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1

Kyu Cho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyu Cho Kyu Cho Electrochemical Technologies Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70-108B Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 70-0189A (510) 486-6590 KTCho@lbl.gov Kyu Taek Cho worked as a senior researcher in Hyundai Motor Company, South Korea to develop fuel cell stacks for automotive application for around 10 years, and he continued on fuel cell research to obtain a Ph.D. for the study of multiphase porous media flow from Pennstate University. In LBNL, he has been working as a Principal Research Associate to develop a cost-effective flow battery system by utilizing hydrogen and bromine as redox couple since 2010. Seminars 1. K. T. Cho, Markus S Ding, Adam Z. Weber, Vince Battaglia and Venkat Srinivasan, 'Effect of Operating Condition On Cyclic

2

Rafael L. Bras | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rafael L. Bras Rafael L. Bras About Us Rafael L. Bras , SC.D. - Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, Georgia Institute of Technology Rafael L. Bras Rafael L. Bras is the provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is a professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. He holds the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair. Prior to becoming provost, Dr. Bras was Distinguished Professor and Dean of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering of the University of California, Irvine (UCI). For 32 years prior to joining UCI he was a professor in the departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at MIT. He is past Chair of the MIT Faculty, former

3

Real Goods Solar San Rafael | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rafael Rafael Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Real Goods Solar San Rafael Name Real Goods Solar San Rafael Address 27 Simms Street Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901 Sector Solar Year founded 1978 Phone number 415-456-2800 Website http://www.realgoodssolar.com Coordinates 37.9584203°, -122.5046361° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9584203,"lon":-122.5046361,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

San Rafael, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from San Rafael, CA) (Redirected from San Rafael, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.9735346°, -122.5310874° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9735346,"lon":-122.5310874,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

LS-l Y. Cho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l Y. Cho October 15, 1984 Preliminary Design Parameters of 6 GeV Storage Ring Lattice for Synchrotron Light Source Introduction In this note, we describe a design of lattice, which...

6

Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... To date, we have identified nine STR markers specific to CHO DNA and seven markers have been used successfully in a multiplex PCR assay. ...

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Uranium favorability of the San Rafael Swell area, east-central Utah  

SciTech Connect

The San Rafael Swell project area in east-central Utah is approximately 3,000 sq mi and includes the San Rafael Swell anticline and the northern part of the Waterpocket Fold monocline at Capitol Reef. Rocks in the area are predominantly sedimentary rocks of Pennsylvanian through Cretaceous age. Important deposits of uranium in the project area are restricted to two formations, the Chinle (Triassic) and Morrison (Jurassic) Formations. A third formation, the White Rim Sandstone (Permian), was also studied because of reported exploration activity. The White Rim Sandstone is considered generally unfavorable on the basis of lithologic characteristics, distance from a possible source of uranium, lack of apparent mineralization, and the scarcity of anomalies on gamma-ray logs or in rock, water, and stream-sediment samples. The lower Chinle from the Moss Back Member down to the base of the formation is favorable because it is a known producer. New areas for exploration are all subsurface. Both Salt Wash and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation are favorable. The Salt Wash Member is favorable because it is a known producer. The Brushy Basin Member is favorable as a low-grade resource.

Mickle, D G; Jones, C A; Gallagher, G L; Young, P; Dubyk, W S

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 results: 4 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Keyword is conductivity [Clear All Filters] 2013 Kusoglu, Ahmet, Kyu Taek Cho, Rafael A. Prato, and Adam Z. Weber. "Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic-acid solutions." Solid State Ionics (2013). 2012 Kusoglu, Ahmet, Alexander Hexemer, Ruichun Jiang, Craig S. Gittleman, and Adam Z. Weber. "Effect of compression on PFSA-ionomer morphology and predicted conductivity changes." Journal of Membrane Science 421-422 (2012): 283-291. 2010 Braun, Artur, Bongjin S. Mun, Yun Sun, Z. Liu, Oliver Gröning, R. Mäder, Selma Erat, Xueyuan Zhang, Samuel S. Mao, Ekaterina Pomjakushina et al. "Correlation of conductivity and angle integrated valence band

9

Increasing IFN-[gamma] productivity in CHO cells through CDK inhibition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 60-70% of all recombinant human glycoproteins are produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Production in CHO cells, however, is often plagued by low productivity when compared with other host cell lines, ...

McClain, David Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Active hypothermic growth : a novel means for increasing total recombinant protein production by CHO cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recombinant human glycoproteins produced by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are an important class of therapeutic molecules and investigating means of improving the production rate and product quality of these glycoproteins ...

Fox, Stephen Richard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

HODIFIED ALADDIN LATTICE L2V2 S. Kramer and Y. Cho LS-20 AUS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L2V2 (40585) HODIFIED ALADDIN LATTICE L2V2 S. Kramer and Y. Cho LS-20 AUS-26 The N30 lattice discussed in a previous note showed that a nearly matched lattice could be produced...

13

Wind buffeting effects on the Gemini 8m primary mirrors M. K. Cho1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind buffeting effects on the Gemini 8m primary mirrors M. K. Cho1,2 , L. Stepp1 , and S. Kim3 and Mechanical Engineering, University of Arizona, 1130 N. Mountain, Tucson, AZ 85721 #12;Wind buffeting effects mirror distortion caused by wind pressure variations. To quantify telescope wind loading effects

14

About making a CHO production cell line research-friendly by genetic engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, CHO EBNALT85 (Icosagen AS, Tartu, Estonia) expressing the full length EBNA1 gene, and the HEK293-6E cell line (from the group of Y. Durocher, NRC, Canada) expressing a truncated EBNA1 gene served as positive controls. A number of commercially available...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Dose-rate-effects in XRCC1 wild-type and mutant CHO cell lines using An ?AM source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on both the AA8 (wild-type CHO cells) and EM9 (XRCC1 null CHO mutants) cell lines. In particular, this study performed clonogenic survival and growth assays to ...

Chambers, Dwight McCoy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Yang-Mills Theory Constructed from ChoFaddeevNiemi Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a new way of looking at the ChoFaddeevNiemi (CFN) decomposition of the Yang-Mills theory to answer how the enlarged local gauge symmetry respected by the CFN variables is restricted to obtain another Yang-Mills theory with the same local and global gauge symmetries as the original Yang-Mills theory. This may shed new light on the fundamental issue of the discrepancy between two theories for independent degrees of freedom and the role of the Maximal Abelian gauge in Yang-Mills theory. As a byproduct, this consideration gives new insight into the meaning of the gauge invariance and the observables, e.g., a gauge-invariant mass term and vacuum condensates of mass dimension two. We point out the implications for the SkyrmeFaddeev model.

Kei-ichi Kondo; Takeharu Murakami; Toru Shinohara

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. McCluskey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. Mc kycho@crc.stanford.edu Abstract When a test set size is larger than desired, some patterns must be dropped. This paper presents a systematic method to reduce test set size; the method reorders a test set

Stanford University

18

An Underwater Communication and Sensing Testbed in Marina del Rey Andrew Goodney, Young H. Cho, John Heidemann, John Wroclawski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Underwater Communication and Sensing Testbed in Marina del Rey Andrew Goodney, Young H. Cho, and communication underwater is increasingly important to scientists who study the oceans, rivers, and lakes, as government and industry seek to observe, protect, exploit, and control resources underwater. With growing

Heidemann, John

19

Near-threshold H/D exchange in CD{sub 3}CHO photodissociation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measuring the isotopic abundance of hydrogen versus deuterium atoms is a key method for interrogating reaction pathways in chemistry. H/D 'scrambling' is the intramolecular rearrangement of labile isotopes of hydrogen atoms and when it occurs through unanticipated pathways can complicate the interpretation of such experiments. Here, we investigate H/D scrambling in acetaldehyde at the energetic threshold for breaking the formyl C-H bond and reveal an unexpected unimolecular mechanism. Laser photolysis experiments of CD{sub 3}CHO show that up to 17% of the products have undergone H/D exchange to give CD{sub 2}H + DCO. Transition-state theory calculations reveal that the dominant mechanism involves four sequential H- or D-shifts to form CD{sub 2}HCDO, which then undergoes conventional C-C bond cleavage. At the lowest energy the molecule undergoes an average of 20 H- or D-shifts before products are formed, evincing significant scrambling of H and D atoms. Analogous photochemically induced isomerizations and isotope scrambling are probably important in both atmospheric chemistry and combustion reactions.

Heazlewood, B. R.; Maccarone, A. T.; Andrews, D. U.; Osborn, D. L.; Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Kable, S. H. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Univ. of Sydney); (SNL)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

11/11/2002 1AVS 49th Int'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) -Cho Dynamic Simulation and Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) - Cho Scope & Strategy Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics &Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics & stochasticsstochastics ESH fluctuations Incorporate capability in models for dynamics & stochastics Process & tool Fundamental science Si

Rubloff, Gary W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SK-N30(4/8/85) MODIFIED ALADDIN LATTICE N30 S. Kramer and Y. Cho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N30(4/8/85) N30(4/8/85) MODIFIED ALADDIN LATTICE N30 S. Kramer and Y. Cho LS-19 AUS-25 The present Aladdin lattice, hereafter referred to as Synch lattice, was designed to provide nearly equal beam size in all the dipole magnets. By offsetting the quadrupole doublets after the dipoles, access to the photon beam lines was made more convenient, but destroys the symmetry of the element placement. The lattice functions for the Synch lattice are shown in Figure 1. The common bussing of the quadrupole doublets and the triplets make the Twiss functions asymmetric through the long straight section and a large negative dispersion in this region. The large value of dispersion around the period, although not by itself bad, limits the natural emittance of this lattice and makes resonance corrections difficult without influencing the

22

Thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 {mu}s after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 {mu}Torr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 {mu}s) are identified: H, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, CO, CH{sub 2}=CHOH, HC{identical_to}CH, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 2}=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH{sub 3}CHO (+M) {yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH{sub 2}CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

Vasiliou, AnGayle K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Zhang Xu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg [Chemical Sciences Division, LBNL MS 6R-2100, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9055, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); David, Donald E. [Integrated Instrument Design Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W. [Center for Combustion and Environmental Research, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tae Joon Cho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Newkome; 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-[4'-(terpyridyl)phenyl]porphyrine and its Heteroleptic RuII Complexes: Synthesis and Photovoltaic Properties; Chem. ...

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Damage to DNA thymine residues in CHO cells by hydrogen peroxide and copper, ascorbate and copper, hypochlorite, or other oxidants: Protection by low MW polyethylene glycol  

SciTech Connect

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) MW 200-600, has been shown to protect animals against oxidant and radiation damage. In order to study the mechanism the authors examined the effect of PEG on damage to thymine residues in the DNA of living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. After growing to confluence in the presence of (methyl{sup 3}H)thymidine, the cells were treated, usually for 1 hr, with various combinations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup ++}, Fe{sup ++}, Ocl{sup {minus}}, ascorbate UV or X-irradiation, and PEG MW 300. The oxidants H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Cu{sup ++}, and OCL{sup {minus}} released {sup 3}H into the medium from DNA thymine, and also formed thymine glycol residues in the DNA that were assayed by alkaline borohydride. The presence of 10% PEG during treatment significantly reduced the release of {sup 3}H into the medium but did not prevent formation of thymine glycol residues bound to the DNA. PEG at 10% had no effect on the cloning efficiency of CHO cells.

Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J. (Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy Storage - Vincent Battaglia, LBNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H H 2 /Br 2 Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage Venkat Srinivasan, Adam Weber, & Vince Battaglia Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory * DOE ESS Review * Washington, DC * September 26, 2012 vsbattaglia@lbl.gov Purpose Develop a low-cost, energy-storage system with high power density at 80% efficiency Use H 2 and Br 2 in a flow battery Future Plans Modeling Funding from ARPA-E GRIDS, USDOE LBNL: Kyu Taek Cho (Cell studies); Paul Ridgway (Catalysis studies); Sophia Haussener (Transport modeling) Bosch: Paul Albertus (Cost Modeling); Roel Sanchez-Carrera and Boris Kozinsky (Catalyst theory)

26

Rafael Martinelli Pinto Exact Algorithms for Arc and Node Routing ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algoritmo de branch-cut-and-price criado o qual usa a geraao de colunas ... has a demand which must be serviced by exactly one vehicle from a set.

27

San Rafael, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.9735346°, -122.5310874° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9735346,"lon":-122.5310874,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 results: 4 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Paul L. Ridgway [Clear All Filters] 2012 Ridgway, Paul L., Honghe Zheng, A. F. Bello, Xiangyun Song, Shidi Xun, Jin Chong, and Vincent S. Battaglia. "Comparison of Cycling Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites." Journal of The Electrochemical Society 159, no. 5 (2012): A520. Cho, Kyu Taek, Paul L. Ridgway, Adam Z. Weber, Sophia Haussener, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Venkat Srinivasan. "High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage." Journal of the Electrochemical Society 159, no. 11 (2012): A1806-A1815. 2010 Delacourt, Charles, Paul L. Ridgway, and John S. Newman. "Mathematical Modeling of CO[sub 2] Reduction to CO in Aqueous Electrolytes." Journal of

29

Arizona Water Atlas Volume 3 San Rafael Basin References and Supplemental Reading References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover, received January 2006. _____, 2004, Water quality exceedences by watershed: Data file, received June 2004.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optimizing microalgal production in raceway systems Rafael Mu~noz-Tamayoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in "Biotechnology Progress 29, 2 (2013) 543--552" DOI : 10.1002/btpr.1699 #12;Due to its biochemical properties have been10 identified as a renewable source for biodiesel production [5, 18]. However, despite these11

31

CALIFORNIA REPORTING, LLC 52 Longwood Drive, San Rafael, California 94901 (415) 457-4417  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* *Aniruddha Roy, Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) *Frank Morrison, Baltimore Aircoil Company *Frank Stanonik, Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) *Ira to Nonresidential ACM Approval Manual Martha Brook 143 Public Comments 149 Adjournment 208 Certificate of Reporter

32

Fabrication and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2010 ... Fabrication of Artificial Bone by the Combination of Electrospinning, Extrusion and Slurry Processes: Hiep Nguyen1; Byong-Taek Lee1;...

