conversion is subject to a Verification Experiment overseen by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Verification Experiment is making use of monitoring technologies developed and installed by several DOE laboratories. One of the measures is a system for sealing valves in the process piping, which secures the path followed by uranium hexafluoride gas (UF{sub 6}) from cylinders at the feed stations to the blend point, where the HEU is diluted with LEU. The Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) was the alternative proposed by Sandia National Laboratories that was selected by the IAEA. Approximately 30 valves were sealed by the IAEA using AIMS fiber-optic seals (AFOS). The seals employ single-core plastic fiber rated to 125 C to withstand the high-temperature conditions of the heated piping enclosures at Portsmouth. Each AFOS broadcasts authenticated seal status and state-of-health messages via a tamper-protected radio-frequency transmitter mounted outside of the heated enclosure. The messages are received by two collection stations, operated redundantly.

Baldwin, G.T.; Bartberger, J.C.; Jenkins, C.D.; Perlinski, A.W.; Schoeneman, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, D.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Whiting, N.E. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Bonner, T.N.; Castle, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Quantum Security for the Physical Layer  

SciTech Connect

The physical layer describes how communication signals are encoded and transmitted across a channel. Physical security often requires either restricting access to the channel or performing periodic manual inspections. In this tutorial, we describe how the field of quantum communication offers new techniques for securing the physical layer. We describe the use of quantum seals as a unique way to test the integrity and authenticity of a communication channel and to provide security for the physical layer. We present the theoretical and physical underpinnings of quantum seals including the quantum optical encoding used at the transmitter and the test for non-locality used at the receiver. We describe how the envisioned quantum physical sublayer senses tampering and how coordination with higher protocol layers allow quantum seals to influence secure routing or tailor data management methods. We conclude by discussing challenges in the development of quantum seals, the overlap with existing quantum key distribution cryptographic services, and the relevance of a quantum physical sublayer to the future of communication security.

Humble, Travis S [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests conducted on a regular frequency to evaluate the capability for nondestructive assay of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed with TRU waste characterization systems. Measurement facility performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples according to the criteria set by this Program Plan. Intercomparison between measurement groups of the DOE complex will be achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar or identical blind samples reported by the different measurement facilities. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). As defined for this program, a PDP sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components, once manufactured, will be secured and stored at each participating measurement facility designated and authorized by Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage.

None

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); LeBlanc, Edward J. (Kennewick, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated.

Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Best Practices for the Security of Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is funded under a grant provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) awarded a contract to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop best practices guidance for Office of Radiological Health (ORH) licensees to increase on-site security to deter and prevent theft of radioactive materials (RAM). The purpose of this document is to describe best practices available to manage the security of radioactive materials in medical centers, hospitals, and research facilities. There are thousands of such facilities in the United States, and recent studies suggest that these materials may be vulnerable to theft or sabotage. Their malevolent use in a radiological-dispersion device (RDD), viz., a dirty bomb, can have severe environmental- and economic- impacts, the associated area denial, and potentially large cleanup costs, as well as other effects on the licensees and the public. These issues are important to all Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Agreement State licensees, and to the general public. This document outlines approaches for the licensees possessing these materials to undertake security audits to identify vulnerabilities in how these materials are stored or used, and to describe best practices to upgrade or enhance their security. Best practices can be described as the most efficient (least amount of effort/cost) and effective (best results) way of accomplishing a task and meeting an objective, based on repeatable procedures that have proven themselves over time for many people and circumstances. Best practices within the security industry include information security, personnel security, administrative security, and physical security. Each discipline within the security industry has its own 'best practices' that have evolved over time into common ones. With respect to radiological devices and radioactive-materials security, industry best practices encompass both physical security (hardware and engineering) and administrative procedures. Security regimes for these devices and materials typically use a defense-in-depth- or layered-security approach to eliminate single points of failure. The Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS), the Security Industry Association (SIA) and Underwriters Laboratory (UL) all rovide design guidance and hardware specifications. With a graded approach, a physical-security specialist can tailor an integrated security-management system in the most appropriate cost-effective manner to meet the regulatory and non-regulatory requirements of the licensee or client.

Coulter, D.T.; Musolino, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Data:Ea428b87-7a85-4113-b48c-3312a726b798 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ea428b87-7a85-4113-b48c-3312a726b798 Ea428b87-7a85-4113-b48c-3312a726b798 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Elkhorn Rural Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHT RENTAL 150-watt sodium Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABLE: To all customers. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: 1. The District will provide the yard light, install the same on Applicant's yard pole and will service and replace the lamp periodically and the yard light, when necessary, without cost to the Applicant. The District will maintain service and replace lamps only during normal working hours except in case of an emergency. If such services are required during times other than normal working hours, the Applicant agrees to pay for such services. 2. If the Applicant desires the farm yard light installed at a location other than the District's meter pole, the Applicant shall pay for or furnish all labor and all the necessary materials required to install the farm yard light on the Applicant's pole. In most cases, if not installed on meter pole and it is on an existing pole belonging to customer, there is no charge. 3. In the event the Applicant desires to have a second or third farm yard light installed at other locations than the District's meter or yard pole, the Applicant's obligations to the District are the same as outlined in paragraph 2. 4. Services and maintenance and replacements required and rendered by the District and which are free to the Applicant shall not be covered by this agreement if such services are necessitated by acts of vandalism. 5. All kwh will be run through the customer's meter and billed at the applicable rate.

375

Data:02431e03-f559-4213-ae8f-efe5b6ca28bb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e03-f559-4213-ae8f-efe5b6ca28bb e03-f559-4213-ae8f-efe5b6ca28bb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Elkhorn Rural Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHT RENTAL 175-watt mercury vapor Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABLE: To all customers. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: 1. The District will provide the yard light, install the same on Applicant's yard pole and will service and replace the lamp periodically and the yard light, when necessary, without cost to the Applicant. The District will maintain service and replace lamps only during normal working hours except in case of an emergency. If such services are required during times other than normal working hours, the Applicant agrees to pay for such services. 2. If the Applicant desires the farm yard light installed at a location other than the District's meter pole, the Applicant shall pay for or furnish all labor and all the necessary materials required to install the farm yard light on the Applicant's pole. In most cases, if not installed on meter pole and it is on an existing pole belonging to customer, there is no charge. 3. In the event the Applicant desires to have a second or third farm yard light installed at other locations than the District's meter or yard pole, the Applicant's obligations to the District are the same as outlined in paragraph 2. 4. Services and maintenance and replacements required and rendered by the District and which are free to the Applicant shall not be covered by this agreement if such services are necessitated by acts of vandalism. 5. All kwh will be run through the customer's meter and billed at the applicable rate.

376

1996 NRC annual report. Volume 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 22nd annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes accomplishments, activities, and plans made during Fiscal Year 1996 (FH 1996)--October 1, 1995, through September 30, 1996. Significant activities that occurred early in FY 1997 are also described, particularly changes in the Commission and organization of the NRC. The mission of the NRC is to ensure that civilian uses of nuclear materials in the US are carried out with adequate protection of public health and safety, the environment, and national security. These uses include the operation of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle plants and medical, industrial, and research applications. Additionally, the NRC contributes to combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons material worldwide. The NRC licenses and regulates commercial nuclear reactor operations and research reactors and other activities involving the possession and use of nuclear materials and wastes. It also protects nuclear materials used in operation and facilities from theft or sabotage. To accomplish its statutorily mandated regulatory mission, the NRC issues rules and standards, inspects facilities and operations, and issues any required enforcement actions.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design of a smart, survivable sensor system for enhancing the safe and secure transportation of hazardous or high-value cargo on railroads  

SciTech Connect

An application of smart sensor technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use in the safe and secure transportation of high value of hazardous materials is proposed for a railroad application. The Green Box would be capable of surviving most typical railroad accidents. In an accident, the system would send a distress signal notifying authorities of the location and condition of the cargo; permitting them to respond in the most effective manner. The concept proposes a strap-on sensor package, the Green Box, that could be attached to any railroad car or cargo container. Its primary purpose is to minimize the number, severity and consequences of accidents and to reduce losses due to theft. The system would also be capable of recognizing component failure conditions, notifying the operators and logging sensor data for use in directing preventative maintenance. The modular implementation, which facilitates system integration in a number of applications including the Advanced Train Control System (ACTS), is discussed. The methodology for determining the environmental specification for accident survivability is presented. A test plan for evaluating hardware performance in both normal operating and accident conditions is described.

Hogan, J.R.; Rey, D.; Faas, S.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of the Department of Energy`s Site Safeguards and Security Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (Department) is required to protect its nuclear facilities from unauthorized access and theft, diversion, or destruction of special nuclear materials such as plutonium and uranium-235. The steps taken by the field sites to meet these requirements are outlined in a document entitled the ``Site Safeguards and Security Plan`` (SSSP). The authors initiated the audit at the request of the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security to evaluate the progress made in the SSSP process. The audit was performed to determine whether SSSP guidance was used as policy to evaluate and approve the site plans and whether new security requirements established by the guidance were justified. Of the five locations visited, three had identified facilities that would be pushed above the Office of Safeguards and Security`s acceptable level of low risk when new security (consequence) values were incorporated. Each of the sites will need to devise and install additional compensatory measures because of the increase in consequence values. The authors recommended that the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security discontinue using guidance as policy for evaluation, approval, and concurrence of Site Safeguards and Security Plans until they had been formally coordinated and concurred on by program and field elements. They also recommended that all proposed policy changes and guidance, when used as policy, be coordinated with affected program and field offices through the Department`s Directives System.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

Trond Bjornard; Humberto Garcia; William Desmond; Scott Demuth

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the US Government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Programmes, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been implemented as the basis for a performance methodology for the design and evaluation of Physical Protection Systems against a Design Basis Threat (DBT) for theft or sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Since integrated systems must include people as well as technology and the man-machine interface, a critical aspect of the human element is to train all stakeholders in nuclear security on the systems approach. Current training courses have been beneficial but are still limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international courses and is completing development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. In the long-term, SNL envisions establishing a comprehensive nuclear security training curriculum that will be developed along with a series of forthcoming IAEA Nuclear Security Series guidance documents.

