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Sample records for tailings site mmts

  1. Microsoft Word - S02997_mmts 2007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Third Five-Year Review Report for Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site City of Monticello San Juan County, Utah June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1472 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy MMTS Third

  2. Microsoft Word - S08399_2012 MMTS 5yrRev.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... MMTS properties by the end of 1999. The mill site was ... domestic-use groundwater consumption exposure scenarios. ... I have a question about reimbursement for electricity. ...

  3. Hanford Site Black-tailed Jackrabbit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Revision 0 Hanford Site Black-tailed Jackrabbit Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited HNF- 56710 Revision 0 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I and II disposal and processing sites. The sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Introduction The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604) is a federal law that provides for the safe and environmentally sound disposal, long-term stabilization, and control of uranium mill tailings in a manner that minimizes or

  5. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of a buried water pipeline to an existing solar evaporation pond for water treatment. ... the Abajo Mountains, U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site OU III ...

  6. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under

  7. CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE August 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis A sheep’s foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. A sheep's foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. Moab, UT MILL TAILINGS REMOVAL Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast

  8. Project Schedules and Milestones Draft July 2014 Site Management Plan Page 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Draft July 2014 Site Management Plan Page 1 5.0 Project Schedules and Milestones (FY 2015-FY 2017) 5.1 Establishing Project Schedules and Milestones As stated in Section 1.1.2, the Site Management Plan (SMP) establishes the overall plan for remedial actions at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and milestones against which progress can be measured. The SMP also documents the overall plan for remedial actions at the Monticello Vicinity Properties site (MVP), which was deleted from the

  9. Project Schedules and Milestones Final August 2013 Site Management Plan Page 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Final August 2013 Site Management Plan Page 1 5.0 Project Schedules and Milestones (FY 2014-FY 2016) 5.1 Establishing Project Schedules and Milestones As stated in Section 1.1.2, the Site Management Plan (SMP) establishes the overall plan for remedial actions at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and milestones against which progress can be measured. The SMP also documents the overall plan for remedial actions at the Monticello Vicinity Properties site (MVP), which was deleted from the

  10. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  12. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  13. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado: summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Gunnison site in order to revise the November 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the ivnvestigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the combined 540,000 dry tons of tailings and the 435,400 tons of contaminated waste at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The 10 alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from stabilization of the site in its present location with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to disposal sites along with decontamination of the Gunnison site (Options II through X). Cost estimates for the 10 options range from about $8,900,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $14,000,000 for disposal in the North Alkali Creek area at a distance of about 18 mi. Truck haulage would be used to transport the tailings and contaminated materials from the Gunnison site to the selected disposal site. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Gunnison tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocesssing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $250 and $230/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981.

  15. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  16. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock Site, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-07-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of the stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and(c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

  17. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Tuba City site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 0.8 million tons of tailings at the Tuba City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  18. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Tuba City site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 0.8 million tons of tailings at the Tuba City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  19. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  20. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  1. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  2. Site-specific study on stabilization of acid-generating mine tailings using coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, J.Q.; Wang, H.L.; Kovac, V.; Fyfe, J.

    2006-03-15

    A site-specific study on stabilizing acid-generating mine tailings from Sudbury Mine using a coal fly ash from Nanticoke Generating Station is presented in this paper. The objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of codisposal of the fly ash and mine tailings to reduce environmental impacts of Sudbury tailings disposal sites. The study includes three phases, i.e., characterization of the mine tailings, and coal fly ash, oxidation tests on the mine tailings and kinetic column permeation tests. The results of the experiments indicate that when permeated with acid mine drainage, the hydraulic conductivity of Nanticoke coal fly ash decreased more than three orders of magnitude (from 1 x 10{sup -6} to 1 x 10{sup -9} cm/s), mainly due to chemical reactions between the ash solids and acid mine drainage. Furthermore, the hydraulic gradient required for acid mine drainage to break through the coal fly ash is increased up to ten times (from 17 to 150) as compared with that for water. The results also show that the leachate from coal fly ash neutralizes the acidic pore fluid of mine tailings. The concentrations of trace elements in effluents from all kinetic column permeation tests indicated that coplacement of coal fly ash with mine tailings has the benefit of immobilizing trace elements, especially heavy metals. All regulated element concentrations from effluent during testing are well below the leachate quality criteria set by the local regulatory authority.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  4. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... If Wetland 3 develops as designed, there is a potential risk to U.S. Depamncnt of Energy ... exceed 200 pgL, followed by solar evaporative treatment at an existing on-site facility. ...

  5. monticello_esd.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water, of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS, added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List in 1989, is located in southeast...

  6. 2015 Annual Inspection report for the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection Report for the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties December 2015 LMS/MNT/S13444 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2015 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah December 2015 Doc. No. S13444 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii Executive Summary

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  8. Economic evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, J H

    1982-12-01

    Mountain States Research and Development was contracted on March 1, 1981 to make an economic evaluation study at each of 12 abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the western states. The objective of this work was to obtain the data necessary at each site to determine the possible revenue that could be derived from reprocessing the tailings. To accomplish this objective a drilling and sampling program was established for each site to determine the total amount of tailings and subbase material available for treatment and the amount of recoverable uranium, vanadium and molybdenum. These three metals were selected due to their common occurrence in uranium ores and common extractability in the leaching process. Laboratory leaching was then conducted on the samples obtained to determine the extractability of each of these metals and the optimum plant process to be applied. As the metal contents were generally low and represented mineral that had not been leached during previous processing, the economic evaluation is limited to consideration of the direct capital and operating costs required in connection with processing of each respective site material. Excavating, transportation and disposal of the material from each site in an environmentally acceptable location and manner was not within the scope of this project. It will be necessary to complete a separate study of these areas in order to determine the total costs involved. This report contains the results of the investigations of the Old Rifle Site.

  9. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  10. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  13. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  14. Comments and responses on the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information concerning public comments and responses on the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  15. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings site, Shiprock, New Mexico: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-05-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the shiprock uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, one mile south of Shiprock, New Mexico. The site contains 72 acres of tailings and four of the original mill buildings. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A seven-foot-thick radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Three other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a more remote location. The no action alternative is also assessed. 99 refs., 40 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings site, Mexican Hat, Utah. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action at the Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Reservation in southern Utah. The site covers 235 acres and contains 69 acres of tailings and several of the original mill structures. Remedial action must be performed in accordance with standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Navajo Nation. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings within the present tailings site by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier of compacted earth would be constructed over the pile, and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document. 240 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

  19. Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site located near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The designated site covers 196 acres and contains 111 acres of tailings and some of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for th remedial action (40 CFR Part 192). Remedial action must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated materials into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion protection measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. Another alternative which would involve moving the tailings to a new location is also assessed in this document. This alternative would generally involve greater short-term impacts and costs but would result in stabilization of the tailings at an undeveloped location. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document.

  20. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  1. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  2. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands assessment (Assessment 2) are included as part of this EA. The following sections and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  3. Big River mine tailings Superfund site lead exposure study, Jefferson City, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murgueytio, A.M.; Clardy, S.A.; Sterling, D.A.; Shadel, B.N.; Clements, B.W.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if living close to the Big River Mine Tailings Superfund site increased blood lead levels of resident children and what contribution mining waste had to any increase. The results of this study indicated that blood lead levels were a product of exposure to lead mining waste, lead-based paint, and other sources. Because the only substantial difference between the study and control areas, in terms of exposure to lead, was the presence of lead mining, mining waste is the reasonable explanation for the difference between the blood lead levels in the two communities.