33

Advanced ODS Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013... Byun2; Seong Woong Kim1; chan hee park1; Jong Taek Yeom1; 1Korea Institute of Materials Science; 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory

34

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY TO: Y. Cho FROM: W. Praeg SUBJECT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(bypass) should be the same as the booster rms current. A general booster current shape is shown in Fig. 1. Its rms value is: I ( lIT 2 ) 1 2 - i dt T o ' 2 2to+t3 t1+t3...

35

Microsoft PowerPoint - 120825IPRC2012_Cho [Compatibility Mode...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of PRIDE IPRC 2012 Oral Session, August 28, 2012 10 Simulator (Digital Mock-up of PRIDE) Remote Handling Evaluation Mock-up Digital Mock-up of PRIDE is used to: Test all...

36

Fluid velocity fluctuations in a collision of a sphere with a wall J. Rafael Pacheco,1,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA and Environmental Fluid Dynamics Laboratories of a combined experimental and numerical study on the fluid motion generated by the controlled approach axisymmetric. The fluid agitation of the fluid related to the kinetic energy is obtained as function of time

Pacheco, Jose Rafael

37

Path Planning in Belief Space with Pose SLAM Rafael Valencia, Juan Andrade-Cetto, and Josep M. Porta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for navigation, i.e., to reach distant locations in the environment efficiently and safely. In recent years, we trajectories to reach distant locations is addressed in the motion planning liter- ature [5]. The most or the Rapidly-exploring Random Trees in which samples are stochastically drawn in the configuration space and

Porta, Josep M.

38

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for San Rafael Cit Hall (built in 1964), including replacement of HVAC system. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Program Energy Efficiency Retrofits San Rafael California...

39

Forest Stewardship Standards A Survival Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Karlis Latisenko Nicaragua: Jaime Rafael Guillen Russia: Yuri Pautov Sweden: Peter Roberntz, Per Larsson

40

Report of the 96th  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Private Sector Member Rafael Jimenez Association of American Railroads Transportation Technology Center, Inc. Private ...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage Title High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Cho, Kyu Taek, Paul L. Ridgway, Adam Z. Weber, Sophia Haussener, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Venkat Srinivasan Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 159 Issue 11 Pagination A1806 - A1815 Date Published 01/2012 ISSN 0013-4651 Keywords hydrogen/bromine, redox flow battery Abstract The electrochemical behavior of a promising hydrogen/bromine redox flow battery is investigated for grid-scale energy-storage application with some of the best redox-flow-battery performance results to date, including a peak power of 1.4 W/cm(2) and a 91% voltaic efficiency at 0.4 W/cm(2) constant-power operation. The kinetics of bromine on various materials is discussed, with both rotating-disk-electrode and cell studies demonstrating that a carbon porous electrode for the bromine reaction can conduct platinum-comparable performance as long as sufficient surface area is realized. The effect of flow-cell designs and operating temperature is examined, and ohmic and mass-transfer losses are decreased by utilizing a flow-through electrode design and increasing cell temperature. Charge/discharge and discharge-rate tests also reveal that this system has highly reversible behavior and good rate capability.

42

Breves acotaciones para una bio-bibliografa de la "vidobra" de ngel Gonzlez  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispuesto a hacer ma la P. Guillen: "el inundo est bienngel Gonzlez, Rafael Guillen", nsula, XXII, 250 (Sept. ,

Brower, Gary L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Committee Reports for the  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rafael Jimenez Association of American Railroads Transportation Technology Center, Inc. ... toward cleaner, fossil-free forms of energy, weights and ...

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan Phone: +81-52-789-2044  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Azerbaijan. "Both its external appearance and internal structure are absolutely extraordinary," says Prof. Dr to Azerbaijan to measure the outside and inside of the tower with a laser scanner. This marked the beginning and Azerbaijan University for Architecture and Construc- tion in Baku. Landscape models created by robots True

Takahashi, Ryo

45

Power-Factor and Torque Calculation with Consideration of Cross Saturation of the Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation Seong Taek Lee1,2 , Timothy A. Burress1 permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM). The conventional two-axis IPMSM model is modified to include motor of a hybrid electric vehicle. I. INTRODUCTION The interior permanent magnet synchronous motor

Tolbert, Leon M.

46

Why Sequence Ceriporiopsis subvermispora?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Laboratory) and Rafael Vicua (Universidad Catlica de Chile). Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

47

Query-Structure Based Web Page Indexing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In Proc. 8th International Symposium on String Processing and Information Retrieval (SPIRE 2001), pages 33-45, San Rafael, Chile, 2001. ...

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

Marin Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marin Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Marin Solar Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901 Sector Solar Product Marin Solar is a residential installer of photovoltaic systems....

49

Greenline Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901 Product Small to medium scale biodiesel plants designer and producer. They also run a biodiesel plant in Vallejo,...

50

Light Metals 2007 Volume 4: Electrode Technology TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Evaluation of the Preheating Process to Gas with Peripheral Protection in Cells of CVG Alcasa, Venezuela [pp. 991-996] Rafael Tosta and Evelyn...

51

Low molecular weight thermostable .beta.-D-glucosidase from ...  

Himmel; Michael E. (Littleton, CO), Tucker; Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO), Adney; William S. (Golden, CO), Nieves; Rafael A. (Lakewood, CO) Assignee:

52

FS1112 / Fsica 2 Septiembre-Diciembre 2012 Prof. Carlos Vsquez CARNET NOMBRE P1/30 P2/35 P3/35 DEF/100 DEF/5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guédez Elmo Bell-Smythe Andrea Gruber Sofía Parada Luigibeth Ríos Rafael Zerpa Luisana Balbi Isaías Bravo

Vásquez, Carlos

53

Toward a Genealogy of Mestizaje: Rethinking Race in Colonial Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pblica en la Nueva Espaa. Mexico City: Editorial Progreso,Pontifical University of Mexico. Trans. Minnie Lee Barrettand trans. Rafael Tena. Mexico City: Consejo Nacional para

Nemser, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Brewing Renewable Diesel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Brewing Renewable Diesel Brewing Renewable Diesel Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.15.11 Brewing Renewable Diesel Researchers at a DOE Bioenergy Research Center use microbes to synthesize a drop-in replacement for standard diesel transportation fuel. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Pamela Peralta-Yahya, Taek Soon Lee, and Mario Ouellet of the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute team that used microbes to synthesize a bio-based drop-in substitute for diesel fuel. Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab From left, Pamela Peralta-Yahya, Taek Soon Lee, and Mario Ouellet of the

55

Google SOAP API Google API Teil II / berblick CVS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google SOAP API CVS Google API Teil II / ?berblick CVS Projektgruppe 520 Rafael Koloch 12. Oktober 2007 Rafael Koloch Google API Teil II / ?berblick CVS #12;Google SOAP API CVS Webservice Denition Webservice Aufruf Webservice Ergebnis auswerten Demonstration ?berblick Google API: Denition des Web

Morik, Katharina

56

California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report July 2008 #12;California Solar Initiative, CPUC Staff Progress Report, July 2008: Zerull Location: San Rafael, CA System size: 14 kW Funded by the California Solar Initiative

57

TABL - Innovation Grant Awards Announcement 20120115-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S eismic S ubsurface I maging --- Michael C ommer, G reg N ewman, a nd P etr P etrov * iMEA---Chip P rototyping a nd O ptimization --- D aojing W ang, Rafael G omez--- Sjoberg...

58

Graphs and Combinatorics (1993)9:97-104 Combinatorics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ryukyu University, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-01 Japan

Bárány, Imre

59

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Physics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Saber, Eli (Eli Saber) - Department of Electrical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology Sacks, Rafael (Rafael Sacks) - Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology Sadeghi, Parastoo (Parastoo Sadeghi) - Research School of Engineering, Australian National University Sadykov, Ruslan (Ruslan Sadykov) - INRIA Bordeaux & Institut de Mathematiques de Bordeaux, Université Bordeaux Saeedi, Parvaneh (Parvaneh Saeedi) - School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University Saghafi, Mahmoud Reza (Mahmoud Reza Saghafi) - Built Environment and Engineering, Queensland University of Technology Saha, Subir Kumar (Subir Kumar Saha) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi

60

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zacherl, Danielle (Danielle Zacherl) - Department of Biological Science, California State University, Fullerton Zaferatos, Nicholas C. (Nicholas C. Zaferatos) - Department of Environmental Studies, Western Washington University Zajac, Roman N. (Roman N. Zajac) - Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven Zamudio, Kelly R. (Kelly R. Zamudio) - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University Zanella, Augusto (Augusto Zanella) - Dipartimento Territorio e Sistemi Agro-Forestali, Università degli Studi di Padova Zanette, Liana (Liana Zanette) - Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario Zanna, Laure (Laure Zanna) - Department of Physics, University of Oxford Zardoya, Rafael (Rafael Zardoya) - Biodiversidad y Biologia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High speed shadowgraphy for the study of liquid drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Creating Panoramic and Object Images, Library of Congress, ISBN: 978-0-165-34223-8, p 38. Hutchings I M, Martin G D and Hoath S D, (2007) Journal of Imaging Science and Technology 51(5), 438-444. Jones A R, (1977) Progress in Energy and Combustion... High speed shadowgraphy for the study of liquid drops Jos Rafael Castrejn-Pita, Rafael Castrejn-Garca, Ian Hutchings Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB3 0FS, 17 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, United Kingdom...

Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Castrejon-Garcia, R.; Hutchings, I.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture - Capture - Membranes (2) Energy Analysis of CO 2 Separation Process with Hollow Fiber Membrane Using ASPEN Simulation Method Hyung-Taek Kim and Hyun-Min Shim Dept. of Energy Studies Ajou University, Suwon Korea Contents Background Purpose of the Study Simulation & Analysis Method Schematic of Process Results of Simulation Conclusion Future Work Background * Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) - Major source of greenhouse gas from Power Plant & Industrial Process - CO 2 Emission : Korea ranked 10 th in the world - Kyoto Protocol : Expected to add carbon tax, emission trade * For sustainable development, Korea must prepare for the duty for reduction of CO 2 emission. * Methods of CO 2 separation : Absorption, Adsorption, Membrane - Absorption : Low conc. CO 2 recovery process & large scale

63

2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Discovery & Innovation » Stories of Discovery & Discovery & Innovation » Stories of Discovery & Innovation » 2011 Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Stories of Discovery & Innovation 2011 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Microscopic image showing three-dimensional "gated" topological insulator device fabricated from (Bi0.50Sb0.50)2Te3 nanoplates. 12.02.11Stories of Discovery & Innovation The Strange Future of Electronics New materials called "topological insulators" may help us chart a path beyond Moore's Law. Read More » Pamela Peralta-Yahya, Taek Soon Lee, and Mario Ouellet of the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute team that used microbes to synthesize a bio-based drop-in substitute for diesel fuel.

64

Comparison of the susceptibility of several cultivars of avocado to the persea mite, Oligonychus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of leaves with their stylets and siphon out the cells' contents (Van der Geest, 1985; Jeppson et al., 1975 For WindowsTM . User's Manual, Jandel Scienti®c Software, San Rafael, CA. Jeppson, L.R., Keifer, H.H., Baker

Hoddle, Mark S.

65

For complete faculty information go to: www.montana.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of leaves with their stylets and siphon out the cells' contents (Van der Geest, 1985; Jeppson et al., 1975 For WindowsTM . User's Manual, Jandel Scienti®c Software, San Rafael, CA. Jeppson, L.R., Keifer, H.H., Baker

Dyer, Bill

66

Quantum mechanics and gravity as preclusion principles of four dimensional geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to employ a "preclusion principle" originally suggested by Rafael Sorkin in order to come up with a relativistically covariant model of quantum mechanics and gravity. Space-time is viewed as geometry as opposed to dynamics, and "unwanted" histories in that geometry are precluded.

Roman Sverdlov

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Defining and implementing a distributed and reconfigurable information system for prognostics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Open System Alliance) proposed an Open System Architecture for Condition Based Maintenance (OSA the maintenance-oriented systems tools such as DMS (Document management system), CMMS (Computerized Maintenance A real world integrated predictive maintenance system Marie-Danièle Gauvain1,2 , Rafael Gouriveau1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

626 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 37, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2012 A Novel Blending Technique for Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Underwater Gigamosaicing Ricard Prados, Rafael Garcia, Nuno Gracias, Javier Escartín, and László Neumann underwater photomosaics to small areas de- spite the hundreds of thousands of square meters that modern sur- veys can cover. Large underwater photomosaics are increasingly in demand for the characterization

Escartin, Javier

69

[3] Fred Douglis and Brian Marsh. Low power disk management for mobile computers. Technical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In Pro­ ceedings ACM SIGMOD, 1994. [6] Ravi Jain and John Werth. Airdisks and air­ raid, November 1996. [5] T. Imielinski, S. Viswanathan, , and B.R. Badri­ nath. Energy efficient indexing on air 1996. [11] Stanley Zdonik, Michael Franklin, Rafael Alonso, and Swarup Acharya. Are ``Disks in the Air

California at Berkeley, University of

70

[3] Fred Douglis and Brian Marsh. Low power disk management for mobile computers. Technical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In Pro- ceedings ACM SIGMOD, 1994. [6] Ravi Jain and John Werth. Airdisks and air- raid, November 1996. [5] T. Imielinski, S. Viswanathan, , and B.R. Badri- nath. Energy efficient indexing on air 1996. [11] Stanley Zdonik, Michael Franklin, Rafael Alonso, and Swarup Acharya. Are "Disks in the Air

Han, Richard Y.

