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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Tamper-indicating seals : practices, problems, and standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tamper-indicating seals have been used by customs officials for over 7,000 years. Today, seals are widely used to help counter theft, smuggling, sabotage, vandalism, terrorism, and espionage. Despite their antiquity and modern widespread use, however, there remains considerable confusion about seals, as well as a lot of misconceptions, wishful thinking, sloppy terminology, and poor practice. The absence of meaningful norms and standards, together with the surprisingly limited amount of research and development (R&D) in the field of tamper detection, has also hindered the effective use of seals. The Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has intensively studied tamper-indicating seals for the last 12 years. We have engaged in vulnerability assessments, R&D, consulting, and training for over two dozen United States government agencies and private companies, as well as for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Euratom. The VAT has also analyzed over 200 different types of seals in detail. This paper summarizes some of our conclusions, recommendations, and warnings regarding seals and tamper detection.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Preventing Theft of Anhydrous Ammonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to occur in waves, with thieves striking the same location several times. Thefts have occurred at such unlikely places as refrig- eration systems, underground pipelines and rail cars. However, most criminals steal from above-ground tanks on farms... such as bottles or tanks may be left behind; these pose a risk to anyone who comes across them and handles them. Signs of Theft Evidence of theft includes valves not tightly closed or that seem to have been tampered with, footprints in the soil, and tire...

Smith, David

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Tamper-indicating seal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed a tamper-indicating seal that permits in the field inspection and detection of tampering. Said seal comprises a shrinkable tube having a visible pattern of markings which is shrunk over th item to be sealed, and a second transparent tube, having a second visible marking pattern, which is shrunk over the item and the first tube. The relationship between the first and second set of markings produces a pattern so that the seal may not be removed without detection. The seal is particularly applicable to UF/sub 6/ cylinder valves.

Fiarman, S.; Degen, M.F.; Peters, H.F.

1982-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF AUTOMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF AUTOMATION An Intelligent Web Service for Operation 2004 Examiner: Prof. Seppo Kuikka #12;2 Abstract TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Automation Degree Program Institute of Automation and Control Jaakkola, Veli-Pekka: An Intelligent Web Service for Operation

5

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Physical security and tamper-indicating devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer systems, electronic communications, digital data, and computer storage media are often highly vulnerable to physical tampering. Tamper-indicating devices, also called security seals, are widely used to detect physical tampering or unauthorized access. We studied 94 different security seals, both passive and electronic, developed either commercially or by the US government. Most of these seals are in wide-spread use, including for critical applications. We learned how to defeat all 94 seals using rapid, inexpensive, low-tech methods. Cost was not a good predictor of seal security. It appears to us that many of these seals can be dramatically improved with minor, low-cost modifications to either the seal or the use protocol.

Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Chapter 23 Intentional Destructive Acts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

terrorism, vandalism, and theft, sometimes occur at power facilities, including transmission lines and substations. Vandalism and thefts are most common, especially theft of metal...

8

1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr Jan -Mar Apr -June July -Sept Oct -Dec Totals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicles 2 7 14 3 26 Vehicle Tampering 3 5 1 8 17 Burglary from Vehicle 7 9 20 13 49 Bikes Stolen 5 7 14 6 Forgery 1 3 3 0 7 Identity Theft 0 1 1 1 3 Burglary from Bldg 18 8 5 4 35 Vandalisms 16 30 15 27 88 Total Drug Related 43 21 36 33 133 DUI Arrests 57 55 53 22 187 Thefts 14 1 5 3 23 Identity Theft 0 2 0 0 2

de Lijser, Peter

9

The relationship between cell phone use and identity theft.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The growth of mobile phone use has paralleled increased reports of identity theft. Identity theft can result in financial loss and threats to a… (more)

Saunders, Lewis O.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measuring Identity Theft at Top Banks (Version 1.5)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ryan Singel, Bank of America, HSBC Most Prone to I.D. Theft,Ryan Singel, Bank of America, HSBC Most Prone to I.D. Theft,problems. An unidentified HSBC bank official was quoted by

Hoofnagle, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Novel tamper-indicating protective devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several novel tamper-indicating devices, originally developed under DOE auspices for arms control applications, might be useful in nonproliferation. Some devices that have reached the laboratory prototype stage could provide specialized alternatives to established seals. As locks and cables, the following might be useful: (1) a brittle ceramic lock--impervious to toxic, radiation, and thermal extremes--interrogated for identification and continuity by ultrasonic means, (2) a flexible ceramic-fiber seal that also tolerates severe environments, (3) an ultrasonic smart-material strip seal, and (4) an RF-resonant coaxial cable, verified by radio frequency and microwave signals. To validate the identity of secured surfaces, joints, welds, and fasteners--two techniques are applicable: (1) the scanning electron microscope, which examines three- dimensional micron-level topography, and (2) the plastic-casting fingerprint, a simple low-cost technique, analogous to human fingerprinting. The techniques mentioned above have one or more of the potential advantages of low cost, immediate availability, security for large-area enclosures, application to hazardous environments, usability in the FSU, or suitability for covert use.

DeVolpi, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Bike Theft Prevention Bicycle theft is an on-going problem. If you haven't already, you should  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bike Theft Prevention Bicycle theft is an on-going problem. If you haven't already, you should record the make, model and serial number of your bicycle and store this information in a safe place. It registered to the owner from New York to California. While it's not possible to make your bicycle 100% theft

Qian, Ning

14

Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the smart grid is an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI replaces the analog meters, but that current AMI devices introduce a myriad of new vectors for achieving it. Key words: AMI, Smart meter currently deployed smart-meters, and attempt to identify root causes of existing vulnerabilities. Theft

McDaniel, Patrick Drew

15

DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Guardians at the Gates of Hell : estimating the risk of nuclear theft and terrorism -- and identifying the highest-priority risks of nuclear theft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods are presented to assess the global risk of nuclear theft and nuclear terrorism, to identify the nuclear facilities and transport legs that pose the highest-priority risks of nuclear theft, and to evaluate policy ...

Bunn, Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Horse Theft Awareness and Prevention - Identification of Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanently identifying horses can deter theft and help prove ownership. This publication discusses hot-iron branding, freeze branding, electronic identification, lip tattoos, and using photographs, illustrations, parentage verification and brand...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Wall, Leman H.; Householder, Doug

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optical-based smart structures for tamper-indicating applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of several related projects performed from 1991 through 1996 concerning the design, construction, and application of optical-based smart structure to tamper-indicating and sensing secure containers. Due to several influences, the projects were carried through to varying degrees of completion. Cancellation of the overall project at the client level motivated the authors to gather all of the technology and ideas about smart structures developed during these several projects, whether completed or just conceptualized, into one document. Although each section individually discusses a specific project, the overall document is written chronologically with each successive section showing how increased smart structure complexity was integrated into the container.

Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Simmons, K.L.; Undem, H.A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A study of hand tamper design for compaction of soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination Standard Oven Dry Method versus Frying Pan Method Grain Size Distribution Curve Centerville Sand 34 Tamper Comparison Chart: Dry Density after 200 Blows per Square Foot of Layer Dry Density versus Compactive Effort Curve on 3. 0 Inch Square... of Utah revealed that a point exists at which an ultimate density is obtained, and any further increase in compaction effort results in lower than ultimate values. Shear Stress and Beari Ca acit If the resistance in a soil is exceeded by applied loads...

McDonough, Brian

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Reporting the Loss or Theft of Inventorial Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Reporting the Loss or Theft of Inventorial Equipment Contact OF INVENTORIAL EQUIPMENT Table of Contents Sections Page I Scope....................................................................................... ..3 V. Procedure for Reporting Theft of Inventorial Equipment ............................. ..3 VI

Bigelow, Stephen

22

Game Theoretic Models of Electricity Theft Detection in Smart Utility Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for monitoring and billing of electricity consumption can avoid sending their employees to read the meters on meters [4]. Although these techniques reduce unmeasured and unbilled consumption of electricity. Electricity theft in distribution networks Historically, widespread energy theft is characteristic

Sastry, S. Shankar

23

Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology.

Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Szoke; Abraham (Fremont, CA), Hau-Riege; Stefan P. (Fremont, CA), Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tamper indicating and sensing optical-based smart structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper has presented an overview of the type of optical-based structures that can be designed and constructed. These smart structures are capable of responding to their environment. The examples given represent a modest sampling of the complexity that can be achieved in both design and practice. Tamper-indicating containers and smart, sensing windows demonstrate just a few of the applications. We have shown that optical-based smart structures can be made multifunctional with the sensing built in. The next generation smart structure will combine the sensing functionality of these optical-based smart structures with other sensors such as piezoelectrics and electro-rheological fluids to not only be able to respond to the environment, but to adapt to it as well. An example of functionality in this regime would be a piezosensor that senses pressure changes (e.g., shock waves), which then causes an electro-rheological fluid to change viscosity. A fiber sensor located in or near the electro-rheological fluid senses the stiffness change and sends a signal through a feedback loop back to the piezosensor for additional adjustments to the electro-rheological fluid.

Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.; Stahl, K.A.; Undem, H.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

15 July 1999 M. Oreglia, EPS Tampere, Parallel 7 1 What to do if there are too many people on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 July 1999 M. Oreglia, EPS Tampere, Parallel 7 1 (at LEP) or What to do if there are too many, EPS Tampere, Parallel 7 2 Higgs Bosons at LEP · In Minimal Standard Model: ­ production via ­ direct- ZHee + 00- Ahee + 0- hffee + #12;15 July 1999 M. Oreglia, EPS Tampere, Parallel 7 3 Fermiophobia

27

Unaccounted-for gas project. Theft Task Force. Volume 3. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Theft Task Force analyzed the percentage of customers involved in gas theft, the average annual volume of gas stolen by a single customer, and the total number of customers and their total gas usage. Results were used in conjunction with documented customer theft to arrive at a calculation that more accurately reflected the theft contribution to UAF for 1987.

Cima, K.M.; Cottengim, T.L.; Wong, R.M.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

TamperEvident, HistoryIndependent, SubliminalFree Data Structures on PROM Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, even if the vote storage mechanism is reliable, catastrophic events like power loss and battery failureTamper­Evident, History­Independent, Subliminal­Free Data Structures on PROM Storage ­or­ How constructions for the vote storage unit of an electronic voting machine. In this application, the record

Wagner, David

29

Evaluation of an Optimal Watermark Tampering Attack Against Dirty Paper Trellis Schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of an Optimal Watermark Tampering Attack Against Dirty Paper Trellis Schemes Patrick Bas powerful attacks. This paper further refines an attack on dirty paper watermarking schemes which relies to be able to handle `complex' trellises. Moreover, the ef- ficiency of this attack has been evaluated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

RESEARCH AT THE AUTOMATION AND CONTROL INSTITUTE OF TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22 5 RESEARCH AT THE AUTOMATION AND CONTROL INSTITUTE OF TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY should try to develop new solutions, methods and tools to improve the level of automation of the Finnish information technologies in automation. More than 50 % of the diploma theses (M.Sc. theses) are done

31

NTL Detection of Electricity Theft and Abnormalities for Large Power Consumers In TNB Malaysia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in power utilities originating from electricity theft and other customer malfeasances are termed as Non]. Investigations are undertaken by electric utility companies to assess the impact of technical lossesNTL Detection of Electricity Theft and Abnormalities for Large Power Consumers In TNB Malaysia J

Ducatelle, Frederick

32

ENHANCED SAFEGUARDS: THE ROLE OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS FOR TAMPER INDICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigates the synthesis of smart functional coatings (SFC) using chemical solution deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition methods have recently received attention in the materials research community due to several unique advantages that include low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products, the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures, and the ease of dopant incorporation in controlled concentrations. The optical properties of thin films were investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman, SEM and EDS, with the aim of developing a protective transparent coating for a ceramic surface as a first line of defense for tamper indication. The signature produced by the addition of rare earth dopants will be employed as an additional tamper indicating feature. The integration of SFC's as part of a broader verification system such as an electronic seals can provide additional functionality and defense in depth. SFC's can improve the timeliness of detection by providing a robust, in-situ verifiable tamper indication framework.

Mendez-Torres, A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Brinkman, K.; Krementz, D.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Experimentally Examining the Effects of a Neighborhood Intervention to Reduce Theft in Multiple City Neighborhoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Property crime and theft are a priority concern in many communities, and costs in the United States are more than 17 billion dollars annually. Research has shown that multiple environmental change strategies implemented ...

Evensen, Paul E.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Diffusion of the Texas Cooperative Extension's horse theft awareness and prevention initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the horse. Stolen horses are sold at auction houses, slaughterhouses, or by private treaty. 3 The Horse Theft Awareness and Protection Act (Texas House Bill 2396) was passed in 1997 and challenged Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE) to develop.... The initial advisory committee was held in McLennan County in 1998. Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE) developed this ongoing initiative to increase awareness and promote prevention of horse theft. Outcome measures have provided some evaluation...

Swaim, Pattrick Lee, Jr.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geographies of identity theft in the u.s.: understanding spatial and demographic patterns, 2002-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result, there are numerous attempts at defining what is (and is not) identity theft. Researchers generally agree that identity theft involves the fraudulent misuse of personal information for illegal activity and unauthorized personal gain, but some... documents issued, Social Security card issued/ forged, Unspecified Loan Fraud 6% (9,712) 5% (12,301) - Business/ Personal/ Student loan, Auto loan, Real estate loan, Unspecified Other Identity Theft 16% (25,903) 24% (59,048) - Illegal...

Lane, Gina W.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Crime Alert -Theft of Electronic Devices & A Personal Safety Reminder To follow up on the UCPD personal safety update sent to the community on the trends involving the theft of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crime Alert - Theft of Electronic Devices & A Personal Safety Reminder To follow up on the UCPD personal safety update sent to the community on the trends involving the theft of electronic devices device on personal electronic devices. In addition to the recovery of those items, officers assigned

Mills, Allen P.

37

Time-Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Monitoring Systems for Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) leads a collaboration that is exploring various tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing detector and data-transmission authentication challenges with IAEA’s unattended systems. PNNL is investigating the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s progress and preliminary findings from the first year of the study, and describes the path forward.

Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Smith, Leon E.; Moore, David E.; Sheen, David M.; Conrad, Ryan C.

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Victim of Identity Theft or Fraud Immediately report the crime to your local law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the anticipation, the recognition and the appraisal of a crime risk and the initiation of some action to remove Theft Dumpster Diving ­ Is when criminals go through your trash to obtain thrown out mail that contains legitimate enterprise in an attempt to obtain private information. Vishing ­ Is contacting the public via

de Lijser, Peter

39

Smart Insulating Container with Anti-Theft Features by M2M Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Insulating Container with Anti-Theft Features by M2M Tracking Cheng-Ting Lee, Chun-Min ChangChen, Brucelai, TroyChiu}@itri.org.tw, pai.chou@gmail.com Abstract--This paper describes a smart insulating and responsive but also of low overhead. I. INTRODUCTION Smart insulating shipping containers are an important

Shinozuka, Masanobu

40

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 5. Theft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume V of the six-volume set examines losses due to theft. Residential and non-residential (commercial and industrial) theft are distinguished. Analysis involves estimating both frequencies of occurrence and the volumes associated with such occurrence. Approaches and techniques of detection and control are discussed. The problem in developing estimates is that theft is difficult to detect. The study finds that theft contributes approximately 644,529 thousand cubic feet to the 1991 UAF. Residential theft is estimated at 324,227 Mcf and non-residential theft at 320,302 Mcf.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Fiero, G.; Harris, G.; Ozenne, D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MIE -H&S -04 -Electrical Under no circumstances is anyone to tamper with, or work with exposed wiring in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIE - H&S - 04 - Electrical ELECTRICAL Under no circumstances is anyone to tamper with, or work legislation, all electrical equipment must be suitable for its use and certified by: (i) The Canadian Standards Association (CSA), or (ii) The Electrical Safety Authority (ESA). The Ontario Electrical Safety

42

Smart Phone Users BEWARE!! The NYPD is reporting an increase in the theft of electronic devices from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Phone Users BEWARE!! The NYPD is reporting an increase in the theft of electronic devices. Don't display it when not in use. Use a hands free device. · Change the color of your earphones from blocks and head for an area where people are or to the nearest open store. · Password protect your device

Papavasiliou, F. Nina

43

Intelligent System for Detection of Abnormalities and Theft of Electricity using Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) analysis in electric utilities using Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The main. Keywords: Support vector machine, Genetic algorithm, Electricity theft, Non-technical loss, Data mining. 1. Introduction Electricity utilities lose large amounts of money each year due to fraud by electricity consumers

Ducatelle, Frederick

44

DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

Sexton, L.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FOR VARIOUS PROLIFERATION AND THEFT SCENARIOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We must anticipate that the day is approaching when details of nuclear weapons design and fabrication will become common knowledge. On that day we must be particularly certain that all special nuclear materials (SNM) are adequately accounted for and protected and that we have a clear understanding of the utility of nuclear materials to potential adversaries. To this end, this paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing SNM and alternate nuclear materials associated with the plutonium-uranium reduction extraction (Purex), uranium extraction (UREX), coextraction (COEX), thorium extraction (THOREX), and PYROX (an electrochemical refining method) reprocessing schemes. This paper provides a set of figures of merit for evaluating material attractiveness that covers a broad range of proliferant state and subnational group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this paper is that all fissile material must be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and must be provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by subnational groups; no 'silver bullet' fuel cycle has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. The work reported herein has been performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for, the nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security is discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Collins, Brian A.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Wallace, R. K.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Attractiveness of Materials in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Various Proliferation and Theft Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an extension to earlier studies1,2 that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) and alternate nuclear materials (ANM) associated with the PUREX, UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study extends the figure of merit (FOM) for evaluating attractiveness to cover a broad range of proliferant state and sub-national group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this study is that all fissile material needs to be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by sub-national groups; no “silver bullet” has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. This series of studies has been performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities.3 The expanded methodology and updated findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security are discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Safeguards and security by design (SSBD) for the domestic threat - theft and sabotage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards by Design (SBD) is receiving significant interest with respect to international safeguards objectives. However, less attention has been focused on the equally important topic of domestic Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD), which addresses requirements such as those of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the United States. While international safeguards are concerned with detecting State diversion of nuclear material from peaceful to nuclear explosives purposes, domestic Material Protection, Control and Accounting measures (MPC&A) are focused on non-State theft and sabotage. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has described the Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' This same concept is equally applicable to SSBD for domestic requirements. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a project through its Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and more specifically its Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, to develop a domestic SSBD discipline and methodology in parallel with similar efforts sponsored by the DOE Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the IAEA for international safeguards. This activity includes the participation of industry (through DOE-sponsored contracts) and DOE National Laboratories. This paper will identify the key domestic safeguards and security requirements (i.e. MC&A and physical protection) and explain how and why Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) is important and beneficial for the design of future US nuclear energy systems.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mullen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Theft Norco Mountain bike BPD notified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Four or more citations received Fine issued 4353 9/8/2011 16:00 Elizabeth Rogers Bicycle Theft Bluish Green bicycle BPD notified 4354 9/9/2011 13:49 Short St Hair Salon Criminal Damage Graffiti on the rear

Baltisberger, Jay H.

49

CRIME STATS 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 20 Bikes Stolen 18 8 12 8 46 Petty Theft 36 25 36 46 143 Grand Thefts 15 12 11 10 48 Poss. of Stolen Property 3 6 8 2 19 Forgery 2 0 1 2 5 Identity Theft 1 2 1 1 5 Burglary from Bldg 9 11 8 15 43 Identity Theft 0 2 2 0 4 Burglaries 1 2 7 6 16 Vandalisms 3 1 3 0 7 Outstanding Warrant 11 8 15 11 45

de Lijser, Peter

50

Crime Alert: Theft of Cell Phone near Campus On November 8th, at about 4:00 pm, a student was walking on Blaine St, near Canyon Crest Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crime Alert: Theft of Cell Phone near Campus On November 8th, at about 4:00 pm, a student was walking on Blaine St, near Canyon Crest Drive listening to his iPhone on a pair of headphones. A subject approached him, asked to use his iPhone and when the victim refused, the suspect grabbed the phone and ran

51

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4705 4/1/2012 14:20 Blue Ridge Theft By Unlawful Taking Blue Northwoods Bel Aire bicycle stolen BPD Notified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By Unlawful Taking Blue Northwoods Bel Aire bicycle stolen BPD Notified 4706 4/2/2012 9:52 Kentucky Hall/2/2012 12:33 Dana Hall Theft By Unlawful Taking Red and silver bicycle stolen BPD Notified 4708 4/2/2012 17

Baltisberger, Jay H.