  4. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

  5. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  6. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The presence of contaminated uranium mill tailings adjacent to the city of Gunnison has been a local concern for many years. The following issues were identified during public meetings that were held by the DOE prior to distribution of an earlier version of this EA. Many of these issues will require mitigation. Groundwater contamination; in December 1989, a herd of 105 antelope were introduced in an area that includes the Landfill disposal site. There is concern that remedial action-related traffic in the area would result in antelope mortality. The proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road may restrict antelope access to their water supply; a second wildlife issue concerns the potential reduction in sage grouse use of breeding grounds (leks) and nesting habitat; the proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road would cross areas designated as wetlands by US Army Corps of Engineers (COE); the proposed disposal site is currently used for grazing by cattle six weeks a year in the spring. Additional concerns were stated in comments on a previous version of this EA. The proposed action is to consolidate and remove all contaminated materials associated with the Gunnison processing site to the Landfill disposal site six air miles east of Gunnison. All structures on the site (e.g., water tower, office buildings) were demolished in 1991. The debris is being stored on the site until it can be incorporated into the disposal cell at the disposal site. All contaminated materials would be trucked to the Landfill disposal site on a to-be-constructed haul road that crosses BLM-administered land.

  7. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  8. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  11. 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah.

  12. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small town of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated UMTRA sites at Slick Rock, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The UC site is approximately 1 mile (mi) [2 kilometers (km)] downstream of the NC site. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres (ac) [22 hectares (ha)] at the UC site and 12 ac (4.9 ha) at the NC site. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 620, 000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [470,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3})]. In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, four vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into groundwater.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  14. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  15. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, J.; Smith, G.; Danforth, B.; Gee, G.; Kothari, V.; Pauling, T.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is evaluating the performance of disposal cell covers at LM sites and exploring ways to enhance their sustainability. The cover of the Lakeview, Oregon, disposal cell relies on a compacted soil layer (CSL) to limit radon escape and water percolation into underlying tailings. The design created habitat favorable for growth of woody plants that sent roots through the CSL. The mean saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub sat}) of the CSL, measured at 17 locations, was 3.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, 300 times greater than the design target. The highest K{sub sat} values were measured near the top of the CSL at locations both with and without roots; the lowest K{sub sat} values were measured deeper in the CSL. Water flux meters (WFMs) installed in 2005 to directly measure percolation flux show significant percolation through the cover. Three WMFs began recording percolation in mid-November, 7 days after the start of a prolonged precipitation event, and continued until early June 2006. Percolation flux during this period ranged between 3.1 x 10{sup -5} and 8.5 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}. The cumulative percolation was greater than total precipitation during the period, probably because of a water-harvesting effect. The WFMs were strategically placed in down-gradient positions on the cover top slope where water likely accumulated in a sand drainage layer. Routine monitoring at Lakeview shows that the ground water remains protected. LM plans to evaluate potential effects of high percolation rates in covers to ensure that disposal cells remain protective for the long term. (authors)

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment and a floodplain/wetlands assessment are included as part of this EA. This report and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

  19. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

  20. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Appendix B, Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Burro Canyon site were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a disposal site for the tailings at two processing sites near the Slick Rock, Colorado, post office. The purposes of these studies are basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies (e.g., analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards) used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-km radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters.

  1. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, Donald K.; Hicks, Allison H.

    2012-07-01

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  2. An active sitetail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 resolution contains tailactive site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that close the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an open structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active sitetail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  4. Revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.; McShane, M.C.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing design and performance guidelines for surface stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings. In this work, vegetation and rock covers are being evaluated for maintaining long-term integrity of impoundment systems. Methods are being developed to estimate erosion rates associated with rock and/or vegetation covers, and to determine the effects of surface treatments on soil moisture. Interactions between surface treatments and barriers (radon and biological) are being studied as well. The product will be a set of guidelines to aid in designing surface covers. This report presents the status of this program and a discussion of considerations pertinent to the application of surface covers to tailings. Test plots located in Grand Junction, Colorado and Waterflow, New Mexico are being used to study: (1) the interactions between vegetation and radon and biological barriers, (2) the effects of surface covers on soil moisture, and (3) the effects of rock covers on vegetation.

  5. Microsoft Word - toc.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    K MMTS and MVP Site Inspection Checklists U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y MMTS Annual Inspection Checklist U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y MMTS Annual Inspection Checklist Page 1 of 38 I. MMTS Site Information Site name: Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site; Operable Units I, II, and III Date of inspection: Site Location: Monticello, Utah: EPA Region 8 EPA ID: UT 3890090035 Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) PCOR Date: September 2004 Operational and

  6. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

  11. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with...

  12. Final Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Falls City uranium mill tailings site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires Federal agencies to assess the impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This EA examines the short- and long-term effects of the DOE`s proposed remedial action for the Falls City tailings site. The no action alternative is also examined. The DOE will use the information and analyses presented here to determine whether the proposed action would have a significant impact on the environment. If the impacts are determined to be significant, an EIS will be prepared. If the impacts are not judged to be significant, the DOE will issue an official ``Finding of No Significant Impact`` and implement the proposed action.

  13. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Tuba City, Arizona. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Tribe, US Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE, the Navajo Nation, and the Hopi Tribe, and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. Following the introduction, contents are as follows: Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3.0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring environmental, health, and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on-site workers. Section 6.0 presents a detailed listing of the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 7.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan. Section 8.0 presents the quality assurance aspects of the project. Section 9.0 documents the ongoing activities to keep the public informed and participating in the project.

  14. Hanford Site Black-Tailed Jackrabbit Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.; Wilde, Justin W.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2014-02-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  16. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  17. Remedial Action Plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, T.V.; Morley, J.A. . Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Began, E.T. )

    1985-06-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a twofold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to effect long-term control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located on the Navajo Reservation at Shiprock, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Shiprock site. Detailed supporting information can be found in appendices and referenced documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3.0 traces the history of operations at the Shiprock site with a description of the present site characteristics. Section 4.0 provides a definition of site-specific problems, a listing of remedial action alternatives which have been considered, and the action which is being proposed. Section 5.0 presents a summary of the conceptual design for the proposed action which includes objectives, design features, schedule, cost, and implementation methods. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the onsite workers. Section 7.0 presents a detailed listing of the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the quality assurance process that will be used by the RAC during construction. Section 9.0 describes the features of the long-term maintenance and surveillance plan. Section 10.0 documents the on-going activities to keep the public informed and participating in the project. Attached as part of the RAP are five appendices which describe in more detail various aspects of the remedial action.

  18. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lowman, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The DOE proposes to achieve compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards (Subparts A and B of 40 CFR 192) by meeting the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLs) or background concentrations for designated hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (alluvium/weathered granodiorite) at the point of compliance (POC) at the Lowman disposal site near Lowman, Idaho. The proposed remedial action in conjunction with existing hydrogeological conditions at the Lowman site will ensure sufficient protection of human health and the environment. The DOE has concluded that the EPA groundwater protection standards will be met at the POC because, with the exception of antimony, none of the hazardous constituents that exceed laboratory method detection limits within the radioactive sand pore fluids were above the proposed concentration limits. The DOE has demonstrated that antimony will meet the proposed concentration limits at the POC through attenuation in subsoils beneath the disposal cell and by dilution in groundwater underflow. The Lowman processing site is in compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 because statistical analyses of groundwater samples indicate no groundwater contamination.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Remedial Action at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1987-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0254) on the proposed remedial action at the inactive uranium milling site near Riverton, Wyoming. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required.