71

Parabolic surfaces in hyperbolic space with constant Gaussian curvature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic surfaces in hyperbolic space with constant Gaussian curvature Rafael L´opez Departamento@ugr.es Keywords: hyperbolic space, parabolic surface, Gaussian curvature MSC 2000 subject classification: 53A10, 53C45 Abstract A parabolic surface in hyperbolic space H3 is a surface invariant by a group

López, Rafael

72

A Study on Performance Degradation of PEMFC by Water Freezing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Feb. 1-2, 2005 EunAe Cho Fuel Cell Research Center Korea Institute of Science and Technology Fuel Cell Research Center Overview E.A. Cho et...

73

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by an electrical method. IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium Proceedings: Cat. # 74 CHO ISU; 1974; 45-49. [21 Greenspan, M ...

2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

O P Q R S O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Najmanovich, Rafael (Rafael Najmanovich) - European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus Cambridge Navarra-Madsen, Junalyn (Junalyn Navarra-Madsen) - Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Texas Woman's University Nawroth, Janna C. (Janna C. Nawroth) - Biological Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Nédellec, Claire -Laboratoire Mathématique Informatique et Génome, INR(édellec, Claire -Laboratoire Mathématique Informatique et Génome, IN)RA Nelson, Celeste M. (Celeste M. Nelson) - Departments of Molecular Biology & Chemical Engineering, Princeton University Nerenberg, Robert (Robert Nerenberg) - Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame

75

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Computer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pacard, Frank (Frank Pacard) - Centre de Mathématiques Laurent Schwartz, École Polytechnique Paccaut, Frédéric (Frédéric Paccaut) - Faculté de Mathématiques et d' Informatique, Université de Picardie Jules Verne Pach, János (János Pach) - Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University Pacheco González, Carlos Gabriel (Carlos Gabriel Pacheco González) - Departamento de Matemáticas, CINVESTAV del Instituto Politécnico Nacional Pacheco, Amílcar (Amílcar Pacheco) - Instituto de Matemática, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Pacheco, Jose Rafael (Jose Rafael Pacheco) - School of Mathematical and Statistical Science, Arizona State University Pachter, Lior (Lior Pachter) - Department of Mathematics, University

76

APPENDICES TECHNICAL SUPPORT MEMO FOR PROPOSED CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION B5.25  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDICES APPENDICES TECHNICAL SUPPORT MEMO FOR PROPOSED CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION B5.25 APPENDIX A SUPPLEMENTAL CURRICULA VITAE FOR EXPERT PANEL APPENDIX A SUPPLEMENTAL CURRICULA VITAE FOR EXPERT PANEL A-1. Kurt W. Buchholz A-2. Paul T. Jacobson, Ph.D. A-3. Louise Kregting, Ph.D. A-4. Dallas J. Meggitt A-5. Rafael A. Olivieri, Ph.D. A-6. Stephen W. Shaner, Ph.D. A-1. Kurt W. Buchholz A-2. Paul T. Jacobson, Ph.D. A-3. Louise Kregting, Ph.D. A-4. Dallas J. Meggitt A-5. Rafael A. Olivieri, Ph.D. A-6. Stephen W. Shaner, Ph.D. APPENDIX B SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS APPENDIX B SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS B-1. Wave Energy Technology Project, Kaneohe Bay, HI, Environmental Assessment (Jan. 2003)

77

SPG Solar Inc formerly Sunpower Geothermal Energy Co Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Sunpower Geothermal Energy Co Inc formerly Sunpower Geothermal Energy Co Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name SPG Solar Inc (formerly Sunpower & Geothermal Energy Co Inc) Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901-4711 Product US-based PV system designer and installer. References SPG Solar Inc (formerly Sunpower & Geothermal Energy Co Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SPG Solar Inc (formerly Sunpower & Geothermal Energy Co Inc) is a company located in San Rafael, California . References ↑ "SPG Solar Inc (formerly Sunpower & Geothermal Energy Co Inc)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SPG_Solar_Inc_formerly_Sunpower_Geothermal_Energy_Co_Inc&oldid=351615"

78

Ultra-High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry on Drop-on-Demand Jetting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2011 Complete List of Authors: Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; University of Cambridge, Engineering Hoath, Stephen; University of Cambridge, Engineering Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso; University of Cambridge, Engineering Morrison, Neil; University of Leeds... *Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. Abstract An experimental setup to study the dynamics of droplet jetting from a commercially available print-head is described. A MicroFab print...

Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hoath, S.D.; Castrejon-Pita, A.A.; Morrison, N.F.; Hsiao, W.-K.; Hutchings, I.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

May 4, 2009 Hon. Barack Obama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Alex 1.00 Borrajo, Rafael 0.50 1.50 MAE110 McDonell McLarty, Dustin 0.50 0.50 MAE115 Brouwer Jarrahbashi, Dorrin 1.00 Fardadi, Mahshid 0.50 Taghavi, Shervin 0.50 2.00 MAE130A Papamoschou Hernandez, FranzRue Hernandez, Franz 1.00 Koster, Timothy 0.50 1.50 MAE146 Villac Nakhjiri, Navid 0.50 0.50 MAE147 Karnani

Laughlin, Robert B.

80

Microsoft Word - 55310808-file00.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using Image J. For 5-CHO-THF (6S)-5-formyl-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydrofolic acid, calcium salt; natural calcium folinate; Schircks Laboratories, Jona, Switzerland, methionine,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effect of Al+B4C Agglomerate Size on Mechanical Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Bo Yao, Travis J. Patterson, Yongho Sohn, Matthew Shaeffer, Cory Smith, Mark van den Bergh, Kyu Cho. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Bo Yao. Abstract...

82

NIVEAUX PROFONDS DANS LES DIODES LECTROLUMINESCENTES GaAs-GaAlAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JEPPSON, B., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 12 (1973) 1011. [15] LANG, D. V., CHO, A. Y., GOSSARD, A. C. et WIEGMANN

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

LA REVUE DE L'EPI N 96 LE SITE DU MUSE DES ARTS ET MTIERS LE SITE WEB DU MUSE NATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Musica Mecanica, PenWeb, TNC Network, L'?cho des Régions, Archives Photo CNAM. #12;158 Michelle ELARDJA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Offering Songs, Festive Songs, Processional Songs mGar-gLu, Khro-Glu, Phebsnga: Tashi Tsering's Music: Re chung tso, 'Playing Party'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are enjoying the program) ????????????????????????????????????????? Da bta a cho dres ba rgan kyang gzhon du bzhon du Now I am old, but I feel young with these activities...

Blumenthal, Katey

85

Fermilab Today | Brown University Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cho and Gena Kukartsev. Front row from left: David Khatidze, Selda Esen Koylu, Duong Nguyen, Shabnam Jabeen, Saptaparna Bhattacharya and John Paul Chou. Brown group at CERN from...

86

Extending the Horizons: Environmental Environmental Excellence as Key to Improving Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liker, J.K. 2004. The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principlesquote from Fujio Cho, President of Toyota, one of themanufacturers: "Since Toyota's founding we have adhered to

Corbett, C. J.; Klassen, R. D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T. Fox, Dae Won Cho, and Kenneth E. Hammel, "Exploring new strategies for cellulosic biofuels production," Energy and Environmental Science 4(10), 3820-3833 (2011). Marcel...

88

Composites for Structural and Multifunctional Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Room: Room 414. Location: David L. Lawrence Convention Ctr Session Chair: Kyu Cho, US Army Research Laboratories; Amit Misra, LANL...

89

USC HUMAN SUBJECTS NEWSLETTER VOLUME 1, ISSUE 11 Human Subjects Protection Program "Aces"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quinn, Maristela Cho, Jessica Spotts, Kevin Pickett, John Bola, Evelyn Gonzalez-Figueroa, William, Esmeralda Endeje, Brenda Qualls, Ed Hill, Chris Longspaugh, Nasairah Carter, and Melissa Venegas #12;

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

90

SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT-WEIGHT METALLIC MATERIALS II: I ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cho, Vice President of Rapidly Solidified Materials Research Center, (RASOM) , Chungnam National University, Taedok Science Town, Taejon 305-764 Korea...

91

Modlisation et simulation dun tage haute temprature pour la purification dun gaz charg en goudrons et en particules carbones par assistance plasma.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Afin de rpondre aux besoins croissants en nergie primaire, le groupe Europlasma a dvelopp le procd CHO-Power permettant de valoriser nergtiquement un mlange de refus (more)

Demarthon, Romain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Calculation of the pulsed Feynman-alpha formulae and their experimental verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.elsevier.com/locate/anucene annals of NUCLEAR ENERGY #12;1. Introduction The theory of the Feynman-alpha method with pulsed sources,*, Y. Kitamura b , J. Wright a , T. Misawa c a Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan c Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan

Pázsit, Imre

93

Single- and Multivoxel Proton Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of two magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for treating pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and to evaluate the relationship of metabolic profiles determined by each technique. Utility of each technique for improving patient management is also discussed. Methods and Materials: Children with DIPG (n = 36) were evaluated using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) during the same imaging session. Patients were followed longitudinally (n = 150 total studies). Technical feasibility was defined by sufficient water and lipid suppression for detection of metabolites. Correlation of metabolic data obtained by SVS and MRSI was determined using the Spearman rank method. Metabolite ratios, including choline:N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho:NAA) and Cho:creatine (Cho:Cr), were obtained from SVS and MRSI. Results: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible in >90% of studies. Maximum Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr from MRSI analysis were strongly associated with Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr obtained by SVS (r = 0.67 and 0.76, respectively). MRSI Cho:NAA values were more heterogeneous than Cho:Cr values within the same lesion, and a strong linear relationship between the range and maximum Cho:NAA values was observed. Conclusions: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible, with a strong correlation in metabolic data. Both techniques may improve diagnostic evaluation and management of DIPG. SVS is recommended for global assessment of tumor metabolism before and after therapy. MRSI showed heterogeneous patterns of metabolic activity within these tumors and is recommended for planning and monitoring targeted therapies and evaluating nearby tissue for tumor invasion.

Steffen-Smith, Emilie A. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Venzon, David J. [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bent, Robyn S. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Hipp, Sean J. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States) [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Warren, Katherine E., E-mail: warrenk@mail.nih.gov [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

African American Fathers Perceptions of Childhood Overweight: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Childhood overweight/obesity (CHO) is a serious health concern for children and adolescents. Despite increased efforts to prevent CHO, prevalence rates have actually increased. Evidence suggests that parents are critical to successful interventions to reduce CHO among children. While research efforts aimed at parental inclusion have increased, limited research has been conducted to investigate fathers perception of CHO, or their influences on their childrens health. The objective of this two-phase study was to answer three research questions: a) How does the extant literature operationalize African American parental perceptions of childhood overweight/obesity? b) What are African American fathers perceptions of CHO? and c) How do African American fathers perceive CHO in relation to their own childs weight status? Evidence-based studies reveal that fathers have the potential to play a significant role in CHO prevention. Phase one (literature review) revealed that published studies on parental perception of CHO either exclude fathers, include them only in data collection, and/or report no results specific to paternal perception. Thus, an exploratory qualitative study was needed to explore African American fathers perceptions of CHO. In phase two (qualitative study), four fathers were interviewed about their perceptions of CHO and how they contextualize this problem. The results indicated fathers believe that weight categories are racially & culturally insensitive and do not account for individual health status or differences in body/bone structure, and that parents with overweight children are financially disadvantaged, irresponsible and overworked. Fathers also indicated that colloquial terms (e.g., chunky, husky, big-boned, thick) were commonly substituted medical definitions for overweight and that child/teen sports participation was motivated by health, as well as non-health related benefits (e.g., competitiveness, educational scholarships). Further, fathers identification of CHO is subjective and includes visual means and parental assessment of health status (e.g., child mobility/activity levels). Implications of this study are that additional studies are needed to clarify fathers roles in CHO and that future studies should consider complex familial structures, as well as reframe prevention efforts to focus on optimal child health as opposed to weight labeling and focusing on parents accuracy in identifying weight categories.

Byrd, Vanessa

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fabrication technique for filling-factor tunable titanium dioxide colloidal crystal replicas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pennsylvania 16802 and Central Technical Research Laboratory, Nippon Oil Corp., 8, Chidori-cho, Naka, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503, Japan Neal Abrams and Thomas E. Mallouka) Department

96

The Molecular Foundry - Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and O. D. Dubon, "2d-Patterned Ferromagnetic Iii-Mn-V Semiconductors for Planar Spintronics", Physica Status Solidi C 4 (5), 2007 1755. pdf F. Wang, D. Cho, B. Kessler, J....