52

Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Sat Totals Stolen Vehicles 1 1 3 0 1 1 3 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 6 2 1 19 Burglary from Vehicle 0 7 8 15 6 6 3 45 Stolen Bikes 2 5 12 17 19 4 0 59 Petty Theft 3 22 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 5 Identity Theft 0 1 5 1 1 0 0 8 Burglary from Bldg 1 1 3 0 1 1 3 10 Vandalisms 6 8 24 6 3 12 17 19 11 79 Thefts 1 3 2 8 1 3 3 21 Identity Theft 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 Burglaries 0 1 0 7 4 0 0

de Lijser, Peter

53

Power Theft The Silent Crime'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the buildings had been intention prominent lawyer, an electrical engi tems also report losses to thieves of all dollar losses. a program to combat it.3 In 1971, the Potomac Electric Power Company Usually estimated losses of almost $1 million. When a customer steals from the utility, the company absorbs the loss

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

54

The 17th Annual IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC'06) 1-4244-0330-8/06/$20.002006 IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Technology Tampere, Finland Tampere, Finland Tampere, Finland Tampere, Finland ABSTRACT A novel

Gabbouj, Moncef

55

CRIME STATS Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Sat Totals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 36 Vehicle Tampering 1 3 1 2 3 3 1 14 Burglary from Vehicle 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Stolen Bikes 2 17 20 Property 0 3 0 2 4 3 2 14 Forgery 0 1 2 1 2 1 0 7 Identity Theft 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 5 Burglary from Bldg 1 3 5 6 13 11 11 18 34 33 154 Thefts 1 2 2 0 6 3 0 14 Identity Theft 0 1 0 3 0 3 0 7 Burglaries 1 0 2 5 5 0 0

de Lijser, Peter

56

CRIME STATS Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Sat Totals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 27 Vehicle Tampering 0 2 5 1 0 1 0 9 Burglary from Vehicle 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 5 Stolen Bikes 6 15 8 9 0 2 2 2 2 1 1 10 Forgery 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 6 Identity Theft 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 6 Burglary from Bldg 1 6 4 4 3 29 13 23 24 18 139 DUI Arrests 29 13 12 11 11 33 29 138 Thefts 0 0 0 3 3 0 2 8 Identity Theft 0 0 0 0

de Lijser, Peter

57

Identity Theft: What You Need to Know  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Registration link:  CHRIS   002664/0002. No registration is required.  However, if you want credit for the training, you must register in CHRIS.  

58

COMMUNITY ALERT INCIDENT: Catalytic Converter Thefts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

converter is a part used to reduce the toxicity of emissions from an internal combustion engine. What can

Rose, Michael R.

59

The 17th Annual IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC'06) 1-4244-0330-8/06/$20.002006 IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Finland Tampere, Finland Tampere, Finland Tampere, Finland ABSTRACT This paper introduces a method

Gabbouj, Moncef

60

Horse Theft Awareness and Prevention - 15 Steps to Minimizing Theft of Horses and Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For more information or more specif_ic guidelines for individual situations, contact law enforce- ment (police, sherif_f departments) authorities in your town, city or county. Many communities have crime prevention guidelines, sug- gestions or programs...

Gibbs, Pete G.

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tampere International Center for Signal Processing TICSP Series #47  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Lappeenranta University of Technology. In the mid 1980s you made another visit abroad. I spent the autumn

Gabbouj, Moncef

62

Tampering detection system using quantum-mechanical systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of quantum-mechanically entangled photons for monitoring the integrity of a physical border or a communication link is described. The no-cloning principle of quantum information science is used as protection against an intruder's ability to spoof a sensor receiver using a `classical` intercept-resend attack. Correlated measurement outcomes from polarization-entangled photons are used to protect against quantum intercept-resend attacks, i.e., attacks using quantum teleportation.

Humble, Travis S. (Knoxville, TN); Bennink, Ryan S. (Knoxville, TN); Grice, Warren P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Believing Your Eyes: Strengthening the Reliability of Tags and Seals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) is working together with scientific experts at the DOE national laboratories to develop the tools needed to safeguard and secure nuclear material from diversion, theft, and sabotage--tasks critical to support future arms control treaties that may involve the new challenge of monitoring nuclear weapons dismantlement. Use of optically stimulated luminescent material is one method to enhance the security and robustness of existing tamper indicating devices such as tags and seals.

Brim, Cornelia P.; Denlinger, Laura S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a unauthorized piece he created and placed in the British Museum known as 'Early Man Goes to Market' received different treatment when placed inside the walls. It was adopted into the permanent collection! I like his story because it's so counter-intuitive. Who would have thought that modern museum security might involve preventing people not just from stealing art, but from sneaking 'unauthorized' art into museums? What is next, tampering with the archive records in order to make it look like the piece in question has always been there? To learn more about museum security, I interviewed multiple experts in the field. It turns out that the glamorous lifestyle of Thomas Crown is not particularly relevant. In fact, usually nobody can point to a Mr. Big of the underworld coordinating thefts, though some organized crime families have been known to use stolen art as black market chips to trade. The common consensus among experts in the field of art theft is that, instead of most high-value pieces being stolen by outsiders with a blue print in hand and rappelling from a ceiling skylight, in reality, 80 percent of art thefts involve insiders or accomplices that execute the crime over a period of time while working or volunteering in the museum. Indeed, according to FBI statistics, between 70 and 80 percent of all solved art theft cases involve insider participation of some kind, yet according to Tom Cremers of the Musuem Security Network, 'Having been involved in risk assessments in over hundreds of museums over the past ten years, it is quite astonishing how rarely the risk of insider participation is discussed.' In regards to the insider threat, a museum is not much different from any corporation or other organization. There are directors, employees, interns, and cleaning staff (very often outsourced), security guards (again outsourced, typically with very high turnover rates). Unlike corporations, most museums also have volunteer staff, docents, and authorized visiting scholars. All these people can potentially take advantage of their position, or to be exploited by a clever attacker on the outside or insid

Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United...

66

Transgressing the Law: Karma, Theft and Its Punishment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was viewed as polluting the natural environment and to cause the displeasure of local deities and spirits. More recently, there has been a ban on the selling of cigarettes in the kingdom. Revue d’Etudes Tibétaines 50 Dharma, Laws and Happiness... in Bhutan – notably an emphasis on non-violence, peace loving and environmentally aware contented subject/citizens.3 This image and its reliance, in my opinion, on 1 Honorary Fellow, Social...

Whitecross, Richard W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid ImplementationDepartment ofAn Update on

68

Measuring Identity Theft at Top Banks (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposits, the data show that HSBC has a higher incidence ofTARGET SEARS DISH NETWORK HSBC WALMART DELL COMPUTER

Hoofnagle, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

What is identity theft? Identity theft is a serious problem affecting millions of people each year. It involves acquiring key pieces of someone's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that all balances and receipts match and no activity is unaccounted for. If you use a computer, install

Rusu, Adrian

71

Theft of the Mind: An Innovative Approach to Plagiarism and Copyright Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real-life case of alleged copyright infringement and then evaluated the defendant?s claim of fair use using the Four Factors test required by US copyright law. The points and counterpoints made by the students in the in-class discussion of ?Fair Use... it in our name? (para. 14). The authors of this chapter have interpreted this explanation to embody and apply to both plagiarism and copyright infringement. In the former case, the student may gain something (a good grade, respect, additional...

Clement, Gail; Brenenson, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Copyright and Publishing Literacy for ETD Authors: Applying the Theft of the Mind Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U, G Identify a credible source on campus for guidance on infringement avoidance Use and Misused defined User Indicator 2, Outcome e U, G Explain why the concepts of ?original authorship? and ?uniquely new creation? is changing in the 21st... of publishing an article in an open access journal Info handling choices User, Author Broadest possible access to published research and other scholarly writings G List two legal consequences a student may face if found to have infringed copyright...

Clement, Gail; Bianchi, Jo Ann

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

The development of a curb valve flow meter for gas theft detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the supply of natural gas continues to dwindle, and government decontrol of pricing progresses, the rising cost of this essential natural resource will drive more individuals to consider various forms of pilferage as a ...

Fitzgerald, Kevin Francis

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A game theory model for electricity theft detection and privacy-aware control in AMI systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a model for the operational costs of an electric distribution utility. The model focuses on two of the new services that are enabled by the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI): (1) the fine-grained anomaly ...

Cardenas, Alvaro A.

75

Government Documents Interest Group (GDIG) From Global Warming to Identity Theft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Advanced Search and Quick Search at http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx · Search the National Technical limit by range of years ­ Search Help ­ Improved Advanced & Basic Search ­ Search by Product Number ­ Technical Report Number #12;#12;NTIS Database Advanced Search #12;Category List on Next Screen Search: (by

Nair, Sankar

76

October 28, 2009, Fraud and Theft in the Information Age - Companion Book  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge,8October 2013 NewsCRAD

77

An Updated Assessment of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities Page 1  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 Documentation andEnergy| Department1AnEnergy

78

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

None

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

How to Sell GSHP Systems A Quick Guide to Making the Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the] or vandalism · No outside wiring or refrigerant no field charging ! No "point of use" pollutants ! Significant reduc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - andres merits tiina Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Unpredictable Environments Andre S. Ribeiro, Tampere University of Technology, Finland; ... Source: Yli-Harja, Olli - Institute of Signal Processing, Tampere University of...

82

Proc. of the 11th Int. Conference on Digital Audio Effects (DAFx-08), Espoo, Finland, September 1-4, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proc. of the 11th Int. Conference on Digital Audio Effects (DAFx-08), Espoo, Finland, September 1 Tampere University of Technology Tampere, Finland annamaria.mesaros@tut.fi Tuomas Virtanen, Dept. of Signal Processing Tampere University of Technology Tampere, Finland tuomas.virtanen@tut.fi ABSTRACT

Virtanen, Tuomas

83

ECE 597AB/697AB Security Engineering Syllabus, Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implementations. Types of attack -- web exploits, card fraud, hardware hacks, electronic warfare , tampering

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

84

Neutral Interface for Assembly and Manufacturing Related Knowledge Exchange in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment Minna Lanz, Roberto Rodriguez, Pasi Luostarinen, Reijo Tuokko Tampere University of Technology, Department of Production Engineering, P.O.Box 589, 33101 Tampere, Finland {minna.lanz,roberto.rodriguez,pasi.luostarinen

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Method of intrinsic marking  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of pulsed laser intrinsic marking can provide a unique identifier to detect tampering or counterfeiting.

Adams, David P; McDonald, Joel Patrick; Jared, Bradley Howell; Hodges, V. Carter; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Blair, Dianna S

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Integrating Automation Design Information with XML and Web Services Mika Viinikkala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Automation Design Information with XML and Web Services Mika Viinikkala Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Automation and Control, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere Tel. +358 3 3115, Institute of Automation and Control, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere Tel. +358 3 3115 3557, Fax. +358 3 3115

88

Information flow control for secure web sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sometimes Web sites fail in the worst ways. They can reveal private data that can never be retracted [60, 72, 78, 79]. Or they can succumb to vandalism, and subsequently show corrupt data to users [27]. Blame can fall on ...

Krohn, Maxwell N. (Maxwell Norman)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identity Theft Prevention, Computer Security, Information Assurance, Social Engineering, CyberNAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution COVERED Master's Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Title (Mix case letters) Identity Theft Prevention in Cyber

90

How to (And How Not to) Store and Transport Pesticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Site Security · Theft reports during the past year: Lee, Palm Beach, Martin, Hendry, and Manatee

Watson, Craig A.

91

How the Drudgery of Getting Water Shapes Women's Lives in Low-income Urban Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply practices: rainwater harvesting, water theft, gifts/to water, in this case from roof rainwater harvesting tanks.

Crow, Ben D; McPike, Jamie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Origin-Bound Certificates: A Fresh Approach to Strong Client Authentication for the Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or keylogging, while cookie theft happens through man-in-the-browser malware (e.g., Zeus [16]), cross site

Tomkins, Andrew

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - ahlstrom pyroflow pcfb Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: ahlstrom pyroflow pcfb Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proc. EUSIPCO, Tampere, Finland, September 2000. ARE NONUNIFORM PRINCIPAL COMPONENT Summary: @systems.caltech.edu,...

94

Improved Classification of Alzheimer's Disease Data via Removal of Nuisance Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiative 1 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland,Tampere, Finland, 2 Department ofUniversity of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland, 3 Department

Koikkalainen, Juha; Polonen, Harri; Mattila, Jussi; van Gils, Mark; Soininen, Hilkka; Lotjonen, Jyrki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - assistive technologies Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Tampere University of Technology, Automation and Control Institute Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 >...

96

Undergraduate Coordinator: Dr. Jim Leary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. of Environmental Regulation Environmental Affairs Consultants Frito Lay Jet Propulsion Laboratory Johnson, develop new biofuels, design biodegradable or tamper-resistant packages, explore agriculture for space

Watson, Craig A.

97

Microsoft Word - 2013 IWD #3155 Trident Target Area Operations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Bounding Conditions Specify preventive measures, controls for each hazard (e.g., lockouttagout points, specific Personal Protective Equipment PPE, Tamper Indicating...

98

Case School of Engineering San Diego Programs HARDWARE SECURITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: A Survey 6. Secure Hardware IPs by Digital Watermark 7. Physical Attacks, Tamper standards. Cheating includes copying from another's work, falsifying problem solutions or laboratory reports

Rollins, Andrew M.

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - attract-and-kill bait stations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. T. Eaton Co. Indoors TAMPER-PROOF CONTAINERS Heavy Duty Molded... Duty Galvanized Metal 910 TPR Metal ... Source: Pittendrigh, Barry - Department of Entomology, Purdue...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced plutonium fuels Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford University Collection: Physics 26 Proliferation J.A.Parmentola Summary: -stage, thermonuclear weapon. Plutonium Uranium Tamper Fusion Fuel High Explosive Plutonium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5340 8/1/2013 21:03 Deep Green Dorm Theft By Unlawful Taking Scrap metal stolen from dumpster behind new dorm construction BPD Notified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By Unlawful Taking Scrap metal stolen from dumpster behind new dorm construction BPD Notified 5341 8/2/2013 17 Taking Coins found missing from jar in apartment Report Filed 5346 8/9/2013 5:30 Industrial Arts Fire

Baltisberger, Jay H.

102

INTEGRATING AUTOMATION DESIGN INFORMATION WITH XML  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATING AUTOMATION DESIGN INFORMATION WITH XML Mika Viinikkala, Seppo Kuikka Institute of Automation and Control, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland Email: mika.viinikkala@tut.fi, seppo.kuikka@tut.fi Keywords: Systems integration, XML, automation design Abstract: This paper presents

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids policy exceptionalism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5272009 Page 4 of 4 Special SituationsExceptions None. Related Policies... Policy 1603 Identity Theft Red Flags Policy Responsible Office Office of the General Counsel......

104

Preventing Fraud Following a Disaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a natural disaster, people may be susceptible to price gouging, home repair fraud and identity theft. This publication explains how to protect yourself from these problems....

Cavanagh, Joyce

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Unaccounted-for gas project: Summary volume. Energy delivery and control. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The Theft Task Force analyzed the percentage of customers involved in gas theft, the average annual volume of gas stolen by a single customer, and the total number of customers and their total gas usage. Results were used in conjunction with documented customer theft to arrive at a calculation that more accurately reflected the theft contribution to UAF for 1987.

Cima, K.M.; Cottengim, T.L.; Wong, R.M.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of sampling height on the concentration of airborne fungal spores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and possible sources of air pollution.8 In addition, it is high enough to avoid vandalism and bothering aeroallergens. Airborne fungal spores are commonly collected from the outdoor air at the rooftop level of high respiration level (1.5 m above the ground) and at roof level (12 m height). Methods: Air samples were

Levetin, Estelle

107

Introduction of First Passage Time (FPT) Analysis for Software Reliability and Network Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhanshan (Sam) Ma Axel W. Krings Richard C. Millar ma@vandals.uidaho.edu krings@uidaho.edu rcmillar mostly emerged in the last two to three decades. Assuming that X(t) is a one-dimensional stochastic stochastic process such as Brownian motion, then the FPT approach may be applied to find the closed- form

Krings, Axel W.

108

2008 Summer Intern Housing Community Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, values, culture and beliefs and the opportunity to learn from others in the community. We remind you Electronic Media Failure to Comply Gambling Identification Sexual Abuse Vandalism Weapons Safety and Security, Health and Safety Inspections Fire Safety Equipment Intentional False Alarms Residence Rooms

Kaup, David J.

109

Les boursiers du Dpartement l'occasion des concours 2012-2013 des grands organismes subventionnaires (CRSH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Jaïmé Dubé (doctorat) Laurence Jay-Rayon (doctorat) Aura Navarro (doctorat) Mariana Soledad Raffo Chantale Marchand Aura Navarro (traduction) Mariana Raffo Hugo Vandal-Sirois Automne 2010 Sanaa Benmessaoud (traduction) Aura Navarro (traduction) Janine Pimentel (traduction) Bourses de rédaction ­ Mémoire et thèse

Parrott, Lael

110

AN EFFICIENT AUTHENTICATION METHOD for H.264/AVC J. Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, A.T.S. Ho, Fellow. lEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological University Singapore 639798 Email: Jingzhang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg;etsho@ntu.edu.sg Keywords: Hard detect the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness

Doran, Simon J.

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - ahonen pekka aromaa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12 springer.com EURASIP Journal on Summary: , Tampere University of Technology, Finland E-mail7 olli.yli-harja@tut.fi Dr. Pekka Ruusuvuori... ,Department of Signal...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromaa jari pitkjrvi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EQUILIBRIUM POINTS BY A DIRECT METHOD JARI MAKINEN , REIJO KOUHIA... Tampere, Finland e-mail: jari.m.makinen@tut.fi,antti.ylinen@tut.fi, web page: http... kinematical...

113

ECSCW 2003. Proceedings of the Computer Supported Scientific Collaboration Workshop, Eighth European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Helsinki, Finland, 14 September 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90014 Oulu University FINLAND Email: Helena.Karasti@oulu.fiTalja University of Tampere, Finland Abstract. The study of8. -9.9.2003, Espoo, Finland. Tuominen, K. , Talja, S. , &

Karasti, Helena; Baker, Karen; Bowker, Geoffrey C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

User Safety Agreement for Hutch Authorization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the End Station Log Book as Responsible Person whenever I take possession of the Search Reset Key*. 4. I will not tamper with any hutch interlock or component. I will operate...

116

A system using implicit feedback and Top Ranking Sentences to help users find relevant web documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White,R.W. Jose,J.M. Ruthven,I.G. 25th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (SIGIR 2002) : Tampere, Finland, 11-15 August 2002 ACM Press

White, R.W.

117

Essays on Welfare Improving Role of Monetary and Fiscal Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In another section, I analyze if the effectiveness of monetary policy changes when credit is introduced in an economy in which theft of cash exists. If agents have a choice between cash and credit, and theft exists in the economy, then expansionary monetary...

Hazra, Devika

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

1284 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 26, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Improving SVM-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

classification. I. INTRODUCTION DISTRIBUTON losses in power utilities originating from electricity theft-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using the Fuzzy Inference System Jawad Nagi, Keem Siah Yap, Sieh of fraud and electricity theft in power distribution utilities. Pre- vious work was carried out by using

Ducatelle, Frederick

119

316 Maxwell Rd., Suite 100 Alpharetta, GA 30009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000+value $ $ $ List below only jewelry, musical instruments, bikes or fine art that are valued over $2 coverages, credits and options may vary by state. identity theft expense coverage: Exclusive Benefit from coverage identity theft expense coverage at no extra cost. You will retain this coverage as long as your

120

How can you review & monitor your personal information?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

your accounts each month and access your credit report regularly. This will allow you to take actions against such crimes is to keep personal details private and safe, to avoid becoming a victim. How does Identity Theft happen? Identity theft is possible when a criminal obtains your personal information

Mahon, Bradford Z.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Forestland can provide countless hours of recreation-al benefits as well as an important source of income.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As a result, many private landowners do not realize that timber theft is a severe problem which could affect There are two legal approaches to dealing with timber theft: criminal and civil. Thanks to recent legislation in Virginia, pursuing these legal remedies has become somewhat easier for landowners. Criminal Remedies While

Liskiewicz, Maciej

122

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4314 8/2/2011 13:40 Agriculture Parking Lot Criminal Damage Spark plug cables cut on pick-up truck Report on file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:48 Boone Tavern Parking Lot Property Damage Mitsubishi Gallant Report on file 4318 8/10/2011 19:10 Anna Smith Parking Lot Theft by Unlawful Taking Car battery and Jumper Cables Report on file 4319 8 responded 4321 8/14/2011 17:14 Evans Sports Complex Theft by Unlawful Taking Solar Panel and Mounting

Baltisberger, Jay H.