  20. Remedial action plan for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-02-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Monument Valley, Arizona It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  2. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Kastens, M.K.; Sheader, L.R.L.; Benson, C.H.; Albright, W.H.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in southeastern Utah. Ground-water recharge is naturally limited at sites like Monticello where thick, fine-textured soils store precipitation until evaporation and plant transpiration seasonally return it to the atmosphere. The cover at Monticello uses local soils and a native plant community to mimic the natural soil water balance. The cover is fundamentally an evapotranspiration (ET) design with a capillary barrier. A 3-hectare drainage lysimeter was embedded in the cover during construction of the disposal cell in 2000. The lysimeter consists of a geo-membrane liner below the capillary barrier that directs percolation water to a monitoring system. Soil water storage is determined by integration of point water content measurements. Meteorological parameters are measured nearby. Plant cover, shrub density, and leaf area index (LAI) are monitored annually. The cover performed well over the 7-year monitoring period (2000-2007). The cumulative percolation was 4.2 mm (0.6 mm yr{sup -1}), satisfying an EPA goal of an average percolation of <3.0 mm yr{sup -1}. Almost all percolation can be attributed to the exceptionally wet winter and spring of 2004-2005 when soil water content slightly exceeded the water storage capacity of the cover. The diversity, percent cover, and LAI of vegetation increased over the monitoring period, although the density of native shrubs that extract water from deeper in the cover has remained less than revegetation targets. DOE and EPA are applying the monitoring results to plan for long-term surveillance and maintenance and to evaluate alternative cover designs for other waste disposal sites. (authors)

  3. Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

  4. Microsoft Word - IR-mnt Apr 2009.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site//Monticello Vicinity Properties Information Repository Subject Index, April 2009 File Index: MNT 010.02 Page 1 of 45 Information Repository for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site/Monticello Vicinity Properties Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Information Repository contains Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) Operable Units I, II and III and Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) documents generated after signatory acceptance of the MMTS OU I & II, MVP,

  5. Document Number Q0029500 Introduction

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the 1998 final RI and presents the results of a FFS conducted for Operable Unit (OU) 111, contaminated surface water and ground water, of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). ...

  6. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona: Phase 2, Construction, Subcontract documents: Appendix E, final report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This appendix discusses Phase II construction and subcontract documents uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It contains the bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings.

  7. Microsoft Word - S07321_FFA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    10 January 2011 Doc. No. S07321 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: October 1-December 31, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented October through December 2010 and provides a schedule for near-term activities at the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) located in and near Monticello, Utah. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the United States

  8. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Attachment 6, Supplemental standard for Durango processing site. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Excavation control to the 15 pCi/g radium-226 (Ra-226) standard at certain areas along the Animas River on the Durango Site would require extensive engineering and construction support. Elevated Ra-226 concentrations have been encountered immediately adjacent to the river at depths in excess of 7 feet below the present river stage. Decontamination to such depths to ensure compliance with the EPA standards will, in our opinion, become unreasonable. This work does not appear to be in keeping with the intent of the standards. Because the principal reason for radium removal is reduction of radon daughter concentrations (RDC) in homes to be built onsite, and because radon produced at depth will be attenuated in clean fill cover before entering such homes, it is appropriate to calculate the depth of excavation needed under a home to reduce RDC to acceptable levels. Potential impact was assessed through radon emanation estimation, using the RAECOM computer model. Elevated Ra-226 concentrations were encountered during final radium excavation of the flood plain below the large tailings pile, adjacent to the slag area. Data from 7 test pits excavated across the area were analyzed to provide an estimate of the Ra-226 concentration profile. Results are given in this report.

  10. Ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final, Revision 2, Version 5: Appendix E to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this appendix is to provide a ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Green River, Utah. Compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards will be achieved by applying supplemental standards (40 CFR {section} 192.22(a); 60 FR 2854) based on the limited use ground water present in the uppermost aquifer that is associated with widespread natural ambient contamination (40 CFR {section} 192.11(e); 60 FR 2854). The strategy is based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The strategy will result in compliance with Subparts A and C of the EPA final ground water protection standards (60 FR 2854). The document contains sufficient information to support the proposed ground water protection strategy, with monitor well information and ground water quality data included as a supplement. Additional information is available in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a), the final completion report (DOE, 1991b), and the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1994a).

  11. Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transition | Department of Energy Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site.

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Landfill disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these studies was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-kilometer (km) (40-mile) radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps. Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data. Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area. Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs. Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

  13. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  14. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona. Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Tuba City, Arizona. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Tribe, US Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE, the Navajo Nation, and the Hopi Tribe, and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. Following the introduction, contents are as follows: Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3.0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring environmental, health, and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on-site workers. Section 6.0 presents a detailed listing of the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 7.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan. Section 8.0 presents the quality assurance aspects of the project. Section 9.0 documents the ongoing activities to keep the public informed and participating in the project.

  15. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies.

  16. Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Five-year reviews for the two Monticello, Utah, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites were completed in June 2012 by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Utah Department of Environmental Quality.

  17. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lowman, Idaho. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The DOE proposes to achieve compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards (Subparts A and B of 40 CFR 192) by meeting the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLs) or background concentrations for designated hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (alluvium/weathered granodiorite) at the point of compliance (POC) at the Lowman disposal site near Lowman, Idaho. The proposed remedial action in conjunction with existing hydrogeological conditions at the Lowman site will ensure sufficient protection of human health and the environment. The DOE has concluded that the EPA groundwater protection standards will be met at the POC because, with the exception of antimony, none of the hazardous constituents that exceed laboratory method detection limits within the radioactive sand pore fluids were above the proposed concentration limits. The DOE has demonstrated that antimony will meet the proposed concentration limits at the POC through attenuation in subsoils beneath the disposal cell and by dilution in groundwater underflow. The Lowman processing site is in compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 because statistical analyses of groundwater samples indicate no groundwater contamination.

  18. A Bivariate Mixed Distribution with a Heavy-tailed Component and its Application to Single-site Daily Rainfall Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chao .; Singh, Vijay P.; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2013-02-06

    This paper presents an improved brivariate mixed distribution, which is capable of modeling the dependence of daily rainfall from two distinct sources (e.g., rainfall from two stations, two consecutive days, or two instruments such as satellite and rain gauge). The distribution couples an existing framework for building a bivariate mixed distribution, the theory of copulae and a hybrid marginal distribution. Contributions of the improved distribution are twofold. One is the appropriate selection of the bivariate dependence structure from a wider admissible choice (10 candidate copula families). The other is the introduction of a marginal distribution capable of better representing low to moderate values as well as extremes of daily rainfall. Among several applications of the improved distribution, particularly presented here is its utility for single-site daily rainfall simulation. Rather than simulating rainfall occurrences and amounts separately, the developed generator unifies the two processes by generalizing daily rainfall as a Markov process with autocorrelation described by the improved bivariate mixed distribution. The generator is first tested on a sample station in Texas. Results reveal that the simulated and observed sequences are in good agreement with respect to essential characteristics. Then, extensive simulation experiments are carried out to compare the developed generator with three other alternative models: the conventional two-state Markov chain generator, the transition probability matrix model and the semi-parametric Markov chain model with kernel density estimation for rainfall amounts. Analyses establish that overall the developed generator is capable of reproducing characteristics of historical extreme rainfall events and is apt at extrapolating rare values beyond the upper range of available observed data. Moreover, it automatically captures the persistence of rainfall amounts on consecutive wet days in a relatively natural and easy way

  19. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  20. DOE Moab Project Reaches Halfway Mark in Mill Tailings Removal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has reached 8 million tons of uranium mill tailings removed from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. ...

  1. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  2. White Tail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tail Jump to: navigation, search Name White Tail Facility White Tail Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer...