97

Substituted Tetraammine Ruthenium Cytochrome c Derivatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myung-ok P. Cho, and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 34, 3301-3309 (1995) Abstract: Horse-heart (hh) cytochrome c, modified at His-33, and Candida krusei (Ck) cytochrome c, modified...

98

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries Speaker(s): Myung D. Cho Date: January 18, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

99

PASJ: Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 61, 339355, 2009 April 25 c 2009. Astronomical Society of Japan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Yasushi FUKAZAWA Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 Susumu INOUE Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo

Sarazin, Craig

100

The alpha-particle induced bystander effect for sister chromatid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agents than typical FA cells. We studied the effects of low-dose alpha-particle irradiation-induced bystander effects in KO40 and control CHO cell lines. Cultures of G0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC_LJK(2012-08-28)_f  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Handling and Evaluation Systems for Use in a Pyroprocess Research Facility Aug. 28, 2012 Jong Kwang LEE, B. S. Park, K. Kim, S. H. Kim, S. N. Yu, I. J. Cho Fuel Cycle...

102

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Publications - Fundamental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selective Oxidation, S. J. Lee,S.-H. Cho,K.L. Mulfort, D.M. Tiede,J.T. Hupp, and S.T. Nguyen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (2008) 130: 16828-16829. Correlating Ultrafast Function with...

103

Proceedingsof the 2002 IEEE InternationalConferenceon Robotics 8 Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Yoji Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1, Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511, Japan yamada@toyota-ti.ac.jp YAMAMOTO, Takahisa Kojima Press Industry Co., Ltd., 3-30 Shimoichiba-cho, Toyota, Aichi 471-8588, Japan

104

This puzzle contains 29 names, terms, prefixes, and acronyms that describe sugars and their polymers. Circle the terms in the matrix below that are CAPITALIZED in the following paragraph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHO Puzzle This puzzle contains 29 names, terms, prefixes, and acronyms that describe sugars and their polymers. Circle the terms in the matrix below that are CAPITALIZED in the following paragraph describing

Jackson, Scott A.

105

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zheng, and Xiufeng Pang. "Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power, and Thermal Energy." ASHRAE Transactions 116, no. 1 (2010): 428-436. 2009 Cho,...

106

Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been constructed with indium oxide (In2O3)nanowires [18].and Cho [20], the native indium oxide thickness is 5nm atin nature. The native indium oxide represents 40% of the

Lee, Gyuhyon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Citethis:Chem. Soc. Rev.,2012,1 ,23082322 CRITICAL REVIEW  

Fossil Energy for ?nancial support. ... A. W. Scaroni, Energy Fuels, 2002, 16, 14631469. 8 K. T. Chue, J. N. Kim, Y. J. Yoo, S. H. Cho and R. T. Yang,

108

Accurately Sized Test Statistics with Misspecified Conditional Homoskedasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functions for Some Robust Tests of Regression Coe?cients,cho R to both the hac and pw tests, although there is someAutocorrelation Robust Tests, Econometric Theory 21, 1130-

Steigerwald, Douglas G; Erb, Jack

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electronic Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... S.K. Kang, D.-Y. Shih, D. Leonard, D.W. Henderson, T. Gosselin, S.-I. Cho, H. Yu, .... Angela Grusd, Brian Bauer, Rick Lathrop, Jim Slattery, Iver Anderson, Jim ...

110

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | Aspiring Scientists and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aspiring Scientists and Engineers Spend Aspiring Scientists and Engineers Spend Summer at NSLS, NSLS-II students Rafael Lozano (top), first-place winner in the GEM Fellow Technical Presentation Competition and Niaja Farve, third-place winner in the GEM competition. More than 40 college students and professors spent their summer at Brookhaven Lab to work on a wide variety of science and engineering projects at NSLS and NSLS-II. The visitors - 26 students and two Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) program professors at NSLS and 14 students at NSLS-II - worked alongside Photon Sciences employees in areas ranging from the study of Alzheimer's disease to the development of new software and instrumentation. Students also had the opportunity to attend scientific lectures, tour Brookhaven's research facilities, and participate in

111

eceee2013_cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Angeles Air Force Base Vehicle Los Angeles Air Force Base Vehicle to Grid Pilot Project Chris Marnay, Terry Chan, Nicholas DeForest, Judy Lai, Jason MacDonald, and Michael Stadler Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road MS: 90-1121, BERKELEY CA 94720, U.S.A. Tobias Erdmann, Andreas Hoheisel, Markus Müller, and Scott Sabre Bosch Software Innovations Stuttgarter Str. 130, 71332 WAIBLINGEN, Germany Ed Koch and Paul Lipkin Akuacom Inc., 781 Lincoln Ave. #210, SAN RAFAEL CA 94901, U.S.A. Robert W. Anderson, Spence Gerber, and Elizabeth Reid Olivine, Inc. 2010 Crow Canyon Place Suite 100, SAN RAMON CA 94583, U.S.A. Environmental Energy Technologies Division to be presented at ECEEE 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency 3-8 June 2013 Club Belambra Les Criques, Presqu'île de Giens, Toulon/Hyères, France

112

Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Women in Clean Energy Careers Women in Clean Energy Careers Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers October 3, 2012 - 12:23pm Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices.

113

Autodesk | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Autodesk Autodesk Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Autodesk Name Autodesk Address 111 McInnis Parkway Place San Rafael, CA Zip 94903 Product digital prototyping software Stock Symbol ADSK Year founded 1982 Number of employees 5001-10,000 Website http://www.autodesk.com Coordinates 38.005707°, -122.530605° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.005707,"lon":-122.530605,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

California's 6th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6th congressional district 6th congressional district A10 Power Akuacom Alternative Energy Inc Autodesk Bio Energy Systems LLC Bioil Energy Matters LLC Enphase Energy Inc Forecast Energy Geysers Geothermal Association GGA GreenSource Solutions LLC Greenline Industries HMH Energy Resources Integrated Power Corp Marin Solar Pioneer Global Renewables Real Goods Solar San Rafael SPG Solar Inc formerly Sunpower Geothermal Energy Co Inc Solar Depot Inc Solar Power Partners Inc SolarCraft Services Inc Sonoma County-Climate Protection Campaign SunLink Corporation Terranova Bioenergy LLC ThermaSource Inc Thermochem Inc Thompson Technology Industries Inc TTI Thompson Technology Industries TTI ZAP Registered Financial Organizations in California's 6th congressional district Marathon Capital LLC (California) Retrieved from

115

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies involve a caprock/reservoir interface, and assume a discrete contact with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Triassic-Jurassic Strata, San Rafael Swell, UT Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person

116

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2009 7, 2009 CX-001250: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Lighting and Plumbing Retrofits for Several City Facilities CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Porterville, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 16, 2009 CX-001252: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/16/2009 Location(s): San Rafael, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 16, 2009 CX-001249: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/16/2009 Location(s): Hayward, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 16, 2009 CX-001248: Categorical Exclusion Determination

117

Women in Clean Energy Symposium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices. "Everyone who spends a few minutes with her," he said, "knows the

118

Catalytic reforming methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Observational Study of the First-Order Vorticity Dynamics in a Tropical Easterly Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GATE Phase III A/B- and B-scale data were analyzed and used to diagnostically test the first-order vorticity equation proposed by Cho et al. The results are given in the form of a composite easterly wave and the analysis shows that the first-...

Mary Ann Jenkins; Han-Ru Cho

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Proceedings of the Fourth Linguistic Annotation Workshop, ACL 2010, pages 182185, Uppsala, Sweden, 15-16 July 2010. c 2010 Association for Computational Linguistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Management Tool for Historical Texts Stefanie Dipper, Lara Kresse, Martin Schnurrenberger & Seong-Eun Cho at texts, or corpora from these languages. Compared to texts from modern lan- guages, early manuscripts be hard to decipher, or pages can be damaged or missing completely. Some texts contain words or passages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Identification of the Major Cysteine Protease of Giardia and Its Role in Encystation*S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosystems). The data base search was conducted using Mascot (Matrix Science Inc) on the full NCBI protein 10 ALLN 10 M 5 5 ALLMb 1 M 6 13 ALLM 10 M 5 5 a ALLN: N-Acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO. b ALLM: N

Craik, Charles S.

122

A Quantum Leap Forward for Li-Ion Battery Cathodes GCEP Final Technical Report: August 2007 July 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, nanoscale coating, nanostructures, interface control 1. INTRODUCTION Lithium-ion batteries are one-Induced Damage and Disorder in LiCoO2 Cathodes for Recharge- able Lithium Batteries, J. Electrochem. Soc. 146 Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries, Chem. Mater. 17, 3695 (2005). 27. J. Cho, Y. J. Kim, and B. Park, Novel

Nur, Amos

123

S. Bressan, J. Kng, and R. Wagner (Eds.): DEXA 2006, LNCS 4080, pp. 114 122, 2006. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kyungmin Cho, Sungjae Jo, Hyukjae Jang, Su Myeon Kim, and Junehwa Song Department of Electrical Engineering in these volumes while efficiently supporting multi- dimensional historical queries. The use of the traditional applications. It can handle high rates of data insertion and adapt to sudden spikes in the input rate while

124

Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan Chen-Fen Huangb) Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan Arata Kaneko Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan Cho-Teng Liu Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University

Frandsen, Jannette B.

125

Proceedings of the Workshop on Information Extraction Beyond The Document, pages 111, Sydney, July 2006. c 2006 Association for Computational Linguistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ryukoku University Otsu, Shiga, 520-2194, Japan Koji Ichii2 ichiikoji@hiroshima-u.ac.jp Tamotsu Shirado1 shirado@nict.go.jp Sachiyo Tsukawaki1 tsuka@nict.go.jp 2 Hiroshima University 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan 4 Kyoto University Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan

126

Language, Information and Computation(PACLIC 11)1996, 347-356 Epistemic Model and Three-valued Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-valued Interpretation Hisashi Komatsu Hiroshima City University, School of Information Sciences 151-5 Ozuka, Numata-cho, Asa-minami-ku, Hiroshima 731-31 Japan e-mail: komatsu©cs.hiroshima-cu.ac.jp Abstract In this paper, I

127

Individuals and Modality Hisashi Komatsu*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Individuals and Modality Hisashi Komatsu* Hiroshima City University School of Information Sciences 151-5 Ozuka, Numata-cho, Asa-minaini-ku, Hiroshima 731-31, Japan Tel.: +81-82-830-1615, 1500 e-mail: komatsu@cs.hiroshima-cu.ac.jp Abstract In this paper, I argue that the modality contained in declarative

128

1:30PM, EE1+ Interface Roughness Broadening of Intersubband ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of InGaAsP on InP DFB Laser Gratings by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy: W.-Y. HWANG, J.N. Baillargeon, A.Y. Cho, S.N.G. Chu, P.F. Jr. Sciortino

129

To whom it may concern, Position Opening Announcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Division, Department of Helical Plasma Research 4. Division overview / Job description: The High Research Division ­ Department of Helical Plasma Research" in red ink. 11. Contact: 1) For the application Division, Department of Helical Plasma Research National Institute for Fusion Science Oroshi-Cho 322

Ito, Atsushi

130

Toyota Chairman vs. a Mathematician Chairman of the Board,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota Chairman vs. a Mathematician Fujio Cho Chairman of the Board, Toyota Motor Corporation IPMU A Dialogue Between a Mathematician and Toyota's Chairman: Think, Think, and Think Again. What Lies and "Kaizen" C: After graduating from the university, I started working for Toyota. Six years later, I

Kobayashi, Toshiyuki

131

The Backward Theory of Feynman-and Rossi-Alpha Methods with Multiple Emission Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Backward Theory of Feynman- and Rossi-Alpha Methods with Multiple Emission Sources I. Pázsit* Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Göteborg, Sweden and Y. Yamane Nagoya University, Department of Nuclear Engineering Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, 46401 Nagoya, Japan Received

Pázsit, Imre

132

Strategy/False-name Proof Protocols for Combinatorial Multi-Attribute Procurement Auction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suyama NTT Communication Science Laboratories, NTT Corporation 2-4 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, in which each sales item is defined by several attributes called quality, the buyer is the auctioneer (e, procurement multi-attribute auction, which can handle such situations. In this model, each sales item

Yokoo, Makoto

133

R&D/Office Space in ATR for Rent Center of Kansai Science City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cho, Souraku-gun, Kyoto #12;Rental Area Plan Rentable area Approx. 1200 2F #12;Terms and Conditions Use and Private Firms R&D institutes Business accounts of ATR Efficient sales activities #12;Detailing the merits to brain information science ( f and support service for a measurement) Efficient sales activities

Nakanishi, Jun

134

Answering it with charts --Dialogue in natural language and charts --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 Japan mat, maeda¡ @cslab.kecl.ntt.co.jp Abstract A methodology is proposed suppose an analyst, planning sales of her company's products, gets interested in its sales in a particular district. So she requests the following from a system in front of her: (1) Show me the sales in the Shikoku

135

Fragmentation and reactivity in collisions of protonated diglycine with chemically modified perfluorinated alkylthiolate-self-assembled monolayer surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct dynamics simulations are reported for quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) trajectories of N-protonated diglycine (gly{sub 2}-H{sup +}) colliding with chemically modified perfluorinated octanethiolate self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. The RM1 semiempirical theory is used for the QM component of the trajectories. RM1 activation and reaction energies were compared with those determined from higher-level ab initio theories. Two chemical modifications are considered in which a head group (-COCl or -CHO) is substituted on the terminal carbon of a single chain of the SAM. These surfaces are designated as the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM, respectively. Fragmentation, peptide reaction with the SAM, and covalent linkage of the peptide or its fragments with the SAM surface are observed. Peptide fragmentation via concerted CH{sub 2}-CO bond breakage is the dominant pathway for both surfaces. HCl formation is the dominant species produced by reaction with the COCl-SAM, while for the CHO-SAM a concerted H-atom transfer from the CHO-SAM to the peptide combined with either a H-atom or radical transfer from the peptide to the surface to form singlet reaction products is the dominant pathway. A strong collision energy dependence is found for the probability of peptide fragmentation, its reactivity, and linkage with the SAM. Surface deposition, i.e., covalent linkage between the surface and the peptide, is compared to recent experimental observations of such bonding by Laskin and co-workers [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 1512 (2008)]. Qualitative differences in reactivity are seen between the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM showing that chemical identity is important for surface reactivity. The probability of reactive surface deposition, which is most closely analogous to experimental observables, peaks at a value of around 20% for a collision energy of 50 eV.