123

Feasibility of suspension culture of oysters at an offshore site on the Texas coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depleted due to death and vandalism, depriving the 20- month experiment of a control. It was decided to retain the oysters at the offshore station to follow survival and to initiate another experiment. As oyster numbers offshore had declined...FEASIBILITY OF SUSPENSION CULTURE OF OYSTERS AT AN OFFSHORE SITE ON THE TEXAS COAST A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS OGLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Ogle, John Thomas

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A review of "The Reformation of the Landscape: Religion, Identity, & Memory in Early Modern Britain and Ireland" by Alexandra Walsham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

says, provides ?evidence of the agency of ordinary people in cleansing their land of abominable idols? (137). #22; e zeal of the New Model Army extended even beyond church property, when soldiers saw #23; t to vandalize mysterious geological sites... histories. Her book occasionally falters when the litany of examples loses any manifest connection to landscape, par- ticularly because questions of aesthetics rarely factor into her analysis. Granted, speci#23; c meanings located in or imposed upon...

Jordan, Nicolle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Volume 70, Numbers 3 & 4 (complete)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

says, provides ?evidence of the agency of ordinary people in cleansing their land of abominable idols? (137). #22; e zeal of the New Model Army extended even beyond church property, when soldiers saw #23; t to vandalize mysterious geological sites... histories. Her book occasionally falters when the litany of examples loses any manifest connection to landscape, par- ticularly because questions of aesthetics rarely factor into her analysis. Granted, speci#23; c meanings located in or imposed upon...

Dickson, Donald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Security of the Europena Electricity Systems: Conceptualizing the ssessment Criteria and Core Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

 effect’ of economic, social and environmental damage post?attacks (Douglas,  2005). While the existing grids are  in the process of being digitalized and getting  ‘smart’ for efficiency improvement reasons; it also invites a new and increased risk  of...  external  events can be natural (such as natural calamities and severe weather conditions),  accidental  (such  as  explosions  and  nuclear  accidents)  or  human?engineered  malicious  threats  (such  as  terrorist  attacks,  sabotage  and  vandalism  and...

Jamasb, Tooraj Nepal, Rabindra

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fundamentalist Contextualist Compatibilism: A Response to the Consequence Argument  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurrences, such as heart attacks and car theft. Because ofthat I’ll have a heart attack sometime in the next sixthat I don’t have a heart attack in the next six months.

Pendergraft, Garrett

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

phone 206.543.6486 fax 206.543.3808  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insurance coverage disputes Non-injury car or bike accidents ENHANCING JUSTICE Top 10 Financial Issues for UW Students 1. Identity theft 2. Misleading sales practices 3. Scams and fraud 4. Internet sales

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

130

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU-100-001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to extreme heat or cold or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Protect the equipment from theft. 2.5.3. For policies regarding remote access to Boston University's information resources, see Remote Access Policy [BU 100-001A]. #12;

Guenther, Frank

131

Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

Schlesinger, Adam Ian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Enlightened shelf awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of RFID technology in libraries has increased to the point where it is now the centerpiece of emerging automated self-checkout, return, and theft detection systems. With the external borders of the library secure, ...

Ehrenberg, Isaac M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Building practical systems that compute on encrypted data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theft of confidential data is prevalent. In most applications, confidential data is stored at servers. Thus, existing systems naturally try to prevent adversaries from compromising these servers. However, experience has ...

Popa, Raluca Ada

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Page 1 of 17 Vehicle Operation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for any damage to or theft of vehicles or any articles left therein, while parked on CSM property of parking privileges on the CSM campus for a minimum of one (1) full academic semester, and may also result

135

Will they buy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proliferation of inexpensive video recording hardware and enormous storage capacity has enabled the collection of retail customer behavior at an unprecedented scale. The vast majority of this data is used for theft ...

Kubat, Rony Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Characterizing pervasive vehicular access to the cellular RAN infrastructure: an urban case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features of pervasive vehicular access in a case- study large-scale urban environment, in presence] and distant support for safety, diagnostic and anti-theft services (e.g., BMW Assist, Ford SYNC, General Motor

Fiore, Marco

137

SPRING 2013 MOVE-OUT INFORMATION TO: Yudof Residents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sharon Roberson ­ Business Operations Supervisor Gary McLean ­ Facilities Operations Supervisor DATE of abandoned bikes. #12;THEFT: With so many unknown people in the building who are here to help, it is also

Blanchette, Robert A.

138

Improved Security Via ''Town Crier'' Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste managers are increasingly expected to provide good security for the hazardous materials they marshal. Good security requires, among other things, effective tamper and intrusion detection. We have developed and demonstrated a new method for tamper and intrusion detection which we call the ''town crier method''. It avoids many of the problems and vulnerabilities associated with traditional approaches, and has significant advantages for hazardous waste transport. We constructed two rudimentary town crier prototype systems, and tested them for monitoring cargo inside a truck. Preliminary results are encouraging.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, A. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Improved security via 'Town Crier' monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste managers are increasingly expected to provide good security for the hazardous materials they marshal. Good security requires, among other things, effective tamper and intrusion detection. We have developed and demonstrated a new method for tamper and intrusion detection which we call the 'town crier' method. It avoids many of the problems and vulnerabilities associated with traditional approaches, and has significant advantages for hazardous waste transport. We constructed two rudimentary town crier prototype systems, and tested them for monitoring cargo inside a truck. Preliminary results are encouraging.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Efficient Video Authentication for H.264/AVC School of Electrical and Electronic Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineer Nanyang Technology University 639798 Singapore jingzjang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg Anthony T. S. Ho School the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness the algorithm the effectiveness the algorithm. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. Sec- tion 2 provides the reader

Doran, Simon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Practical issues on CFD use and some industry aspects on research with CFD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tampere #12;Our core areas of engineering are: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Structural Analysis (FEMPractical issues on CFD use and some industry aspects on research with CFD Sture Boström, 24.3.2011 Process Flow Ltd Oy www.processflow.fi #12;Outline Process Flow Ltd Oy Industrial example: CFD analysis

Zevenhoven, Ron

142

Hindawi Publishing Corporation EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Ying Chen,1 Ye-Kui Wang,2 Kemal Ugur,2 Miska M. Hannuksela,2 Jani Lainema,2 and Moncef Gabbouj1 1 Center, Visiokatu 1, 33720 Tampere, Finland Correspondence should be addressed to Ying Chen, ying supplemental enhancement information (SEI) and parallel decoding SEI. Copyright © 2009 Ying Chen et al

Gabbouj, Moncef

143

Optimal Neighborhood Preserving Visualization by Maximum Satisfiability Kerstin Bunte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Finland Matti J¨arvisalo HIIT, University of Helsinki Finland Jeremias Berg HIIT, University of Helsinki Finland Petri Myllym¨aki HIIT, University of Helsinki Finland Jaakko Peltonen University of Tampere, Finland HIIT, Aalto University, Finland Samuel Kaski HIIT, Aalto University, University

Kaski, Samuel

144

Project 93L-EWL-097, fire alarm system improvements, 300 Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) which will demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems in the 338 Building function as intended. The ATP will test the fire alarm control panel, flow alarm pressure switch, post indicator valve tamper switch, heat detectors, flow switches, and fire alarm signaling devices.

Scott, M.V.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ret2dir: Rethinking Kernel Isolation Vasileios P. Kemerlis Michalis Polychronakis Angelos D. Keromytis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) attacks redirect corrupted kernel pointers to data residing in user space. In response, sev- eral kernel code in privileged mode, or tamper-with critical kernel data structures, by exploiting a kernel, and are applicable in x86/x86-64, ARM, and other popular architectures. In response to ret2usr attacks, several

Yang, Junfeng

146

Energy and Environment Programme, Royal Institute of International Affairs 1 Intergovernmental Actions on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actions on Illegal Logging Forest Law Enforcement and Governance Conference, 11 September 2001 Duncan all along chain of custody (logging, processing, export) ­ need for: · Accredited certifiers (government, NGO, company) · Independent monitoring · Tamper-proof accompanying documentation/ information

147

Phoneme-dependent NMF for speech enhancement in monaural mixtures Bhiksha Raj1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phoneme-dependent NMF for speech enhancement in monaural mixtures Bhiksha Raj1 , Rita Singh1, over conventional NMF-based separation. Index terms: Monaural signal separation, speech enhance- ment, Tampere, Finland. Abstract The problem of separating speech signals out of monaural mix- tures (with other

Virtanen, Tuomas

148

Three-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays: Static magnetic response R. De Luca and T. Di Matteo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays: Static magnetic response R. De Luca and T. Di Matteo Tampere, Finland Received 17 July 1997 In this work we present a simple three-dimensional Josephson-junction directions perpendicular to one cube side. S0163-1829 98 05502-7 I. INTRODUCTION The interest in Josephson-junction

Di Matteo, Tiziana

149

Cryptanalysis of Two Dynamic IDbased Remote User Authentication Schemes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Harbin City 150001, China 2 Automobile Management Institute of PLA, Bengbu City 233011, China guessing attack under their non­tamper resistance assumption of the smart card; (2) It fails to provide of schemes. Keywords: Cryptanalysis, Authentication protocol, O#ine password guessing attack, Smart card

150

Approved by Principal Investigator_____________________________Date:________________ Approved by Super User: _____________________________Date:________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside the RIE system chassis. In addition, the external RF power supply unit has connections behind the RF power supply chassis. Do not disconnect the external RF lines. Use normal precautions C. Chemical: Bottled gases are used with the RIE. Do not disconnect or tamper with gas lines behind

Healy, Kevin Edward

151

Approved by BNC Managing Director______Paul Lum___________Date:________________ Approved by PI (s) /Super User (s): _Peter Hosemann/Andy Minor_Date:________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside the FEG/FIB system chassis. In addition, the power supply unit has connections behind the FEG) connections behind the FEG/FIB chassis. C. Chemical: Bottled gases are used with the FEG/FIB. Do not disconnect or tamper with gas lines on the FIB. D. Pressure Hazards: Pressurized bottled and house gases

Healy, Kevin Edward

152

Integration of automation design information using XML technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of automation design information using XML technologies Master of Science Thesis Mika UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF AUTOMATION #12;2 Abstract TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Automation Degree Program Institute of Automation and Control Viinikkala, Mika: Integration of automation design

153

Process Assessment In Very Small Entities An ISO/IEC 29110 based method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Assessment In Very Small Entities An ISO/IEC 29110 based method Timo Varkoi Tampere entities I. INTRODUCTION A new standard, ISO/IEC 29110 Software Engineering -- Lifecycle Profiles for Very. ISO/IEC 29110 Guides (TR) Assessment Guide (TR 29110-3) Management and Engineering Guide (TR 29110

Québec, Université du

154

Voice Conversion Jani Nurminen1, Hanna Siln2, Victor Popa2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of voice conversion, it is essential to understand the factors that determine the perceived speaker0 Voice Conversion Jani Nurminen1, Hanna Silén2, Victor Popa2, Elina Helander2 and Moncef Gabbouj2 1Accenture 2Tampere University of Technology Finland 1. Introduction Voice conversion (VC

Gabbouj, Moncef

155

Memory-centric Security Architecture Weidong Shi Chenghuai Lu Hsien-Hsin S. Lee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computing School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332- loads and cycle based out-of-order processor simulation. 1 Introduction Recently, there is a growing interest in creating tamper-resistant/copy protection systems that combine the strengths of security

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

156

2009 No part may be reproduced in any form without prior authorization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Tamper Detection 3. Comm. Protocol Security 4. Risk Mgmt. Enhancement 5. High Speed Encryption 1. Self Healing Grid without prior authorization. Goal: Optimize controls to compensate for damage or failure conditions prior authorization. Intelligent Flight Control System: Example ­ complete hydraulic failure (1997) #12

Amin, S. Massoud

157

Insider Attacker Detection in Wireless Sensor Fang Liu & Xiuzhen Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be low-cost and lack of tamper resistance. The compromise or capture of a sensor releases all the intrusion detection techniques developed for a fixed wired network. A typical low-cost sensor has limited working towards securing sensor networks in the fields of pairwise key establishment [13

Cheng, Xiuzhen "Susan"

158

Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems This paper studies the security requirements for remote authentication and communication in smart grid to smart grid systems. For example, in order to unlock the credentials stored in tamper

Wang, Yongge

159

Semi-BlindImage Restoration Based on TelltaleWatermarking Deepa Kundur and DimitriosHatzinakos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the embedded stream. The altered stream is used for semi-blind restoration to undo tampering. It is assumedSemi-BlindImage Restoration Based on TelltaleWatermarking ~ AUTHENTIC IMAGE Deepa Kundur the restorationof locally degraded images based on telltalefragilewatermarking. In our approach a data stream culled

Kundur, Deepa

160

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, dishwashing machine and water heater. Stop operating until power is restored. Write down the time of onset Lesson 3 Fire 4 Lesson 4 Water service disruption or contamination 5 Lesson 5 Biological tampering into refrigerated food storage (it will raise the temperature). 8 Discard food that is unsafe to eat. Partially

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NON-NEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATION FOR HIGHLY NOISE-ROBUST ASR: TO ENHANCE OR TO RECOGNIZE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¨at M¨unchen, Germany 2 Department ESAT, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium 3 Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, Finland weninger@tum.de ABSTRACT This paper proposes a multi. On the one hand, a clean speech sig- nal can be estimated from the product of speech dictionaries

Virtanen, Tuomas

162

Proliferation J.A.Parmentola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­stage, thermonuclear weapon. Plutonium Uranium Tamper Fusion Fuel High Explosive Plutonium Primary Secondary #15; High, the fusion fuel (containing deuterium and 6 Li), and the remaining pluto­ nium. The uranium and plutonium `burn' and increase the temperature until fusion occurs. #15; The energy released by the fusion reaction

Gilfoyle, Jerry

163

Banking Security: Attacks and Defences Steven J. Murdoch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is still a serious problem in the UK Initially (2005), PEDs were tampered on a small scale and installed;Counterfeit fraud mainly exploited backwards compatibility features · Upgrading to Chip & PIN was too complex a full copy of the magstrip · Simplifies issuer upgrade · Chip transactions can be processed by systems

Doran, Simon J.

164

Transmission Line Security Monitor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Annals of Telecoms. Volume X n X/2005, pages 1 X Data confidentiality: to which extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be accessed by an unauthorized person or program. The integrity property guarantees that the data cannot management is performed on the server, relying on the assumption that the server is a trusted party. However. KEYWORDS: data confidentiality, access control management, data encryption, integrity control, tamper

166

Annals of Telecoms. Volume X n X/2005, pages 1 X Data confidentiality: to which extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data can never be accessed by an unauthorized person or program. The integrity property guarantees management is performed on the server, relying on the assumption that the server is a trusted party. However. KEYWORDS: data confidentiality, access control management, data encryption, integrity control, tamper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Supplementary Table1. TE-derived miRNAs. ath-MIR414 MI0001425 chr1:25141119-25141226(-) ATCopia24I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Table1. TE-derived miRNAs. Namea Accnb Coordsc TEd Overlape ath-MIR414 MI0001425 chr1:25141119-25141226(-) ATCopia24I (LTR/Copia) 57.41 ath-MIR855 MI0005411 chr2:4681509-4681780(+) Athila4B_LTR (LTR/Gypsy) 100.00 ath-MIR416 MI0001427 chr2:7015602-7015681(+) Vandal1 (DNA/MuDR) 100.00 ath-MIR405a MI0001074 chr2

Jordan, King

168

Evaluation of Canal Lining Projects in the Lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?unintentional?vandalism,?and?normal?irrigation?district?operational?and?maintenance? activities.??Each?project?was?evaluated?using?a?visual?inspection?process?during?which? performance/condition?ratings?were?assigned.? ? Without?question,?the?best?lining?system?is?a?synthetic?liner?with?a?protective?barrier?of? shotcrete.??The?synthetic?liner?significantly?reduces?seepage,?while?the?shotcrete?protects...?it? from?damage.??This?lining?system?needs?little?to?no?maintenance.??There?were?two?types?of? liners?used:?PVC?and?polyester.??Each?performed?equally?as?well.? ? The?performance?of?synthetic?liners?without?a?protective...

Karimov, Askar; Leigh, Eric; Fipps, Guy

169

A review of "Drama and the Performing Arts in Pre-Cromwellian Ireland: A Repertory of Sources and Documents from the Earliest Times Until c. 1642." by Alan J. Fletcher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

among the Irish State Papers in the Public Record Office in London describing the vandalism of a statue by Sir Brian O?Rourke and his men. According to one document: . . . O reworcke found an Image of a [tall] tall woman and wroate vpon the brest...). The other documents in Sir Brian O?Rourke?s ?trayterous pagent? (6.3) support the above statement. Not all performing artists were designated as such, neither O?Rourke nor his men were entertainers in the true sense, though they could easily be classified...

Kay J. Blalock

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degree. More than half of committed in rural America are urglaries, and many farm thefts go unre- pays for rural crime losses? rmer pays for the millions of dollars lost eft of farm machinery. Too often these are simply written off in higher... insurance y equipment replacement, lost work urs and so forth. mers can discourage and minimize y theft from their farms is by providing a law enforcement officers to easily identify Mark all machinery and tools with a tification number (ID). Use...