  3. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final design, specifications, and drawings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

  4. DOE Announces Preferred Alternatives For Moab, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Preferred Alternatives For Moab, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings DOE Announces Preferred Alternatives For Moab, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings April 6, 2005 - 11:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the department's preferred alternatives for remediation of the Moab, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Site: active groundwater remediation, and offsite disposal of the tailings pile and other contaminated materials to the

  5. DOE Signs Decision to Move Moab Tailings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision to Move Moab Tailings DOE Signs Decision to Move Moab Tailings September 14, 2005 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that a Record of Decision (ROD) clearing the way for the removal of 11.9 million tons of radioactive Uranium Mill Tailings from the banks the Colorado River in Utah has been signed. Under the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Site Record of Decision, the tailings will be moved, predominately by

  6. Risk-Based Remediation Approach for Cs-137 Contaminated Sediment/Soils at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Lower Three Runs Tail (U) - 13348 - SRNS-RP-2012-00546

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Candice; Bergren, Christopher; Blas, Susan; Kupar, James

    2013-07-01

    Lower Three Runs is a large blackwater stream that runs through the eastern and southern portion of the Savannah River Site. The Lower Three Runs watershed includes two SRS facility areas: P Area (P Reactor) and R Area (R Reactor) that provided effluent discharges to Lower Three Runs. During reactor operations, effluent discharges were well above natural (pre-industrial) or present day stream discharges. The watershed contains a 2,500-acre mainstream impoundment (PAR Pond), several smaller pre-cooler ponds, and a canal system that connects the pre-cooler ponds and discharges surface water to PAR Pond. From the PAR Pond dam, Lower Three Runs flows approximately 36 kilometers braiding through bottom-land/flood-plain forests before it enters the Savannah River. About eight kilometers downstream from the PAR Pond dam, the SRS boundary narrows (termed the Lower Three Runs tail) providing a limited buffer of DOE property for the Lower Three Runs stream and associated flood-plain. Previous screening characterization efforts revealed Cs-137 contamination in the sediment/soils of the flood-plain. As a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus package, a comprehensive characterization effort was executed on the sediment/soils of the Lower Three Runs tail flood-plain providing a comprehensive look at the contaminant signature of the area. As a follow-up to that characterization, a regulatory decision Core Team, comprised of members of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Environmental Protection Agency - Region IV, and DOE, conducted negotiations on a risk-based approach to address the level of contamination found in the tail flood-plain as an early action that provided a long-term solution to exposure scenarios. For evaluation purposes, the adolescent trespasser was selected as the most likely human receptor for the Lower Three Runs tail portion because of the natural attractiveness of the area for recreational activities (i

  7. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix B to Attachment 3, Lithologic logs and monitor well construction information. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This volume contains lithology logs and monitor well construction information for: NC processing site; UC processing site; and Burro Canyon disposal site. This information pertains to the ground water hydrology investigations which is attachment 3 of this series of reports.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah November 2003 Page 1 2003 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites Summary The Monticello site, which includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties site, was inspected September 23-25, 2003. A follow-up inspection of the Soil and Sediment properties was conducted on

  9. DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has safely moved another million tons of uranium mill tailings from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  10. Microsoft Word - AR OU III April 09 subject.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Administrative Record, Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III, Subject Index April 2009 File Index: MRAP 1.11 page 1 of 10 Administrative Record for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Unit III (OU III), Monticello Ground Water Remedial Action Project (MSGRAP) Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Administrative Record contains documents specifically relevant to Operable Unit III leading up to the Record of Decision in October 2004. Later

  11. Otter Tail Power Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information regarding rebate program eligibility and product and equipment requirements may be found on the web site listed above. Contact Otter Tail Power Company for more information on this pr...

  12. Western Red-tailed Skink Distribution in Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D. B. and Gergor, P. D.

    2011-11-01

    This slide show reports a study to: determine Western Red-tailed Skink (WRTS) distribution on Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); identify habitat where WRTS occur; learn more about WRTS natural history; and document distribution of other species.

  13. Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information regarding rebate program eligibility and product and equipment requirements may be found on the web site listed above. Contact Otter Tail Power Company for more information on this ...

  14. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, M.L.; Mitzelfelt, R.

    1991-11-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a dual purpose. It presents the series of activities that is proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control radioactive materials at the inactive Phillips/United Nuclear uranium processing site designated as the Ambrosia Lake site in McKinley County, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both State of New Mexico and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  15. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report, attachment 2, geology report; attachment 3, groundwater hydrology report; and attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  17. DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water ...

  18. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  19. DOE Moab Project Reaches Halfway Mark in Mill Tailings Removal 2.5 Million Hours Safely Worked

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    (Grand Junction, CO) ― The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has reached 8 million tons of uranium mill tailings removed from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  20. Site Transition Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Transition Framework (April 2004) PDF icon Site Transition Framework More Documents & Publications Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title ...

  1. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  2. Microsoft Word - S07079_jul_sep_10.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 1-September 30, 2010 October 2010 Doc. No. S07079 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List (NPL) Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented July through September 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate

  3. Microsoft Word - S08308_FFA_ jul_sep_2011

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 October 2011 Doc. No. S08308 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2011 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). Both of these sites are located in and near Monticello, Utah. The reporting period is from July through September 2011. The report includes a summary of projected near-term activity and reporting

  4. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  5. Microsoft Word - S08830_FFA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    January-March 2012 March 2012 Doc. No. S08830 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement Quarterly Report: January 1-March 31, 2012 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), located in and near Monticello, Utah, for the period of January 1, 2012, through March 2012. The report also includes a summary of projected near- term activity and reporting

  6. DOE to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail DOE to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis Department Approves Project Baseline and Obtains Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nod WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today reaffirmed its prior decision to relocate mill tailings predominantly by rail from the former uranium-ore processing site near Moab, Utah, 30 miles north to Crescent Junction, Utah. As determined previously, oversized material that is not

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  8. Small Site Closures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Center, OR 1993 Baker and Williams Warehouses, NY 1993 Falls City, TX 1994 Grand Junction Mill Tailings Site, CO 1994 Monument Valley, AZ 1994 Salton Sea Test Base, CA 1994 ...

  9. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Location of the Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  12. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site 6.1 Compliance Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on December 8, 2015. A ...

  13. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring ...

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The FY 1983 project accomplishments are: completed the Remedial Action Plan and Phase I engineering design for the Canonsburg processing site; completed remedial action on an additional 52 vicinity properties and the inclusion of an additional 303 properties in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; executed cooperative agreements with four states and the Navajo Nation; published the draft environmental impact statement for Salt Lake City site; and issued the approved Project Plan.

  15. Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing sites and disposal site at Slick Rock, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History The Slick Rock processing sites consist of two former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing

  16. Langdon II - Otter Tail Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otter Tail Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Langdon II - Otter Tail Wind Farm Facility Langdon II - Otter Tail Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  17. Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site near Green River, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. ...

  18. Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal and processing sites at Grand Junction, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Sites Site Description and History The former Grand Junction processing site, historically known as the Climax uranium mill, sits at an elevation of

  19. Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I Disposal Sites Annual Report Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites (March 2016) 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites (March 2016) (35.26 MB) More Documents & Publications Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites

  20. Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance | Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term

  1. Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson...

  2. Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground Water Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S H E E T November 2003 Figure 1. Monticello Millsite Location Background The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is a former ore-buying station and vanadium and uranium mill that operated from about 1942 through 1959 (see Figure 1). The former millsite and nearby properties are being cleaned up as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Monticello Mill Tailings Site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities

  3. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smythe, C.; Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M.

    1995-03-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  5. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... in sodium and other trace elements (Robbins 1993). Soil ingestion rate values are rare in the literature. ... Radium-226, as an alkaline earth series radionuclide, is ...

  6. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American ... of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. ...