Ellis, Doris E.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Infrastructure: A technology battlefield in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major part of technological advancement has involved the development of complex infrastructure systems, including electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks; oil and gas pipeline systems; highway and rail networks; and telecommunication networks. Dependence on these infrastructure systems renders them attractive targets for conflict in the twenty-first century. Hostile governments, domestic and international terrorists, criminals, and mentally distressed individuals will inevitably find some part of the infrastructure an easy target for theft, for making political statements, for disruption of strategic activities, or for making a nuisance. The current situation regarding the vulnerability of the infrastructure can be summarized in three major points: (1) our dependence on technology has made our infrastructure more important and vital to our everyday lives, this in turn, makes us much more vulnerable to disruption in any infrastructure system; (2) technologies available for attacking infrastructure systems have changed substantially and have become much easier to obtain and use, easy accessibility to information on how to disrupt or destroy various infrastructure components means that almost anyone can be involved in this destructive process; (3) technologies for defending infrastructure systems and preventing damage have not kept pace with the capability for destroying such systems. A brief review of these points will illustrate the significance of infrastructure and the growing dangers to its various elements.

Drucker, H.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Investigation of the State and Uses of Ultra-Wide-Band Radio-Frequency Identification Technology  

SciTech Connect

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology has revolutionized the concept of asset tracking. By affixing an RFID tag to a valued asset, one can track the item throughout any facility where RIFD readers are in place, thereby alerting inspectors to theft, misuse, and misplacement of the tracked item. While not yet implemented for tracking very high value assets, RFID technology is already widely used in many industries as the standard for asset tracking. A subset of RFID technology exists called Ultra-Wide-Band (UWB) RFID. While traditional (sometimes called narrow-band) RFID technology transmits a continuous sine-wave signal of a narrow frequency range, UWB technology works by transmitting signals as short pulses of a broad frequency range. This improves performance in several areas, namely, range, precision, and accuracy of motion detection. Because of the nature of the technology, it also performs well in close proximity to metal, which sets it apart from traditional RFID. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current state of UWB RFID technology and research the areas where it already is being used. This is accomplished through study of publicly known uses of the technology as well as personal exploration of RFID hardware and software. This paper presents the findings in a general manner to facilitate their usefulness for diverse applications.

Hickerson, Jonathan W [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory search and property protection programs -- March 22, 1984  

SciTech Connect

On November 30, 1983, the LLNL Directorate met to discuss Laboratory policy regarding searches. An advance package (dated November 16, 1983) discussing background issues and DOE`s property protection and safeguards concerns was distributed to the Director and Associate Directors. A number of Associate Directors expressed concern about the nature of the theft problem at the Laboratory. There was also discussion about many employees` perception that Laboratory Management (including the Security Department) really did not care. The Director endorsed the need to establish searches in the SNM areas. The property protection type of searches were perceived as being very sensitive from a labor relations perspective. Nevertheless, the Directorate was sufficiently concerned about the safeguards and property protection issues to request the Security Department to develop a search plan for their review. A draft Search Program was prepared by the Security Department and reviewed individually with the Directorate for their comments. On March 19, 1984, the Directorate met collectively to consider a summary of these individual comments and to finalize a Search Program. Decisions made during that meeting have been incorporated into this document. This plan describes the search procedures that will be implemented at SNM areas and a two point program concerning property protection. Procedures are also set forth that will allow for expanded searches during periods of heightened security concern.

Leary, D.A.

1984-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

The World is Full of BANANAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better ways to fight diseases such as cancer, AIDS and SARS, the development of new drugs to improve our quality of life, the creation of new and improved jobs to generate products that make our lives easier, safer and more productive, the assurance of safety in our homes from fire, theft and adversity, an abundant and safe food supply, and a reliable source of energy that does not pollute our environment or destroy the ozone layer are but a few of the goals that we all continually strive to achieve. Our ability to provide each of these has been made easier through the use of radioactive materials. Unavoidably, when we use radioactive materials, like anything else, we end up with some waste that needs to be managed in a safe, efficient and effective manner. This presentation reviews the experiences of the Appalachian Compact Users of Radioactive Isotopes (ACURI) in helping to site a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Pennsylvania to serve the four-state compact of

Presenter Ken Miller; Kenneth L. Miller; Presenter Mr; Rodney Teague; R. Teague; J. G Young; Presenter Ms; Carolyn Thomas

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sandia Laboratories energy programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As one of the multiprogram laboratories of the Energy Research and Development Administration, Sandia Laboratories applies its resources to a number of nationally important programs. About 75 percent of these resources are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons--the principal responsibility of the Laboratories. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those requiring resources that are also used in nuclear weapon and other national security programs. Examples of such energy programs and activities are research into nuclear fusion, protection of nuclear materials from theft or diversion, and the disposal of radioactive waste. A number of technologies and disciplines developed for the weapon program are immediately applicable for the development of various energy sources. Instruments developed to detect, measure, and record the detonation of nuclear devices underground, now being used to support the development of in-situ processing of coal and oil shale, are examples. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of these and other energy programs being conducted by these laboratories in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. Energy programs are undertaken when they require capabilities used at the Laboratories for the weapon program, and when they have no adverse effect upon that primary mission. The parallel operation of weapon and energy activities allows optimum use of facilities and other resources.

Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.; Gillespie, R.S. (eds.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technologies for Real-Time Monitoring and Surveillance of High-Valued Assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working on technologies that can provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of high-valued assets. It is hoped through effective system design that some of these technologies can be utilized as the technical equivalent for the "two person rule" (required for many domestic safeguards operations). The major efforts associated with this work to date involve the integration and adaptation of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency-based technologies into basic system elements that can be effectively layered into integrated unobtrusive monitoring systems that are specifically designed to detect unauthorized asset movements. Each system element is designed to provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of both protected assets and the people who have access to them. The goal is to accomplish up-to-the-minute status of monitored assets using site-specific, rules-based algorithms. The overall system concepts focus on early detection (of theft or diversion) at the asset, followed by appropriate alarms or notifications that can be used to initiate appropriate response(s).

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nonproliferation Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For its many benefits to be realized, nuclear technology should continue to be applied in such a way that it does not contribute to the spread of nuclear weapons. In addition, the public must have confidence that the diversion of civil nuclear materials into weapons programs will not happen. An effective nonproliferation policy should prevent diversion by States of fissile material from the nuclear fuel cycle; theft of fissile material by subnational or terrorist groups; clandestine operation of a fissile material production facility. It is the position of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) that the following actions are required to deal with these threats effectively: 1. Nuclear science and technology can be applied for peaceful purposes in a manner that fully supports and is compatible with achieving nonproliferation goals, as embodied in the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). To prevent proliferation, sovereign states should adhere to the NPT and its safeguards system including the Additional Protocol and adopt effective export controls. Incentives to acquire nuclear weapons must also be addressed through foreign policies that discourage clandestine

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

PLANNING AND COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE RUSSIAN SYSTEM OF CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT ROSATOM FACILITIES IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION.  

SciTech Connect

The MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support Strategic Plan (MEMS SP) for implementing modern MC&A equipment and methodologies at Rosatom facilities has been developed within the framework of the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program. This plan developed by the Rosatom's Russian MC&A Equipment and Methodologies (MEM) Working Group and is coordinated by that group with support and coordination provided by the MC&A Measurements Project, Office of National Infrastructure and Sustainability, US DOE. Implementation of different tasks of the MEMS Strategic Plan is coordinated by Rosatom and US-DOE in cooperation with different U.S.-Russian MC&A-related working groups and joint site project teams. This cooperation allows to obtain and analyze information about problems, current needs and successes at Rosatom facilities and facilitates solution of the problems, satisfying the facilities' needs and effective exchange of expertise and lessons learned. The objective of the MEMS Strategic Plan is to enhance effectiveness of activities implementing modern equipment and methodologies in the Russian State MC&A system. These activities are conducted within the joint Russian-US MPC&A program aiming at reduction of possibility for theft or diversion of nuclear materials and enhancement of control of nuclear materials.

SVIRIDOVA, V.V.; ERASTOV, V.V.; ISAEV, N.V.; ROMANOV, V.A.; RUDENKO, V.S.; SVIRIDOV, A.S.; TITOV, G.V.; JENSEN, B.; NEYMOTIN, L.; SANDERS, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Motion Tracking Of A Handheld Scanner With An Infrared Vision System  

SciTech Connect

Handheld scanners are used in a large number of applications to inspect walls, floors, tanks, and other large structures. Measurements are made to characterize physical properties, uncover defects, detect evidence of tampering, quantify surface contamination, and so forth. Handheld scanning suffers from a number of drawbacks. The relationship between the data collected and scanned location is difficult or impossible to track. Humans using handheld scanners can unintentionally scan the same area multiple times or entirely overlook an area of interest. An automated scanner tracking system could improve upon current inspection practices with a handheld scanner in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and quality. The authors have developed a handheld scanner tracking system that will allow users to visualize previously scanned areas, highlight areas where important or unusual data are acquired, and store scanning location with acquired data. The scanned regions are saved in real time and projected back on the scanned area using a projector. The system currently utilizes the Smoothboard software, which has already been designed to interpret the location of a captured infrared source from a Wii Remote controller to create an interactive whiteboard. This software takes advantage of the Wii Remotes ability to track the location of an infrared source, and when proper calibration of the Wii Remote orientation is complete, any surface can become a virtual whiteboard. In addition to recording and projecting scan pathways, the system developed by the authors can be used to make notes on the scanning process and project acquired data on top of the scanned area. This latter capability can be used to guide sample acquisition or demolition activities. This paper discusses development of the system and potential benefits to wall scanning with handheld scanners.

Seppi, Jeremy H.; Hatchell, Brian K.; McMakin, Douglas L.