Nelson, Gary S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

Bzorgi, Fariborz M

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Understanding Users' Requirements for Data Protection in Smartphones Ildar Muslukhov #1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ece.ubc.ca 5 beznosov@ece.ubc.ca Nokia Research Center Palo Alto, USA 3 cynthia.kuo@nokia.com 4 jonathan than browsing the Web [3]. Recent report shows that 96% of the U.S. population have a mobile phone, 35 or damaged. Recent report shows that 52% of Miami city's population have experienced cell phone loss or theft

173

Eurocontrol Workshop Dec , 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chilled products ­ Piles of cartons Fresh fruits 1. Carton alignment for unrestricted air flow 2 practices · Dangerous products · Pharmaceutical products · Air cargo theft Manifest · Detailed loading plan Including Air Traffic Abder AGGOUN abder.aggoun@klsoptim.com #12;Eurocontrol Workshop ­ Dec , 2008 Packing

Flener, Pierre

174

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF BEIRUT UNIVERSITY RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

): _____________________________________________________ 9. RADIOACTIVE WASTE What method(s) will be used to dispose of your radioactive wastes? Separation): _____________________________________________________ How will you secure radioactive waste to prevent loss or theft? Waste container will be conspicuously will be the principal authorized user for communications, ordering radioactive materials, etc. The Training

Shihadeh, Alan

175

Justification for Acquisition and Use of Broadband Device Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal Use of NIH Information Technology (IT) Resources Policy (http://www3.od.nih.gov/oma/manualchapters/management Cellular Activation* AT&T Verizon T-Mobile Provide SIMM Card Number* *GO TO SETTINGS ­ GENERAL country. I will immediately report the loss or theft of my broadband device as outlined in the Managing

176

Improvement of the QoS via an Adaptive and Dynamic Distribution of Applications in a Mobile Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@irisa.fr Anne-Marie Kermarrec Microsoft Research Ltd. St George house 1, Guildhall Street Cambridge CB2 3NH. UK to the battery life limit. - Wireless connections used by PIA suffer from a low and extremely variable bandwidth for battery lifetime reason or hos- tile events such as security problems, theft or destruc- tion. - PIA may

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Student Business Services Student Services Bldg.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Business Services 203 Hahn Student Services Bldg. sbs.ucsc.edu Sheryl Hoffman #12;Information Student Billing Refunds: Financial Aid, Loans and scholarships Direct Deposit Checks Deferred As an outgrowth of the University's commitment to the student's privacy and protection against identity theft

California at Santa Cruz, University of

178

Volume 130, Number 30 tech.mit.edu Wednesday, August 4, 2010 Oldest and Largest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

televisions and propane tanks, in a dumpster reserved for single-stream recycling. According to Komola on security and theft prevention in a storage unit at nearby Metro- politan Storage Warehouse in May. Manning and carbon-copied to sev- eral MIT individuals and to Man- ning. The storage unit had no con- nection

Ishii, Hiroshi

179

Evolving Strategies for the Prisoner's Dilemma JENNIFER GOLBECK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and then compared to the performance of the controls. The results presented here strongly indicate behavior from petty theft to nuclear war. Much of the current body of research has focused on which should perform well. My hypothesis is that superior strategies have two traits in common. First, they can

Golbeck, Jennifer

180

Copyright Siemens Business Services Patient Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Copyright Siemens Business Services Patient Tracking based on RFID labels ThomasThomas JellJell Principal ConsultantPrincipal Consultant DirectorDirector SBS SI 22 #12;2 Siemens One Projects · SBS Companies / Goverment #12;3 Siemens One Projects · Showroom GfM Furniture · Designer Knock Offs ( · Theft

Manstein, Dietmar J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Abstract--Efficient methods for detecting electricity fraud has been an active research area in recent years. This paper presents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, genetic algorithm, electricity theft, non-technical loss, load profile. I. INTRODUCTION LECTRIC utilities for electric utilities using Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The main motivation, electric utilities will never be able to eliminate fraud, however, it is possible to take measures

Ducatelle, Frederick

182

Campus Safety Tips Connect Ed ConnectEd is a service that allows the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while on campus, espe- cially in the Library. Use a U-Lock to lock up your bike. Do not give out your personal infor- mation to strangers, you may become a victim of Identity Theft. If you dial 9-1-1 from

de Lijser, Peter

183

Northwestern University Information Technology Your data. Your privacy. Your role.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the risk presented by identity theft, and avoid possible criminal and civil action and penalties Network of those actions: Your information -- Protecting your personally identifiable information helps keep it private and out of the hands of identity thieves Safety of our constituents -- Proper handling

Shahriar, Selim

184

Log Design for Accountability Denis Butin, Marcos Chicote and Daniel Le Metayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the logs we examine here record actions by data controllers handling personally identifiable information or identity theft can arise through criminal obtainment of PII. To address these threats, legislation on how safeguards for the private sector and the 1974 Privacy Act [7] does so for government agencies. In practice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Virginia State Police www.vsp.virginia.gov Media Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) on the Smart Road at Virginia Tech. At the time of the armed robbery, Radford City Police had issued a multi of an abandoned vehicle on the Smart Road on Dec. 8, they immediately notified Radford City Police of its recovery-SUICIDE Radford City Police Link Auto Theft to Gunman BLACKSBURG, Va. ­ Virginia State Police have identified

Virginia Tech

186

Salvaging Timber: What should I do with my damaged timber?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Casualty losses can be claimed on IRS Form 4684, which is available in IRS Publi- cation 2194, the Disaster Losses Kit. To file IRS Form 4684, Casualties and Theft, and claim a loss, a landowner needs three values: ? fair market value before...

Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

IBM Web Security -Overview Animation With more instrumentation, interconnections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IBM enables you to not only protect your existing web applications and backend databases, but also, there is the IBM Proventia family of network and host solutions, for real-time ahead of the threat protection at risk, which can lead to identity theft and fraud. #12;Our changing technological landscape demands new

188

M E M O R A N D U M To: IT Steering Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to marriage); information in #12;student education records that is protected under the Family Educational with these procedures over the past seventeen months, and your comments. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PROCEDURES I of this information. Loss of data integrity, theft of data, and unauthorized or inadvertent disclosure could lead

Qiu, Weigang

189

Devorah Heitner, PhD of Raising Digital Natives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issues to discuss with your child. You can create a smart tech culture in your family where you lead for technology to bring your family together. Dr. Heitner will discuss issues such as choosing quality apps, how) Register Protecting Your Money from Cons, Fraud and Identity Fraud Theft With NU Life Matters People from

Ottino, Julio M.

190

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 100-000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Plan and controls will not prohibit building access to authorized disaster recovery personnel personnel should be logged whenever feasible. 2.2. Facility Security Plan [164.310(a)(2)(ii)] ­ CEs must, or theft. Each CE must develop a Facility Security Plan specific to its local environment. 2

Guenther, Frank

191

We've found an error in our paper. In the threshold signature scheme that we used, there are restrictions on the threshold value. In particular if the key is shared over a degree t polynomial, then 2t+1 players (not t+1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and will be updating the paper accordingly. Securing Bitcoin wallets via threshold signatures Steven Goldfeder stevenag@cs.princeton.edu Arvind Narayanan arvindn@cs.princeton.edu ABSTRACT The Bitcoin ecosystem has suffered frequent thefts serious. Due to the irre- versibility, automation, and pseudonymity of transactions, Bitcoin currently

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

192

2010 Daily Log Report #: 2010-00262  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Daily Log June 2010 Report #: 2010-00262 Reported: 06/30/10 0957 Occurred: 06/24/10 1630 to 0957 Incident: Theft Location: Founders Hall Disposition: Report--Open Comments: Several textbooks stolen from office. No Reportable Activity on 06/29/10 Report #: 2010-00261 Reported: 06/28/10 1720

Boyce, Richard L.

193

FEBRUARY 2008 Report #: 2008-00182  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEBRUARY 2008 Report #: 2008-00182 Reported: 02/29/08 1814 Occurred: Same Incident: Theft Location: Dorms ­ Woodcrest Apartment (Oak) Disposition: Report--Inactive Comments: Student reported personal belongings came up missing from her room. Report #: 2008-00181 Reported: 02/29/08 1702 Occurred: Same

Boyce, Richard L.

194

August 2008 Report #: 2008-00632  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2008 Report #: 2008-00632 Reported: 08/30/08 1757 Occurred: Same Incident: Fire/Smoke Alarm Location: Dorms--Callahan Hall Disposition: Report--Closed Comments: Fire alarm activation due to burnt popcorn. Report #: 2008-00631 Reported: 08/30/08 0900 Occurred: 08/28/08 1050 to 1205 Incident: Theft

Boyce, Richard L.

195

2009 Daily Log Report #: 2009-00202  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Daily Log March 2009 Report #: 2009-00202 Reported: 03/31/09 2045 Occurred: 03/29/09 1400 to 03/30/09 2000 Incident: Theft Location: Lot Q Disposition: Report--Open Comments: GPS System stolen from unlocked vehicle. Report #: 2009-00201 Reported: 03/31/09 1833 Occurred: Same Incident: Fire

Boyce, Richard L.

196

JANUARY 2008 Report #: 2008-00070  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JANUARY 2008 Report #: 2008-00070 Reported: 01/31/08 1914 Occurred: 01/31/08 1300 to 1900 Incident: Theft Location: Parking Lot M Disposition: Report--Inactive Comments: Student reported his NKU Student Parking Permit was taken from his unlocked vehicle. Report #: 2008-00069 Reported: 01/30/08 1410 Occurred

Boyce, Richard L.

197

Report #: 2008-00572 Reported: 07/31/08 2200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July 2008 Report #: 2008-00572 Reported: 07/31/08 2200 Occurred: Same Incident: Disorderly Conduct and trying to incite a crowd. Report #: 2008-00571 Reported: 07/31/08 1012 Occurred: 07/30/08 1230 to 07/31/08 1000 Incident: Burglary Location: Landrum Disposition: Report--Open Comments: Theft of property from

Boyce, Richard L.

198

TABLE OF CONTENTS Risk Analysis Methods Adapted to Computer Security (Revised Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security e Espionage e Terrorism e Nuclear Theft Environmental Risk Computer Reliability Health & Safety#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page Risk Analysis Methods Adapted to Computer Security (Revised Security Lattice Management c. T. Fe~guson & c. B. Murphy . . . · · . . . 15 Gould Computer Systems

199

In Nevada, during 2008, about 16,000 motor vehicles were stolen.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-propelled vehicle that runs on land surfaces and not on rails (FBI, 2008). Nationally, nearly 1 million motor vehicles were stolen in 2008, totaling over $6 billion in losses (FBI, 2008). Efforts to control motor 1994, the national rate of motor vehicle theft has remained relatively stable (see Figure 1) (FBI, 2008

Hemmers, Oliver

200

Supply Chain Logistics Post Recovery Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Logistics · Land Bridges, Inland ports, Import Warehouses, Plant Locations · Domestic Logistics · Retail / Consumer Demands, Geographic "Mega Regions," Land Prices Impacts, Freight Security / Theft, Network Design Changes · Green Logistics · Green measures, Certifications, Urban Heat Island, Stormwater, Energy

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SCI-FI NO MORE Restoring sight to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bots INVISIBLE CITIES Michelle Povinelli plots solar theft 46 36 26 SPRING 2013 #12;The USC Viterbi SchoolJimCollins'good-to-greatascent: passion, excellence and the resources to fuel them. We have encapsulated the first two in the following

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

202

Impact of orifice metering uncertainties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a recent utility study, attributed 38% of its unaccounted-for UAF gas to orifice metering uncertainty biasing caused by straightening vanes. How this was determined and how this applied to the company's orifice meters is described. Almost all (97%) of the company's UAF gas was found to be attributed to identifiable accounting procedures, measurement problems, theft and leakage.

Stuart, J.W. (Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

GUIDELINES: KEEPING GOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUIDELINES: KEEPING GOOD RESEARCH LAB NOTEBOOKSUC San Diego's Technology Transfer Office (TTO to university policies and guidelines thereby providing incentives for the generation of new innovations and initials. · Consider the possibility of theft, damage, or loss of logbook and take appropriate measure (e

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

204

Online Money Management Tools for Students Borrow strategically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Money Management Tools for Students Borrow strategically Direct Loan program: studentloans.com/CreditEducation/WhatsInYourScore.aspx What you need to know about your credit: ftc.gov/gettingcredit Manage your personal finances Money management: onestop.umn.edu/finances/manage_money Planning your financial life: mymoney.gov Identity Theft

Weinberger, Hans

205

Yes, you can control lost and unaccounted-for gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982, lost and unaccounted-for gas cost the US gas industry $1.983 billion, based on a gas worth of $5.00/1000 CF. A survey of key gas operators across the country produced a list of 23 suggestions for reducing gas losses in the areas of leakage control, measurement practices, accounting accuracy, and theft prevention.

Hale, D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

IMPROVING ELECTRIC FRAUD DETECTION USING CLASS IMBALANCE STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that automatically detects suspicious behavior analyzing customers historical consumption curve. Thus, UTE's expertsIMPROVING ELECTRIC FRAUD DETECTION USING CLASS IMBALANCE STRATEGIES Mat´ias Di Martino, Federico, jmolinelli}@gmail.com Keywords: Electricity theft, Support vector machine, Optimum path forest, Unbalance

207

SUMMER SCHOOL CLASS OF INTEREST --2012 DS 501 Special Topics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or "Earthships;" light-emitting and energy-harvesting fabrics; the cityscapes and "new neighborhoods and environmental problems (e.g., overwhelming waste, toxicity, inequities from globalization). Twenty-first century to generating and transporting light, conceiving of and manufacturing clothing, cleaning water, preventing theft

Sheridan, Jennifer

208

November 2007 USING STORAGE ENCRYPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

user devices, such as personal computers, portable electronic devices, and removable storage media in disruption, identity theft, and other fraud. End user devices, such as personal computers, portable the confidentiality of the information stored on the devices and enable unauthorized persons to gain access

209

How to Properly Secure Your Bicycle Make sure the U-lock passes through the center of the frame as well as both wheels!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to Properly Secure Your Bicycle Make sure the U-lock passes through the center of the frame as well as both wheels! Improperly Securing & Locking Your Bicycle Makes It an Easy Target for Thieves and seats Most thefts of bicycles occur because the lock being used is either a cable lock

Blanchette, Robert A.

210

BICYCLE WARNING Bicycles must be parked in bicycle racks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BICYCLE WARNING Bicycles must be parked in bicycle racks They are not to be locked to or leaned responsibilities of University employees. Bicycles found in violation are subject to ticketing and/or impoundment YOUR BICYCLE Fill the bike lock as much as possible This helps to prevent theft as tools are difficult

Thompson, Michael

211

Table 1. A survey of bicycle experience from 208 National Taiwan University students who use or have used a bicycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. A survey of bicycle experience from 208 National Taiwan University students who use or have used a bicycle Questions Avg. Answer What is the total period that you ride a bike in campus? 2 and Participatory Sensing ABSTRACT Bicycle theft has been a well-known issue for many years. This study presents

Ouhyoung, Ming

212

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ACADEMIC SENATE, IRVINE DIVISION Council on Student Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for victims. Crime rates overall are low. The largest issue on campus is theft of personal property), the Director of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, the Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student, 48 recommendations were made. UC Irvine formed an event management team which works prior to events

Rose, Michael R.

213

SANCTIONING GUIDELINES STUDENT ORGANIZATION VIOLATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and facilitate risk management program that focuses on ethical #12;Student Conduct Code: Sanctioning Guidelines and the consequences of property damage or theft. · Every person involved in incident write a reflection paper. · Every. Taking property/property damage 1.1. Intentional taking of (a) University property or (b) property

Gering, Jon C.

214

U N I V E R S I T Y O F F L O R I D A I N F O R M AT I O N P R I V A C Y P O L I C I E S & P R O C E D U R E S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to repay the funds or repayable from specific property pledged by or on behalf of the person (i E D U R E S GENERAL PRIVACY MANAGEMENT Privacy Policy & Procedure ManualGeneral Privacy Management. Identity Theft Prevention Program Use of Social Security Numbers and Financial Information POLICIES Rev

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

215

MEMBER HANDBOOK Klotsche Center and Pavilion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rooms 8. Loss or Theft 9. Lost and Found 10. Personal Property 11. Plastic Water Bottles 12 within the Division of Student Affairs and manages the facilities and the recreational sport programs VALUES 3 II. GENERAL 3 1. Facilities 2. Location 3. Phone Numbers 4. Hours 5. Programming 6. Reservation

Saldin, Dilano

216

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, suppl6ment au n012, Tome 49, dgcembre 1988  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If the burn fraction of fuel in a cryogenic target of one-shell three-layers (lead tamper, aluminium pusher%. For such an optimized target, the ion-beam-energy and power radiating on target are required to be 6 MJ and 200 TW/cm2 respectively in order to realize Ti = 4 keV and R = 4 g/cm* for fuel. Spherical hollow shell target forms

Boyer, Edmond

217

Security seal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

Gobeli, Garth W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Security seal. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to fingerprints are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

Gobeli, G.W.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

Tippee, B.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Groundwater monitoring system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Ensures appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access; theft, diversion, loss of custody, or destruction of nuclear weapons, or weapons components; espionage; loss or theft of classified matter or Government property; and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security or on the health and safety of Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor employees, the public, or the environment. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01. Cancels DOE 5630.11B, DOE 5630.13A, DOE 5630.14A, DOE 5630.15, DOE 5630.16A, DOE 5630.17, DOE 5631.1C, DOE 5631.4A, DOE 5634.1B, DOE 5634.3, DOE 5639.3, and Chapter IX of DOE M 5632.1C-1

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

THE IMPACT OF ANCHOR ITEM EXPOSURE ON MEAN/SIGMA LINKING AND IRT TRUE SCORE EQUATING UNDER THE NEAT DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have evaluated the impact of exposed anchor items on the IRT equating process using Monte Carlo investigations (Jurich, DeMars, & Goodman, 2012; Jurich, Goodman, & Becker, 2010). However, studies of item exposure up to this date 3 have not placed... condition that included examinees with a low level of ability or the condition with the organized item theft group. Few studies have investigated the impact of exposed anchor items on the IRT equating process using Monte Carlo investigations. Jurich, De...

Barri, Moatasim Asaad

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

All regulations and procedures are subject to amendment. Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that access or utilize covered data understand their responsibility with respect to complying with the GLBA 23 Federal Register, p. 346484) http://www.ftc.gov/os/2002/05/67fr36585.pdf New Jersey Identity Theft Prevention Act, NJSA 56:8-161 through 56:8-166, http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2004/Bills/PL05/226_.HTM 50

Garfunkel, Eric

224

Cryptanalysis of S-DES Dr. K. S. Ooi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery. Other forms of security threat do exist, for example: identity theft, cyber stalking and cyber-DES Results 8.8 Difference Pair Table of S0 8.9 Difference Pair Table of S1 8.10 Difference Distribution Table of S0 8.11 Difference Distribution Table of S1 8.12 Differential Characteristic of S-DES 8.13 I/0 Table

Babinkostova, Liljana

225

Design of a Computerized Energy Management System for Marine Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEStGN OF A COtWUTERIZED ENERGY MANAGEtffiNT SYSTEt1 FOR MARINE APPLICATIONS B. Don Russell Leslie W. Perry, Gary W. Gerloff, R. Page Heller Gary Pankonien Texas A&M University MICON, Incorporated ECI College Station, Texas College Station, Texas... formance. In short, engine operators need assistance in two areas: improved data to increase operating efficiencies and improved data to control losses and eliminate fuel theft. In an attempt to solve this problem, Electronic Concepts, Inc. and MICON...

Russell, B. D.; Perry, L. W.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller, R. P.; Pankonien, G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Why is the insider a concern? There are many documented cases of nuclear material available for sale - there are more insider diversions than outsider attacks and more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. Insider attributes are: have access, has authority, possesses knowledge, works with absence of timeline, can test system, and may act alone or support a team. Material control and accountability (MC&A) is an essential part of an integrated safeguards system. Objectives of MC&A are: (1) Ongoing confirmation of the presence of special nuclear material (SNM) in assigned locations; (2) Prompt investigation of anomalies that may indicate a loss of SNM; (3) Timely and localized detection of loss, diversion, or theft of a goal quantity; (4) Rapid assessment and response to detection alarms; and (5) Timely generation of information to aid in the recovery of SNM in the event of an actual loss, diversion, or theft from the purview of the MC&A system. Control and accountability of material, equipment, and data are essential to minimizing insider threats.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A GAMMA RAY SCANNING APPROACH TO QUANTIFY SPENT FUEL CASK RADIONUCLIDE CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has outlined a need to develop methods of allowing re-verification of LWR spent fuel stored in dry storage casks without the need of a reference baseline measurement. Some scanning methods have been developed, but improvements can be made to readily provide required data for spent fuel cask verification. The scanning process should be conditioned to both confirm the contents and detect any changes due to container/contents degradation or unauthorized removal or tampering. Savannah River National Laboratory and The University of Tennessee are exploring a new method of engineering a high efficiency, cost effective detection system, capable of meeting the above defined requirements in a variety of environmental situations. An array of NaI(Tl) detectors, arranged to form a 'line scan' along with a matching array of 'honeycomb' collimators provide a precisely defined field of view with minimal degradation of intrinsic detection efficiency and with significant scatter rejection. Scanning methods are adapted to net optimum detection efficiency of the combined system. In this work, and with differing detectors, a series of experimental demonstrations are performed that map system spatial performance and counting capability before actual spent fuel cask scans are performed. The data are evaluated to demonstrate the prompt ability to identify missing fuel rods or other content abnormalities. To also record and assess cask tampering, the cask is externally examined utilizing FTIR hyper spectral and other imaging/sensing approaches. This provides dated records and indications of external abnormalities (surface deposits, smears, contaminants, corrosion) attributable to normal degradation or to tampering. This paper will describe the actual gathering of data in both an experimental climate and from an actual spent fuel dry storage cask, and how an evaluation may be performed by an IAEA facility inspector attempting to draw an independent safeguards conclusion concerning the status of the special nuclear material.

Branney, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rotary mechanical latch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary mechanical latch for positive latching and unlatching of a rotary device with a latchable rotating assembly having a latching gear that can be driven to latched and unlatched states by a drive mechanism such as an electric motor. A cam arm affixed to the latching gear interfaces with leading and trailing latch cams affixed to a flange within the drive mechanism. The interaction of the cam arm with leading and trailing latch cams prevents rotation of the rotating assembly by external forces such as those due to vibration or tampering.