  7. Long-term protection of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.; Hartley, J.N.

    1984-04-01

    US Environmental Protection Agency standards for the cleanup and disposal of inactive tailings sites require that control measures for disposal of tailings be designed to be effective for up to 1000 years if reasonably achievable, and, in any case, for 200 years at least. To control the escape of contaminants over such long periods, containment systems must be capable of adjusting to changing environmental conditions. Elements of a containment system include surface covers, biotic barriers, radon barriers, and, in some cases, liners. Each element of the system affects the others, and the whole system responds to the surrounding environment. Interaction is facilitated primarily by soil moisture. Consequently, the control of soil moisture is critical to the effectiveness of containment systems. Protective covers are necessary to prevent disruption of the containment system by physical or biological factors, to provide for the effective functioning of the radon barrier, and to prevent infiltration of excess water that could cause leaching. In order to design protective covers, a working knowledge of the factors and processes impacting tailings piles is required. This report characterizes the major factors and processes, and presents generic solutions based on current research. 65 references, 9 figures, 6 tables.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cotter Canon City Site - 009

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Site ID (CSD Index Number): 009 Site Name: Cotter Canon City Site Site Summary: The Cotter site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Canon City, Colorado. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U. S. Government.

  9. Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 (Public Law 95-604). The site is under the jurisdiction of Title II of UMTRCA, which applies to ...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman Mill Site - ID 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lowman Mill Site - ID 01 Site ID (CSD Index Number): ID.01 Site Name: Lowman Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site Alternate Name(s): Lowman Mill Site Uranium Mill in Lowman Alternate Name Documents: Location: Lowman, Idaho Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Eligibility Determination Documents:

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - UT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello Mill Site (UT.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Documents Related to Monticello Mill Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000.

  12. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Spook, Wyoming Page 18-1 18.0 Spook, Wyoming, Disposal Site 18.1 Compliance Summary The Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site ...

  13. Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2015 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

  14. UMTRCA Sites Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UMTRCA Sites Fact Sheet UMTRCA Sites Fact Sheet This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I and II disposal and processing sites.The sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. UMTRCA Sites Fact Sheet (968.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Site Management Guide Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2011

  15. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the

  16. EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198, October 1996). The surface remediation alternatives analyzed in the EIS include on-site disposal of the contaminated materials and off-site disposal at one of three alternative locations in Utah using one or more transportation options: truck, rail, or slurry pipeline.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Edgemont Mill Site (SD.01) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management Designated Name: Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site Alternate Name: Edgemont Mill Site Ore Buying Station at Edgemont Location: Edgemont, South Dakota Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II site Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive

  18. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m/sup 2/. The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m/sup 2/. The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m/sup 2/. The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m/sup 2/, but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m/sup 2/. Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m/sup 2/ for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m/sup 2/ and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m/sup 2/. The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers.

  19. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Ellis, B.S.; Chou, K.D.

    1980-03-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Durango, Colorado, conducted in April 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented together with descriptions of the instruments and techniques used to obtain the data. Direct above-ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface soil and sediment samples indicate movement of tailings from the piles toward Lightner Creek on the north and the Animas River on the east side of the piles. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in the former raffinate pond area is only slightly above the background level. Two structures in Durango were found to contain high concentrations of airborne radon daughters, where tailings are known to have been utilized in construction. Near-background concentrations of radon daughters were found in a well-ventilated building close to the tailings.

  20. Microsoft Word - Q0032900-Aug-2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Q0032900 DOE-LM/GJ684-2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan Draft Final August 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number Q0032900 Contents U.S. Department of Energy MMTS OU III Post-ROD Monitoring Plan August 2004 Draft Final Page iii Contents Page

  1. Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Monument Valley, Arizona. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, approximately 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah, on the west side of Cane Valley. A uranium-ore

  2. Gunnison, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gunnison, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Gunnison, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Gunnison, Colorado, Sites Site Description and History The Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site is a former uranium-ore processing site on a 61.5-acre tract of land adjacent to the

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sohio Lbar Site - 022

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sohio Lbar Site - 022 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Sohio Lbar Site (022 ) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/lbar/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: L-Bar, NM, Disposal Site Location: Cibola County, New Mexico Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal Site Disposition: Remediated by DOE and managed by DOE LM Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Sherwood Site - 039

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sherwood Site - 039 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Sherwood Site (039) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/sherwood/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Sherwood, WA, Disposal Site Location: Stevens County, Washington Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal cell Site Disposition: Remediated under UMTRCA Title II Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  5. DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Moab, Utah Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Environmental Impact Statement for Moab, Utah Site DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Moab, Utah Site July 25, 2005 - 2:27pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued its final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Site, located on the bank of the Colorado River. The EIS details the preferred option of removal of the tailings pile and contaminated materials, along

  6. DOE Awards Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup November 4, ... has awarded a competitive small business contract worth 121.2 million over the next five ...

  7. Task Order Awarded for Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Task Order Awarded for Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Follow-On Effort Task Order Awarded for Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Follow-On ...

  8. Paleoclimatic data applications: Long-term performance of uranium mill tailings repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Petersen, K.L.

    1995-09-01

    Abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the Four Corners region are a lasting legacy of the Cold War. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is designing landfill repositories that will isolate hazardous constituents of tailings from biological intrusion, erosion, and the underlying aquifer for up to 1,000 years. With evidence of relatively rapid past climate change, and model predictions of global climatic variation exceeding the historical record, DOE recognizes a need to incorporate possible ranges of future climatic and ecological change in the repository design process. In the Four Corners region, the center of uranium mining and milling activities in the United States, proxy paleoclimatic records may be useful not only as a window on the past, but also as analogs of possible local responses to future global change. We reconstructed past climate change using available proxy data from tree rings, packrat middens, lake sediment pollen, and archaeological records. Interpretation of proxy paleoclimatic records was based on present-day relationships between plant distribution, precipitation, and temperature along a generalized elevational gradient for the region. For the Monticello, Utah, uranium mill tailings site, this first approximation yielded mean annual temperature and precipitation ranges of 2 to 10{degrees} C, and 38 to 80 cm, respectively, corresponding to late glacial and Altithermal periods. These data are considered to be reasonable ranges of future climatic conditions that can be input to evaluations of groundwater recharge, radon-gas escape, erosion, frost penetration, and biointrusion in engineered earthen barriers designed to isolate tailings.

  9. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Index Site Index Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Site Index Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size About Us About Hanford Cleanup Regulators, Boards, Councils Hanford Advisory Board Hanford Natural Resource Trustee Council Environmental Protection Agency Washington State Department of Ecology Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs DOE Human Resources Management

  10. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  11. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. The wet tailings remaining after processing were placed as a slurry in three piles at the site. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The site is expected to remain in this status until licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation-specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource.

  12. BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office

  13. L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 (Public Law 95-604). The site is under the jurisdiction of Title II of UMTRCA, which applies to ...

  14. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I ...

  15. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado Page 17-1 17.0 Slick Rock, Colorado, Disposal Site 17.1 Compliance Summary The Slick Rock, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title ...

  16. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Durango, Colorado Page 4-1 4.0 Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site 4.1 Compliance Summary The Durango, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal ...

  17. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naturita, Colorado Page 13-1 13.0 Naturita, Colorado, Disposal Site 13.1 Compliance Summary The Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I ...

  18. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I ...

  19. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico Page 1-1 1.0 Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site 1.1 Compliance Summary The Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act ...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Site ID (CSD Index Number): UT.0-01 Site Name: Green River Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Green River, Utah, Disposal Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Green River Mill Site Alternate Name Documents: Location: Green River, Utah Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Eligibility Determination

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Gunnison Mill Site - CO 0-06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gunnison Mill Site - CO 0-06 Site ID (CSD Index Number): CO.0-06 Site Name: Gunnison Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Gunnison Mill Site Uranium Mill in Gunnison Alternate Name Documents: Location: Gunnison, Colorado Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Eligibility

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maybell Mill Site - CO 0-07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maybell Mill Site - CO 0-07 Site ID (CSD Index Number): CO.0-07 Site Name: Maybell Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Maybell, Colorado, Disposal Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Maybell Mill Site Uranium Mill in Maybell Alternate Name Documents: Location: Moffat County, Colorado Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site. Eligibility

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat Mill Site - UT 0-02A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - UT 0-02A Site ID (CSD Index Number): UT.0-02A Site Name: Mexican Hat Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Mexican Hat Mill Site Uranium Mill in Mexican Hat Alternate Name Documents: Location: Mexican Hat, Utah, Navajo Nation Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naturita Mill Site - CO 0-08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naturita Mill Site - CO 0-08 Site ID (CSD Index Number): CO.0-08 Site Name: Naturita Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Naturita Mill Site Alternate Name Documents: Location: Naturita, Colorado Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site. Eligibility Determination Documents:

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rifle Mill Site - CO 0-11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rifle Mill Site - CO 0-11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Rifle Mill Site (CO.0-11 ) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. Designated Name: Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site; New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site Alternate Name: Rifle Mill Site; New Uranium Mill in Rifle, Old Uranium Mill in Rifle Location: Rifle, Colorado Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spook Site - WY 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Spook Site - WY 0-01 Site ID (CSD Index Number): WY.0-01 Site Name: Spook Site Site Summary: Site Link: http://www.lm.doe.gov/spook/Sites.aspx External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Spook Site Uranium Mill in Converse County Converse County Mill Alternate Name Documents: Location: Converse County, Wyoming Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site.