2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Secure Video Surveillance System (SVSS) for unannounced safeguards inspections.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secure Video Surveillance System (SVSS) is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC). The joint project addresses specific requirements of redundant surveillance systems installed in two South American nuclear facilities as a tool to support unannounced inspections conducted by ABACC and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The surveillance covers the critical time (as much as a few hours) between the notification of an inspection and the access of inspectors to the location in facility where surveillance equipment is installed. ABACC and the IAEA currently use the EURATOM Multiple Optical Surveillance System (EMOSS). This outdated system is no longer available or supported by the manufacturer. The current EMOSS system has met the project objective; however, the lack of available replacement parts and system support has made this system unsustainable and has increased the risk of an inoperable system. A new system that utilizes current technology and is maintainable is required to replace the aging EMOSS system. ABACC intends to replace one of the existing ABACC EMOSS systems by the Secure Video Surveillance System. SVSS utilizes commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technologies for all individual components. Sandia National Laboratories supported the system design for SVSS to meet Safeguards requirements, i.e. tamper indication, data authentication, etc. The SVSS consists of two video surveillance cameras linked securely to a data collection unit. The collection unit is capable of retaining historical surveillance data for at least three hours with picture intervals as short as 1sec. Images in .jpg format are available to inspectors using various software review tools. SNL has delivered two SVSS systems for test and evaluation at the ABACC Safeguards Laboratory. An additional 'proto-type' system remains at SNL for software and hardware testing. This paper will describe the capabilities of the new surveillance system, application and requirements, and the design approach.

Galdoz, Erwin G. (Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Pinkalla, Mark

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Results of the first year of operation at Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Argentina  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the International Remote Monitoring Project, during March 1995, a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. This system monitors the status of four typical Candu spent fuel dry storage silos. The monitoring equipment for each silo consists of analog sensors for temperature and gamma radiation measurement; digital sensors for motion detection; and electronic fiber-optic seals. The monitoring system for each silo is connected to a wireless Authenticate Item Monitoring System (AIMS). This paper describes the operation of the RMS during the first year of the trial and presents the results of the signals reported by the system compared with the on site inspections conducted by the regulatory bodies, ABACC, IAEA, ENREN. As an additional security feature, each sensor periodically transmits authenticated State-of-Health (SOH) messages. This feature provides assurance that all sensors are operational and have not been tampered with. The details of the transmitted information and the incidents of loss of SOH, referred to as Missing SOH Event, and the possible causes which produced the MSOHE are described. The RMS at the embalse facility uses gamma radiation detectors in a strong radiation field of spent fuel dry storage silos. The detectors are Geiger Muller tubes and Silicon solid state diodes. The study of the thermal drift of electronics in GM detectors and the possible radiation damage in silicon detectors is shown. Since the initial installation, the system has been successfully interrogated from Buenos Aires and Albuquerque. The experience gained, and the small changes made in the hardware in order to improve the performance of the system is presented.

Bonino, A.; Pizarro, L.; Higa, Z. [Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dupree, S.A.; Schoeneman, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

The DOE/Gosatomnadzor collaboration, Project 3: Providing equipment and support for Gosatomnadzor inspection activities in Russia  

SciTech Connect

Project 3 consists of two subprojects: Project 3.1 -- providing Materials Control and Accounting (MC and A) equipment to GAN inspectors; and Project 3.2 -- the development of Russian indigenous MC and A equipment capability for GAN. The objective of Project 3.1 is to provide equipment for use by GAN inspectors during independent inspections of facilities that contain direct-use material. To accomplish this, Project 3.1 develops the initial training for GAN instructors on the instruments provided by the US and contracts with Safety Limited, a GAN contractor for developing methodologies and procedures for using the equipment and acceptance checkout and delivery. The equipment deliveries were divided into three phases to fit within the DOE budget and priority constraints. With the equipment delivered to the inspectors, Phase 1 is complete. Phase 2 has been started by purchasing and checking out neutron coincidence counting (NCC) equipment at Los Alamos. The GAN instructors have been trained on NCCs, cherenkov vision devices (CVDs), ultrasonic thickness gages (UTGs), and tamper indicating devices (TIDs) at Los Alamos. Phase 3 has been delayed to fiscal year 1999 (FY99) due to budget constraints. Project 3.2 addresses the important issue of sustainability for safeguards equipment in Russia. GAN`s Project 3.2 will help establish indigenous equipment for Russian safeguards. The initial review of Russian manufacturing capabilities for safeguards equipment has been completed and recommendations have been made. To this end, the authors are encouraging US vendors to collaborate with Russian institutes and have contracted with the All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (VINIIA) and Aquila Technologies to fabricate a Russian Active-Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) from US parts.

Hoida, H.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lanier, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schultz, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

USE OF MAILBOX APPROACH, VIDEO SURVEILLANCE, AND SHORT-NOTICE RANDOM INSPECTIONS TO ENHANCE DETECTION OF UNDECLARED LEU PRODUCTION AT GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability. ''Mailbox'' declarations have been used in the last two decades to verify receipts, production, and shipments at some bulk-handling facilities (e.g., fuel-fabrication plants). The operator declares the status of his plant to the IAEA on a daily basis using a secure ''Mailbox'' system such as a secure tamper-resistant computer. The operator agrees to hold receipts and shipments for a specified period of time, along with a specified number of annual inspections, to enable inspector access to a statistically large enough population of UF{sub 6} cylinders and fuel assemblies to achieve the desired detection probability. The inspectors can access the ''Mailbox'' during randomly timed inspections and then verify the operator's declarations for that day. Previously, this type of inspection regime was considered mainly for verifying the material balance at fuel-fabrication, enrichment, and conversion plants. Brookhaven National Laboratory has expanded the ''Mailbox'' concept with short-notice random inspections (SNRIs), coupled with enhanced video surveillance, to include declaration and verification of UF{sub 6} cylinder operational data to detect activities associated with undeclared LEU production at GCEPs. Since the ''Mailbox'' declarations would also include data relevant to material-balance verification, these randomized inspections would replace the scheduled monthly interim inspections for material-balance purposes; in addition, the inspectors could simultaneously perform the required number of Limited-Frequency Unannounced Access (LFUA) inspections used for HEU detection. This approach would provide improved detection capabilities for a wider range of diversion activities with not much more inspection effort than at present.

BOYER, B.D.; GORDON, D.M.; JO, J.

2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

New PAMTRAK features  

SciTech Connect

Sandia is developing a Personnel and Material Tracking System (PAMTRAK) which uses a variety of techniques to monitor material inside a vault in real-time. It can detect material movement using video cameras inside the vault or motion sensors attached to the material. It also contains two prototype attribute monitoring systems that continuously measure material weight, temperature or movement. A site can use any of these alone or together to extend physical inventory intervals. PAMTRAK can reduce the cost of storing material by reducing inventory frequency and radiation exposure to workers. Analysis at Savannah River in 1992 estimated that installing PAMTRAK in the 7 active and future vaults at that site would save $1,073,000 per year by reducing inventory frequency from monthly to yearly. Performing similar calculations now, assuming lower radiation exposure limits of 700m Rem per year, new inventory reduction guidelines allowing a baseline interval of 6 months, and an achieved inventory interval of 3 years, results in an estimated average savings of $400,000 per year. PAMTRAK, since it is real-time, can detect theft or diversion soon enough to give the guard force a chance of recovering the material and apprehending the perpetrator. In performing an inventory a site typically checks only a fraction of the material using random, statistical sampling, while PAMTRAK monitors all material in the vault. In addition to static environments such as vaults, PAMTRAK can be used to protect material in active work areas. Several of the sensor types can ignore activity around material but still report alarms if the material is moved or handled. PAMTRAK includes a personnel tracking capability that allows a site to monitor and restrict personnel movements. It can exclude workers from designated areas unless they have explicit permission to be there. It can also enforce the 2-person rule by requiring a worker to be accompanied by at least one other qualified worker.

Dahly, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anspach, J. [Allied Signal/Kirtland Operations, Albquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Security-by-design handbook.  

SciTech Connect

This document is a draft SecuritybyDesign (SeBD) handbook produced to support the Work Plan of the Nuclear Security Summit to share best practices for nuclear security in new facility design. The Work Plan calls on States to %E2%80%9Cencourage nuclear operators and architect/engineering firms to take into account and incorporate, where appropriate, effective measures of physical protection and security culture into the planning, construction, and operation of civilian nuclear facilities and provide technical assistance, upon request, to other States in doing so.%E2%80%9D The materials for this document were generated primarily as part of a bilateral project to produce a SeBD handbook as a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which represented the US Department Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under a Project Action Sheet PASPP04. Input was also derived based on tours of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) Rokkasho Mixed Oxide Fuel fabrication facilities and associated project lessonslearned. For the purposes of the handbook, SeBD will be described as the systemlevel incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new nuclear power plant or nuclear facility resulting in a PPS design that minimizes the risk of malicious acts leading to nuclear material theft; nuclear material sabotage; and facility sabotage as much as possible through features inherent in (or intrinsic to) the design of the facility. A fourelement strategy is presented to achieve a robust, durable, and responsive security system.

Snell, Mark Kamerer; Jaeger, Calvin Dell; Scharmer, Carol; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Tanuma, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Ochiai, Kazuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Iida, Toru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Security-by-design handbook.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a draft SecuritybyDesign (SeBD) handbook produced to support the Work Plan of the Nuclear Security Summit to share best practices for nuclear security in new facility design. The Work Plan calls on States to %E2%80%9Cencourage nuclear operators and architect/engineering firms to take into account and incorporate, where appropriate, effective measures of physical protection and security culture into the planning, construction, and operation of civilian nuclear facilities and provide technical assistance, upon request, to other States in doing so.%E2%80%9D The materials for this document were generated primarily as part of a bilateral project to produce a SeBD handbook as a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which represented the US Department Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under a Project Action Sheet PASPP04. Input was also derived based on tours of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) Rokkasho Mixed Oxide Fuel fabrication facilities and associated project lessonslearned. For the purposes of the handbook, SeBD will be described as the systemlevel incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new nuclear power plant or nuclear facility resulting in a PPS design that minimizes the risk of malicious acts leading to nuclear material theft; nuclear material sabotage; and facility sabotage as much as possible through features inherent in (or intrinsic to) the design of the facility. A fourelement strategy is presented to achieve a robust, durable, and responsive security system.