Spletzer, Barry L.; Martinez, Michael A.; Marron, Lisa C.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Genesis Aftermath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On the GRISSOM, Spock goes into a coma. The Klingons cross the border and head straight for the antimatter plant. On Earth, the EXCELSIOR and ENTERPRISE test their engines, and the EXCELSIOR work crew tries to tamper with the ENTERPRISE. Chapter 6 Wherein...'ve had some discussions, With Intelligence. Our guess is that they'll either try to lay claim to another agriclll tural planet in the buffer zone, 1 or they'll go after the new antimatter plant." "Into the Bubble? That's a long way for them to go...

Verba, Joan Marie

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seal system is disclosed for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials. The seal is tamper-indicating, indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to bypass the seal, is unique and cost effective. The seal system is comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, S.

1982-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed a seal system for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials, which is tamper-indicating, which indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to by-pass the seal, which is unique and cost effective, said seal system comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, Sidney (Port Jefferson, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Idaho National Laboratory Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Intrusion Detection System (SCADA IDS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current Intrusion Detection System (IDS) technology is not suited to be widely deployed inside a Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) environment. Anomaly- and signature-based IDS technologies have developed methods to cover information technology-based networks activity and protocols effectively. However, these IDS technologies do not include the fine protocol granularity required to ensure network security inside an environment with weak protocols lacking authentication and encryption. By implementing a more specific and more intelligent packet inspection mechanism, tailored traffic flow analysis, and unique packet tampering detection, IDS technology developed specifically for SCADA environments can be deployed with confidence in detecting malicious activity.

Jared Verba; Michael Milvich

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessment of institutional barriers to the use of natural gas in automotive vehicle fleets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Institutional barriers to the use of natural gas as a fuel for motor vehicle fleets were identified and assessed. Recommendations for barrier removal were then developed. The research technique was a combination of literature review and interviews of knowledgeable persons in government and industry, including fleet operators and marketers of natural gas vehicles and systems. Eight types of institutional barriers were identified and assessed. The most important were two safety-related barriers: (1) lack of a national standard for the safety design and certification of natural gas vehicles and refueling stations; and (2) excessively conservative or misapplied state and local regulations, including bridge and tunnel restrictions, restrictions on types of vehicles that may be fueled by natural gas, zoning regulations that prohibit operation of refueling stations, parking restrictions, application of LPG standards to LNG vehicles, and unintentionally unsafe vehicle or refueling station requirements. Other barriers addressed include: (3) need for clarification of EPA's tampering enforcement policy; (4) the US hydrocarbon standard; (5) uncertainty concerning state utility commission jurisdiction; (6) sale-for-resale prohibitions imposed by natural gas utility companies or state utility commissions; (7) uncertainty of the effects of conversions to natural gas on vehicle manufacturers warranties; and (8) need for a natural gas to gasoline-equivalent-units conversion factor for use in calculation of state road use taxes. Insurance on natural gas vehicles, and state emissions and anti-tampering regulations were also investigated as part of the research but were not found to be barriers.

Jablonski, J.; Lent, L.; Lawrence, M.; White, L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Crime and Fire Log Nature Case No. Date/Time Reported Date/Time Occurred Location Disposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/27/2011 1023 W Peltason Dr, Irvine Inactive 12/27/2011 Battery On Person 11-1409 12/24/2011 21:30 12/24/2011 22/30/2011 - 12/10/2011 6322 Verano Rd, Irvine Inactive 12/11/2011 Battery On Person 11-1369 12/10/2011 01:34 12/10/2011 01:33 - 12/10/2011 International Peace House Pending Grand Theft:Money/Prop/Etc $950+ 11-1366 12

Loudon, Catherine

237

Hybrid GPS-GSM Localization of Automobile Tracking System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated GPS-GSM system is proposed to track vehicles using Google Earth application. The remote module has a GPS mounted on the moving vehicle to identify its current position, and to be transferred by GSM with other parameters acquired by the automobile's data port as an SMS to a recipient station. The received GPS coordinates are filtered using a Kalman filter to enhance the accuracy of measured position. After data processing, Google Earth application is used to view the current location and status of each vehicle. This goal of this system is to manage fleet, police automobiles distribution and car theft cautions.

Al-Khedher, Mohammad A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

US-Russian Cooperation in Upgrading MC&A System at Rosatom Facilities: Measurement of Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improve protection of weapons-usable nuclear material from theft or diversion through the development and support of a nationwide sustainable and effective Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program based on material measurement. The material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) cooperation has yielded significant results in implementing MC&A measurements at Russian nuclear facilities: (1) Establishment of MEM WG and MEMS SP; (2) Infrastructure for development, certification, and distribution of RMs; and (3) Coordination on development and implementation of MMs.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Jensen, Bruce A [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Security of Bhutan: Walking Between the Giants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Beginning of an Aerial Invasion Bhutan became the last nation in the world to introduce television in 1999, and a few years later a crime waves of murder, homicide, shop-lifting, burglary, theft, fraud, drunk driving followed, together with students... ), and the introduction of satellite TV and information technology which are changing the very fabrics on which Bhutan’s national identity is writ large. Besides other problems, the above three issues are going to have major impacts on the security of Bhutan...

Penjore, Dorji

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Mixcoin Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. We propose Mixcoin, a protocol to facilitate anonymous payments in Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies. We build on the emergent phenomenon of currency mixes, adding an accountability mechanism to expose theft. We demonstrate that incentives of mixes and clients can be aligned to ensure that rational mixes will not steal. Our scheme is efficient and fully compatible with Bitcoin. Against a passive attacker, our scheme provides an anonymity set of all other users mixing coins contemporaneously. This is an interesting new property with no clear analog in better-studied communication mixes. Against active attackers our scheme offers similar anonymity to traditional communication mixes. 1

Joseph Bonneau; Arvind Narayanan; Andrew Miller; Jeremy Clark; Joshua A. Kroll; Edward W. Felten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

A secure email login system using virtual password  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In today's world password compromise by some adversaries is common for different purpose. In ICC 2008 Lei et al. proposed a new user authentication system based on the virtual password system. In virtual password system they have used linear randomized function to be secure against identity theft attacks, phishing attacks, keylogging attack and shoulder surfing system. In ICC 2010 Li's given a security attack on the Lei's work. This paper gives modification on Lei's work to prevent the Li's attack with reducing the server overhead. This paper also discussed the problems with current password recovery system and gives the better approach.

Doshi, Nishant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 1. Project summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) to determine the UAF gas volume in the SoCalGas system, to identify the factors contributing to UAF, and to estimate the gas volume associated with each factor, is described. It was found that measurement-related effects contributed more than 80% of SoCalGas' 1991 UAF volume. Less than 3% is associated with adjustments to SoCalGas' accounting system, and approximately 6% is associated with losses due to theft. Testing showed that the leakage element contributed only 8% of the UAF volume.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Ozenne, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Unaccounted-for gas project. Data bases. Volume 5. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study identifies, explains, and quantifies unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E) Co.'s gas transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The results demonstrate that the UAF volumes are reasonable for determining the indirectly billed gas requirements component of the gas cost and for operating the PG E gas system. Gas leakage is a small percentage of UAF. Summaries of studies on gas leakage, gas theft, measurement inaccuracies, and accounting methodologies are presented along with recommendations for further work which could reduce or more accurately measure UAF.

Cowgill, R.; Waller, R.L.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

©Wilolud Online Journals, 2008. THE NIGERIAN FUEL ENERGY SUPPLY CRISIS AND THE PROPOSED PRIVATE REFINERIES – PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamism of the world economy has compelled Nigerians to accept the liberalization of its economy to encourage private sector participation and induce managerial efficiency. This has become very imperative most especially, in the downstream sub-sector of the Nigerian oil and gas industry by the establishment and management of private refineries in view of the persistent fuel energy crisis. An attempt is made here at analyzing the prospects and problems of such refineries that are expected to end the fuel energy crisis which started in the 1970s due to increased demand for petroleum products for rehabilitation and reconstruction after the civil war but later metamorphosed into a hydraheaded monster in the 1980s to date. Efforts towards arresting this crisis by the government through the establishment of more refineries, storage depots and network of distribution pipelines etc achieved a short-term solution due to the abysmal low performance of the refineries and facilities in contrast to increasing demand for petroleum products. It is deduced that the low performance resulted from bad and corrupt management by indigenous technocrats and political leaders as well as vandalization of facilities. Prospects for such investments were identified, as well as some of the problems to content with. This is in order to understand the pros and cons of such investments in view of their capital intensiveness and the need to achieve economic goals that must incorporate environmental and social objectives.

Agwom Sani Z

248

The effects of material properties and confinement on DDT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used a DDT numerical code, RDUCT, to evaluate the effect of material properties and confinement on DDT in porous beds. RDUCT is a 1-D solid and gas two phase hydrodynamic program that computes deflagration to detonation transition in porous beds, using and ignition and growth'' type reaction model in a solid phase Lagrange coordinate system. The calculation model contains tamper masses at both ends of the reacting bed and is ignited by a squib at one end. Here RDUCT is used to compute the growth of reaction in porous bed inside a rigid tube. The input parameters are varied to produce changes in ignition, burn rate, and confinement. The results of this study illustrate the great sensitivity of the DDT phenomenon to these basic parameters. Implications to modelling and to practical problems of hazard are discussed. 15 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Lee, E.L.; Weston, A.M.; Aldis, D.F.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Zero Knowledge Protocol For Nuclear Warhead Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The verification of nuclear warheads for arms control faces a paradox: International inspectors must gain high confidence in the authenticity of submitted items while learning nothing about them. Conventional inspection systems featuring ''information barriers'', designed to hide measurments stored in electronic systems, are at risk of tampering and snooping. Here we show the viability of fundamentally new approach to nuclear warhead verification that incorporates a zero-knowledge protocol, designed such that sensitive information is never measured so does not need to be hidden. We interrogate submitted items with energetic neutrons, making in effect, differential measurements of neutron transmission and emission. Calculations of diversion scenarios show that a high degree of discrimination can be achieved while revealing zero information. Timely demonstration of the viability of such an approach could be critical for the nexxt round of arms-control negotiations, which will likely require verification of individual warheads, rather than whole delivery systems.

Glaser, Alexander [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security] [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security; Goldston, Robert J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Supplemental Systems for Unattended UF6 Cylinder Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cylinder assay and mass measurements, the mainstay of enrichment plant verification efforts have historically been performed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors using portable equipment. For the sake of efficiency, accuracy, and timeliness, such equipment is being supplanted by unattended measurement stations. Ancillary systems must be employed with such stations to ensure that measured parameters are properly recorded, cylinders are positively identified, operations occur according to procedure, and no tampering takes place in the inspectors’ absence. Depending on the facility, it may prove feasible to track cylinders from the measurement vicinity to their storage locations using surveillance. This paper will provide a cursory description of the various subsystems associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Integrated Cylinder Verification Station and how inattention to the requirements of such systems could seriously diminish the capability of the integrated whole.

Curtis, Michael M.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Threshold Verification Technique for Network Intrusion Detection System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internet has played a vital role in this modern world, the possibilities and opportunities offered are limitless. Despite all the hype, Internet services are liable to intrusion attack that could tamper the confidentiality and integrity of important information. An attack started with gathering the information of the attack target, this gathering of information activity can be done as either fast or slow attack. The defensive measure network administrator can take to overcome this liability is by introducing Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) in their network. IDS have the capabilities to analyze the network traffic and recognize incoming and on-going intrusion. Unfortunately the combination of both modules in real time network traffic slowed down the detection process. In real time network, early detection of fast attack can prevent any further attack and reduce the unauthorized access on the targeted machine. The suitable set of feature selection and the correct threshold value, add an extra advantage for I...

Faizal, M A; Shahrin, S; Robiah, Y; Rahayu, S Siti; Nazrulazhar, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An improved environmental TLD field package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the design of an environmental TAD field package which can have a significant impact on the accuracy and reliability of an environmental monitoring program. Ideally, a field package should protect its TAD(s) from light and moisture, but it should not expose the TAD(s) to elevated temperatures that could increase fading and invalidate calibration factors. Furthermore, a field package must be relatively strong and tamper-proof, while at the same time maintaining an open, unshielded configuration to minimize attenuation of incident radiation. These conflicting goals - protection without interference - can be satisfied with the improved field package design described her. This package has been tested with considerable success at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and a U.S. Patent Application has been filed in preparation for marketing the package as a commercial product.

Graham, B.D. (Southern California Edison Co., San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, CA (US))

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hardware device binding and mutual authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Safeguards Evaluation Method for evaluating vulnerability to insider threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As protection of DOE facilities against outsiders increases to acceptable levels, attention is shifting toward achieving comparable protection against insiders. Since threats and protection measures for insiders are substantially different from those for outsiders, new perspectives and approaches are needed. One such approach is the Safeguards Evaluation Method. This method helps in assessing safeguards vulnerabilities to theft or diversion of special nuclear meterial (SNM) by insiders. The Safeguards Evaluation Method-Insider Threat is a simple model that can be used by safeguards and security planners to evaluate safeguards and proposed upgrades at their own facilities. The method is used to evaluate the effectiveness of safeguards in both timely detection (in time to prevent theft) and late detection (after-the-fact). The method considers the various types of potential insider adversaries working alone or in collusion with other insiders. The approach can be used for a wide variety of facilities with various quantities and forms of SNM. An Evaluation Workbook provides documentation of the baseline assessment; this simplifies subsequent on-site appraisals. Quantitative evaluation is facilitated by an accompanying computer program. The method significantly increases an evaluation team's on-site analytical capabilities, thereby producing a more thorough and accurate safeguards evaluation.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Ensures appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access; theft, diversion, loss of custody, or destruction of nuclear weapons, or weapons components; espionage; loss or theft of classified matter or Government property; and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security or on the health and safety of Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor employees, the public, or the environment. DOE O 470.1 Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 9/28/95, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Change 1, 5/21/96, revises Chapter IV. Cancels: DOE 5630.11B, DOE 5630.13A, DOE 5630.14A, DOE 5630.15, DOE 5630.16A, DOE 5630.17, DOE 5631.1C, DOE 5631.4A, DOE 5634.1B, DOE 5634.3, DOE 5639.3, DOE M 5632.1C-1 in part.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Analysis of Anonymity in the Bitcoin System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—Anonymity in Bitcoin, a peer-to-peer electronic currency system, is a complicated issue. Within the system, users are identified by public-keys only. An attacker wishing to de-anonymize its users will attempt to construct the oneto-many mapping between users and public-keys and associate information external to the system with the users. Bitcoin frustrates this attack by storing the mapping of a user to his or her public-keys on that user’s node only and by allowing each user to generate as many public-keys as required. In this paper we consider the topological structure of two networks derived from Bitcoin’s public transaction history. We show that the two networks have a non-trivial topological structure, provide complementary views of the Bitcoin system and have implications for anonymity. We combine these structures with external information and techniques such as context discovery and flow analysis to investigate an alleged theft of Bitcoins, which, at the time of the theft, had a market value of approximately half a million U.S. dollars.

Fergal Reid; Martin Harrigan

1107-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

An Analysis of Anonymity in the Bitcoin System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anonymity in Bitcoin, a peer-to-peer electronic currency system, is a complicated issue. Within the system, users are identified by public-keys only. An attacker wishing to de-anonymize its users will attempt to construct the oneto- many mapping between users and public-keys and associate information external to the system with the users. Bitcoin frustrates this attack by storing the mapping of a user to his or her public-keys on that user's node only and by allowing each user to generate as many public-keys as required. In this paper we consider the topological structure of two networks derived from Bitcoin's public transaction history. We show that the two networks have a non-trivial topological structure, provide complementary views of the Bitcoin system and have implications for anonymity. We combine these structures with external information and techniques such as context discovery and flow analysis to investigate an alleged theft of Bitcoins, which, at the time of the theft, had a market value of approx...

Reid, Fergal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Technologies for UF6 Cylinder Tracking at Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort describes how radio-frequency (RF) technology can be integrated into a uranium enrichment facility's nuclear materials accounting and control program to enhance uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder tracking and thus provide benefits to both domestic and international safeguards. Approved industry-standard cylinders are used to handle and store UF6 feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. In the international arena, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming manual cylinder inventory and tracking techniques to verify operator declarations and to detect potential diversion of UF6. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant process for tracking and monitoring UF6 cylinders would greatly reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a "proof-of concept" system that was designed show the feasibility of using RF based technologies to track individual UF6 cylinders throughout their entire life cycle, and thus ensure both increased domestic accountability of materials and a more effective and efficient method for application of IAEA international safeguards at the site level. The proposed system incorporates RF-based identification devices, which provide a mechanism for a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant tracking network. We explore how securely attached RF tags can be integrated with other safeguards technologies to better detect diversion of cylinders. The tracking system could also provide a foundation for integration of other types of safeguards that would further enhance detection of undeclared activities.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Dixon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development of a Whole Container Seal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines a technique for utilizing electrically conductive textiles as a whole container seal. This method has the potential to provide more robustness for ensuring that the container has not been breached versus conventional sealing methods that only provide tamper indication at the area used for normal access. The conductive textile is used as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing container tamper or breach. For sealing purposes, the conductive fabric represents a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. The well-known infinite resistance grid problem was used to model and confirm the expected accuracy and validity of this approach. An experimental setup was built that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge measurement to determine the resistances of a coarse electrode grid across the conductive fabric. Non-uniform resistance values of the grid infer the presence of damage or tears in the fabric. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of disturbances in conductive fabric samples. Current work is focused on constructing experimental prototypes for field and environmental testing to gauge the performance of these whole container seals in real world conditions. We are also developing software and hardware to interface with the whole container seals. The latest prototypes are expected to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events, although detection of a penetration should be adequate for most sealing applications. We are also developing smart sensing nodes that integrate digital hardware and additional sensors (e.g., motion, humidity) into the electrode nodes within the whole container seal.

Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Archaeological investigations on the Buckboard Mesa Road Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a new alignment for the Buckboard Mesa Road on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy (DOE). During this reconnaissance, several archaeological sites of National Register quality were discovered and recorded including a large quarry, site 26Ny4892, and a smaller lithic scatter, site 26Ny4894. Analysis of the debitage at 26Ny4892 indicates that this area was used primarily as a quarry for relatively small cobbles of obsidian found in the alluvium. Lithic reduction techniques used here are designed for efficiently reducing small pieces of toolstone and are oriented towards producing flake blanks from small cores and bifacially reducing exhausted cores. Projectile point cross references indicate that the area has seen at least casual use for about 10,000 years and more sustained use for the last 3,000 years. Initial obsidian hydration measurements indicate sustained use of the quarry for about the last 3,000 years although the loci of activities appear to change over time. Based on this study, the DRI recommends that quarrying activities in the area of 26Ny4892 are sufficiently sampled and that additional investigations into that aspect of prehistoric activity in the area are not necessary. This does not apply to other aspects of prehistoric use. DRI recommends that preconstruction surveys continue to identify nonquarrying, prehistoric utilization of the area. With the increased traffic on the Buckboard Mesa Road, there is a greater potential for vandalism to sites of National Register-quality located near the road. The DRI recommends that during the orientation briefing the workers at the Test Site be educated about the importance of cultural resources and the need for their protection. 202 refs., 41 figs., 52 tabs.

Amick, D.S.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1993. Volume 16, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1993. This report discusses six abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities. Five involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved an overexposure to a nursing infant. Seven abnormal occurrences that were reported by the Agreement States are also discussed, based on information provided by the Agreement States as of February 28, 1994. Of these events, three involved brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a teletherapy misadministration, one involved a theft of radioactive material during transport and improper disposal, and two involved lost sources.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Application of EMCAS timeliness model to the safeguards facility interface: (Final report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a method of computing the probability that a nuclear material control and accounting test will detect and insider theft of special nuclear material (SNM) in a timely fashion. Often, when nuclear facilities are evaluated for their ability to defend against this threat, the detection capability of the material accounting system is considered to be late. However, a careful examination of the adversary's most likely stealth and deceit scenarios shows that several hours or more are often required to move material beyond the protected area. If material accounting tests are conducted and verified before material leaves the protected area, they are timely. This paper shows how to compute the probability of timely detection by the material accounting system.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Enduring Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Proceedings of a panel discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The panel reviewed the complete nuclear fuel cycle in the context of alternate energy resources, energy need projections, effects on the environment, susceptibility of nuclear materials to theft, diversion, and weapon proliferation. We also looked at ethical considerations of energy use, as well as waste, and its effects. The scope of the review extended to the end of the next century with due regard for world populations beyond that period. The intent was to take a long- range view and to project, not forecast, the future based on ethical rationales, and to avoid, as often happens, long-range discussions that quickly zoom in on only the next few decades. A specific nuclear fuel cycle technology that could satisfy these considerations was described and can be applied globally.