  7. Progress Toward Remediation of Uranium Tailings in Mailuu-Suu, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, P B; Ranville, J; Honeyman, B D; Smith, D K; Rosenberg, N; Knapp, R B

    2003-07-09

    The town of Mailuu-Suu in Kyrgyzstan inherited 23 distinct tailings deposits from Soviet-Era uranium mining operations. Mailuu-Suu is located in the narrow landslide-prone valley of the Mailuu-Suu River about 25 km from the Uzbekistan border. Large-scale release of the radioactive tailings, as a result of landslides, could lead to irreversible contamination of the river and downstream areas. The Mailuu-Suu River is a tributary to the Syr-Darya River, the Fergana valley's main source of irrigation water. The Fergana Valley is a key agricultural region and major population center that spans Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. The trans-boundary nature of the Mailuu-Suu tailings issue presents an opportunity for collaboration among these Central Asian states. A cooperative approach to addressing environmental issues such as Mailuu-Suu may contribute to the region's stability by facilitating peaceful associations. Experience from remediation of sites in the US under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project (UMTRA) will be useful in progressing toward remediation at Mailuu-Suu.

  8. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  9. Naturita, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naturita, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing and disposal sites located at Naturita, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Naturita, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Description and History The Naturita processing site is a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility in western

  10. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  12. Site Feeds - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Feeds Site Feeds Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Hanford RSS Feeds Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size RSS Feed Links Site News RSS Did You Know RSS What's New RSS Event Calendar RSS Recent Videos RSS Press Releases RSS What is a feed? A feed is a document that contains summaries of web content with web links to the original versions. It may be viewed with a feed reader or news aggregator. If you

  13. Geochemical Weathering Increases Lead Bioaccessibility in Semi-Arid Mine Tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Sarah M.; Webb, Sam M.; Bargar, John R.; O?Day, Peggy A.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2012-09-05

    Mine tailings can host elevated concentrations of toxic metal(loid)s that represent a significant hazard to surrounding communities and ecosystems. Eolian transport, capable of translocating small (micrometer-sized) particles, can be the dominant mechanism of toxic metal dispersion in arid or semiarid landscapes. Human exposure to metals can then occur via direct inhalation or ingestion of particulates. The fact that measured doses of total lead (Pb) in geomedia correlate poorly with blood Pb levels highlights a need to better resolve the precise distribution of molecularly speciated metal-bearing phases in the complex particle mixtures. Species distribution controls bioaccessibility, thereby directly impacting health risk. This study seeks to correlate Pb-containing particle size and mineral composition with lability and bioaccessibility in mine tailings subjected to weathering in a semiarid environment. We employed X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF), coupled with sequential chemical extractions, to study Pb speciation in tailings from the semiarid Arizona Klondyke State Superfund Site. Representative samples ranging in pH from 2.6 to 5.4 were selected for in-depth study of Pb solid-phase speciation. The principle lead-bearing phase was plumbojarosite (PbFe{sub 6}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 12}), but anglesite (PbSO{sub 4}) and iron oxide-sorbed Pb were also observed. Anglesite, the most bioavailable mineral species of lead identified in this study, was enriched in surficial tailings samples, where Pb concentrations in the clay size fraction were 2-3 times higher by mass relative to bulk. A mobile and bioaccessible Pb phase accumulates in surficial tailings, with a corresponding increase in risk of human exposure to atmospheric particles.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ambrosia Lake Mill Site - NM 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ambrosia Lake Mill Site - NM 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Ambrosia Lake Mill Site (NM.0-01) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management Designated Name: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site Alternate Name: Ambrosia Lake Mill Site Uranium Mill in Ambrosia Lake Location: McKinley County, New Mexico Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Radioactive Materials Handled:

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - TX 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Falls City Mill Site (TX.04 ) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. Designated Name: Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Alternate Name: Falls City Mill Site Uranium Mill in Falls City Location: Karnes County, Texas Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monument Valley Mill Site - AZ 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monument Valley Mill Site - AZ 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monument Valley Mill Site (AZ.0-01) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management Designated Name: Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site Alternate Name: Monument Valley Mill Site Uranium Mill in Monument Valley Location: Navajo Nation, northeastern Arizona Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site Radioactive

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Riverton Mill Site - WY 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - WY 0-04 Site ID (CSD Index Number): WY.0-04 Site Name: Riverton Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Riverton Mill Site Uranium Mill in Riverton Alternate Name Documents: Location: Riverton, Wyoming, Wind River Indian Reservation Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shiprock Mill Site - NM 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock Mill Site - NM 0-04 Site ID (CSD Index Number): NM.0-04 Site Name: Shiprock Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Shiprock Disposal, New Mexico, Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Shiprock Mill Site Uranium Mill at Shiprock Alternate Name Documents: Location: Shiprock, New Mexico, Navajo Nation Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I

  19. Mathematical simulation of contaminant distribution in and around the uranium mill tailing piles, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Tokunaga, T.; White, A.F.; Smith, A.R.

    1983-02-01

    As part of the Research and Development phase of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has set itself the goal of explaining the physico-chemical evolution of the Riverton site on the basis of the already collected field data at the site (Tokunaga and Narasimhan, 1982, Smith and Moed, 1982; White et al., 1984). The predictive aspects as well as addressing the question of critical quantity of field data have to be considered during the design phase of the project as a joint effort between the LBL team and the construction engineers. At the present time, LBL is in the process of completing the Research and Development phase of the work. As of this writing, the development of an appropriate set of mathematical models has been completed. The computations of the soil-water regime at the upper tailings surface, involving climatological factors is nearing completion. Computations of chemical transport are still in progress. This paper is devoted to a description of the key mathematical issues, the mathematical models that are needed to address these issues and a discussion of the model results pertaining to the soil water regime at the tailings-atmosphere interface. 11 references, 3 figures.

  20. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  1. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office (UMTRA PO) directs the overall project. Since these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA PO shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan.

  2. Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Fact Sheet, July 2001

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed at the Climax millsite at Grand Junction, Colorado, between 1951 and 1970. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike material containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The tailings were an ideal and inexpensive construction material suitable for concrete, mortar, and fill. Accordingly, the tailings were widely used in the Grand Junction area for these purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy

  3. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  4. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-' CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  5. Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-` CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

  6. Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Cell Site Location and History The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and 1 mile south of the San

  7. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernndez-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueas, Francisco J.; Martnez, Mara Jess; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Llus Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martnez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structuralfunctional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2?-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their

  8. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. A total of 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. Two processes were used to refine the ore: an acid leach process and a sodium carbonate alkaline process. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation. The specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource.

  9. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  10. Otter Tail Ag Enterprises LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enterprises LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Otter Tail Ag Enterprises LLC Place: Fergua Falls, Minnesota Zip: 56537-7518 Product: Developed a 55m gallon ethanol facility in...