Snell, Mark Kamerer; Jaeger, Calvin Dell; Scharmer, Carol; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Tanuma, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Ochiai, Kazuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Iida, Toru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MIXED-OXIDE FUEL USE IN COMMERCIAL LIGHT WATER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a Commission briefing on high-bumup fuel on March 25, 1997, the staff said that they would prepare a white paper on mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in anticipation of a DOE program to bum excess weapons plutonium in commercial reactors. This memorandum and its attachment comprise that paper and are provided to inform the Commissioners of technical issues associated with such a program. More recently, on February 5, 1999, I was contacted by the Nuclear Control Institute regarding a paper they have written on this subject. They presented that paper to the staff in a public meeting on April 7, 1999. The Nuclear Control Institute's written paper had been provided to the staff earlier, and we have taken the paper into consideration in preparing this memorandum. Back-ground In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy released a record of decision for the storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials. In this record, DOE recommended that excess weapons-grade plutonium be disposed of by two methods: (1) reconstituting the plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rods and burning it in current light water reactors, and (2) immobilizing the plutonium in glass logs with appropriate radioactive isotopes to deter theft prior to geologic disposal. Based on current information, it now appears that, if the MOX fuel method is utilized, fuel fabrication will take place at the Savannah River site in South Carolina with burning in nearby Westinghouse-type PWRs. Although DOE will probably not receive funding in FY 2000 for developing a license application, Congress has already given its approval for NRC licensing authority over a MOX fuel fabrication facility operated under

United States; William D. Travers

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Job Satisfaction, Disgruntlement and Insider Risk  

SciTech Connect

The prediction of future events and trends was the purview of fortune tellers and science writers; however futuristic studies are now an acceptable form of sociological research including workplace dynamics. The nuclear industry is also affected by workplace trends which currently indicate that there will be fewer jobs and individuals who are employed will be required to have greater technical skills. This reshaping of the workforce is partially due to an aging workforce and diversity within the work environment. The reshaping brings with it the need for greater productivity and employee expectations for increased pay and/or benefits. If employee satisfaction is not realized there is a real possibility of disgruntled employees who then become a potential insider risk to the organization. Typically this is an individual who has been employed for several years, becomes dissatisfied with the job, or some other aspect of their life. If the dissatisfaction is directly related to work the individual may retaliate in a destructive manner. Perceived inequities are a major factor and directly related to situational pressures, opportunity, and personal integrity. It is known that the greatest losses within an organization are attributed to employees working alone or in a conspiracy with fellow employees who engage in theft and other fraudulent activities. In the nuclear industry this threat is intensified by the nature of the work, the materials employees come in contact with and the potential of an occurrence that could adversely affect a large geographic region and/or the security of a country. The paper will address motivating factors, recommendations, and include a profile discussion of a possible disgruntled employee.

Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL; Coates, Cameron W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

New Tool for Proliferation Resistance Evaluation Applied to Uranium and Thorium Fueled Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison of nuclear facilities based on their barriers to nuclear material proliferation has remained a difficult endeavor, often requiring expert elicitation for each system under consideration. However, objectively comparing systems using a set of computable metrics to derive a single number representing a system is not, in essence, a nuclear nonproliferation specific problem and significant research has been performed for business models. For instance, Multi-Attribute Utility Analysis (MAUA) methods have been used previously to provide an objective insight of the barriers to proliferation. In this paper, the Proliferation Resistance Analysis and Evaluation Tool for Observed Risk (PRAETOR), a multi-tiered analysis tool based on the multiplicative MAUA method, is presented. It folds sixty three mostly independent metrics over three levels of detail to give an ultimate metric for nonproliferation performance comparison. In order to reduce analysts' bias, the weighting between the various metrics was obtained by surveying a total of thirty three nonproliferation specialists and nonspecialists from fields such as particle physics, international policy, and industrial engineering. The PRAETOR was used to evaluate the Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Cycle (FBRFC). The results obtained using these weights are compared against a uniform weight approach. Results are presented for five nuclear material diversion scenarios: four examples include a diversion attempt on various components of a PUREX fast reactor cycle and one scenario involves theft from a PUREX facility in a LWR cycle. The FBRFC was evaluated with uranium-plutonium fuel and a second time using thorium-uranium fuel. These diversion scenarios were tested with both uniform and expert weights, with and without safeguards in place. The numerical results corroborate nonproliferation truths and provide insight regarding fast reactor facilities' proliferation resistance in relation to known standards.

Metcalf, Richard R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Physical protection cooperation with Former Soviet Union countries  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of physical protection cooperation activities between Sandia (SNL) and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) regarding Material Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A) responsibilities. Begun four years ago as part of the Safe, Secure Dismantlement Program, this project is intended to stem proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward a goal shared by both Russia and the United States: to reduce the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials. This will be accomplished by strengthening the MPC&A systems in both, countries. This new program (US Department of Energy Laboratory-to-Laboratory MPC&A program) is designed to complement Government-to-Government programs sponsored by US Senators Nunn and Lugar. US and Russian representatives exchange visits and discuss physical protection philosophies. Russian representatives have received formal training in the US process of system design and analysis to include the design of an effective physical protection system, determination of physical protection system objectives, initial design of a physical protection system, evaluation of the design, and often redesign or refinement of the existing system. Some Russian organizations have philosophies similar to those of the United States, but when they differ, the US and Russian representatives must negotiate. Other Russian organizations, because of heavy reliance on guard forces, have not developed a systematic design process. Cooperative work between US national laboratories and Russian counterparts has resulted in major physical protection enhancements at a Russian demonstration site and other advancements for Laboratory-to-Laboratory projects.

Williams, J.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Use of Thorium as Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society endorses continued research and development of the use of thorium as a fertile a fuel material for nuclear reactors. Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant in the earths crust as uranium and is a widely distributed natural resource, which is readily accessible in many countries. 1 Use of thorium as a fertile fuel material leads to the following: production of an alternative fissile uranium isotope, uranium-233 coproduction of a highly radioactive isotope, uranium-232, which provides a high radiation barrier to discourage theft and proliferation of spent fuel. The path to sustainability of nuclear energy in several countries, notably India, profits from technology that utilizes their vast thorium resources. Waste produced during reactor operations benefits from the fact that the thorium-uranium fuel cycle does not readily produce long-lived transuranic elements. To date thorium utilization has been demonstrated in light water reactors, 2 as well as in other reactor types 3 including fast spectrum reactors, heavy water reactors, and gas-cooled reactors. In this context, the database and experience with thorium fuel and fuel cycles are very limited and must be augmented significantly before large-scale investment is committed to commercialization. Since thorium is an abundant resource that can potentially be used as a fertile nuclear fuel, it is likely to be an important contributor to the future global nuclear enterprise in several countries. It is, therefore, paramount that the evolving global thorium fuel cycle (including fuel conditioning and recycling operations) incorporate the latest in safeguards and other proliferation-resistant design features so that the thorium fuel cycle complements the uranium fuel cycle and enhances the long-term global sustainability of nuclear energy.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development of the fundamental attributes and inputs for proliferation resistance assessments of nuclear fuel cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust and reliable quantitative proliferation resistance assessment tools are critical to a strengthened nonproliferation regime and to the future deployment of nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Efforts to quantify proliferation resistance have thus far met with limited success due to the inherent subjectivity of the problem and interdependencies between attributes that contribute to proliferation resistance. This work focuses on the diversion of nuclear material by a state and defers other threats such as theft or terrorism to future work. A new approach is presented that assesses the problem through four stages of proliferation: the diversion of nuclear material, the transportation of nuclear material from an internationally safeguarded nuclear facility to an undeclared facility, the transformation of material into a weapons-usable metal, and weapon fabrication. A complete and concise set of intrinsic and extrinsic attributes of the nation, facility and material that could impede proliferation are identified. Quantifiable inputs for each of these attributes are defined. For example, the difficulty of handling the diverted material is captured with inputs like mass and bulk, radiation dose, heating rate and others. Aggregating these measurements into an overall value for proliferation resistance can be done in multiple ways based on well-developed decision theory. A preliminary aggregation scheme is provided along with results obtained from analyzing a small spent fuel reprocessing plant to demonstrate quantification of the attributes and inputs. This quantification effort shows that the majority of the inputs presented are relatively straightforward to work with while a few are not. These few difficult inputs will only be useful in special cases where the analyst has access to privileged, detailed or classified information. The stages, attributes and inputs of proliferation presented in this work provide a foundation for proliferation resistance assessments which may use multiple types of aggregation schemes. The overall results of these assessments are useful in comparing nuclear technologies and aiding decisions about development and deployment of that technology.

Giannangeli, Donald D. J., III

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass/fail criteria of reference 7 stated 'The facility will report measured values, book values, and statistical control limits for the selected items to DOE SR...', and 'The site/facility operator must develop, document, and maintain measurement methods for all nuclear material on inventory'. These new requirements exceeded SRNL's experience with prior semi-annual inventory expectations, but allowed the AD nuclear field measurement group to demonstrate its excellent adaptability and superior flexibility to respond to unpredicted expectations from the DOE customer. The requirements yielded five SRNL items subject to Pu verification and two SRNL items subject to HEU verification. These items are listed and described in Table 1.

Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result of this analysis, a formal training curriculum will be designed and implemented to include several blended learning delivery options. This training will be piloted at RMS sites; initial training will become a required element of RMS installation and refresher training will be considered for sustainability of operations.

Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Novel Nuclear Powered Photocatalytic Energy Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Massachusetts Lowell Radiation Laboratory (UMLRL) is involved in a comprehensive project to investigate a unique radiation sensing and energy conversion technology with applications for in-situ monitoring of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) during cask transport and storage. The technology makes use of the gamma photons emitted from the SNF as an inherent power source for driving a GPS-class transceiver that has the ability to verify the position and contents of the SNF cask. The power conversion process, which converts the gamma photon energy into electrical power, is based on a variation of the successful dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) design developed by Konarka Technologies, Inc. (KTI). In particular, the focus of the current research is to make direct use of the high-energy gamma photons emitted from SNF, coupled with a scintillator material to convert some of the incident gamma photons into photons having wavelengths within the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The high-energy gammas from the SNF will generate some power directly via Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect, and the generated visible photons output from the scintillator material can also be converted to electrical power in a manner similar to that of a standard solar cell. Upon successful implementation of an energy conversion device based on this new gammavoltaic principle, this inherent power source could then be utilized within SNF storage casks to drive a tamper-proof, low-power, electronic detection/security monitoring system for the spent fuel. The current project has addressed several aspects associated with this new energy conversion concept, including the development of a base conceptual design for an inherent gamma-induced power conversion unit for SNF monitoring, the characterization of the radiation environment that can be expected within a typical SNF storage system, the initial evaluation of Konarka's base solar cell design, the design and fabrication of a range of new cell materials and geometries at Konarka's manufacturing facilities, and the irradiation testing and evaluation of these new cell designs within the UML Radiation Laboratory. The primary focus of all this work was to establish the proof of concept of the basic gammavoltaic principle using a new class of dye-sensitized photon converter (DSPC) materials based on KTI's original DSSC design. In achieving this goal, this report clearly establishes the viability of the basic gammavoltaic energy conversion concept, yet it also identifies a set of challenges that must be met for practical implementation of this new technology.

White,John R.; Kinsmen,Douglas; Regan,Thomas M.; Bobek,Leo M.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

The development and application of the Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced sealing technologies are often an integral part of a containment surveillance (CS) approach to detect undeclared diversion of nuclear materials. As adversarial capabilities continue to advance, the sophistication of the seal design must advance as well. The intelligent integration of security concepts into a physical technology used to seal monitored items is a fundamental requirement for secure containment. Seals have a broad range of capabilities. These capabilities must be matched appropriately to the application to establish the greatest effectiveness from the seal. However, many current seal designs and their application fail to provide the high confidence of detection and timely notification that can be appreciated with new technology. Additionally, as monitoring needs rapidly expand, out-pacing budgets, remote monitoring of low-cost autonomous sealing technologies becomes increasingly appealing. The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes this technology and has implemented cost effective security concepts establishing the high confidence that is expected of active sealing technology today. RMSA is a system of relatively low-cost but secure active loop seals for the monitoring of nuclear material containers. The sealing mechanism is a fiber optic loop that is pulsed using a low-power LED circuit with a coded signal to verify integrity. Battery life is conserved by the use of sophisticated power management techniques, permitting many years of reliable operation without battery replacement or other maintenance. Individual seals communicate by radio using a secure transmission protocol using either of two specially designated communication frequency bands. Signals are encrypted and authenticated by private key, established during the installation procedure, and the seal bodies feature both active and passive tamper indication. Seals broadcast to a central 'translator' from which information is both stored locally and/or transmitted remotely for review. The system is especially appropriate for nuclear material storage facilities, indoor or outdoor, enabling remote inspection of status rather than tedious individual seal verification, and without the need for interconnected cabling. A handheld seal verifier is also available for an inspector to verify any particular individual seal in close proximity. This paper will discuss the development of the RMSA sealing system, its capabilities, its application philosophy, and projected future trends.

Schoeneman, Barry Dale; Stein, Marius (Canberra, USA); Wishard, B. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Austria)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324  

SciTech Connect

With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured when they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items do not take a lot of work, but require an awareness of the risks involved in not doing them or doing them incorrectly. The security of home networks and communications with company networks can be significantly improved by adding an appropriate software or hardware firewall to the home network and using a protected protocol such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), a Virtual Private Network (VPN), or Secure Shell (SSH) for connecting to the company network.

Orvis, W J; Krystosek, P; Smith, J

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the facility's MC&A (software widely used in the aerospace, chemical, and nuclear power industries) MSET was peer reviewed in 2007 and validated in 2008 by benchmark testing at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States. The MSET documents were translated into Russian and provided to Rosatom in July of 2008, and MSET is currently being evaluated for potential application in Russian Nuclear Facilities.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL; Campbell, Billy J [ORNL; Hammond, Glenn A [ORNL; Meppen, Bruce W [ORNL; Brown, Richard F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.  

SciTech Connect

A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Disassembly and Sanitization of Classified Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Disassembly Sanitization Operation (DSO) process was implemented to support weapon disassembly and disposition by using recycling and waste minimization measures. This process was initiated by treaty agreements and reconfigurations within both the DOD and DOE Complexes. The DOE is faced with disassembling and disposing of a huge inventory of retired weapons, components, training equipment, spare parts, weapon maintenance equipment, and associated material. In addition, regulations have caused a dramatic increase in the need for information required to support the handling and disposition of these parts and materials. In the past, huge inventories of classified weapon components were required to have long-term storage at Sandia and at many other locations throughout the DoE Complex. These materials are placed in onsite storage unit due to classification issues and they may also contain radiological and/or hazardous components. Since no disposal options exist for this material, the only choice was long-term storage. Long-term storage is costly and somewhat problematic, requiring a secured storage area, monitoring, auditing, and presenting the potential for loss or theft of the material. Overall recycling rates for materials sent through the DSO process have enabled 70 to 80% of these components to be recycled. These components are made of high quality materials and once this material has been sanitized, the demand for the component metals for recycling efforts is very high. The DSO process for NGPF, classified components established the credibility of this technique for addressing the long-term storage requirements of the classified weapons component inventory. The success of this application has generated interest from other Sandia organizations and other locations throughout the complex. Other organizations are requesting the help of the DSO team and the DSO is responding to these requests by expanding its scope to include Work-for- Other projects. For example, Pantex personnel have asked the DSO team to assist them with the destruction of their stored classified components. The DSO process is in full-scale operation and continues to grow and serve SNL/NM and DOE by providing a solution to this evolving disposal issue. For some time, SNL has incurred significant expenses for the management and storage of classified components. This project is estimated to save DOE and Sandia several hundreds of thousands of dollars while the excess inventory is eliminated. This innovative approach eliminates the need for long-term storage of classified weapons components and the associated monitoring and accounting expenditures.

Stockham, Dwight J.; Saad, Max P. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800-1151, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Facility Safeguardability Analysis In Support of Safeguards-by-Design  

SciTech Connect

The following report proposes the use of Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) to: i) compare and evaluate nuclear safeguards measures, ii) optimize the prospective facility safeguards approach, iii) objectively and analytically evaluate nuclear facility safeguardability, and iv) evaluate and optimize barriers within the facility and process design to minimize the risk of diversion and theft of nuclear material. As proposed by the authors, Facility Safeguardability Analysis would be used by the Facility Designer and/or Project Design Team during the design and construction of the nuclear facility to evaluate and optimize the facility safeguards approach and design of the safeguards system. Through a process of Safeguards-by-Design (SBD), this would be done at the earliest stages of project conceptual design and would involve domestic and international nuclear regulators and authorities, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The benefits of the Safeguards-by-Design approach is that it would clarify at a very early stage the international and domestic safeguards requirements for the Construction Project Team, and the best design and operating practices for meeting these requirements. It would also minimize the risk to the construction project, in terms of cost overruns or delays, which might otherwise occur if the nuclear safeguards measures are not incorporated into the facility design at an early stage. Incorporating nuclear safeguards measures is straight forward for nuclear facilities of existing design, but becomes more challenging with new designs and more complex nuclear facilities. For this reason, the facility designer and Project Design Team require an analytical tool for comparing safeguards measures, options, and approaches, and for evaluating the safeguardability of the facility. The report explains how preliminary diversion path analysis and the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PRPP) evaluation methodology can be adapted for evaluating and assessing the safeguardability of nuclear facilities both existing, as well as those still on the drawing board. The advantages of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis is that it would not only give the facility designer an analytical method for evaluating and assessing the safeguards measures and approaches for the prospective facility, but also the ability to optimize the design of the facility process for enhancing facility safeguardability. The following report explains the need for Facility Safeguardability Analysis and explains how it could be used in the Safeguards-by-Design, in support of the design and construction of nuclear facilities.

Philip Casey Durst; Roald Wigeland; Robert Bari; Trond Bjornard; John Hockert; Michael Zentner

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Termination of Safeguards on ULWBR Material  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management, has approved the disposition of 31 metric tons of Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (ULWBR) material in canisters stored within dry wells of the Underground Fuel Storage Facility at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This unirradiated material consists primarily of ceramic pellets of thorium oxide in stainless steel cladding, but it also contains 300 kilograms of uranium that is 98 wt% U-233. The ULWBR material was not processed at the INTEC because it was incompatible with prior chemical separation schemes. Other economical recovery options have not been identified, and expressions of interest for consolidating the material with existing projects at other DOE sites have not been received. The U-233 could be used for producing the medical isotope Actinium-225, but the proof-of-principle demonstration and follow-on pilot program have not been developed to the point of requiring production quantities of U-233. Consequently, the selected disposition of the ULWBR material was burial as Low Level Waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which required terminating safeguards controls for the contained Category II quantity of Attractiveness Level D special nuclear material (SNM). The requested termination followed the twelve point evaluation criteria of the Historical Defense Program Discard Guidance and included a security analysis for evaluating the risks of theft, diversion, and radiological sabotage associated with the material. Continuity of knowledge in the book inventory was assured by documenting that the original shippers measurements accurately reflected the quantities of materials received and that the ULWBR materials had remained under adequate physical protection and had been subject to periodic physical inventories. The method selected for substantiating the book values as the basis for terminating safeguards was the nondestructive assay used during physical inventories. Shipping arrangements included refurbishing a licensed cask to be reused over the duration of the termination process. An accompanying batching plan and shipping schedule were developed to accommodate multiple commercial shipments of Category III quantities of SNM in the selected cask, such that all canisters would be received at NTS prior to the expiration of the nonrenewable cask license.