Barnes, George L.; Yang Li; Hase, William L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Young, Kelsey [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, Texas 79699 (United States)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

Latin American Political Trends and their Impact on the Future of U.S.-Latin American Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent political trends in Latin America have led to the election of a number of leftist presidents throughout the region. Some, such as Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and Ecuador's Rafael Correa, profess goals centered to varying degrees in socialism and independence from United States influence. Historically speaking, the United States has never been hesitant to aggressively ensure that Latin American political developments are favorable to US interests. This thesis seeks to predict how US foreign policy toward Latin America will likely change within the next decade or so in response to the region's political developments. To do so, the nature and background of those developments must be understood; Ecuador and Venezuela are utilized as in-depth case studies for this purpose, and illustrate the heterogeneity within Latin America?s move to the left. Bueno de Mesquita?s predictive model is then used to examine the interaction between each of the case studies and the US on two specific issues: the growth of Iranian influence in Latin America and the future of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA).

Davis, Andrew Milton

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Human platelet aggregation and phospholipid fatty acid composition during omega-3 fatty acid enriched egg consumption: influence of nutrient intake and omega-3 fatty acid source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study investigated the usefulness of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) enriched eggs for duplicating health benefits of consuming fish, specifically decreasing platelet aggregation via changes in plasma phospholipid (PL) composition. A further aspect of this investigation was to determine if other nutrients may significantly hinder or promote the incorporation of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA, specifically essential fatty acids (EFA), and their derivatives, into plasma PL. Healthy, normolipidemic individuals (n=30) consumed four typical, linolenic acid-rich (LNA; 18:3n-3), or docosahexaenoic acid-rich (DHA; 22:6n-3) eggs weekly for alternating six-week periods, separated by four-week washouts, in a completely randomized design. According to analysis of variance using the GLM procedure of SAS, either n-3 PUFA-rich egg promoted the accumulation of n-3 PUFA in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) fraction of plasma rather than the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction. Likewise, both eggs resulted in significant reductions in linoleic acid (LINO; 18:2n-6) esterification in plasma PE. The influence of eggs on plasma PL n-3 PUFA was physiologically significant as platelet aggregation was decreased in response to consuming either DHA-rich or LNA-rich eggs but not in response to typical egg consumption, as determined by non-parametric analysis using Chi Square. Stepwisemultiple regression of dietary nutrients and plasma PL PUFA composition indicated that dietary intake accounted for 42% of the variability in plasma PL EFA. Dietary carbohydrate (CHO), as a percentage of total energy, was significantly different between subjects for which the within 20% versus >20% difference from measured. The plasma EFA profile of individuals consuming dietary CHO in amounts recommended by the current RDA was significantly less predictable by the model than for those consuming lesser amounts of CHO. These data suggest that individuals consuming increased CHO may consume less EFA, consume EFA infrequently, or conversely, those individuals with low CHO intake have higher EFA intake. The results of the current study suggest that eggs designed to be rich in n-3 PUFA can supply health benefits typically associated with fish consumption. Our findings also suggest that excess dietary CHO may interfere with the accumulation of EFA in plasma PL.

Hatch, Sandra D

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microprobing the Molecular Spatial Distribution and Structural Architecture of Feed-type Sorghum Seed Tissue (Sorghum Bicolor L.) using the Synchrotron Radiation Infrared Microspectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorghum seed (Sorghum bicolor L.) has unique degradation and fermentation behaviours compared with other cereal grains such as wheat, barley and corn. This may be related to its cell and cell-wall architecture. The advanced synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) technique enables the study of cell or living cell biochemistry within cellular dimensions. The objective of this study was to use the SR-IMS imaging technique to microprobe molecular spatial distribution and cell architecture of the sorghum seed tissue comprehensively. High-density mapping was carried out using SR-IMS on beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA). Molecular images were systematically recorded from the outside to the inside of the seed tissue under various chemical functional groups and their ratios [peaks at {approx}1725 (carbonyl C=O ester), 1650 (amide I), 1657 (protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix), 1628 (protein secondary structure {beta}-sheet), 1550 (amide II), 1515 (aromatic compounds of lignin), 1428, 1371, 1245 (cellulosic compounds in plant seed tissue), 1025 (non-structural CHO, starch granules), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160 (CHO), 1150 (CHO), 1080 (CHO), 930 (CHO), 860 (CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2960 (CH{sub 3} anti-symmetric), 2929 (CH{sub 2} anti-symmetric), 2877 (CH{sub 3} symmetric) and 2848 cm{sup -1} (CH{sub 2} asymmetric)]. The relative protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratio image, protein amide I to starch granule ratio image, and anti-symmetric CH{sub 3} to CH{sub 2} ratio image were also investigated within the intact sorghum seed tissue. The results showed unique cell architecture, and the molecular spatial distribution and intensity in the sorghum seed tissue (which were analyzed through microprobe molecular imaging) were generated using SR-IMS. This imaging technique and methodology has high potential and could be used for scientists to develop specific cereal grain varieties with targeted food and feed quality, and can also be used to monitor the degree of grain maturity, grain damage, the fate of organic contaminants and the effect of chemical treatment on plant and grain seeds.

P Yu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS ARGONNE NATIONAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Y. CHO DEC 2 01985 LS-45 INTRA-LABORATORY MEMO December 20, 1985 TO: Y. Cho HEP FROM: w. praeg(~ ETP SUBJECT: Frequency Response of Storage Ring Magnets, Eddy Current Shielding of Vacuum Chamber It is planned to use feedback to correction coils on ring magnets to reduce beam motion at frequencies of 120 Hz or less. The magnet cores, made from 1.5 mm thick laminations of 1010 steel, will readily carry flux of ~ 400 Hz. However, due to eddy currents, the aluminum vacuum chamber will attenuate verticle ac fields above 8 Hz and horizontal fields above 25 Hz. Eddy currents will also cause phase shifts between the field generated by the correction coils, Bo' and the field inside the vacuum

140

Prepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is schematically shown in Fig. 1. A high-purity nitrogen gas was cooled and liquefied through the cooling stagesPrepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet J. Son,a M. Cho.3­4.4 nm x ray from a liquid nitrogen jet. It is observed that a prepulse of only 2 mJ enhances

Kim, Jae-Hoon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "taek cho rafael" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Interacting Frameworks in Catalysis KungKiu Lau \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Manchester Manchester M13 9PL, UK kung­kiu@cs.man.ac.uk Shaoying Liu y Dept. of Computer Science Hiroshima City University 151­5, Ozuka, Numata­cho,Asaminami­ku Hiroshima, 731­31, Japan liu@white.sel.cs.hiroshima of the existing (semi­ \\Lambda Sponsored by Hiroshima City University under Hiroshima City Uni­ versity Grant

Lau, Kung-Kiu

142

On the relevance of automatically selected single-voxel MRS and multimodal MRI and MRSI features for brain tumour differentiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the relevance of magnetic resonance (MR) features selected by automatic feature selection techniques to build classifiers for differential diagnosis and tissue segmentation two data sets containing MR spectroscopy data from patients ... Keywords: ANOVA, ARD, Ala, Automatic feature selection, Brain tumour, CSF, Cho, Cr, Differential diagnosis, Gd, Glc, Glx, Gly, HLSVD, LDA, LS-SVM, Lac, Lip, MR, MRI, MRS, MRSI, NAA, PD, PRESS, QDA, STEAM, SVM, TE, TM, TR, Tau, mI

Geert J. Postma; Jan Luts; Albert J. Idema; Margarida Juli-Sap; ngel Moreno-Torres; Witek Gajewicz; Johan A. K. Suykens; Arend Heerschap; Sabine Van Huffel; Lutgarde M. C. Buydens

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

(E)-4-[(4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl]phenyl anthracene-9-carboxylate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the title compound, C{sub 27}H{sub 17}N{sub 3}O{sub 4}, the azo group displays a trans conformation and the dihedral angles between the central benzene ring and the pendant anthracene and nitrobenzene rings are 82.94 (7) and 7.30 (9){sup o}, respectively. In the crystal structure, weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds, likely associated with a dipole moment present on the molecule, help to consolidate the packing.

Vance, Andrew L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Nichol, Jessica L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wong, Bryan Matthew (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Testing of Crystallization Temperature of a New Working Fluid for Absorption Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

Lithium bromide/water (LiBr/water) absorption systems are potential candidates for absorption heat pump water heating applications since they have been widely commercialized for cooling applications. One drawback to LiBr/water absorption water heater systems is that they are unable to operate at typical water heating temperatures due to solution crystallization hazards. Binary or ternary mixtures, serving as working fluids, were reported (Ally, 1988; Herold et al., 1991; Iyoki and Uemura, 1981; Yasuhide Nemoto et al., 2010; Zogg et al., 2005) to help improve the absorption performance or avoid crystallization of absorption heat pump systems. A recent development (De Lucas et al., 2007) investigated the use of a ternary mixture of aqueous mixture of lithium bromide and sodium formate (CHO2Na). The new working fluid composition maintains a ratio of LiBr/CHO2Na of 2 by weight. This new working fluid is a potential competitor to aqueous LiBr solution in absorption system due to higher water vapor absorption rates and lower generation temperature needed (De Lucas et al., 2004). There exists data on equilibrium performance and other physical properties of this new working fluid. However, there is no available data on crystallization behavior. Crystallization temperature is crucial for the design of absorption heat pump water heater in order to avoid crystallization hazards during operation. We have therefore conducted a systematic study to explore the crystallization temperature of LiBr/CHO2Na water solution and compared it against aqueous LiBr solutions. These results were then used to evaluate the feasibility of using the new working fluid in water heating applications showing limited potential.

Wang, Kai [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effects of cadmium on karyotype stability in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Progress report, July 1, 1976--June 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were examined for cadmium-induced growth rate perturbations and chromosome aberrations. Experimental protocols were designed to simulate conditions of cellular Cd/sup + +/ exposure both in vivo and in vitro. CHO cells grown in the presence of nontoxic levels of Cd/sup + +/ (2 x 10/sup -7/ M) for 12 wk became resistant to toxic levels (2 x 10/sup -6/ M) after this exposure. Metaphase cells in these resistant populations contained only background levels of chromosome aberrations. This suggests that individuals exposed to constant or intermittent low levels of Cd/sup + +/ may be more resistant to the toxic effects of this metal and may not show chromosome aberrations as readily as nonexposed individuals. CHO cells grown in medium supplemented with several types of serum (fetal calf, newborn calf, and human) at concentrations commonly used for in vitro culture (5 to 20 percent v/v) or found in mammalian circulatory systems (50 percent v/v) differed markedly in Cd/sup + +/ tolerance. Cells grown in medium containing 1 x 10/sup -6/ M Cd/sup + +/ and supplemented with human or newborn calf serum were slightly protected against Cd/sup + +/ damage at high serum concentrations (30 and 50 percent v/v) and accumulated approximately 90 ..mu..g Cd/sup + +//10/sup 9/ cells in 48 h. Cells growing at low or high concentrations of fetal calf serum were completely protected from 1 x 10/sup -6/ M Cd/sup + +/ and accumulated approximately 12 ..mu..g Cd/sup + +//10/sup 9/ cells in 48 h. These results demonstrate the necessity for standardized protocols for cytogenetic investigations of Cd/sup + +/ toxicity and should help to explain discrepancies between studies of chromosome damage in patients with high blood levels of cadmium.

Deaven, L.L.; Campbell, E.W.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Activation of Hydrogen with Bi-Functional Ambiphillic Catalyst Complexes - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Tom Autrey (Primary Contact), Greg Schenter, Don Camaioni, Abhi Karkamkar, Herman Cho, Bojana Ginovska-Pangovska Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 MS#K2-57 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 375-3792 Email: tom.autrey@pnnl.gov DOE Program Officer: Raul Miranda Objectives The objective of our research is to develop fundamental insight into small molecule activation in molecular complexes that will provide the basis for developing rational approaches

147

In vitro circadian ANP secretion by gene transferring cells encapsulated in polycaprolactone tubes: gene chronotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new insofar as chronobiologic therapeutic approach by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) for hypertension and/or congestive heart failure (CHF) is based on the release of ANP from ANP cDNA transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells encapsulated in polycaprolactone (PCL) tubes. ANP secretion was maintained for at least 6 months. The encapsulated cells remained viable during culturing. Control cells without transferred ANP cDNA were negative. ANP secretion is circadian periodic, peaking around 04:18, shifted to around 07:56 by melatonin treatment. The encapsulation technique, based on principles of chronotherapy, may provide a more efficient gene therapy, applicable for eventual human implantation of gene transferred cells.