  11. A note on trans-Planckian tail effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graef, L.L.; Brandenberger, R.

    2015-09-09

    We study the proposal by Mersini et al. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.64.043508 that the observed dark energy might be explained by the back-reaction of the set of tail modes in a theory with a dispersion relation in which the mode frequency decays exponentially in the trans-Planckian regime. The matter tail modes are frozen out, however they induce metric fluctuations. The energy-momentum tensor with which the tail modes effect the background geometry obtains contributions from both metric and matter fluctuations. We calculate the equation of state induced by the tail modes taking into account the gravitational contribution. We find that, in contrast to the case of frozen super-Hubble cosmological fluctuations, in this case the matter perturbations dominate, and they yield an equation of state which to leading order takes the form of a positive cosmological constant.

  12. Otter Tail Power Company - Dollar Smart Financing Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Customers who have satisfactory 12-month payment histories with Otter Tail or another utility may use the 8.5% interest rate loan to finance purchases of new electric...

  13. Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MOAB, Utah – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter.

  14. PSR J0357+3205: THE TAIL OF THE TURTLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelli, M.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D.; Sartore, N.; Sartori, A.; Caraveo, P.; Pizzolato, F.; Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2013-03-01

    Using a new XMM-Newton observation, we have characterized the X-ray properties of the middle-aged radio-quiet {gamma}-ray pulsar J0357+3205 (named Morla) and its tail. The X-ray emission from the pulsar is consistent with a magnetospheric non-thermal origin plus a thermal emission from a hot spot (or hot spots). The lack of a thermal component from the whole surface makes Morla the coldest neutron star in its age range. We found marginal evidence for a double-peaked modulation of the X-ray emission. The study of the 9' long tail confirmed the lack of extended emission near the pulsar itself. The tail shows a very asymmetric brightness profile and its spectrum lacks any spatial variation. We found the nebular emission to be inconsistent with a classical bow shock, ram-pressure-dominated pulsar wind nebula. We propose thermal bremsstrahlung as an alternative mechanism for Morla's tail emission. In this scenario, the tail emission comes from the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) material heated up to X-ray temperatures. This can fully explain the peculiar features of the tail, assuming a hot, moderately dense ISM around the pulsar. For a bremsstrahlung-emitting tail, we can estimate the pulsar distance to be between 300 and 900 pc. A pulsar velocity of {approx}1900 km s{sup -1} is required, which would make Morla the pulsar with the largest velocity, and high inclination angles (>70 Degree-Sign ) are preferred. We propose Morla's nebula as the first example of a new 'turtle's tail' class of thermally emitting nebulae associated with high-velocity pulsars.

  15. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Meeting in Vienna | Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna October 22, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium

  16. Moab Site is ‘Beezy’ with a New Kind of Worker

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MOAB, Utah – Things are abuzz at EM’s Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Utah. This spring, two Italian honeybee hives were started on the site’s northeast portion.

  17. Moab Site Installs Radar Unit to Monitor for Future Potential Rockfalls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MOAB, Utah – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project continues to implement safety measures to protect its workers from a rockfall like the one that occurred on the hillside above the site last November.

  18. DOE Moab Site Cost-Effectively Eliminates 200 Million Gallons of Contaminated Ground Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Junction, CO ― The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it has extracted 200 million gallons of contaminated ground water from the Moab site in Utah as part of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  19. Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site.

  20. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act Funds | Department of Energy Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with

  1. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site

  2. Enhanced window breakdown dynamics in a nanosecond microwave tail pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chao; Zhu, Meng; Li, Shuang; Xie, Jialing; Yan, Kai; Luo, Tongding; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Verboncoeur, John

    2014-06-23

    The mechanisms of nanosecond microwave-driven discharges near a dielectric/vacuum interface were studied by measuring the time- and space-dependent optical emissions and pulse waveforms. The experimental observations indicate multipactor and plasma developing in a thin layer of several millimeters above interface. The emission brightness increases significantly after main pulse, but emission region widens little. The mechanisms are studied by analysis and simulation, revealing intense ionization concentrated in a desorbed high-pressure layer, leading to a bright light layer above surface; the lower-voltage tail after main pulse contributes to heat electron energy tails closer to excitation cross section peaks, resulting in brighter emission.

  3. DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup May 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of an $18 million small disadvantaged business contract with S&K Aerospace, LLC, of St. Ignatius, Montana to continue to provide technical assistance services for the Moab

  4. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  5. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (?¢????38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (?¢????17.0%), and diel rate of travel (?¢????18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Did You Know Did You Know Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Did You Know Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Close Did you know.... Close

  7. EIS-0132: Remedial Actions at the Former Union Carbide Corp. Uranium Mill Sites, Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate and compare the environmental impacts of remediating the residual radioactive materials left at the inactive uranium tailing sites in Rifle, Colorado.

  8. EIS-0099: Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Chemical Company Site, South Salt Lake, Salt Lake County, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of various scenarios associated with the cleanup of those residues remaining at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site located in South Salt Lake, Utah.

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Tour Registration Required Forms of ID Tour Information Tour Route Find Confirmation Seat Notification Frequently Asked Questions Media Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size This website will not function with Javascript disabled Tour Information Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Hanford Site Cleanup Tours for the public are planned on the following dates: May 3, 11, 17, 24 and 25 June 1, 7, 15, 21, 28, and

  10. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site. https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack

  11. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  12. New Claus tail-gas process proved in German operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettner, R.; Liermann, N.

    1988-01-11

    A process for removing sulfur components from Claus-plant tail gases increases sulfur-recovery rates to 99.5%. It has been in use for more than 4 years. In December 1983, a tail-gas cleaning unit was started up for the sulfur-recovery plants of the Nordeutsche Erdgas Aufbereitungsgesellschaft (NEAG) natural-gas treating complex at Voigten, West Germany. NEAG, a joint venture of Exxon, Shell, and Mobil Oil, desulfurizes 7.7 million normal cu m/day (approximately 271.2 million cfd) of sour gas in three plants. Up to 1,050 tons/day of elemental sulfur are produced (Fig. 1). Mobil Oil AG developed the process which has been dubbed the Mobil direct-oxidation process (Modop).

  13. Review and analysis of proposed EPA groundwater standards for the UMTRA Project. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Title I groundwater standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which were promulgated on January 5, 1983, by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, were remanded to the EPA on September 3, 1985, by the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court instructed the EPA to compile general groundwater standards for all sites. On September 24, 1987, the EPA published proposed standards in response to the remand. This Summary Report includes an evaluation of the potential effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the UMTRA Project as well as a discussion of the DOE's position on the proposed standards. This report is accompanied by a detailed Technical Report and Appendices which provide supporting information and analyses. This Summary Report results from a study undertaken to: determine the impact of the proposed standards on the UMTRA Project; and recommend provisions for the implementation of the final standards that will minimize adverse impact to the conduct of the UMTRA Project while ensuring protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, the following were considered: the flexibility of the proposed standards; interpretations of the proposed standards; the extent of aquifer restoration that may be required to implement the proposed standards at each site; the costs of aquifer restoration; and design changes necessary to meet the standards.

  14. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  15. Understanding of fundamentals. Key to process modification for tailings reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.; Woods, J.R. ); Schutte, R. )

    1993-12-01

    The tailings produced during bitumen separation from oil sands have a high water holding capacity attributed to ultrafine ([le] 0.2 [mu]m), aluminosilicate clay fractions. These components readily form gels within which both fine and coarse particles may be embedded. This complex mixture (or [open quotes]fine tails[close quotes]) shows poor dewatering and consolidation characteristics. In this work it has been demonstrated that for gel formation to occur an appropriate combination of ultrafines (amount and particle size) and water chemistry is needed. The natural salt concentration in water recycled from the tailings or pore (connate) water is sufficient to cause the ultrafines to form gels in a matter of days. Gel formers are an integral part of oil sands ores which are unavoidably released during processing. However, one way to prevent gel formation is to change the water chemistry in the extraction process where the bitumen is released. This can be achieved by the addition of sodium silicate instead of sodium hydroxide as process aid in the initial oil sands conditioning step. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Survey of Radionuclide Distributions Resulting from the Church Rock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Pond Dam Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, W. C.; Kinnison, R. R.; Reeves, J. H.