Walter, C. E., LLNL

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Role of the George Kuzmycz Training Center in Improving the Nuclear Material Management Culture in Ukraine.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The George Kuzmycz Training Center for Physical Protection, Control and Accounting (GKTC) was established in 1998 in a collaborative endeavor of the State Nuclear Regulatory Administration of Ukraine, the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Located at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Kyiv, the GKTC provides theoretical and practical training in physical protection, control, and accounting techniques and systems that are employed to reduce the risk of unauthorized use, theft, or diversion of weapons-usable nuclear material. Participants in GKTC workshops and courses include nuclear facility specialists as well as officials of the State's regulatory authorities. Recently, the training scope has been broadened to include students from other nations in the region.

Gavrylyuk, V. I. (Viktor I.); Scherbachenko, A. M. (Alexander M.); Bazavov, D. A. (Dmitri A.); Kyryshchuk, V. I. (Volodymyr I.); Robinson, P. (Phil); Sheppard, G. A. (Gregory A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Approach to proliferation risk assessment based on multiple objective analysis framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach to the assessment of proliferation risk using the methods of multi-criteria decision making and multi-objective optimization is presented. The approach allows the taking into account of the specifics features of the national nuclear infrastructure, and possible proliferation strategies (motivations, intentions, and capabilities). 3 examples of applying the approach are shown. First, the approach has been used to evaluate the attractiveness of HEU (high enriched uranium)production scenarios at a clandestine enrichment facility using centrifuge enrichment technology. Secondly, the approach has been applied to assess the attractiveness of scenarios for undeclared production of plutonium or HEU by theft of materials circulating in nuclear fuel cycle facilities and thermal reactors. Thirdly, the approach has been used to perform a comparative analysis of the structures of developing nuclear power systems based on different types of nuclear fuel cycles, the analysis being based on indicators of proliferation risk.

Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Studgorodok 1, Obninsk, Kaluga region, 249030 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Standard guide for application of radiation monitors to the control and physical security of special nuclear material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide briefly describes the state-of-the-art of radiation monitors for detecting special nuclear material (SNM) (see 3.1.11) in order to establish the context in which to write performance standards for the monitors. This guide extracts information from technical documentation to provide information for selecting, calibrating, testing, and operating such radiation monitors when they are used for the control and protection of SNM. This guide offers an unobtrusive means of searching pedestrians, packages, and motor vehicles for concealed SNM as one part of a nuclear material control or security plan for nuclear materials. The radiation monitors can provide an efficient, sensitive, and reliable means of detecting the theft of small quantities of SNM while maintaining a low likelihood of nuisance alarms. 1.2 Dependable operation of SNM radiation monitors rests on selecting appropriate monitors for the task, operating them in a hospitable environment, and conducting an effective program to test, calibrat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A unique radioisotopic label as a new concept for safeguarding and tagging of long-term stored items and waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper discuss a novel method of tagging and labeling of waste casks, copper canisters, spent fuel containers, mercury containers, waste pack- ages and other items. In particular, it is related to the development of new long-term security identification tags/labels that can be applied to articles for carrying information about the content, inventory tracking, prevention of falsifi- cation and theft etc. It is suggested to use a unique combination of radioisotopes with different predictable length of life, as a label of the items. The possibil- ity to realize a multidimensional bar code symbology is proposed as an option for a new labeling method. The results of the first tests and evaluations of this are shown and discussed in the paper. The invention is suitable for use in items assigned to long-term (hundreds of years) storing or for final repositories. Alternative field of use includes fresh nuclear fuel handling and shipment of goods.

Dina Chernikova; Kare Axell

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Secure Data Transfer Guidance for Industrial Control and SCADA Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was developed to provide guidance for the implementation of secure data transfer in a complex computational infrastructure representative of the electric power and oil and natural gas enterprises and the control systems they implement. For the past 20 years the cyber security community has focused on preventative measures intended to keep systems secure by providing a hard outer shell that is difficult to penetrate. Over time, the hard exterior, soft interior focus changed to focus on defense-in-depth adding multiple layers of protection, introducing intrusion detection systems, more effective incident response and cleanup, and many other security measures. Despite much larger expenditures and more layers of defense, successful attacks have only increased in number and severity. Consequently, it is time to re-focus the conventional approach to cyber security. While it is still important to implement measures to keep intruders out, a new protection paradigm is warranted that is aimed at discovering attempted or real compromises as early as possible. Put simply, organizations should take as fact that they have been, are now, or will be compromised. These compromises may be intended to steal information for financial gain as in the theft of intellectual property or credentials that lead to the theft of financial resources, or to lie silent until instructed to cause physical or electronic damage and/or denial of services. This change in outlook has been recently confirmed by the National Security Agency [19]. The discovery of attempted and actual compromises requires an increased focus on monitoring events by manual and/or automated log monitoring, detecting unauthorized changes to a system's hardware and/or software, detecting intrusions, and/or discovering the exfiltration of sensitive information and/or attempts to send inappropriate commands to ICS/SCADA (Industrial Control System/Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems.

Mahan, Robert E.; Fluckiger, Jerry D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Tews, Cody W.; Burnette, John R.; Goranson, Craig A.; Kirkham, Harold

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Inspection Report on "Internal Controls over Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media at Oak Ridge National Laboratory"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts cutting edge scientific research. ORNL utilizes removable electronic media, such as computer hard drives, compact disks, data tapes, etc., to store vast amounts of classified information. Incidents involving breakdowns in controls over classified removable electronic media have been a continuous challenge for the Department. The loss of even one piece of such media can have serious national security implications. In 2004, the Department had a complex-wide 'stand-down' of all activities using classified removable electronic media, and such media containing Secret/Restricted Data or higher classified data was designated 'Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media' (ACREM). As part of the stand-down, sites were required to conduct a 100 percent physical inventory of all ACREM; enter it all into accountability; and conduct security procedure reviews and training. Further, the Department implemented a series of controls, including conducting periodic inventories, utilizing tamper proof devices on ACREM safes, and appointing trained custodians to be responsible for the material. After performance testing and validation that the required accountability systems were in place, ACREM operations at ORNL were approved for restart on August 10, 2004. We conducted a review at ORNL and associated facilities to determine whether ACREM is managed, protected, and controlled consistent with applicable requirements. We found that: (1) Eight pieces of Secret/Restricted Data media had not been identified as ACREM and placed into a system of accountability. Consequently, the items were not subject to all required protections and controls, such as periodic accountability inventories, oversight by a trained custodian, or storage in a designated ACREM safe. (However, the items were secured in safes approved for classified material.) (2) Other required ACREM protections and controls were not implemented as follows: a tamper indicating device was not being used on an ACREM safe; records documenting when a certain safe was opened did not support that a purported inventory had been conducted; and a safe inventory had not been completed in a timely manner. (3) A Personal Digital Assistant and a thumb drive, both capable of recording or transmitting data, were stored in a security area without an analysis to identify vulnerabilities and compensatory measures having been conducted, as required. We also found that an ORNL Cooperative Research and Development Agreement partner had not disabled classified computer ports at the partner's site that were capable of writing classified information to external or removable media, as required. We made several recommendations designed to enhance the security of ACREM, security areas, and computers.

None

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Monitoring system including an electronic sensor platform and an interrogation transceiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wireless monitoring system suitable for a wide range of remote data collection applications. The system includes at least one Electronic Sensor Platform (ESP), an Interrogator Transceiver (IT) and a general purpose host computer. The ESP functions as a remote data collector from a number of digital and analog sensors located therein. The host computer provides for data logging, testing, demonstration, installation checkout, and troubleshooting of the system. The IT transmits signals from one or more ESP's to the host computer to the ESP's. The IT host computer may be powered by a common power supply, and each ESP is individually powered by a battery. This monitoring system has an extremely low power consumption which allows remote operation of the ESP for long periods; provides authenticated message traffic over a wireless network; utilizes state-of-health and tamper sensors to ensure that the ESP is secure and undamaged; has robust housing of the ESP suitable for use in radiation environments; and is low in cost. With one base station (host computer and interrogator transceiver), multiple ESP's may be controlled at a single monitoring site.

Kinzel, Robert L.; Sheets, Larry R.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Report on the US Program of Technical Assistance to Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (POTAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done under the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), providing the US Government, IAEA, and others with a short review of the progress made in the program since its inception. Becaue of the size and complexity of the program, only major accomplishments are presented. These are grouped under the following categories: (1) equipment and standard which cover assay of irradiated and unirradiated nuclear materials, automatic data processing, and physical standards; (2) experts who are involved in technology transfer, training, system design, and safeguard information processing and analysis; (3) system studies which cover diversion hazard analysis, safeguards approaches and application, and inspection effort planning and forecasting; (4) techniques, procedures, and equipment evaluation; (5) training of IAEA inspectors and safeguards specialists from member states. The major achievement has been the provisions of safeguards equipment designed to be reliable, and tamper resistant, some of which have already been in use in the field by inspector or by IAEA staff members in Vienna. These are listed in a table. (AT)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Remote Monitoring and Tracking of UF6 Cylinders Using Long-Range Passive Ultra-wideband (UWB) RFID Tags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IAEA Technical Meeting on Techniques for IAEA Verification of Enrichment Activities identified 'smart tags' as a technology that should be assessed for tracking and locating UF6 cylinders. Although there is vast commercial industry working on RFID systems, the vulnerabilities of commercial products are only beginning to emerge. Most of the commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) RFID systems operate in very narrow frequency bands, making them vulnerable to detection, jamming and tampering and also presenting difficulties when used around metals (i.e. UF6 cylinders). Commercial passive RFID tags have short range, while active RFID tags that provide long ranges have limited lifetimes. There are also some concerns with the introduction of strong (narrowband) radio frequency signals around radioactive and nuclear materials. Considering the shortcomings of commercial RFID systems, in their current form, they do not offer a promising solution for continuous monitoring and tracking of UF6 cylinders. In this paper, we identify the key challenges faced by commercial RFID systems for monitoring UF6 cylinders, and introduce an ultra-wideband approach for tag/reader communications that addresses most of the identified challenges for IAEA safeguards applications.

Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

AUTHENTICATED SENSOR INTERFACE DEVICE FOR JOINT USE SAFEGUARDS APPLICATIONS - CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the key features of the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device that collectively provide the ability to share data among a number of parties while ensuring the authentication of data and protecting both the operator’s and the IAEA’s interests. The paper will also discuss the development of the prototype, the initial testing with an accountancy scale, and future plans and challenges to implementation into the joint use and remote monitoring applications. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent throughout the world and the capacity of plants increases, limited resources of the IAEA are being stretched near a breaking point. A strategy is to increase efficiency in safeguards monitoring using “joint use” equipment that will provide the facility operator process data while also providing the IAEA key safeguards data. The data, however, must be authenticated and validated to ensure the data have not been tampered with. The Authenticated Sensor Interface Device provides the capability to share data and can be a valuable component in the IAEA’s ability to collect accountancy data from scales in Uranium conversion and enrichment plants, as well as nuclear fuel fabrication plants. Likewise, the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device can be configured to accept a diverse array of input signals, ranging from analog voltage, to current, to digital interfaces and more. These modular capabilities provide the ability to collect authenticated, joint-use, data streams from various process monitoring sensors.

Poland, R.; Drayer, R.; Wilson, J.

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated

Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS BY CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New coating technology enables the fabrication of low cost structural health monitoring (SHM) and tamper indication devices that can be employed to strengthen national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such innovations could serve the safeguards community by improving both the timeliness of detection and confidence in verification and monitoring. This work investigates the synthesis of functional surface coatings using chemical solutions deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition has recently received attention in the materials research community due to its unique advantages such as low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products and the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures. The synthesis of functional coatings aimed at modifying the materials conductivity and optical properties was investigated by the incorporation of transition element (e.g. Cr{sup +3}) and rare earth (e.g. Er{sup +3}) serving as dopants in a polymer or gel matrix. The structural and morphological investigation of the as-deposited films was carried out using UV/Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The as deposited coating was further investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microscopy.

Mendez-Torres, A.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated.

Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Proceedings Second Annual Cyber Security and Information Infrastructure Research Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop theme is Cyber Security: Beyond the Maginot Line Recently the FBI reported that computer crime has skyrocketed costing over $67 billion in 2005 alone and affecting 2.8M+ businesses and organizations. Attack sophistication is unprecedented along with availability of open source concomitant tools. Private, academic, and public sectors invest significant resources in cyber security. Industry primarily performs cyber security research as an investment in future products and services. While the public sector also funds cyber security R&D, the majority of this activity focuses on the specific mission(s) of the funding agency. Thus, broad areas of cyber security remain neglected or underdeveloped. Consequently, this workshop endeavors to explore issues involving cyber security and related technologies toward strengthening such areas and enabling the development of new tools and methods for securing our information infrastructure critical assets. We aim to assemble new ideas and proposals about robust models on which we can build the architecture of a secure cyberspace including but not limited to: * Knowledge discovery and management * Critical infrastructure protection * De-obfuscating tools for the validation and verification of tamper-proofed software * Computer network defense technologies * Scalable information assurance strategies * Assessment-driven design for trust * Security metrics and testing methodologies * Validation of security and survivability properties * Threat assessment and risk analysis * Early accurate detection of the insider threat * Security hardened sensor networks and ubiquitous computing environments * Mobile software authentication protocols * A new "model" of the threat to replace the "Maginot Line" model and more . . .

Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Krings, Axel [ORNL; Yoo, Seong-Moo [ORNL; Mili, Ali [ORNL; Trien, Joseph P [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sandia technology. Volume 13, number 2 Special issue : verification of arms control treaties.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear deterrence, a cornerstone of US national security policy, has helped prevent global conflict for over 40 years. The DOE and DoD share responsibility for this vital part of national security. The US will continue to rely on nuclear deterrence for the foreseeable future. In the late 1950s, Sandia developed satellite-borne nuclear burst detection systems to support the treaty banning atmospheric nuclear tests. This activity has continued to expand and diversify. When the Non-Proliferation Treaty was ratified in 1970, we began to develop technologies to protect nuclear materials from falling into unauthorized hands. This program grew and now includes systems for monitoring the movement and storage of nuclear materials, detecting tampering, and transmiting sensitive data securely. In the late 1970s, negotiations to further limit underground nuclear testing were being actively pursued. In less than 18 months, we fielded the National Seismic Station, an unattended observatory for in-country monitoring of nuclear tests. In the mid-l980s, arms-control interest shifted to facility monitoring and on-site inspection. Our Technical On-site Inspection Facility is the national test bed for perimeter and portal monitoring technology and the prototype for the inspection portal that was recently installed in the USSR under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces accord. The articles in the special issue of Sundiu Technology describe some of our current contributions to verification technology. This work supports the US policy to seek realistic arms control agreements while maintaining our national security.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests conducted on a regular frequency to evaluate the capability for nondestructive assay of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed with TRU waste characterization systems. Measurement facility performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples according to the criteria set by this Program Plan. Intercomparison between measurement groups of the DOE complex will be achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar or identical blind samples reported by the different measurement facilities. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). As defined for this program, a PDP sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components, once manufactured, will be secured and stored at each participating measurement facility designated and authorized by Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage.

None

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

When Materials Matter--Analyzing, Predicting, and Preventing Disasters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Architectural Surety{trademark} program at Sandia National Laboratories is to assure the performance of buildings, facilities, and other infrastructure systems under normal, abnormal, and malevolent threat conditions. Through educational outreach efforts in the classroom, at conferences, and presentations such as this one, public and professional awareness of the need to defuse and mitigate such threats is increased. Buildings, airports, utilities, and other kinds of infrastructure deteriorate over time, as evidenced most dramatically by the crumbling cities and aging buildings, bridges, and other facility systems. Natural disasters such as tornadoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and flooding also stress the materials and structural elements of the built environment. In addition, criminals, vandals, and terrorists attack federal buildings, dams, bridges, tunnels, and other public and private facilities. Engineers and architects are beginning to systematically consider these threats during the design, construction, and retrofit phases of buildings and infrastructures and are recommending advanced research in new materials and techniques. Existing building codes and standards do not adequately address nor protect the infrastructure or the public from many of these emerging threats. The activities in Sandia National Laboratories' Architectural Surety{trademark} efforts take a risk management approach to enhancing the safety, security, and reliability of the constructed environment. The technologies and techniques developed during Sandia's 50 years as the nation's lead laboratory for nuclear weapons surety are now being applied to assessing and reducing the vulnerability of dams, to enhancing the safety and security of staff in foreign embassies, and assuring the reliability of other federal facilities. High consequence surety engineering and design brings together technological advancements, new material requirements, systems integration, and risk management to improve the safety, security, and reliability of the as-built environment. The thrust of this paper is the role that new materials can play in protecting the infrastructure. Retrofits of existing buildings, innovative approaches to the design and construction of new facilities, and the mitigation of consequences in the event of an unpreventable disaster are some of the areas that new construction materials can benefit the Architectural Surety{trademark} of the constructed environment.

MATALUCCI,RUDOLPH V.; O'CONNOR,SHARON

2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Best Practices for the Security of Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is funded under a grant provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) awarded a contract to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop best practices guidance for Office of Radiological Health (ORH) licensees to increase on-site security to deter and prevent theft of radioactive materials (RAM). The purpose of this document is to describe best practices available to manage the security of radioactive materials in medical centers, hospitals, and research facilities. There are thousands of such facilities in the United States, and recent studies suggest that these materials may be vulnerable to theft or sabotage. Their malevolent use in a radiological-dispersion device (RDD), viz., a dirty bomb, can have severe environmental- and economic- impacts, the associated area denial, and potentially large cleanup costs, as well as other effects on the licensees and the public. These issues are important to all Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Agreement State licensees, and to the general public. This document outlines approaches for the licensees possessing these materials to undertake security audits to identify vulnerabilities in how these materials are stored or used, and to describe best practices to upgrade or enhance their security. Best practices can be described as the most efficient (least amount of effort/cost) and effective (best results) way of accomplishing a task and meeting an objective, based on repeatable procedures that have proven themselves over time for many people and circumstances. Best practices within the security industry include information security, personnel security, administrative security, and physical security. Each discipline within the security industry has its own 'best practices' that have evolved over time into common ones. With respect to radiological devices and radioactive-materials security, industry best practices encompass both physical security (hardware and engineering) and administrative procedures. Security regimes for these devices and materials typically use a defense-in-depth- or layered-security approach to eliminate single points of failure. The Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS), the Security Industry Association (SIA) and Underwriters Laboratory (UL) all rovide design guidance and hardware specifications. With a graded approach, a physical-security specialist can tailor an integrated security-management system in the most appropriate cost-effective manner to meet the regulatory and non-regulatory requirements of the licensee or client.

Coulter, D.T.; Musolino, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Towards a Standard for Highly Secure SCADA Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The critical energy inkstructures include gas, OL and electric power. These Mrastructures are complex and interdependent nmvorks that are vital to the national secwiy and social well being of our nation. Many electric power systems depend upon gas and oil, while fossil energy delive~ systems depend upon elecnic power. The control mechanisms for these Mrastructures are often referred to as SCADA (Supmivry CkmdandDaU Ac@itz&z) systems. SCADA systems provide remote monitoring and centralized control for a distributed tmnsportation infmsmucture in order to facilitate delivery of a commodi~. AIthough many of the SCADA concepts developed in this paper can be applied to automotive mmsponation systems, we will use transportation to refer to the movement of electrici~, gas, and oil. \\ Recently, there have been seveml reports suggesting that the widespread and increasing use of SCADA for control of energy systems provides an increasing opportuni~ for an advers~ to cause serious darnage to the energy inbstmcturei~. This damage could arise through cyber infiltration of the SCADA networks, by physically tampering with the control networks, or through a combination of both means. SCADA system threats decompose into cyber and physical threats. One solution to the SCADA security problem is to design a standard for a highly secure KA.DA system that is both cyber, and physdly secure. Not all-physical threats are possible to guard again% but of those threats that are, high security SCADA provides confidence that the system will continue to operate in their presence. One of the most important problems in SCADA securi~ is the relationship between the cyber and physical vulnerabilities. Cyber intrusion increases physical Vulnerabilities, while in the dual problem physical tampering increases cyber vulnerabilit.ies. There is potential for feedback and the precise dynamics need to be understood. As a first step towards a stan~ the goal of this paper is to facilitate a discussion of the requirements analysis for a highly secure SCADA system. The fi-arnework for the discussion consists of the identification of SCADA security investment areas coupled with the tradeoffs that will force compromises in the solution. For example, computational and bandwidth requirements of a security standard could force the replacement of entire SCADA systems. The requirements for a real-time response in a cascading electric power failure could pose limitations on authentication and encryption mechanisms. The shortest path to the development of a high securi~ SC.ADA standard will be achieved by leveraging existing standards efforts and ensuring that security is being properly addressed in those standards. The Utility Communications Architecture 2.o (UC@, for real-time utili~ decision control, represents one such standard. The development of a SCADA secwiy specification is a complex task that will benefit from a systems engineering approach.