Ivan R. Thomas; Ernest L. Laible

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

The International Safeguards Technology Base: How is the Patient Doing? An Exploration of Effective Metrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The term Technology Base is commonly used but what does it mean? Is there a common understanding of the components that comprise a technology base? Does a formal process exist to assess the health of a given technology base? These are important questions the relevance of which is even more pressing given the USDOE/NNSA initiatives to strengthen the safeguards technology base through investments in research & development and human capital development. Accordingly, the authors will establish a high-level framework to define and understand what comprises a technology base. Potential goal-driven metrics to assess the health of a technology base will also be explored, such as linear demographics and resource availability, in the hope that they can be used to better understand and improve the health of the U.S. safeguards technology base. Finally, through the identification of such metrics, the authors will offer suggestions and highlight choices for addressing potential shortfalls. Introduction The U.S. safeguards technology base got its start almost half a century ago in the nuclear weapons program of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and their predecessors: AEC & ERDA. Due to nuclear materials strategic importance and value, and the risk associated with the publics and workers health and the potential for theft, significant investments were made to develop techniques to measure nuclear materials using both destructive assay (DA) and non-destructive assay (NDA). Major investment within the U.S. DOE Domestic Safeguards Program continued over the next three decades, resulting in continuous improvements in the state-of-the-art of these techniques. This was particularly true in the area of NDA with its ability to use gamma rays, neutrons, and heat to identify and quantify nuclear materials without the need to take direct samples of the material. Most of these techniques were commercialized and transferred to industry, opening their applications to the nuclear industry worldwide and to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Schanfein, Mark; Gouveia, Fernando; Crawford, Cary E.; Pickett, Chris J.; Jay, Jeffrey

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

When pixels speak: why video games deserve free speech protection; why video games will not receive free speech protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines how games have been construed legally and publicly and compares the nature of games to the de facto legal criteria: in order for games to receive free speech protection, games must inform and communicate. In Chapter I, I review the literature surrounding the effects of violent video games. This literature review serves as a foundation for the rhetorical nature of the legal controversy since the controversy has no clear-cut answer to the effects of video games. Instead of a clear "Yes"??? or "????No"??? answer, game effects researchers can only posit "Maybe"??? and "No"??? findings. Game antagonists employed long-shot and shoddy research to argue their case that violent games produce violent people. The next two chapters lay a foundation for justifying why games have become increasingly controversial to date. In Chapter II, I outline a history of games and argue that games became communicative in the early 1990s. As a response to graphically communicative games and congressional bullying, the video game industry created a self regulatory rating board which should have quelled the public controversy. It did not. In Chapter III, I argue that Columbine changed the face of the game industry in the eyes of the public, as a matter of public morality. Before 1999, the public viewed games in a positive light, embodying one of America'????s pastimes and helping the disabled with their motor skills. After the events at Columbine, the public saw the video game industry as an unruly and rogue force. In Chapter IV, I explain the legal hurtles the game industry faces in becoming protected speech. While video games have become communicative and informative, they likely will not receive free speech protection because of the public scapegoating of the industry during the last two and a half decades. I conclude by discussing the latest Grand Theft Auto "????Hot Coffee"??? controversy and how game developers remain gun-shy about the free speech issue.

Bailey, Joseph Harold

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work summarized in this report, namely the development of guidance to support the consideration of MC&A in the design of both pebble-bed and prismatic-fueled HTGRs. The objective is to identify and incorporate design features into the facility design that will cost effectively aid in making MC&A more effective and efficient, with minimum impact on operations. The theft of nuclear material is addressed through both MC&A and physical protection, while the threat of sabotage is addressed principally through physical protection.

Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Profile of World Uranium Enrichment Programs - 2007  

SciTech Connect

It is generally agreed that the most difficult step in building a nuclear weapon is acquiring weapons grade fissile material, either plutonium or highly enriched uranium (HEU). Plutonium is produced in a nuclear reactor, while HEU is produced using a uranium enrichment process. Enrichment is also an important step in the civil nuclear fuel cycle, in producing low enriched uranium (LEU) for use in fuel for nuclear reactors. However, the same equipment used to produce LEU for nuclear fuel can also be used to produce HEU for weapons. Safeguards at an enrichment plant are the array of assurances and verification techniques that ensure uranium is only enriched to LEU, no undeclared LEU is produced, and no uranium is enriched to HEU or secretly diverted. There are several techniques for enriching uranium. The two most prevalent are gaseous diffusion, which uses older technology and requires a lot of energy, and gas centrifuge separation, which uses more advanced technology and is more energy efficient. Gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) provide about 40% of current world enrichment capacity, but are being phased out as newer gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) are constructed. Estimates of current and future enrichment capacity are always approximate, due to the constant upgrades, expansions, and shutdowns occurring at enrichment plants, largely determined by economic interests. Currently, the world enrichment capacity is approximately 53 million kg-separative work units (SWU) per year, with 22 million in gaseous diffusion and 31 million in gas centrifuge plants. Another 23 million SWU/year of capacity are under construction or planned for the near future, almost entirely using gas centrifuge separation. Other less-efficient techniques have also been used in the past, including electromagnetic and aerodynamic separations, but these are considered obsolete, at least from a commercial perspective. Laser isotope separation shows promise as a possible enrichment technique of the future, but has yet to be demonstrated commercially. In the early 1980s, six countries developing gas centrifuge technology (United States, United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, Japan, and Australia) along with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) began developing effective safeguards techniques for GCEPs. This effort was known as the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP). The HSP had the goal of maximizing safeguards effectiveness while minimizing the cost to the operator and inspectorate, and adopted several recommendations, such as the acceptance of limited-frequency unannounced access (LFUA) inspections in cascade halls, and the use of nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and tamper-indicating seals. While only the HSP participants initially committed to implementing all the measures of the approach, it has been used as a model for the safeguards applied to GCEPs in additional states. This report provides a snapshot overview of world enrichment capacity in 2007, including profiles of the uranium enrichment programs of individual states. It is based on open-source information, which is dependent on unclassified sources and may therefore not reflect the most recent developments. In addition, it briefly describes some of the safeguards techniques being used at various enrichment plants, including implementation of HSP recommendations.

Laughter, Mark D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Profile of World Uranium Enrichment Programs-2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that the most difficult step in building a nuclear weapon is acquiring fissile material, either plutonium or highly enriched uranium (HEU). Plutonium is produced in a nuclear reactor, whereas HEU is produced using a uranium enrichment process. Enrichment is also an important step in the civil nuclear fuel cycle, in producing low enriched uranium (LEU) for use as fuel for nuclear reactors to generate electricity. However, the same equipment used to produce LEU for nuclear reactor fuel can also be used to produce HEU for weapons. Safeguards at an enrichment plant are the array of assurances and verification techniques that ensure uranium is not diverted or enriched to HEU. There are several techniques for enriching uranium. The two most prevalent are gaseous diffusion, which uses older technology and requires a lot of energy, and gas centrifuge separation, which uses more advanced technology and is more energy efficient. Gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) provide about 40% of current world enrichment capacity but are being phased out as newer gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) are constructed. Estimates of current and future enrichment capacity are always approximate, due to the constant upgrades, expansions, and shutdowns occurring at enrichment plants, largely determined by economic interests. Currently, the world enrichment capacity is approximately 56 million kilogram separative work units (SWU) per year, with 22.5 million in gaseous diffusion and more than 33 million in gas centrifuge plants. Another 34 million SWU/year of capacity is under construction or planned for the near future, almost entirely using gas centrifuge separation. Other less-efficient techniques have also been used in the past, including electromagnetic and aerodynamic separations, but these are considered obsolete, at least from a commercial perspective. Laser isotope separation shows promise as a possible enrichment technique of the future but has yet to be demonstrated commercially. In the early 1980s, six countries developing gas centrifuge technology (United States, United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, Japan, and Australia) along with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Atomic Energy Community began developing effective safeguards techniques for GCEPs. This effort was known as the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP). The HSP had the goal of maximizing safeguards effectiveness while minimizing the cost to the operator and inspectorate, and adopted several recommendations, such as the acceptance of limited-frequency unannounced access inspections in cascade halls, and the use of nondestructive assay measurements and tamper-indicating seals. While only the HSP participants initially committed to implementing all the measures of the approach, it has been used as a model for the safeguards applied to GCEPs in additional states. Uranium enrichment capacity has continued to expand on all fronts in the last few years. GCEP capacity is expanding in anticipation of the eventual shutdown of the less-efficient GDPs, the termination of the U.S.-Russia HEU blend-down program slated for 2013, and the possible resurgence of nuclear reactor construction as part of an expected 'Nuclear Renaissance'. Overall, a clear trend in the world profile of uranium enrichment plant operation is the continued movement towards multinational projects driven by commercial and economic interests. Along this vein, the safeguards community is continuing to develop new safeguards techniques and technologies that are not overly burdensome to enrichment plant operators while delivering more effective and efficient results. This report provides a snapshot overview of world enrichment capacity in 2009, including profiles of the uranium enrichment programs of individual states. It is a revision of a 2007 report on the same topic; significant changes in world enrichment programs between the previous and current reports are emphasized. It is based entirely on open-source information, which is dependent on published sources and may theref

Laughter, Mark D [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

1972-1997, Twenty-five years of energy and environmental history : lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect

Given the events of the past 25 years concerning energy and environmental issues and our reaction to them, what lessons can we learn? First, the individual American consumer wants and expects energy to be a stable commodity with low prices and easy availability. As evidenced by the heated debate over increasing the federal gasoline tax by $.05 per gallon (which would still leave Americans paying only one-third of what Europeans pay for gasoline), increases in energy prices elicit very strong public and political opposition. As further evidence, it has been argued that the general public support of the Gulf War was due, in part, to a recognition of the need to maintain a stable source of cheap oil from the region. The American public wants to maintain the benefits of cheap and abundant energy and expects its political leaders to make it happen. A second lesson is that if constraints on the energy supply do occur (e.g., the OPEC-imposed oil embargo) ardor environmental impacts from energy use do appear to be significant (e.g., SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} emissions), the preference is for a technology fix rather than a behavioral change. This is evidenced by our reliance on moving low-sulfur coal more than 1,000 miles from Wyoming to burn in Illinois power plants rather than reducing the demand for electricity with energy-efficient measures in residential, commercial, and industrial activities. National research programs to produce an automobile that gets 80+ miles per gallon take higher priority over working to get people to use mass transit to reduce their driving mileage. Americans expect that advanced technology can be relied upon to come up with solutions to energy and environmental problems without having to change their lifestyles. The experience with natural gas, in which a regulatory change (deregulation) was combined with technology developments (horizontal drilling and improved gas turbines for electricity generation) to increase available supply and hold prices down, has added to the confidence in the efficacy of technology fixes to solve energy and environmental problems. Third, it is difficult for government to tamper with energy markets and achieve the desired results.The energy system has shown itself to be a complex adaptive system that adjusts to even the most strenuous burdens in ways that are not easy to predict. Governmental attempts to predict and then prescribe the development of the future energy system are bound to meet with limited, if any, success. Rather, the more appropriate goal seems to be development of a robust and flexible energy system that can evolve and adjust to changing conditions. Given the experiences of the past and the lessons learned from these experiences, what might the future bring? Some predictions can be made with considerable confidence. It is highly likely that the trend of deregulating the energy sector will continue, with electricity deregulation a virtual certainty. It is also highly probable that the demand and consumption of energy from developing countries will soon surpass those of the US, Europe, and Japan, thus making them serious competitors for limited fossil fuel resources. In the environmental arena, some form of emission control of greenhouse gases from the energy sector will be agreed upon soon by the international community. More stringent regulations in the US for the emissions of some air and water pollutants are also likely. Preservation of biological diversity will also likely continue to be an issue of increasing importance.

Drucker, H.

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for storing and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants and processing facilities. To verify that no diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material involving UF{sub 6} cylinders at the facility has occurred, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts periodic, labor-intensive physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identities, and cylinder weights. A reliable cylinder monitoring system that would improve overall inspector effectiveness would be a significant improvement to the current international safeguards inspection regime. Such a system could include real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, situation-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of safeguards technologies. This type of system could provide timely detection of abnormal operational activities that may be used to ensure more appropriate and efficient responses by the IAEA. A system of this type can reduce the reliance on paper records and have the additional benefit of facilitating domestic safeguards at the facilities at which it is installed. A radio-frequency (RF)-based system designed to track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders during processing operations was designed, assembled, and tested at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio, to determine the operational feasibility and durability of RF technology. The overall objective of the effort was to validate the robustness of RF technology for potential use as a future international safeguards tool for tracking UF6 cylinders at uranium-processing facilities. The results to date indicate that RF tags represent a feasible technique for tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders in operating facilities. Additional work will be needed to improve the operational robustness of the tags for repeated autoclave processing and to add tamper-indicating and data authentication features to some of the pertinent system components. Future efforts will focus on these needs along with implementing protocols relevant to IAEA safeguards. The work detailed in this report demonstrates the feasibility of constructing RF devices that can survive the operational rigors associated with the transportation, storage, and processing of UF6 cylinders. The system software specially designed for this project is called Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System (CATS). This report details the elements of the CATS rules-based architecture and its use in safeguards-monitoring and asset-tracking applications. Information is also provided on improvements needed to make the technology ready, as well as options for improving the safeguards aspects of the technology. The report also includes feedback from personnel involved in the testing, as well as individuals who could utilize an RF-based system in supporting the performance of their work. The system software was set up to support a Mailbox declaration, where a declaration can be made either before or after cylinder movements take place. When the declaration is made before cylinders move, the operators must enter this information into CATS. If the IAEA then shows up unexpectedly at the facility, they can see how closely the operational condition matches the declaration. If the declaration is made after the cylinders move, this provides greater operational flexibility when schedules are interrupted or are changed, by allowing operators to declare what moves have been completed. The IAEA can then compare where cylinders are with where CATS or the system says they are located. The ability of CATS to automatically generate Mailbox declarations is seen by the authors as a desirable feature. The Mailbox approach is accepted by the IAEA but has not been widely implemented (and never in enrichment facilities). During the course of this project, we have incorporated alternative methods for implementation.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Carrick, Bernie [USEC; Ken, Whittle [USEC; Johns, R E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Proceedings of the 7th Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research: Energy Infrastructure Cyber Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy industry is embarking upon an infrastructure transformation that will result in a national power grid that is more intelligent, robust, resilient, and secure. While the final form will not be known for quite some time, clearly a smarter grid will make better use of information. Whether an electric utility is making real-time adjustments in response to changing load conditions, or commercial and private consumers are making better choices, the timely availability of this information will become increasingly critical. Ultimately, the overall efficiency, reliability, and resilience of the grid is inextricably linked to information. Unfortunately, "the electric power sector is second from the bottom of all major U.S. industries in terms of R&D spending as a percentage of revenue, exceeding only pulp and paper [Amin2011]." Moreover, U.S. officials worry that cyber-spies could use their [demonstrated] access to shut down the grid or take control of power plants during a time of crisis or war [CIO09, WSJ09]. Protecting and trusting information is not unique to the grid. Indeed, the information security market is worth tens of billions of dollars, almost exclusively in cyber security products and services. Yet, solutions designed for the Internet are often not appropriate for securing the energy grid, which has a different set of priorities and communication needs. Any viable information security solution must address those unique challenges and features. The discussion at the CSIIR Workshop was primarily focused about the Energy Infrastructure Cyber Protection (ENCyP) Initiative. ENCyP is a multidisciplinary strategic theme oriented on cyber protection for the most critical and most vulnerable components of Energy Delivery System (EDS). The initiative derived from ORNL's focus on energy and cyber-physical defenses. On this basis we received just over 100 submissions stemming from both novel theoretical and empirical research focused on the many different aspects of ENCyP. We encouraged the participation of researchers and practitioners from a wide range of professional disciplines to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the needs, stakes and the evolving context ENCyP. Topics included: Security assurance/interoperability for Energy Delivery Systems (EDS) Scalable/trusted control (cyber-physical) systems security Visual analytics for cyber security Next generation control systems vulnerability assessment Wireless Smart Grid security SCADA, EDS communications security test beds Use cases and attack scenarios for EDS Wide area monitoring, protection & control AMI, demand-response, distribution grid management security Electric transportation & distributed energy resources security Policy/standards driven architectures for EDS Anti-tamper device architectures Cryptographic key management for EDS Security risk assessment and management for EDS Insider and life-cycle threats Automated vulnerability detection Access control management and authentication services for EDS Secure information exchange gateway & watchdog switches Bio-Inspired technologies for enhancing EDS cybersecurity A principle goal of the workshop was to foster discussions and dialog among the 210 registered attendees from North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. This goal was initiated and facilitated by 8 plenary keynote addresses including our banquet and reception speakers. There were also six invited speakers, including two panels of government and national laboratory representatives. A total of one hundred and three papers (i.e., extended abstracts [EAs]) were submitted involving over three hundred independent reviews from more than one hundred reviewers. Thirty two percent of the papers that were submitted received two reviews while all of the rest of the papers received three or more. Fifty-four EAs were accepted. Twenty-five posters were invited. All of the EAs, presentations and posters are included in our proceedings. The subject areas span the topics above and were organized into nine tracks: Security Assurance for EDS; Wide Area Mo

Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Krings, Axel [University of Idaho

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

U.S. and Russian Collaboration in the Area of Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensics has become increasingly important in the fight against illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials. The illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is, of course, an international problem; nuclear materials may be mined and milled in one country, manufactured in a second country, diverted at a third location, and detected at a fourth. There have been a number of articles in public policy journals in the past year that call for greater interaction between the U. S. and the rest of the world on the topic of nuclear forensics. Some believe that such international cooperation would help provide a more certain capability to identify the source of the nuclear material used in a terrorist event. An improved international nuclear forensics capability would also be important as part of the IAEA verification toolkit, particularly linked to increased access provided by the additional protocol. A recent study has found that, although international progress has been made in securing weapons-usable HEU and Pu, the effort is still insufficient. They found that nuclear material, located in 40 countries, could be obtained by terrorists and criminals and used for a crude nuclear weapon. Through 2006, the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database had recorded a total of 607 confirmed events involving illegal possession, theft, or loss of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Although it is difficult to predict the future course of such illicit trafficking, increasingly such activities are viewed as significant threats that merit the development of special capabilities. As early as April, 1996, nuclear forensics was recognized at the G-8 Summit in Moscow as an important element of an illicit nuclear trafficking program. Given international events over the past several years, the value and need for nuclear forensics seems greater than ever. Determining how and where legitimate control of nuclear material was lost and tracing the route of the material from diversion through interdiction are important goals for nuclear forensics and attribution. It is equally important to determine whether additional devices or materials that pose a threat to public safety are also available. Finding the answer to these questions depends on determining the source of the material and its method of production. Nuclear forensics analysis and interpretation provide essential insights into methods of production and sources of illicit radioactive materials. However, they are most powerful when combined with other sources of information, including intelligence and traditional detective work. The certainty of detection and punishment for those who remove nuclear materials from legitimate control provides the ultimate deterrent for such diversion and, ultimately, for the intended goal of such diversion, including nuclear terrorism or proliferation. Consequently, nuclear forensics is an integral part of 'nuclear deterrence' in the 21st century. Nuclear forensics will always be limited by the diagnostic information inherent in the interdicted material. Important markers for traditional forensics (fingerprints, stray material, etc.) can be eliminated or obscured, but many nuclear materials have inherent isotopic or chemical characteristics that serve as unequivocal markers of specific sources, production processes, or transit routes. The information needed for nuclear forensics goes beyond that collected for most commercial and international verification activities. Fortunately, the international nuclear engineering enterprise has a restricted number of conspicuous process steps that makes the interpretation process easier. Ultimately, though, it will always be difficult to distinguish between materials that reflect similar source or production histories, but are derived from disparate sites. Due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. There are a limited number of