    1981-12-01

    An intensive site survey and on-site analysis program were conducted to evaluate the distribution of four radionucliGes in the general vicinity of Gallup, New Mexico, subsequent to the accidental breach of a uranium mill tailings pond dam and the release of a large quantity of tailings pond materials. The objective of this work was to determine the distribution and concentration levels of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 238}U in the arroyo that is immediately adjacent to the uranium tailings pond (pipeline arroyo) and in the Rio Puerco arroyo into which the pipeline arroyo drains. An intensive survey between the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Church Rock Mill site and the New Mexico-Arizona state border was performed. Sampling locations were established at approximately 500-ft intervals along the arroyo. During the weeks of September 24 through October 5, 1979, a series of samples was collected from alternate sampling locations along the arroyo. The purpose of this collection of samples and their subsequent analysis was to provide an immediate evaluation of the extent and the levels of radioactive contamination. The data obtained from this extensive survey were then compared to action levels which had been proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and were adapted by the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division (NMEID) for {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra concentrations that would require site cleanup. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory/Nuclear Regulatory Commission mobile laboratory van was on-site at the UNC Church Rock Mill from September 22, 1979, through December 13, 1979, and was manned by one or more PNL personnel for all but four weeks of this time period. Approximately 1200 samples associated with the Rio Puerco survey were analyzed 1n the laboratory. An additional 1200 samples related to the Rio Puerco cleanup operations which the United Nuclear Corporation was conducting were analyzed on-site in the mobile laboratory. The purpose of

  17. Study of Cu and Pb partitioning in mine tailings using the Tessier sequential extraction scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei, Mariana Lucia; Senila, Marin; Hoaghia, Maria Alexandra; Levei, Erika-Andrea; Borodi, Gheorghe

    2015-12-23

    The Cu and Pb partitioning in nonferrous mine tailings was investigated using the Tessier sequential extraction scheme. The contents of Cu and Pb found in the five operationally defined fractions were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results showed different partitioning patterns for Cu and Pb in the studied tailings. The total Cu and Pb contents were higher in tailings from Brazesti than in those from Saliste, while the Cu contents in the first two fractions considered as mobile were comparable and the content of mobile Pb was the highest in Brazesti tailings. In the tailings from Saliste about 30% of Cu and 3% of Pb were found in exchangeable fraction, while in those from Brazesti no metals were found in the exchangeable fraction, but the percent of Cu and Pb found in the bound to carbonate fraction were high (20% and 26%, respectively). The highest Pb content was found in the residual fraction in Saliste tailings and in bound to Fe and Mn oxides fraction in Brazesti tailings, while the highest Cu content was found in the fraction bound to organic matter in Saliste tailings and in the residual fraction in Brazesti tailings. In case of tailings of Brazesti medium environmental risk was found both for Pb and Cu, while in case of Saliste tailings low risk for Pb and high risk for Cu were found.

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  20. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  1. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting and Review Process Abstract Overview of the siting and review process for...

  2. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Sudip Dosanjh: Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas Richard Gerber Publications Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Kerri Peyovich Lynn Rippe David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Kathy Kincade Linda Vu Margie Wylie Advanced Technologies Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Christopher Daley Glenn K.

  3. DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (July 2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2005-08-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) is proposing to clean up surface contamination and implement a ground water compliance strategy to address contamination that resulted from historical uranium-ore processing at the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Site (Moab site), Grand County, Utah. Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) {section} 4321 et seq., DOE prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the potential environmental impacts of remediating the Moab site and vicinity properties (properties where uranium mill tailings were used as construction or fill material before the potential hazards associated with the tailings were known). DOE analyzed the potential environmental impacts of both on-site and off-site remediation and disposal alternatives involving both surface and ground water contamination. DOE also analyzed the No Action alternative as required by NEPA implementing regulations promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality. DOE has determined that its preferred alternatives are the off-site disposal of the Moab uranium mill tailings pile, combined with active ground water remediation at the Moab site. The preferred off-site disposal location is the Crescent Junction site, and the preferred method of transportation is rail. The basis for this determination is discussed later in this Summary. DOE has entered into agreements with 12 federal, tribal, state, and local agencies to be cooperating agencies in the development and preparation of this EIS. Several of the cooperating agencies have jurisdiction by law and intend to use the EIS to support their own decisionmaking. The others have expertise relevant to potential environmental, social, or economic impacts within their geographic regions. During the preparation of the EIS, DOE met with the cooperating agencies, provided them with opportunities to review preliminary versions of the document, and addressed their comments

  4. Reclamation of acidic copper mine tailings using municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, M.T.; Thompson, T.L.; Bengson, S.A.

    1998-12-31

    Reclamation of copper mine tailings in a cost effective, successful, and sustainable manner is an ongoing area of evaluation in the arid southwest. A study was initiated in September, 1996 near Hayden, Arizona to evaluate the use of municipal biosolids for reclaiming acidic copper mine tailings (pH of 2.5 to 4.0). The main objectives of the study were to (1) define an appropriate level of biosolids application for optimum plant growth, and (2) evaluate the effects of green waste and lime amendments. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four biosolid rates of 20, 70, 100 and 135 dry tons/acre, three amendment treatments (none, green waste, and green waste plus lime); with three replications. Non-replicated controls (no treatment, green waste only and lime only) were included for comparison. Shortly after biosolids incorporation to a depth of 10--12 inches, composite soil samples (0--12 inches) of each plot were taken. Biosolids incorporation increased the pH of the tailings (>5.75) and additional increases in pH were noted with lime application. In January 1997, the plots were seeded and sprinkler irrigation was commenced. A total of 4.47 inches of rainfall and 3.8 inches of irrigation were applied until harvest in May 1997. Data from the first growing season indicates optimum growth (>66 lbs/acre) at biosolids rates of 70--100 dry tons/acre. There was a significant positive effect on growth of green waste and lime amendments. Surface NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in biosolids amended plots were greatly reduced (from 23 to 6 mg/kg) by addition of green waste. There was no evidence for NO{sub 3}N leaching below 12 inches.

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  6. DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Jody

    2004-04-21

    Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid and semiarid sites. Later covers were designed to mimic this natural soil-water balance with the goal of sustaining performance with little or no maintenance. For example, the cover for the Monticello, Utah, Superfund site relies on a thick soil-sponge layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to store precipitation while plants are dormant and on native vegetation to dry the soil sponge during the growing season. Measurements of both off-site caisson lysimeters and a large 3-ha lysimeter built into the final cover show that drainage has been well below a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency target of less than 3.0 mm/yr. Our stewardship strategy combines monitoring precursors to failure, probabilistic riskbased modeling, and characterization of natural analogs to project performance of covers for a range of possible future environmental scenarios. Natural analogs are needed to understand how ecological processes will influence cover performance, processes that cannot be predicted with short-term monitoring and existing numerical models.

  7. Hanford Site Tours - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tours Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tour Restrictions Hanford Site Tours Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Hanford Site is a very unique place offering a number of tours for members of the public, elected officials and their staffs, tribal officials, stakeholders, and others. A list of the kinds of Hanford tours we provide is shown below, along with links to register for the tour or a contact person to call for more information on how to sign up.

  8. Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, Richard P.; Morrison, Stan J.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 μg/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

  9. LM Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison Sites Hallam Site Hamilton Site ...

  10. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.