Carlson, R.

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

EMCAS, an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MCandA) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EMCAS: An evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluating safeguard effectiveness against violent insiders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat posed by a violent insiders presents a major challenge to safeguards managers. These insiders, in addition to their ability to exploit their special authorities, access, and knowledge of facility operations and safeguards, could use violence to defeat safeguards components and personnel. In protecting against theft of special nuclear material, facilities have emphasized the use of perimeter protection and physical barriers to protect against attacks by an outsider adversary group. Recently emphasis has begun to shift toward the implementation of hardware and procedural measures to protect against nonviolent insiders. Approaches are also needed to help assess the effectiveness of protection against those insiders who are willing to use violence. In this paper we describe an approach we're developing for dealing with violent insiders. We begin by categorizing insiders according to whether they are active or passive, rational or irrational, and whether they are willing to use force against safeguards components or coworkers. We define characteristics of each category, and describe the extent to which each category is adequately modelled by existing evaluation tools. We also discuss several modelling issues posed by active insiders, including: entry of contraband; reluctance to use violence; neutralization of insiders; and the ability to switch modes of attack between force, stealth, and deceit. 5 refs., 2 figs.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Fortney, D.S.

1990-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Modelling and evaluating against the violent insider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The violent insider threat poses a special challenge to facilities protecting special nuclear material from theft or diversion. These insiders could potentially behave as nonviolent insiders to deceitfully defeat certain safeguards elements and use violence to forcefully defeat hardware or personnel. While several vulnerability assessment tools are available to deal with the nonviolent insider, very limited effort has been directed to developing analysis tools for the violent threat. In this paper, we present an approach using the results of a vulnerability assessment for nonviolent insiders to evaluate certain violent insider scenarios. Since existing tools do not explicitly consider violent insiders, the approach is intended for experienced safeguards analysts and relies on the analyst to brainstorm possible violent actions, to assign detection probabilities, and to ensure consistency. We then discuss our efforts in developing an automated tool for assessing the vulnerability against those violent insiders who are willing to use force against barriers, but who are unwilling to kill or be killed. Specifically, we discuss our efforts in developing databases for violent insiders penetrating barriers, algorithms for considering the entry of contraband, and modelling issues in considering the use of violence.

Fortney, D.S.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Saleh, R.A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

1996 NRC annual report. Volume 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 22nd annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes accomplishments, activities, and plans made during Fiscal Year 1996 (FH 1996)--October 1, 1995, through September 30, 1996. Significant activities that occurred early in FY 1997 are also described, particularly changes in the Commission and organization of the NRC. The mission of the NRC is to ensure that civilian uses of nuclear materials in the US are carried out with adequate protection of public health and safety, the environment, and national security. These uses include the operation of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle plants and medical, industrial, and research applications. Additionally, the NRC contributes to combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons material worldwide. The NRC licenses and regulates commercial nuclear reactor operations and research reactors and other activities involving the possession and use of nuclear materials and wastes. It also protects nuclear materials used in operation and facilities from theft or sabotage. To accomplish its statutorily mandated regulatory mission, the NRC issues rules and standards, inspects facilities and operations, and issues any required enforcement actions.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Savannah River Site delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) includes a variety of nuclear production facilities that, since 1953, have processed special nuclear materials (SNM) including highly-enriched uranium (>90% {sup 235}U), recycled enriched uranium ({approximately}50% {sup 235}U + 40% {sup 236}U), low burnup plutonium (> 90% {sup 239}Pu + < 6% {sup 240}Pu ) and several other nuclear materials such as heat source plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). DOE Orders, primarily 5633.3, require all nuclear materials to be safeguarded through accountability and material control. Accountability measurements determine the total amount of material in a facility, balancing inventory changes against receipts and shipments, to provide assurance (delayed) that all material was present. Material control immediately detects or deters theft or diversion by assuring materials remain in assigned locations or by impeding unplanned movement of materials within or from a material access area. Goals for accountability or material control, and, therefore, the design of measurement systems, are distinctly different. Accountability measurements are optimized for maximum precision and accuracy, usually for large amounts of special nuclear material. Material control measurements are oriented more toward security features and often must be optimized for sensitivity, to detect small amounts of materials where none should be.

Studley, R.V.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Equipment for Anti- Electricity Stealing with Remote Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The power theft monitoring is an important research in electric power system, and electricity-stealing prevention became a big problem to the electricity board. based on the kind of electricity-stealing and actual demand of prevention of stealing electricity, the equipment of electricity-stealing with remote monitoring is designed, with PIC microcontroller as the control core. In this the standard energy meter and user energy meter are used to calculate and judge whether electricity-stealing happen or not. Results of the user application show that the system not only realizes monitoring the behavior of electricity stealing, accurately recording the time of electricity-stealing occur and finish, the quantity of electricity-stealing and sends the information to the area field man through SMS to detect the electricity-stealer, but also realizes the behavior of electricity-stealing with remote monitoring, which is convenient for centralized management.In addition, the system offers a solving method to the data of meter reading.

Mr. Sudheer K. Reddy; Mr. Musthafa. P; Mr. K. Sakthidhasan

307

Development of an ASTM standard guide on performing vulnerability assessments for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an effort undertaken by subcommittee C26.12 (Safeguards) of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) to develop a standard guide for performing vulnerability assessments (VAs). VAs are performed to determine the effectiveness of safeguards and security systems for both domestic and international nuclear facilities. These assessments address a range of threats, including theft of nuclear material and sabotage, and use an array of methods. The approach to performing and documenting VAs is varied and is largely dependent upon the tools used to perform them. This diversity can lead to tools being misused, making validation of VAs more difficult. The development of a standard guide for performing VAs would, if generally accepted, alleviate these concerns. ASTM provides a forum for developing guides that includes a high level of peer review to assure that the result is acceptable to all potential users. Additionally, the ASTM is widely recognized for setting standards, and endorsement by the Society may increase the likelihood of acceptance by the nuclear community. The goal of this work is to develop a guide that is independent of the tools being used to perform the VA and applicable to the spectrum of threats described above.

Wilkey, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Infrastructure: A technology battlefield in the 21st century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major part of technological advancement has involved the development of complex infrastructure systems, including electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks; oil and gas pipeline systems; highway and rail networks; and telecommunication networks. Dependence on these infrastructure systems renders them attractive targets for conflict in the twenty-first century. Hostile governments, domestic and international terrorists, criminals, and mentally distressed individuals will inevitably find some part of the infrastructure an easy target for theft, for making political statements, for disruption of strategic activities, or for making a nuisance. The current situation regarding the vulnerability of the infrastructure can be summarized in three major points: (1) our dependence on technology has made our infrastructure more important and vital to our everyday lives, this in turn, makes us much more vulnerable to disruption in any infrastructure system; (2) technologies available for attacking infrastructure systems have changed substantially and have become much easier to obtain and use, easy accessibility to information on how to disrupt or destroy various infrastructure components means that almost anyone can be involved in this destructive process; (3) technologies for defending infrastructure systems and preventing damage have not kept pace with the capability for destroying such systems. A brief review of these points will illustrate the significance of infrastructure and the growing dangers to its various elements.

Drucker, H.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Prediction of the Virgo axis anisotropy: CMB radiation illuminates the nature of things  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent findings of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation are confusing for standard cosmology. Remarkably, this fact has been predicted several years ago in the framework of our model of the physical world. Moreover, in exact agreement with our prediction the CMB has a preferred direction towards the Virgo Cluster. The transpired structure of the CMB shows workings of the suggested model of the physical world. Comprising the information processes of Nature, this model presents a high-tech version of the previous low-tech developments for mechanical ether and quantum vacuum. In the current model, the phenomenon of Life turns up as a collective effect on the "Internet of the Physical Universe" using DNA structures for access codes. Most convincingly, this construction points to a harmful analogy with so-called "identity theft" - improper manipulations with DNA of individual organisms can destroy these organisms from a remote location without any physical contact. Appearing incredible, such a possibility creates a superlative Experimentum Crucis. In a broad sense, this surmised biological effect is intimately related to the cosmological prediction of the structurization of the CMB, but it is more compelling.

Simon Berkovich

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Safeguards First Principles Initiative at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was selected as a test bed for the Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI). The implementation of the SFPI is evaluated using the system effectiveness model and the program is managed under an approved MC&A Plan. The effectiveness model consists of an evaluation of the critical elements necessary to detect, deter, and/or prevent the theft or diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The modeled results indicate that the MC&A program established under this variance is still effective, without creating unacceptable risk. Extensive performance testing is conducted through the duration of the pilot to ensure the protection system is effective and no material is at an unacceptable risk. The pilot was conducted from January 1, 2007, through May 30, 2007. This paper will discuss the following activities in association with SFPI: 1. Development of Timeline 2. Crosswalk of DOE Order and SFPI 3. Peer Review 4. Deviation 5. MC&A Plan and Procedure changes 6. Changes implemented at NTS 7. Training 8. Performance Test

Geneva Johnson

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gamma watermarking  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards: Common technologies and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards have much in common, including the basic physical phenomena and technologies involved as well as the commitments and challenges posed by expanding nuclear programs in many countries around the world. The unique characteristics of the fission process -- such as prompt and delayed neutron and gamma ray emission -- not only provide the means of sustaining and controlling the fission chain reaction, but also provide unique ''signatures'' that are essential to quantitative measurement and effective safeguarding of key nuclear materials (notably /sup 239/Pu and /sup 235/U) against theft, loss, or diversion. In this paper, we trace briefly the historical emergence of safeguards as an essential component of the expansion of the nuclear enterprise worldwide. We then survey the major categories of passive and active nondestructive assay techniques that are currently in use or under development for rapid, accurate measurement and verification of safe-guarded nuclear materials in the many forms in which they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 23 refs., 14 figs.

Keepin, G.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Algorithm for detecting energy diversion. [Appendix contains an annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate those factors influencing energy consumption and to develop advanced statistical algorithms and a corresponding computer program to aid utilities in identifying energy diversion by analyzing patterns of energy consumption and other factors readily available to the utility. This final report documents the development of the algorithms, the methodologies used in analyzing their validity, and the advantages and disadvantages of these methods that resulted from these analyses. In the internal study, the algorithms appear to discriminate diverters from the rest of the population. Problems were found that decreased the efficiency of the algorithms during the field investigation. These included the quality of the data used by the algorithms, and the incomplete description of diverters. For the external study 300 potential diverters were submitted to the participating utility for field investigation. They found many cases of vacancies, seasonal use, two cases of tampering, several of suspect nature, irregularities in billing, and a number of meter problems. The code development was not undertaken due to the inconclusive nature of the results obtained in the external validation of the algorithms. Two final recommendations are presented. The first, to create better profiles for diverters and nondiverters, a large sample investigation of electric utility customers should be conducted. This would eliminate selection bias problems perceived to be present in current data. The second provides a list of action items that can be taken by the utilities, to improve both present detection methods and any algorithms that may be developed in the future. 64 refs., 39 figs., 32 figs.

Altschul, R.E.; Janky, D.G.; Scholz, F.W.; Tjoelker, R.A.; Tosch, T.J.; Tosch, T.J. (Boeing Computer Services Co., Seattle, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Test and evaluation of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the definition of a Material Balance Area (MBA) as a well-defined geographical area involving an Integral operation, the building housing the BFS-1 and BFS-1 critical facilities is considered to consist of one MBA. The BFS materials are in the form of small disks clad in stainless steel and each disk with nuclear material has its own serial number. Fissile material disks in the BFS MBA can be located at three key monitoring points: BFS-1 facility, BFS-2 facility and main storage of BFS fissile materials (storage 1). When used in the BFS-1 or BFS-2 critical facilities, the fissile material disks are loaded in tubes (fuel rods) forming critical assembly cores. The following specific features of the BFS MBA should be taken into account for the purpose of computerized accounting of nuclear material: (1) very large number of nuclear material items (about 70,000 fissile material items); and (2) periodically very intensive shuffling of nuclear material items. Requirements for the computerized system are determined by basic objectives of nuclear material accounting: (1) providing accurate information on the identity and location of all items in the BFS material balance area; (2) providing accurate information on location and identity of tamper-indicating devices; (3) tracking nuclear material inventories; (4) issuing periodic reports; (5) assisting with the detection of material gains or losses; (6) providing a history of nuclear material transactions; (7) preventing unauthorized access to the system and data falsification. In August 1995, the prototype computerized accounting system was installed on the BFS facility for trial operation. Information on two nuclear material types was entered into the data base: weapon-grade plutonium metal and 36% enriched uranium dioxide. The total number of the weapon-grade plutonium disks is 12,690 and the total number of the uranium dioxide disks is 1,700.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Verifiable process monitoring through enhanced data authentication.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure the peaceful intent for production and processing of nuclear fuel, verifiable process monitoring of the fuel production cycle is required. As part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-EURATOM collaboration in the field of international nuclear safeguards, the DOE Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) and Directorate General-Energy (DG-ENER) developed and demonstrated a new concept in process monitoring, enabling the use of operator process information by branching a second, authenticated data stream to the Safeguards inspectorate. This information would be complementary to independent safeguards data, improving the understanding of the plant's operation. The concept is called the Enhanced Data Authentication System (EDAS). EDAS transparently captures, authenticates, and encrypts communication data that is transmitted between operator control computers and connected analytical equipment utilized in nuclear processes controls. The intent is to capture information as close to the sensor point as possible to assure the highest possible confidence in the branched data. Data must be collected transparently by the EDAS: Operator processes should not be altered or disrupted by the insertion of the EDAS as a monitoring system for safeguards. EDAS employs public key authentication providing 'jointly verifiable' data and private key encryption for confidentiality. Timestamps and data source are also added to the collected data for analysis. The core of the system hardware is in a security enclosure with both active and passive tamper indication. Further, the system has the ability to monitor seals or other security devices in close proximity. This paper will discuss the EDAS concept, recent technical developments, intended application philosophy and the planned future progression of this system.

Goncalves, Joao G. M. (European Commission Joint Research Centre, Italy); Schwalbach, Peter (European Commission Directorate General%3CU%2B2014%3EEnergy, Luxemburg); Schoeneman, Barry Dale; Ross, Troy D.; Baldwin, George Thomas

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Changing Adventures of Mixed Low-Level Waste Disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a 15-year hiatus, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) began accepting DOE off-site generated mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in December 2005. This action was predicated on the acceptance by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) of a waste analysis plan (WAP). The NNSA/NSO agreed to limit mixed waste disposal to 20,000 cubic meters (approximately 706,000 cubic feet) and close the facility by December 2010 or sooner, if the volume limit is reached. The WAP and implementing procedures were developed based on Hanford’s system of verification to the extent possible so the two regional disposal sites could have similar processes. Since the NNSA/NSO does not have a breaching facility to allow the opening of boxes at the site, verification of the waste occurs by visual inspection at the generator/treatment facility or by Real-Time-Radiography (RTR) at the NTS. This system allows the NTS to effectively, efficiently, and compliantly accept MLLW for disposal. The WAP, NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria, and procedures have been revised based on learning experiences. These changes include: RTR expectations; visual inspection techniques; tamper-indicating device selection; void space requirements; and chemical screening concerns. The NNSA/NSO, NDEP, and the generators have been working together throughout the debugging of the verification processes. Additionally, the NNSA/NSO will continue to refine the MLLW acceptance processes and strive for continual improvement of the program.

DOE /Navarro/NSTec

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

U.S. bioassay Intercomparison Studies Program at Oak Ridge National Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) for in-vitro bioassay at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been in place since May 1991. The ISP was originally created to fill a need in the Radiobioassay area at ORNL, specifically in the areas of Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Performance Testing. In the beginning, this consisted of two or three laboratories working in a pilot intercomparison program. Once it was determined that this could work effectively, the program began to seek additional members to broaden the scope of the effort. The program became formalized with a quarterly report in January 1992. The ISP currently provides cross-check blind/double-blind samples spiked with known amounts of radioactivity to various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, universities, and private industry organizations throughout the US. These samples can be packaged according to ORNL procedures (ORNL sample bottles, ORNL chain-of-custody forms, tamper seals etc.), for a single blind sample or according to the needs of a particular facility if the double-blind sample mode is to be maintained. In 1998, the customer base was broadened to include European facilities. In January 1993, the whole-body count program was added. This involves each participating facility receiving a block phantom from the ISP and determining a geometry factor using a known standard. At quarterly intervals, each participant receives an unknown sample for analysis. The sample is counted and the data is collected for publication in an annual report. In October 1994, the fecal program was added. This involves spiking an artificial matrix with known amounts of radioactivity. Laboratories receive unknown samples on a quarterly basis. The sample is counted and the data is collected and published in a quarterly report. The ISP maintains archive samples which can be analyzed in the QC laboratory at the request of any participants if a conflict or discrepancy in a sample analysis/result occurs.

Payne, G.F.; Bores, N.; Melton, K.K.; Rankin, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tampering theft vandalism" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

Security-by-design handbook.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a draft SecuritybyDesign (SeBD) handbook produced to support the Work Plan of the Nuclear Security Summit to share best practices for nuclear security in new facility design. The Work Plan calls on States to %E2%80%9Cencourage nuclear operators and architect/engineering firms to take into account and incorporate, where appropriate, effective measures of physical protection and security culture into the planning, construction, and operation of civilian nuclear facilities and provide technical assistance, upon request, to other States in doing so.%E2%80%9D The materials for this document were generated primarily as part of a bilateral project to produce a SeBD handbook as a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which represented the US Department Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under a Project Action Sheet PASPP04. Input was also derived based on tours of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) Rokkasho Mixed Oxide Fuel fabrication facilities and associated project lessonslearned. For the purposes of the handbook, SeBD will be described as the systemlevel incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new nuclear power plant or nuclear facility resulting in a PPS design that minimizes the risk of malicious acts leading to nuclear material theft; nuclear material sabotage; and facility sabotage as much as possible through features inherent in (or intrinsic to) the design of the facility. A fourelement strategy is presented to achieve a robust, durable, and responsive security system.

Snell, Mark Kamerer; Jaeger, Calvin Dell; Scharmer, Carol; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Tanuma, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Ochiai, Kazuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Iida, Toru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva [Div. of Physics and Biophysics, University of Salzburg Hellbrunnerstr. 34, A 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Orphan Source Recovery Project in the Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After 9/11, officials at the United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grew more concerned about radiological materials that were vulnerable to theft and illicit use around the world. The concern was that terrorists could combine stolen radiological materials with explosives to build and detonate a radiological dispersal device (RDD), more commonly known as a “dirty bomb.” In response to this and other terrorist threats, the DOE/NNSA formed what is now known as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to consolidate and accelerate efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Although a cooperative program was already underway in the Russian Federation to secure nuclear materials at a range of different facilities, thousands of sealed radioactive sources remained vulnerable at medical, research, and industrial sites. In response, GTRI began to focus efforts on addressing these materials. GTRI’s Russia Orphan Source Recovery Project, managed at the Nevada National Security Site’s North Las Vegas facility, was initiated in 2002. Throughout the life of the project, Joint Stock Company “Isotope” has served as the primary Russian subcontractor, and the organization has proven to be a successful partner. Since the first orphan source recovery of an industrial cobalt-60 irradiator with 647 curies (Ci) at an abandoned facility in Moscow in 2003, the GTRI Orphan Source Recovery Project in the Russian Federation has accomplished substantial levels of threat reduction. To date, GTRI has recovered and securely disposed of more than 5,100 sources totaling more that 628,000 Ci. This project serves as an extraordinary example of how international cooperation can be implemented by partners with mutual interests to achieve significant goals.