Zhengrong Wang A; Liguo Chen A; Chaomin Wan A; Yiqu A; G. Cornlissen B; F. Halberg B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Untangling the water gas shift from Fischer-Tropsch: a Gordian knot. [185 references  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water gas shift reaction is an integral part of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Although it may appear convenient to consider the water gas shift a separate reaction, in some cases, a detailed examination of the mechanism indicates theat the water gas shift and other synthesis gas reactions share several elementary reactions. Experimental support for the relevant elementary reactions for the water gas shift on metals, metal oxides, and in homogeneous solution is examined, from both surface and complex chemistry. Multiple paths leading to a net water gas shift reaction may be available; oxygen transfer and reaction through C-H-O intermediates may take place. 185 references, 6 tables.

Rofer-Depoorter, C.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant Oct. 1, 2008 … Sept. 30, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drexel University Drexel University Y. Cho, A. Fridman, and A. Starikovskii Oct. 28, 2008 Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory New Scale-Prevention Technology Use electrical pulse spark discharges in water to precipitate dissolved mineral ions. Remove them using a self-cleaning filter from cooling water. Specific objectives of the proposed work 1. Determine whether the spark discharge can promote the precipitation of mineral ions in cooling water. 2. Determine whether the proposed technology can increase the COC through a continuous precipitation of calcium ions

150

Microsoft Word - PNNL 90 1-2010_TSD_Final 5-23-2011_Final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P P un A E o B W H B M repared for the nder Contract D Achie Energ of AS BA Thornton W Wang H Cho B Liu, Projec May 2011 U.S. Departmen DE-AC05-76RL0 eving gy and HRAE n MI Ro Y Xie VV Me ct Manager nt of Energy 01830 the 3 d Cos E Stan osenberg endon r 0% G st Sav ndard EE Rich J Zhang RA Atha Goal: vings d 90.1 hman g alye Analy -2010 PNNL-2040 ysis 0 05 PNNL-20405 Achieving the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 BA Thornton MI Rosenberg EE Richman W Wang Y Xie J Zhang H Cho VV Mendon RA Athalye B Liu, Project Manager May 2011 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Executive Summary This project was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the U.S.

151

EGG-M-90457 EGG-M--9045  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EGG-M-90457 EGG-M-90457 EGG-M--9045 7 A Paper Submi_ed for DE91 006149 AGENG 90 in West Ge,,_nany (Paper NO, F7,22) NON,-DESTRUCTIVE RIPENESS SENSING __-__ "4 _ _ B Y USING PROTON NMR _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ,. By. _' g''_ _=° " ! Seong In Cho /Research Engineer _ _ _ _ _ = _ A_riculmral Engineering, Purdue University _ "_ _,_-= _ i " _ West Lafayette, IN 47907,USA _ _= .:-_ * _ _= Gary W. Krutz/Professor _ _ _ Agricultural Engineering, Purdue University _ = _ i 8 = _._ _ __ West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA _ "_ _ _ _._ ._ 2 Vemnique Bel/on/Research Scientist _ _' ,=-_ "__ _' _ CEMAGREF, BP5095 34033 Mont'l_llier, France _ _ _ .- , _ ,__ _" - _ = and Richard L. Stmshine/Assot.Sate Professor Agricultural En_neering, Purdue University West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA .% DI8']"RIB tITt C i'q ,:2;, ;:: a, ;),,> :,,., ;.2_._ :.._,: _:.,.ii.::;,_,i 1:3'. _N1.lM lTED . INTRODUCTION More than 80 '.,rindsof

152

Draft TF Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEETING OF THE FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE March 26, 2009 Location: Department of Commerce 1401 Constitution Ave, NW, Washington DC 20230 Room 4830 8:30 Opening and Introduction * Call the meeting to order, around-the-table introductions, and review of the agenda - Eric Lightner, DOE 8:40 Update from DOE OE - Eric Lightner * ARRA Activities * Federal Smart Grid Taskforce Factsheet * Smart Grid clearinghouse status * Smart Grid maturity model status EERE - Steve Lindenberg, Dan Ton * ARRA Activities 9:20 Update from FERC - Ray Palmer, David Andrejcak * Status of FERC-NARUC Collaborative on Smart Grid 9:40 Update from DOC NIST - William Anderson, Jerry FitzPatrick * Status of Smart Grid Interoperability efforts ITA - Man Cho, Robin Roarke

153

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Earlier Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earlier Events Earlier Events 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 April 2000 Ionizing Radiation Science and Protection in the 21st Century, NCRP, April 5-6, Arlington, VA. RADIATION RESEARCH 2000, Association for Radiation Research, April 10-12, Bristol, UK. Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society Spring 2000 Meeting, Gainesville, FL, April 13-14. 47th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society, April 29-May 3, Albuquerque, NM. May 2000 IRPA-10 International Congress 2000, May 14-19, Hiroshima, Japan. IRPA-10 Secretariat, c/o Japan Convention Services, Inc., Nippon Press Center Building, 2-2-1, Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan. Phone: 81-3-3508-1214. Fax: 81-3-3508-0820. irpa10@convention.jp. 4th International Non-Ionizing Radiation Workshop, May 22-25, Kyoto,

154

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries Speaker(s): Myung D. Cho Date: January 18, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Frank McLarnon A new process for the preparation of lithium-polymer batteries with crosslinked gel-polymer electrolyte will be introduced. The new process employs a thermal crosslinking method rather than cell lamination, and is termed "lithium ion type polymer battery (ITPB)". This thermal crosslinking process has many advantages over the standard lamination method, such as fusing the polymer into the electrodes and better adhesion between the electrolyte and electrodes. The new method results in improved high-temperature stability and a simpler process, as well as the improved

155

ET to Equidistant Sites: Importance of Electronic Effects and Peptide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the Heme of Cytochrome c to Two Equidistant from the Heme of Cytochrome c to Two Equidistant Redox-Modified Sites, Histidine 33 and Methionine 65: The Importance of Electronic Effects and Peptide Networks Icaro Moreira, Ji Sun, Myung O.-K. Cho, James F. Wishart and Stephan S. Isied J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 8396-8397 (1994) Abstract: Intramolecular electron transfer rates for the [RuIII(NH3)4isn]-(His 33)-cyt cII and the [FeIII(CN)5]-(Met 65)-cyt cII derivatives differ by a factor of > 730. The two complexes are located in different sections of the protein at equal distances from the heme iron of cytochrome c (within 1 Å) and possess comparable driving force and reorganization energies which slightly favor the [Fe(CN)5] derivative. The lack of an observable intramolecular electron transfer rate in

156

LS-61  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 April 28, 1986 SITE EXCAVATION STUDY A. N. Lowing ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY To: Y. Cho From: A. N. Lowing ~~ Subject: Site Excavation Study INTRA-LABORATORY MEMO ARGONNE NAn HIGH £NE.~:~llAaO~l\TCF?Y Apri 1 28, 1986 Y. CH6HYSICS MAY 11986 Project Manager, HEP-LSP PFS-FPE As a method of identifying a site location for the GXS based upon least- excavation vs. zero percent fill material as a criteria, four separate sites each having three separate floor elevations were investigated. The attached study data indicates that site "C" with floor elevation at 742-~, appears to be the most cost-effective site. Selection of site "C" will require relocating the utility service building from the position shown in the Conceptual Design Report, which could

157

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconi anemia (FA) cells to bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P.F. Wilson P.F. Wilson Brookhaven National Laboratory Abstract Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and cellular hypersensitivity to agents that induce DNA interstrand crosslinks and oxidative stress, including IR [1]. The disease is transmitted either as an autosomal-recessive or X-linked trait, and hypomorphic biallelic mutations in 15 FA and homologous recombinational repair (HRR) genes have been identified in FA patients (with more likely to be discovered). We have previously reported hypersensitivity of the isogenic fancg Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant KO40 for sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction following low-dose (<3 mGy) 3.86-MeV plutonium-238

158

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconi anemia (FA) cells to bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paul Wilson Paul Wilson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Abstract Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and cellular hypersensitivity to agents that induce DNA interstrand crosslinks and oxidative stress [1]. The disease is transmitted either as an autosomal-recessive or X-linked trait, and mutations in 13 FA genes have been identified in FA patients (with more likely to be discovered). Previously, we reported on the hypersensitivity of the isogenic Fancg-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant KO40 for sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction following low dose 3.86-MeV plutonium-238 α-particle irradiation where <1% of cell nuclei are hit.

159

coupling2.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Measurement of Input Coupler Matching of a Loaded Storage Ring Single-Cell Cavity Jin Wook Cho, Yoon Kang Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 August 14, 1995 1 Introduction In the APS storage ring cavities, magnetic loop type input couplers are used. The loaded Q fo a cavity varies as the beam loading changes 1 . The beam loading changes the cavity input impedance. Therefore, the input coupler must be adjusted to maintain a good impedance match. Measurements have been made to determine the coupler loop position depth of penetration with respect to various loading conditions in a storage ring single-cell cavity. An input coupler was inserted into the storage ring single-cell cavity at various loaded Q points, then matched. The relationship between the coupling coe cient, , and the gap width, where gap width is the separation

160

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC_LJK(2012-08-28)_f  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Remote Handling and Evaluation Systems for Use in a Pyroprocess Research Facility Aug. 28, 2012 Jong Kwang LEE, B. S. Park, K. Kim, S. H. Kim, S. N. Yu, I. J. Cho Fuel Cycle Process Technology Development Division 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference The Abbey Resort Fontana, WI Contents Contents 1  Background  Scenario for enhancing the degree of completeness of process equipment development  Remote Handling and Evaluation Systems I. BDSM II. Simulator : digital mock-up of PRIDE III. Remote Handling Evaluation Mock-up (RHEM)  Summary Background Background 2  The construction of a pyroprocess research facility, called the PRIDE, has been recently completed, and is now being prepared for start-up operations  All operations and maintenance of the process equipment must be performed remotely  Direct access by human operators to the

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161

Microsoft Word - 510448_0_art_1_jsf8r5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: Gas Hydrate Dissociation in Sediments: Pressure-Temperature Evolution Title: Gas Hydrate Dissociation in Sediments: Pressure-Temperature Evolution Authors: Tae-Hyuk Kwon Graduate Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, Korea Tel: +82-42-869-5662 Fax: +82-42-869-3610 Email: kikig@kaist.ac.kr Gye-Chun Cho Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, Korea Tel: +82-42-869-3622 Fax: +82-42-869-3610 Email: gyechun@kaist.edu J. Carlos Santamarina Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Dr. Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Tel: +1-404-894-7605 Fax: +1-404-894-2281

162

Microsoft Word - Final Report DE-FC26-06NT42724 final-rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of pulsed electrical fields Application of pulsed electrical fields for advanced cooling and water recovery in coal-fired power plant Final Technical Report April 2006 -March 2009 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 June 30, 2009 Submitted by Young I Cho and Alexander A. Fridman Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Drexel University 3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 DOE Award No: DE-FC26-06NT42724 This work was sponsored by The Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Final Report DE-FC26-06NT42724 Page i

163

Major Gary Widner Illinois National Guard Camp Lincoln 1301 N. McArthur Blvd.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gary Widner Gary Widner Illinois National Guard Camp Lincoln 1301 N. McArthur Blvd. Springfield, Illinois 62702 Dear Major Widner: As we discussed during our telecon of December 5, 1985, I am enclosing two letters and their attachments (Enclosures 1 and 2) relative to information on the National Guard Armory at Chicago, Illinois. In response to your questions on previous notification of surveys and the associated results, we have nothjng in our earlier files or those of the Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office (DOE/O) that indicates the survey results (draft reports) were forwarded to you, although verbal discussions between national guard members and representatives of the DOE/CHO, relative to the surveys and their findings , were held during and as a result of the initial

164

A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2012 August 2012 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about this report may be directed to Alice Lippert, Senior Technical Advisor (alice.lippert@hq.doe.gov). (Cover image from the National Weather Service) OE/ISER 8/6/2012 1 Background On June 29, 2012, a major storm system known as a derecho ("deh-REY-cho") formed and

165

Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

Epstein, Arthur J. (Bexley, OH); Ginder, John M. (Columbus, OH); Roe, Mitchell G. (Columbus, OH); Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid (Columbus, OH)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of methanol decomposition on Cu(100)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dynamics of methanol decomposition on Cu(100) at room temperature over a time scale of minutes. Mechanisms of reaction were found using min-mode following saddle point searches based upon forces and energies from density functional theory. Rates of reaction were calculated with harmonic transition state theory. The dynamics followed a pathway from CH3-OH, CH3-O, CH2-O, CH-O and finally C-O. Our calculations confirm that methanol decomposition starts with breaking the O-H bond followed by breaking C-H bonds in the dehydrogenated intermediates until CO is produced. The bridge site on the Cu(100) surface is the active site for scissoring chemical bonds. Reaction intermediates are mobile on the surface which allows them to find this active reaction site. This study illustrates how the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method can model the dynamics of surface chemistry from first principles.