Kristo, M J

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Summary  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. The material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system. The MSET process is divided into four distinct and separate parts: (1) Completion of the questionnaire that assembles information about the operations of every aspect of the MPC&A system; (2) Conversion of questionnaire data into numeric values associated with risk; (3) Analysis of the numeric data utilizing the MPC&A fault tree and the SAPHIRE computer software; and (4) Self-assessment using the MSET reports to perform the effectiveness evaluation of the facility's MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. If the need for system improvements or upgrades is indicated when the system is analyzed, MSET provides the capability to evaluate potential or actual system improvements or upgrades. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time. The system can be reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential system improvement can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance and reveals where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk. The functional model, the system risk assessment tool, and the facility evaluation questionnaire are valuable educational tools for MPC&A personnel. These educational tools provide a framework for ongoing dialogue between organizations regarding the design, development, implementation, operation, assessment, and sustainability of MPC&A systems. An organization considering the use of MSET as an analytical tool for evaluating the effectiveness of its MPC&A system will benefit from conducting a complete MSET exercise at an existing nuclear facility.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

U.S. and Russian Collaboration in the Area of Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensics has become increasingly important in the fight against illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials. The illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is, of course, an international problem; nuclear materials may be mined and milled in one country, manufactured in a second country, diverted at a third location, and detected at a fourth. There have been a number of articles in public policy journals in the past year that call for greater interaction between the U. S. and the rest of the world on the topic of nuclear forensics. Some believe that such international cooperation would help provide a more certain capability to identify the source of the nuclear material used in a terrorist event. An improved international nuclear forensics capability would also be important as part of the IAEA verification toolkit, particularly linked to increased access provided by the additional protocol. A recent study has found that, although international progress has been made in securing weapons-usable HEU and Pu, the effort is still insufficient. They found that nuclear material, located in 40 countries, could be obtained by terrorists and criminals and used for a crude nuclear weapon. Through 2006, the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database had recorded a total of 607 confirmed events involving illegal possession, theft, or loss of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Although it is difficult to predict the future course of such illicit trafficking, increasingly such activities are viewed as significant threats that merit the development of special capabilities. As early as April, 1996, nuclear forensics was recognized at the G-8 Summit in Moscow as an important element of an illicit nuclear trafficking program. Given international events over the past several years, the value and need for nuclear forensics seems greater than ever. Determining how and where legitimate control of nuclear material was lost and tracing the route of the material from diversion through interdiction are important goals for nuclear forensics and attribution. It is equally important to determine whether additional devices or materials that pose a threat to public safety are also available. Finding the answer to these questions depends on determining the source of the material and its method of production. Nuclear forensics analysis and interpretation provide essential insights into methods of production and sources of illicit radioactive materials. However, they are most powerful when combined with other sources of information, including intelligence and traditional detective work. The certainty of detection and punishment for those who remove nuclear materials from legitimate control provides the ultimate deterrent for such diversion and, ultimately, for the intended goal of such diversion, including nuclear terrorism or proliferation. Consequently, nuclear forensics is an integral part of 'nuclear deterrence' in the 21st century. Nuclear forensics will always be limited by the diagnostic information inherent in the interdicted material. Important markers for traditional forensics (fingerprints, stray material, etc.) can be eliminated or obscured, but many nuclear materials have inherent isotopic or chemical characteristics that serve as unequivocal markers of specific sources, production processes, or transit routes. The information needed for nuclear forensics goes beyond that collected for most commercial and international verification activities. Fortunately, the international nuclear engineering enterprise has a restricted number of conspicuous process steps that makes the interpretation process easier. Ultimately, though, it will always be difficult to distinguish between materials that reflect similar source or production histories, but are derived from disparate sites. Due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. There are a limited

Kristo, M J

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

Successful Waste Treatment Methods at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the remediation of the waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico nine drums of mock high explosives were generated. This mixed waste stream was proposed to several offsite vendors for treatment and prices ranged from $2.50 to $10 per gram a total cost estimated to be in excess of $2 million dollars. This cost represents more than 30 percent of the annual budget for the Sandia Waste Management Operations. Concentrated solutions of common oxidizers, such as nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides, will also act as oxidizers and will give positive results in the Hazard Categorization oxidizer test. These solutions carry an EPA Hazardous Waste Number D001, Ignitable Waste, and Oxidizer as defined in 49 CFR 173.151. Sandia decided that given budget and time constraints to meet a Federal Facilities Compliance Act milestone, a process for onsite treatment should be evaluated. Clean samples of mock high explosive materials were obtained from Pantex excess inventory and treatability studies initiated to develop a treatment formula and process. The following process was developed and implemented in the summer of 2006: - Size reduction to allow for dissolution of the barium nitrate in water; - Dissolution of the Mock HE in water; - Deactivation of the oxidizer; - Stabilization of the barium and the cadmium contamination present as an underlying hazardous constituent. This project was completed and the treatment milestone achieved for less than $300,000. The Disassembly Sanitization Operation (DSO) is a process that was implemented to support weapon disassembly and disposition using recycling and waste minimization while achieving the demilitarization mission. The Department of Energy is faced with disassembling and disposition of a huge inventory of retired weapons, components, training equipment, spare parts, and weapon maintenance equipment. Environmental regulations have caused a dramatic increase for information needed to support the disposal and handling of these parts and materials. Manufacturing information from past decades often does not meet the needs for regulatory decisions of today to assure proper management of weapons components. Huge inventories of classified weapon components were required to have long-term storage at Sandia and many other locations throughout the complex. These materials are stored because they are classified, they may also contain radiological and/or hazardous components and disposal options may not have existed for this material. Long-term storage is costly and somewhat problematic. It requires a secured storage area, monitoring, auditing and it also has the potential for loss or theft of this material. Overall recycling rates for materials sent through the DSO process have enabled 70 to 80% of these components to be recycled. These components are made to extreme standards and are made of high quality materials. Once the material has been sanitized, the demand for these metals is very high. The DSO process for the NGPF classified components established the credibility of this technique as a viable process for addressing the long-term storage requirements of classified weapons component inventory. The success of this operation has generated interest from other Sandia Organization other locations throughout the complex. Other organizations are soliciting the help of the DSO team and the DSO is responding to these solicitations by expanding its scope to include work for other projects. For example, Pantex has asked the DSO team to assist with the destruction of their classified components. The operation is full scale and continues to grow and serve SNL/NM and DoE by providing a solution to this evolving issue. On an ongoing basis, SNL has been incurring expenses for the management and storage of classified components. It is estimated that this project will save the DoE and Sandia several hundreds of thousands of dollars until the excess inventory is eliminated. This innovative approach eliminates the need for long-term storage of classified weapons components and the

Rast, D.M.; Thompson, J.J.; Cooper, T.W.; Stockham, D.J

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. A self-appraisal helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. The material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) fault tree was developed to depict the failure of the MPC&A system as a result of poor practices and random failures in the MC&A system. It can also be employed as a basis for assessing deliberate threats against a facility. MSET uses fault tree analysis, which is a top-down approach to examining system failure. The analysis starts with identifying a potential undesirable event called a 'top event' and then determining the ways it can occur (e.g., 'Fail To Maintain Nuclear Materials Under The Purview Of The MC&A System'). The analysis proceeds by determining how the top event can be caused by individual or combined lower level faults or failures. These faults, which are the causes of the top event, are 'connected' through logic gates. The MSET model uses AND-gates and OR-gates and propagates the effect of event failure using Boolean algebra. To enable the fault tree analysis calculations, the basic events in the fault tree are populated with probability risk values derived by conversion of questionnaire data to numeric values. The basic events are treated as independent variables. This assumption affects the Boolean algebraic calculations used to calculate results. All the necessary calculations are built into the fault tree codes, but it is often useful to estimate the probabilities manually as a check on code functioning. The probability of failure of a given basic event is the probability that the basic event primary question fails to meet the performance metric for that question. The failure probability is related to how well the facility performs the task identified in that basic event over time (not just one performance or exercise). Fault tree calculations provide a failure probability for the top event in the fault tree. The basic fault tree calculations establish a baseline relative risk value for the system. This probability depicts relative risk, not absolute risk. Subsequent calculations are made to evaluate the change in relative risk that would occur if system performance is improved or degraded. During the development effort of MSET, the fault tree analysis program used was SAPHIRE. SAPHIRE is an acronym for 'Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations.' Version 1 of the SAPHIRE code was sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1987 as an innovative way to draw, edit, and analyze graphical fault trees primarily for safe operation of nuclear power reactors. When the fault tree calculations are performed, the fault tree analysis program will produce several reports that can be used to analyze the MPC&A system. SAPHIRE produces reports showing risk importance factors for all basic events in the operational MC&A system. The risk importance information is used to examine the potential impacts when performance of certain basic events increases or decreases. The initial results produced by the SAPHIRE program are considered relative risk values. None of the results can be interpreted as absolute risk values since the basic event probability values represent estimates of risk associated with the performance of MPC&A tasks throughout the material balance area (MBA). The RRR for a basic event represents the decrease in total system risk that would result from improvement of that one event to a perfect performance level. Improvement of the basic event with the greatest RRR value produces a greater decrease in total system risk than improvement of any other basic event. Basic events with the greatest potential for system risk reduction are assigned performance improvement values, and new fault tree calculations show the improvement in total system risk. The ope

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z