Russell, J. W. [NSTec; Ahumada, A. D. [NSTec; Blanchard, T. A. [NNSA

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

325

New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Job Satisfaction, Disgruntlement and Insider Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prediction of future events and trends was the purview of fortune tellers and science writers; however futuristic studies are now an acceptable form of sociological research including workplace dynamics. The nuclear industry is also affected by workplace trends which currently indicate that there will be fewer jobs and individuals who are employed will be required to have greater technical skills. This reshaping of the workforce is partially due to an aging workforce and diversity within the work environment. The reshaping brings with it the need for greater productivity and employee expectations for increased pay and/or benefits. If employee satisfaction is not realized there is a real possibility of disgruntled employees who then become a potential insider risk to the organization. Typically this is an individual who has been employed for several years, becomes dissatisfied with the job, or some other aspect of their life. If the dissatisfaction is directly related to work the individual may retaliate in a destructive manner. Perceived inequities are a major factor and directly related to situational pressures, opportunity, and personal integrity. It is known that the greatest losses within an organization are attributed to employees working alone or in a conspiracy with fellow employees who engage in theft and other fraudulent activities. In the nuclear industry this threat is intensified by the nature of the work, the materials employees come in contact with and the potential of an occurrence that could adversely affect a large geographic region and/or the security of a country. The paper will address motivating factors, recommendations, and include a profile discussion of a possible disgruntled employee.

Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL] [ORNL; Coates, Cameron W [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result of this analysis, a formal training curriculum will be designed and implemented to include several blended learning delivery options. This training will be piloted at RMS sites; initial training will become a required element of RMS installation and refresher training will be considered for sustainability of operations.

Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

The development and application of the Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced sealing technologies are often an integral part of a containment surveillance (CS) approach to detect undeclared diversion of nuclear materials. As adversarial capabilities continue to advance, the sophistication of the seal design must advance as well. The intelligent integration of security concepts into a physical technology used to seal monitored items is a fundamental requirement for secure containment. Seals have a broad range of capabilities. These capabilities must be matched appropriately to the application to establish the greatest effectiveness from the seal. However, many current seal designs and their application fail to provide the high confidence of detection and timely notification that can be appreciated with new technology. Additionally, as monitoring needs rapidly expand, out-pacing budgets, remote monitoring of low-cost autonomous sealing technologies becomes increasingly appealing. The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes this technology and has implemented cost effective security concepts establishing the high confidence that is expected of active sealing technology today. RMSA is a system of relatively low-cost but secure active loop seals for the monitoring of nuclear material containers. The sealing mechanism is a fiber optic loop that is pulsed using a low-power LED circuit with a coded signal to verify integrity. Battery life is conserved by the use of sophisticated power management techniques, permitting many years of reliable operation without battery replacement or other maintenance. Individual seals communicate by radio using a secure transmission protocol using either of two specially designated communication frequency bands. Signals are encrypted and authenticated by private key, established during the installation procedure, and the seal bodies feature both active and passive tamper indication. Seals broadcast to a central 'translator' from which information is both stored locally and/or transmitted remotely for review. The system is especially appropriate for nuclear material storage facilities, indoor or outdoor, enabling remote inspection of status rather than tedious individual seal verification, and without the need for interconnected cabling. A handheld seal verifier is also available for an inspector to verify any particular individual seal in close proximity. This paper will discuss the development of the RMSA sealing system, its capabilities, its application philosophy, and projected future trends.

Schoeneman, Barry Dale; Stein, Marius (Canberra, USA); Wishard, B. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Austria)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Novel Nuclear Powered Photocatalytic Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Massachusetts Lowell Radiation Laboratory (UMLRL) is involved in a comprehensive project to investigate a unique radiation sensing and energy conversion technology with applications for in-situ monitoring of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) during cask transport and storage. The technology makes use of the gamma photons emitted from the SNF as an inherent power source for driving a GPS-class transceiver that has the ability to verify the position and contents of the SNF cask. The power conversion process, which converts the gamma photon energy into electrical power, is based on a variation of the successful dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) design developed by Konarka Technologies, Inc. (KTI). In particular, the focus of the current research is to make direct use of the high-energy gamma photons emitted from SNF, coupled with a scintillator material to convert some of the incident gamma photons into photons having wavelengths within the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The high-energy gammas from the SNF will generate some power directly via Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect, and the generated visible photons output from the scintillator material can also be converted to electrical power in a manner similar to that of a standard solar cell. Upon successful implementation of an energy conversion device based on this new gammavoltaic principle, this inherent power source could then be utilized within SNF storage casks to drive a tamper-proof, low-power, electronic detection/security monitoring system for the spent fuel. The current project has addressed several aspects associated with this new energy conversion concept, including the development of a base conceptual design for an inherent gamma-induced power conversion unit for SNF monitoring, the characterization of the radiation environment that can be expected within a typical SNF storage system, the initial evaluation of Konarka's base solar cell design, the design and fabrication of a range of new cell materials and geometries at Konarka's manufacturing facilities, and the irradiation testing and evaluation of these new cell designs within the UML Radiation Laboratory. The primary focus of all this work was to establish the proof of concept of the basic gammavoltaic principle using a new class of dye-sensitized photon converter (DSPC) materials based on KTI's original DSSC design. In achieving this goal, this report clearly establishes the viability of the basic gammavoltaic energy conversion concept, yet it also identifies a set of challenges that must be met for practical implementation of this new technology.

White,John R.; Kinsmen,Douglas; Regan,Thomas M.; Bobek,Leo M.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO's). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the drummed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Drum PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage. Using removable PDP radioactive standards, isotopic activities in the simulated waste containers are varied to the extent possible over the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization situations. Manufactured matrices simulate expected waste matrix conditions and provide acceptable consistency in the sample preparation process at each measurement facility. Analyses that are required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and that are included in the PDP may only be performed by measurement facilities that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes in this document.

DOE Carlsbad Field Office

2001-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass/fail criteria of reference 7 stated 'The facility will report measured values, book values, and statistical control limits for the selected items to DOE SR...', and 'The site/facility operator must develop, document, and maintain measurement methods for all nuclear material on inventory'. These new requirements exceeded SRNL's experience with prior semi-annual inventory expectations, but allowed the AD nuclear field measurement group to demonstrate its excellent adaptability and superior flexibility to respond to unpredicted expectations from the DOE customer. The requirements yielded five SRNL items subject to Pu verification and two SRNL items subject to HEU verification. These items are listed and described in Table 1.

Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the facility's MC&A (software widely used in the aerospace, chemical, and nuclear power industries) MSET was peer reviewed in 2007 and validated in 2008 by benchmark testing at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States. The MSET documents were translated into Russian and provided to Rosatom in July of 2008, and MSET is currently being evaluated for potential application in Russian Nuclear Facilities.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Billy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hammond, Glenn A [ORNL] [ORNL; Meppen, Bruce W [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Richard F [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured when they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items do not take a lot of work, but require an awareness of the risks involved in not doing them or doing them incorrectly. The security of home networks and communications with company networks can be significantly improved by adding an appropriate software or hardware firewall to the home network and using a protected protocol such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), a Virtual Private Network (VPN), or Secure Shell (SSH) for connecting to the company network.

Orvis, W J; Krystosek, P; Smith, J

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Termination of Safeguards on ULWBR Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management, has approved the disposition of 31 metric tons of Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (ULWBR) material in canisters stored within dry wells of the Underground Fuel Storage Facility at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This unirradiated material consists primarily of ceramic pellets of thorium oxide in stainless steel cladding, but it also contains 300 kilograms of uranium that is 98 wt% U-233. The ULWBR material was not processed at the INTEC because it was incompatible with prior chemical separation schemes. Other economical recovery options have not been identified, and expressions of interest for consolidating the material with existing projects at other DOE sites have not been received. The U-233 could be used for producing the medical isotope Actinium-225, but the proof-of-principle demonstration and follow-on pilot program have not been developed to the point of requiring production quantities of U-233. Consequently, the selected disposition of the ULWBR material was burial as Low Level Waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which required terminating safeguards controls for the contained Category II quantity of Attractiveness Level D special nuclear material (SNM). The requested termination followed the twelve point evaluation criteria of the Historical Defense Program Discard Guidance and included a security analysis for evaluating the risks of theft, diversion, and radiological sabotage associated with the material. Continuity of knowledge in the book inventory was assured by documenting that the original shipper’s measurements accurately reflected the quantities of materials received and that the ULWBR materials had remained under adequate physical protection and had been subject to periodic physical inventories. The method selected for substantiating the book values as the basis for terminating safeguards was the nondestructive assay used during physical inventories. Shipping arrangements included refurbishing a licensed cask to be reused over the duration of the termination process. An accompanying batching plan and shipping schedule were developed to accommodate multiple commercial shipments of Category III quantities of SNM in the selected cask, such that all canisters would be received at NTS prior to the expiration of the nonrenewable cask license.

Ivan R. Thomas; Ernest L. Laible

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work summarized in this report, namely the development of guidance to support the consideration of MC&A in the design of both pebble-bed and prismatic-fueled HTGRs. The objective is to identify and incorporate design features into the facility design that will cost effectively aid in making MC&A more effective and efficient, with minimum impact on operations. The theft of nuclear material is addressed through both MC&A and physical protection, while the threat of sabotage is addressed principally through physical protection.

Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Inspection Report "Personal Property Management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) is a premier research and development institution for science and technology supporting the core mission of national security. According to Livermore, as of November 2008 the Laboratory managed 64,933 items of Government personal property valued at about $1 billion. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 2008, Livermore reported 249 DOE property items valued at about $1.3 million that were missing, unaccounted for, or stolen during Fiscal Year 2007. Livermore centrally tracks property utilizing the Sunflower Assets system (Sunflower), which reflects the cradle to grave history of each property item. Changes in the custodianship and/or location of a property item must be timely reported by the custodian to the respective property center representative for updating in Sunflower. In Fiscal Year 2008, over 2,000 individuals were terminated as a result of workforce reduction at Livermore, of which about 750 received a final notification of termination on the same day that they were required to depart the facility. All of these terminations potentially necessitated updates to the property database, but the involuntary terminations had the potential to pose particular challenges because of the immediacy of individuals departures. The objective of our inspection was to evaluate the adequacy of Livermore's internal controls over Government property. Based upon the results of our preliminary field work, we particularly focused on personal property assigned to terminated individuals and stolen laptop computers. We concluded that Livermore's internal controls over property could be improved, which could help to reduce the number of missing, unaccounted for, or stolen property items. Specifically, we found that: (1) The location and/or custodian of approximately 18 percent of the property items in our sample, which was drawn from the property assigned to individuals terminated on short notice in 2008, was inaccurately reflected in Sunflower. The data in this system is relied upon for tracking purposes, so inaccurate entries could increase the probability of property not being located during inventories and, thus, being reported as 'lost' or 'missing'. We believe that providing formal training to property custodians, which was not being done at the time of our inspection, could help improve this situation. (2) Some property custodians were not adequately protecting their Government laptop computers when taking them offsite, and they were not held accountable for the subsequent theft of the laptops. We made several recommendations to management intended to improve property controls at Livermore.

None

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP for boxed waste assay systems. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO’s). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the boxed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a modified standard waste box (SWB) emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. An SWB is a waste box with ends designed specifically to fit the TRUPACT-II shipping container. SWB’s will be used to package a substantial volume of the TRU waste for disposal. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Box PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage. Using removable PDP radioactive standards, isotopic activities in the simulated waste containers are varied to the extent possible over the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization situations. Manufactured matrices simulate expected waste matrix configurations and provide acceptable consistency in the sample preparation process at each measurement facility. Analyses that are required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and that are included in the PDP may only be performed by measurement facilities that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes in this document.

Carlsbad Field Office

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Development and Demonstration of a Security Core Component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, the convergence of a number of trends has resulted in Cyber Security becoming a much greater concern for electric utilities. A short list of these trends includes: · Industrial Control Systems (ICSs) have evolved from depending on proprietary hardware and operating software toward using standard off-the-shelf hardware and operating software. This has meant that these ICSs can no longer depend on “security through obscurity. · Similarly, these same systems have evolved toward using standard communications protocols, further reducing their ability to rely upon obscurity. · The rise of the Internet and the accompanying demand for more data about virtually everything has resulted in formerly isolated ICSs becoming at least partially accessible via Internet-connected networks. · “Cyber crime” has become commonplace, whether it be for industrial espionage, reconnaissance for a possible cyber attack, theft, or because some individual or group “has something to prove.” Electric utility system operators are experts at running the power grid. The reality is, especially at small and mid-sized utilities, these SCADA operators will by default be “on the front line” if and when a cyber attack occurs against their systems. These people are not computer software, networking, or cyber security experts, so they are ill-equipped to deal with a cyber security incident. Cyber Security Manager (CSM) was conceived, designed, and built so that it can be configured to know what a utility’s SCADA/EMS/DMS system looks like under normal conditions. To do this, CSM monitors log messages from any device that uses the syslog standard. It can also monitor a variety of statistics from the computers that make up the SCADA/EMS/DMS: outputs from host-based security tools, intrusion detection systems, SCADA alarms, and real-time SCADA values – even results from a SIEM (Security Information and Event Management) system. When the system deviates from “normal,” CSM can alert the operator in language that they understand that an incident may be occurring, provide actionable intelligence, and informing them what actions to take. These alarms may be viewed on CSM’s built-in user interface, sent to a SCADA alarm list, or communicated via email, phone, pager, or SMS message. In recognition of the fact that “real world” training for cyber security events is impractical, CSM has a built-in Operator Training Simulator capability. This can be used stand alone to create simulated event scenarios for training purposes. It may also be used in conjunction with the recipient’s SCADA/EMS/DMS Operator Training Simulator. In addition to providing cyber security situational awareness for electric utility operators, CSM also provides tools for analysts and support personnel; in fact, the majority of user interface displays are designed for use in analyzing current and past security events. CSM keeps security-related information in long-term storage, as well as writing any decisions it makes to a (syslog) log for use forensic or other post-event analysis.

Turke, Andy

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. The material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system. The MSET process is divided into four distinct and separate parts: (1) Completion of the questionnaire that assembles information about the operations of every aspect of the MPC&A system; (2) Conversion of questionnaire data into numeric values associated with risk; (3) Analysis of the numeric data utilizing the MPC&A fault tree and the SAPHIRE computer software; and (4) Self-assessment using the MSET reports to perform the effectiveness evaluation of the facility's MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. If the need for system improvements or upgrades is indicated when the system is analyzed, MSET provides the capability to evaluate potential or actual system improvements or upgrades. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time. The system can be reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential system improvement can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance and reveals where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk. The functional model, the system risk assessment tool, and the facility evaluation questionnaire are valuable educational tools for MPC&A personnel. These educational tools provide a framework for ongoing dialogue between organizations regarding the design, development, implementation, operation, assessment, and sustainability of MPC&A systems. An organization considering the use of MSET as an analytical tool for evaluating the effectiveness of its MPC&A system will benefit from conducting a complete MSET exercise at an existing nuclear facility.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

U.S. and Russian Collaboration in the Area of Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear forensics has become increasingly important in the fight against illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials. The illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is, of course, an international problem; nuclear materials may be mined and milled in one country, manufactured in a second country, diverted at a third location, and detected at a fourth. There have been a number of articles in public policy journals in the past year that call for greater interaction between the U. S. and the rest of the world on the topic of nuclear forensics. Some believe that such international cooperation would help provide a more certain capability to identify the source of the nuclear material used in a terrorist event. An improved international nuclear forensics capability would also be important as part of the IAEA verification toolkit, particularly linked to increased access provided by the additional protocol. A recent study has found that, although international progress has been made in securing weapons-usable HEU and Pu, the effort is still insufficient. They found that nuclear material, located in 40 countries, could be obtained by terrorists and criminals and used for a crude nuclear weapon. Through 2006, the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database had recorded a total of 607 confirmed events involving illegal possession, theft, or loss of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Although it is difficult to predict the future course of such illicit trafficking, increasingly such activities are viewed as significant threats that merit the development of special capabilities. As early as April, 1996, nuclear forensics was recognized at the G-8 Summit in Moscow as an important element of an illicit nuclear trafficking program. Given international events over the past several years, the value and need for nuclear forensics seems greater than ever. Determining how and where legitimate control of nuclear material was lost and tracing the route of the material from diversion through interdiction are important goals for nuclear forensics and attribution. It is equally important to determine whether additional devices or materials that pose a threat to public safety are also available. Finding the answer to these questions depends on determining the source of the material and its method of production. Nuclear forensics analysis and interpretation provide essential insights into methods of production and sources of illicit radioactive materials. However, they are most powerful when combined with other sources of information, including intelligence and traditional detective work. The certainty of detection and punishment for those who remove nuclear materials from legitimate control provides the ultimate deterrent for such diversion and, ultimately, for the intended goal of such diversion, including nuclear terrorism or proliferation. Consequently, nuclear forensics is an integral part of 'nuclear deterrence' in the 21st century. Nuclear forensics will always be limited by the diagnostic information inherent in the interdicted material. Important markers for traditional forensics (fingerprints, stray material, etc.) can be eliminated or obscured, but many nuclear materials have inherent isotopic or chemical characteristics that serve as unequivocal markers of specific sources, production processes, or transit routes. The information needed for nuclear forensics goes beyond that collected for most commercial and international verification activities. Fortunately, the international nuclear engineering enterprise has a restricted number of conspicuous process steps that makes the interpretation process easier. Ultimately, though, it will always be difficult to distinguish between materials that reflect similar source or production histories, but are derived from disparate sites. Due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. There are a limited number of

Kristo, M J

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. A self-appraisal helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. The material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) fault tree was developed to depict the failure of the MPC&A system as a result of poor practices and random failures in the MC&A system. It can also be employed as a basis for assessing deliberate threats against a facility. MSET uses fault tree analysis, which is a top-down approach to examining system failure. The analysis starts with identifying a potential undesirable event called a 'top event' and then determining the ways it can occur (e.g., 'Fail To Maintain Nuclear Materials Under The Purview Of The MC&A System'). The analysis proceeds by determining how the top event can be caused by individual or combined lower level faults or failures. These faults, which are the causes of the top event, are 'connected' through logic gates. The MSET model uses AND-gates and OR-gates and propagates the effect of event failure using Boolean algebra. To enable the fault tree analysis calculations, the basic events in the fault tree are populated with probability risk values derived by conversion of questionnaire data to numeric values. The basic events are treated as independent variables. This assumption affects the Boolean algebraic calculations used to calculate results. All the necessary calculations are built into the fault tree codes, but it is often useful to estimate the probabilities manually as a check on code functioning. The probability of failure of a given basic event is the probability that the basic event primary question fails to meet the performance metric for that question. The failure probability is related to how well the facility performs the task identified in that basic event over time (not just one performance or exercise). Fault tree calculations provide a failure probability for the top event in the fault tree. The basic fault tree calculations establish a baseline relative risk value for the system. This probability depicts relative risk, not absolute risk. Subsequent calculations are made to evaluate the change in relative risk that would occur if system performance is improved or degraded. During the development effort of MSET, the fault tree analysis program used was SAPHIRE. SAPHIRE is an acronym for 'Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations.' Version 1 of the SAPHIRE code was sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1987 as an innovative way to draw, edit, and analyze graphical fault trees primarily for safe operation of nuclear power reactors. When the fault tree calculations are performed, the fault tree analysis program will produce several reports that can be used to analyze the MPC&A system. SAPHIRE produces reports showing risk importance factors for all basic events in the operational MC&A system. The risk importance information is used to examine the potential impacts when performance of certain basic events increases or decreases. The initial results produced by the SAPHIRE program are considered relative risk values. None of the results can be interpreted as absolute risk values since the basic event probability values represent estimates of risk associated with the performance of MPC&A tasks throughout the material balance area (MBA). The RRR for a basic event represents the decrease in total system risk that would result from improvement of that one event to a perfect performance level. Improvement of the basic event with the greatest RRR value produces a greater decrease in total system risk than improvement of any other basic event. Basic events with the greatest potential for system risk reduction are assigned performance improvement values, and new fault tree calculations show the improvement in total system risk. The ope

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z