Xu, Lijun; Mei, Donghai; Henkelman, Graeme A.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Density Functional Studies of Methanol Decomposition on Subnanometer Pd Clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A density functional theory study of the decomposition of methanol on subnanometer palladium clusters (primarily Pd4) is presented. Methanol dehydrogenation through C-H bond breaking to form hydroxymethyl (CH2OH) as the initial step, followed by steps involving formation of hydroxymethylene (CHOH), formyl (CHO), and carbon monoxide (CO), is found to be the most favorable reaction pathway. A competing dehydrogenation pathway with O-H bond breaking as the first step, followed by formation of methoxy (CH3O) and formaldehyde (CH2O), is slightly less favorable. In contrast, pathways involving C-O bond cleavage are much less energetically favorable, and no feasible pathways involving C-O bond formation to yield dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) are found. Comparisons of the results are made with methanol decomposition products adsorbed on more extended Pd surfaces; all reaction intermediates are found to bind slightly more strongly to the clusters than to the surfaces.

Mehmood, Faisal; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Brief History of Kagyudpa (with Prayer for the Rapid Reincarnation of H. H. Rang Jung Rigpai Dorje the 16th Karmapa)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~'~'~'~~'~'el I bDe~Chtlen -Longs-sPyod-bLa -Ma-Chhos- Kyi-r Je DE CHE.;J' LON3CHO, LA MA, CHOKYIJE enjoying great' Sambhogakaya ,Guru/ Lord of Dharma happiness The Guru of great happiness, ths Lord of Dharma is the Sam bhogakaya. q~'~C:: ~~"'lac... -IDan-Chhos-Kyi-bLo-aGros-rJe NYAM-IVIE /r'AL - Dt:N/CHHOS-KYI-LO-GROS-JE unequalled, / glorious / Marpa Lotsawa Unequalled, glorious, most kind Chhos-KYi-Lo-Gros (Marpa) S~~~ 'q~'~~'qC1~'q~'( i~~qc.tl 1 Byin-G yis-rlobs-Shig -bShad - Pa'j -rDo-Je'i-d Pal JIN GYI LOB I SHIK...

Lama, Chimed Rinzing

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4, Physical sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into the following sections, with technical sections in parentheses: dosimetry research (Chernobyl database, radon alpha irradiation of mammalian cells, cell growth rates in individual colonies), measurement science (ultrahigh resolution studies of molecular structure and dynamics, circular dichroism in hyperfine state resolved photoelectron angular distributions, Sr isotope shifts, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for DNA adduct research, rapid DNA sequencing techniques), and radiological and chemical physics (hit size effectiveness in radiation protection, track ends, cross sections for partially stripped ion impact, scaling of differential ionization cross sections, ionization by neutral projectiles, secondary electron emission from thin foils, stochastic model of ion track structure, stochastics of positive ion penumbra, plasmid structure and spontaneous strand separation, isolation and radiation sensitivity of DNA-synthesis-deficient CHO double mutants, semiempirical model of differential ionization cross sections for multishell atoms and molecules, ionization of DNA in solution, perturbations of DNA conformation by thymine glycol and dihydrothymine). 32 figs, 3 tabs.

Toburen, L.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into the following sections, with technical sections in parentheses: dosimetry research (Chernobyl database, radon alpha irradiation of mammalian cells, cell growth rates in individual colonies), measurement science (ultrahigh resolution studies of molecular structure and dynamics, circular dichroism in hyperfine state resolved photoelectron angular distributions, Sr isotope shifts, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for DNA adduct research, rapid DNA sequencing techniques), and radiological and chemical physics (hit size effectiveness in radiation protection, track ends, cross sections for partially stripped ion impact, scaling of differential ionization cross sections, ionization by neutral projectiles, secondary electron emission from thin foils, stochastic model of ion track structure, stochastics of positive ion penumbra, plasmid structure and spontaneous strand separation, isolation and radiation sensitivity of DNA-synthesis-deficient CHO double mutants, semiempirical model of differential ionization cross sections for multishell atoms and molecules, ionization of DNA in solution, perturbations of DNA conformation by thymine glycol and dihydrothymine). 32 figs, 3 tabs.

Toburen, L.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reduction of Carbon Monoxide. Past Research Summary  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

Schrock, R. R.

1982-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

172

Intramolecular ET Rates in Modified Ferrocytochromes c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intramolecular Electron-Transfer Rates on Driving Force, pH, Intramolecular Electron-Transfer Rates on Driving Force, pH, and Temperature in Ammineruthenium-Modified Ferrocytochromes c James F. Wishart, Ji Sun, Myung Cho, Chang Su, and Stephan S. Isied J. Phys. Chem. B 101, 687-693 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Several ruthenium ammine complexes were used to modify horse-heart cytochrome c at histidine-33, creating a series of (NH3)4(L)Ru-Cyt c derivatives (L = H2O/OH-, ammonia, 4-ethylpyridine, 3,5-lutidine, pyridine, isonicotinamide, N-methylpyrazinium) with a wide range of driving forces for Fe-to-Ru electron transfer (-DG° = -0.125 to +0.46 eV). Electron-transfer rates and activation parameters were measured by pulse radiolysis using azide or carbonate radicals. The driving-force dependence

173

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bae-KAERI 2012 IPRC3 [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molten Molten Salt Actinide Chem. 0 Concentration Measurement of Actinide and Lanthanide ions in LiCl-KCl Melt by Using Electrochemical Techniques 2012. 8. 28 Sang-Eun Bae, D.-H. Kim, J. Y. Kim, Y. H. Cho, T.-H. Park, J.-W. Yeon, K. Song Molten Salt Actinide Chem. Outline 1. Work scope in our laboratory 2. Some electrochemical techniques -CV, CA, CP -NPV, SWV 3. Apparatus and Experimental 4. Results and Discussion a. Conventional electrochemical measurements b. Repeating chronoamperometry c. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy 5. Conclusion Molten Salt Actinide Chem. 2 U 3+ U Cl - Cl 2 Sm 3+ Electrode Source Photometer Optical fiber connection Optical fiber connection For Fluorescence Nd:YAG Laser Detector for Fluorescence U 3+ U 4+ Sm 2+ Eu 3+ Eu 2+ Multi Component system Sensing Tech. UV-Vis absorption Measurement system h Work scope in our laboratory Molten Salt Actinide Chem. 3 3 Electrochemical

174

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Sfh3, a member of the Sec14 protein superfamily  

SciTech Connect

Sec14 is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of the Sec14 protein superfamily. Recent functional data suggest that Sec14 functions as a nanoreactor for PtdCho-regulated presentation of PtdIns to PtdIns kinase to affect membrane trafficking. Extrapolation of this concept to other members of the Sec14 superfamily suggests a mechanism by which a comprehensive cohort of Sec14-like nanoreactors sense correspondingly diverse pools of lipid metabolites. In turn, metabolic information is translated to signaling circuits driven by phosphoinositide metabolism. Sfh3, one of five Sec14 homologs in yeast, exhibits several interesting functional features, including its unique localization to lipid particles and microsomes. This localization forecasts novel regulatory interfaces between neutral lipid metabolism and phosphoinositide signaling. To launch a detailed structural and functional characterization of Sfh3, the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity, diffraction-quality crystals were produced and a native X-ray data set was collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. To aid in phasing, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.93 {angstrom} resolution from an SeMet-labeled crystal at the Southeast Regional Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source. Here, the cloning and purification of Sfh3 and the preliminary diffraction of Sfh3 crystals are reported, enabling structural analyses that are expected to reveal novel principles governing ligand binding and functional specificity for Sec14-superfamily proteins.

Ren, Jihui; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Pathak, Manish C. (Emory-MED); (UNC)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

Understanding of Ethanol Decomposition on Rh(111) From Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reaction mechanisms of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) were elucidated by means of periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We propose that the most probable reaction pathway is via CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* on the basis of our mechanistic study: CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. In contrast, the contribution from the pathway via CH{sub 3}CHOH* is relatively small, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHOH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 3}CO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. According to our calculations, one of the slow steps is the formation of the oxametallacycle CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* species, which leads to the production of CHCO*, the precursor for C-C bond breaking. Finally, the decomposition of ethanol leads to the production of C and CO. Our calculations, for ethanol combustion on Rh, the major obstacle is not C-C bond cleavage, but the C contamination on Rh(1 1 1). The strong C-Rh interaction may deactivate the Rh catalyst. The formation of Rh alloys with Pt and Pd weakens the C-Rh interaction, easing the removal of C, and, as expected, in accordance with the experimental findings, facilitating ethanol combustion.

Liu, P.; Choi, Y.M.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Diet composition and performance of female collegiate soccer players  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal nutrition for soccer athletes facilitates adaptation to the metabolic and energy demands of training and competition. Limited data have examined habitual dietary practices of female players, especially at the intercollegiate level. The purpose of this investigation was: 1) To establish baseline dietary analysis, anthropometrics, and performance data; 2) To compare values between rigorous pre-season training (2 sessions/day) to that of the post-competitive season; and 3) To examine correlations between performance and nutritional parameters. Members of a NCAA, Division I soccer squad completed a 3-day diet record in combination with physical tests, including VO?[], both pre- and post-season. No significant pre- to post differences were found for body weight or body fatness (62.0 4.8 kg vs. 61.6 4.7 kg; 16.4 2.4% vs. 16.1 2.8%). Total energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intakes were significantly greater during the pre-season (2290 312 kcal vs.1866 530 kcal; 320 70 g (55%) vs. 263 71 g (57%); 86.5 18.7 g (15%) vs. 58.2 16.8 g (13%); 75.2 3.3 g (29%) vs. 65.9 28.7 g (31%)) compared to post-season. Pre-season energy intake met the RDA for moderate levels of activity (37 kcal/kg). While CHO intake failed to meet minimum recommendations to promote glycogen repletion (7-10 g/kg), protein and fat intakes were above the minimum recommendations. Pre-season intakes of vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, biotin, pantothenic acid, copper, and magnesium were marginal (fat, in addition to foods with low nutrient value may displace CHO-rich and nutrient-dense foods within athletes' energy requirements and satiety limits. Sport nutrition counseling may benefit female soccer athletes to enhance dietary practices, thus encouraging optimal intake of nutrients during periods of increased and decreased food intake.

Clark, Mandy Michele

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synthesis of 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) and 3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DAPTA) complexes and the development of chromium salen catalysts for the copolymerization of CO2 and epoxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two main areas are considered in this manuscript. The first describes the synthesis of group 10 metal complexes incorporating the water-soluble 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) ligand and the second deals with the preparation of Cr(salen)X catalysts for the copolymerization of CO2 and epoxides. In the first topic, the synthesis of nickel(II) and palladium(II) salicylaldiminato complexes incorporating PTA has been achieved employing two preparative routes. Upon reacting the original ethylene polymerization catalyst developed by Grubbs and coworkers (Organometallics, 1998, 17, 3149), (salicylaldiminato)Ni(Ph)PPh3, with PTA using a homogeneous methanol/toluene solvent system resulted in the formation of the PTA analogs in good yields. Alternatively, complexes of this type may be synthesized via a direct approach utilizing (TMEDA)M(CH3)2 (M = Ni, Pd), the corresponding salicylaldimine, and PTA. Polymerization reactions were attempted using the nickel-PTA complexes in a biphasic toluene/water mixture in an effort to initiate ethylene polymerization by trapping the dissociated phosphine ligand in the water layer, thereby, eliminating the need for a phosphine scavenger. Unfortunately, because of the strong binding ability of the small, donating phosphine (PTA) as compared to PPh3, dissociation did not occur at a temperature where the complexes are not subjected to decomposition. Additionally, the unexplored PTA derivative, 3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DAPTA), prepared by the literature procedure, was fully characterized by NMR and X-ray analysis. DAPTA is found be similar to its parent (PTA) in coordination mode and binding strength, as supported by its representative group 6 and group 10 complexes The second main topic involves the copolymerization of CO2 and epoxides (i.e., cyclohexene oxide (CHO)) for the formation of polycarbonate using Cr(salen)X (X = Br, OPh) catalysts with one equivalent of PR3 as the co-catalyst. The use of these catalysts and cocatalysts results in the most active chromium-based catalytic systems to date. The . hr-1highest activities observed are on the order of 109 mol CHO consumed . mol Cr-1 using PCy3 as the co-catalyst, and is clearly seen in the in situ monitoring of copolymer formation. An advantage of these systems involves the lack of cyclic carbonate production and high CO2 incorporation (>99%) within the polymer.

Ortiz, Cesar Gabriel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to fully characterize the effectiveness and limits of using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique for analysis of radiation induced strand breakage. If the TUNEL technique is found valuable, it could be applied to develop a biodosimetry protocol, primarily useful for individuals exposed in radiological accidents. Several techniques currently in use include fluorescent in-situ hybridization, the comet assay and the dicentric assay, yet each has drawbacks such as limited sensitivity or considerable preparation time. Recently, the TUNEL assay has been used in studies by Harvey and Ford (1997) to investigate chromatid breaks due to restriction enzymes. This research uses similar protocols to examine breaks due to radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured and exposed to X rays, receiving a dose ranging from 0 to 2 Gy. Slides were created using a standard metaphase chromosome preparation technique, followed by the TUNEL reaction to highlight chromosome breaks. The results were used to build a dose response curve. Although the expected increase in TUNEL positives per metaphase cell with increased x-ray dose was seen, large errors were associated with the results rendering TUNEL assay less than ideal for biodosimetry purposes. Additionally, TUNEL is not very effective at high doses because each TUNEL positive becomes indistinguishable from neighboring positives due to the high number of positives on each chromosome.

Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Flow microfluorometric and spectrophotofluorometric analysis of DNA staining in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The effects of pH, ionic strength, stain concentration, and magnesium concentration on DNA staining with the antibiotics mithramycin, chromomycin A3, and olivomycin were examined with DNA in solution and in mammalian cells. Ethanol-fixed Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) stained with mithramycin solution in the pH range 4.0 to 10.0 and analyzed by flow microfluorometry (FMF) showed only a slight increase in fluorescence intensity from pH 4.0 to 8.0. Above this range, there was a more dramatic increase in intensity of stained cells, and at pH 10.0 the flouorescence intensity was 1-1/2 times greater than cells stained at pH 4.5. The resolution in DNA distribution patterns also improved as a function of increasing pH, corresponding with a marked decrease in the coefficient of variation (CV). However, the distribution of cells in various phases of the cell cycle remained essentially the same over the pH ranges tested.

Crissman, H.A.; Stevenson, A.; Kissane, R.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Detecting Molecular Features of Spectra Mainly Associated with Structural and Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Co-Products from BioEthanol Production Using DRIFT with Uni- and Multivariate Molecular Spectral Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The objective of this study was to use DRIFT spectroscopy with uni- and multivariate molecular spectral analyses as a novel approach to detect molecular features of spectra mainly associated with carbohydrate in the co-products (wheat DDGS, corn DDGS, blend DDGS) from bioethanol processing in comparison with original feedstock (wheat (Triticum), corn (Zea mays)). The carbohydrates related molecular spectral bands included: A_Cell (structural carbohydrates, peaks area region and baseline: ca. 14851188 cm ?1), A_1240 (structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 1240 cm ?1 with region and baseline: ca. 12921198 cm ?1), A_CHO (total carbohydrates, peaks region and baseline: ca. 1187950 cm-1), A_928 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 928 cm ?1 with region and baseline: ca. 952910 cm ?1), A_860 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 860 cm ?1 with region and baseline: ca. 880827 cm-1), H_1415 (structural carbohydrate, peak height centered at ca. 1415 cm ?1 with baseline: ca. 14851188 cm ?1), H_1370 (structural carbohydrate, peak height at ca. 1370 cm ?1 with a baseline: ca. 14851188 cm ?1). The study shows that the grains had lower spectral intensity (KM Unit) of the cellulosic compounds of A_1240 (8.5 vs. 36.6, P < 0.05), higher (P < 0.05)

Peiqiang Yu; Daalkhaijav Damiran; Arash Azarfar; Zhiyuan Niu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

An Experimental Study of Circuit Breakers: The Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper analyzes the effect of circuit breakers on price behavior, trading volume, and profit-making ability in a market setting. We conduct nine experimental asset markets to compare behavior across three regulatory regimes: market closure, temporary halt, and no interruption. The presence of a circuit breaker rule does not affect the magnitude of the absolute deviation in price from fundamental value or trading profit. The primary driver of behavior is information asymmetry in the market. By comparison, trading activity is significantly affected by the presence of a circuit breaker. Mandated market closures cause market participants to advance trades. JEL classification: D40, G10, G14 Key words: circuit breakers, trading halts, market structure The authors thank the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta for financial support, Kendra Hiscox for valuable research assistance, and Jin-Wan Cho, Jerry Dwyer, Kalpana Narayanan, Joe Sinkey, and seminar participants at Georgia Tech and the Atlanta Finance Workshop for helpful comments. The views expressed here are the authors and not necessarily those of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta or the Federal Reserve System. Any remaining errors are

Lucy F. Ackert; Bryan K. Church; Narayanan Jayaraman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

VALIDATION OF THE eCALC COMMERCIAL CODE-COMPLIANT SIMULATION VERSUS MEASURED DATA FROM AN OFFICE BUILDING IN A HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares the results of a calibrated simulation of a case-study building versus simulation using the web-based eCALC code-compliant commercial simulation program (Haberl et al., 2004). Previously, as-built calibrated simulation results for the case-study building were performed and reported in Cho and Haberl (2008). In this paper an extension of the previous work is presented using the eCALC commercial simulation model, which uses simplified geometry and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-compliant equipment selection and sizing values for energy calculation. This paper compares the results between the as-built geometry simulation and simplified geometry simulation with similar equipment configuration. The simplified geometry simulation model is a modified-eCALC DOE-2 model that includes simplifications of the case-study buildings characteristics. The modified-eCALC DOE-2 model was intended to be used for the development of an easy-to-use tool for the selection of high-performance systems for office buildings in hot and humid climates, which will be presented in another publication.

Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Crosslinked Polyamide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A crosslinked polyamide material and a process for preparing the crosslinked polyamide material are disclosed. The crosslinked polyamide material comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (1) a polyamide of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n is between about 50 and 10,000, wherein each R is between 1 and 50 carbon atoms alone and is optionally substituted with heteroatoms, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, or phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone forming the polyamide, and wherein two or more of the R contain an amino group; and (2) a crosslinking agent containing at least two functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups of the polyamide. In one embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is an aliphatic or aromatic isocyanate compound having 2 or more --N.dbd.C.dbd.O groups. In another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is an aliphatic aldehyde or aromatic aldehyde compound having 2 or more --CHO groups. In still another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is selected from a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.2 P(B) and mixtures thereof, wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, and B is hydroxyalkyl, alkyl, or aryl. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is selected from the group consisting of epoxy resins having more than one epoxide group per molecule.

Huang, Zhi H. (East Lansing, MI); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Chromosome aberrations and loss of some cell functions following in vitro exposure to retorted oil shale. [Cultured cells were exposed to processes oil shale particles (spent shales)  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of cellular level effects of processed oil shale from a simulation of modified in situ retorting was undertaken as part of an assessment of the toxicity and mutagenicity of oil shale. Complete assessment of the health hazards associated with physical contact, inhalation, or ingestion of oil shale has not been examined in humans and until it becomes practical to assess these hazards in man, we must rely upon well established in vitro detection procedures in addition to whole animal testing. CHO cells and L-2 rat lung epithelial cell lines were exposed in vitro to processed oil shale particles at different intervals following exposure. Cells were analyzed for chromosome alterations, cell colony forming ability, DNA synthesis, and cell transformation. The results of these studies demonstrate that retorted oil shale, under these experimental conditions, does modify cells in vitro. Chromosome aberrations increased with dose, cell colony forming ability decreased exponentially with dose, and the rate of DNA synthesis was affected, however cell transformation was not demonstrated after 3 months.

Stroud, A.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Submitted to:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

felt it would be easier for you to view the color photograph copy, in case this information was relevant to your review. We are asking you to send back the original after you copy it. You can keep the original for at least a month if necessary, and then return it. We are having a copy made for Philip Ramsey at JPG. Please be warned that the Agency has not completed it's review of the document. We have not included the Executive Summary Chapter 1, or Chapter 5 the Recommendations portion, because these are enforcement sensitive at this time. We would be happy to discuss with you or Phil what are recomiendations might be on some of the areas. We are currently working on the review of the USATHEMA Workplan, and will send comments to Phil when they are organized. We also will send you a copy of Region V's Quality Assurance Protocols that must be met for compliance with a RCRA Facility Investigation. I hope the information will be useful to you. If you have any questions regarding this matter, please contact me at (312) 886-6146. or Hak Cho at

Abraham Chen Ph. D; King Ave; Carol Ann Wi Tt-smi Th; Phil Ramsey Jpg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolaldehyde (HOCH{sub 2}CHO) is a sugar-related interstellar prebiotic molecule that has been detected in two star-forming regions, Sgr B2(N) and G31.41+0.31. Glycolaldehyde is suspected to form from photodissociation-driven ice chemistry, and therefore can be used to trace complex organic chemistry in interstellar environments. The relative abundance of glycolaldehyde to its structural isomers, methyl formate (HCOOCH{sub 3}) and acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH), can be used to constrain astrochemical models. Given its central role in the complex chemistry of the interstellar medium, glycolaldehyde has been suggested as a prime molecular target for upcoming high-frequency molecular line searches using new far-infrared observatories. In particular, glycolaldehyde is a target for the Herschel Space Observatory HEXOS Key Program, which is conducting spectral line surveys of the Sgr B2(N) and Orion KL star-forming regions across the entire HIFI band. Laboratory investigation of glycolaldehyde in the HIFI frequency range is required before its lines can be identified in these spectra. We have therefore acquired the laboratory spectrum of glycolaldehyde in selected frequency ranges across the submillimeter range. We present here the laboratory spectral analysis of the ground vibrational state of glycolaldehyde up to 1.2 THz.

Carroll, P. Brandon; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Drouin, Brian J., E-mail: pbcarro@emory.ed, E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.ed, E-mail: brian.j.drouin@jpl.nasa.go [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Strength of Weak Cooperation: an Attempt to Understand the Meaning of Web 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper examines some continuities and ruptures in the use of Web 2.0 such as blogs, social media, user-generated content services etc. vis--vis earlier web services. We hypothesize that one of the sociological characteristics of Web 2.0 services is that making personal production public creates a new articulation between individualism and solidarity, which reveals the strength of weak cooperation. Web 2.0 services allow individual contributors to experience cooperation ex post. The strength of the weak cooperation arises from the fact that it is not necessary for individuals to have an ex ante cooperative action plan or altruistic intention. They discover cooperative opportunities only by making public their individual production. The paper illustrates this phenomenon by analysing the uses of different services and by looking at the new process of innovation that appears through Barcamp and Coworking spaces. Key words: Web 2.0, weak cooperation, BarCamp. E choing the euphoric 2000 internet bubble, the Web 2.0 label is now so widespread that it is increasingly difficult to define the boundaries and

Christophe Aguiton; Dominique Cardon; France Tlcom R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modeling of the formation of short-chain acids in propane flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to better understand their potential formation in combustion systems, a detailed kinetic mechanism for the formation of short-chain monocarboxylic acids, formic (HCOOH), acetic (CH3COOH), propionic (C2H5COOH) and propenic (C2H3COOH)) acids, has been developed. Simulations of lean (equivalence ratios from 0.9 to 0.48) laminar premixed flames of propane stabilized at atmospheric pressure with nitrogen as diluent have been performed. It was found that amounts up to 25 ppm of acetic acid, 15 ppm of formic acid and 1 ppm of C3 acid can be formed for some positions in the flames. Simulations showed that the more abundant C3 acid formed is propenic acid. A quite acceptable agreement has been obtained with the scarce results from the literature concerning oxygenated compounds, including aldehydes (CH2O, CH3CHO) and acids. A reaction pathways analysis demonstrated that each acid is mainly derived from the aldehyde of similar structure.

Battin-Leclerc, Frdrique; Jaffrezo, J L; Legrand, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mhlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four thin-film damage competitions organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site  

SciTech Connect

The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and CO-CH{sub 4} systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH{sub 2}N{sub 2}), and its radical fragment (HCN{sub 2}); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the azide radical (N{sub 3}). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

An Exocyclic Methylene Group Acts As a Bioisostere of the 2?-Oxygen Atom in LNA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We show for the first time that it is possible to obtain LNA-like (Locked Nucleic Acid 1) binding affinity and biological activity with carbocyclic LNA (cLNA) analogs by replacing the 2{prime}-oxygen atom in LNA with an exocyclic methylene group. Synthesis of the methylene-cLNA nucleoside was accomplished by an intramolecular cyclization reaction between a radical at the 2{prime}-position and a propynyl group at the C-4{prime} position. Only methylene-cLNA modified oligonucleotides showed similar thermal stability and mismatch discrimination properties for complementary nucleic acids as LNA. In contrast, the close structurally related methyl-cLNA analogs showed diminished hybridization properties. Analysis of crystal structures of cLNA modified self-complementary DNA decamer duplexes revealed that the methylene group participates in a tight interaction with a 2{prime}-deoxyribose residue of the 5{prime}-terminal G of a neighboring duplex, resulting in the formation of a CH...O type hydrogen bond. This indicates that the methylene group retains a negative polarization at the edge of the minor groove in the absence of a hydrophilic 2{prime}-substituent and provides a rationale for the superior thermal stability of this modification. In animal experiments, methylene-cLNA antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) showed similar in vivo activity but reduced toxicity as compared to LNA ASOs. Our work highlights the interchangeable role of oxygen and unsaturated moieties in nucleic acid structure and emphasizes greater use of this bioisostere to improve the properties of nucleic acids for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

Seth, Punit P.; Allerson, Charles R.; Berdeja, Andres; Siwkowski, Andrew; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Gaus, Hans; Prakash, Thazha P.; Watt, Andrew T.; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E. (Isis Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Molecular Clustering Interrelationships and Carbohydrate Conformation in Hull and Seeds Among Barley Cultivars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to use molecular spectral analyses with the diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) bioanlytical technique to study carbohydrate conformation features, molecular clustering and interrelationships in hull and seed among six barley cultivars (AC Metcalfe, CDC Dolly, McLeod, CDC Helgason, CDC Trey, CDC Cowboy), which had different degradation kinetics in rumen. The molecular structure spectral analyses in both hull and seed involved the fingerprint regions of ca. 1536-1484 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to aromatic lignin semicircle ring stretch), ca. 1293-1212 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to cellulosic compounds in the hull), ca. 1269-1217 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to cellulosic compound in the seeds), and ca. 1180-800 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to total CHO C-O stretching vibrations) together with an agglomerative hierarchical cluster (AHCA) and principal component spectral analyses (PCA). The results showed that the DRIFT technique plus AHCA and PCA molecular analyses were able to reveal carbohydrate conformation features and identify carbohydrate molecular structure differences in both hull and seeds among the barley varieties. The carbohydrate molecular spectral analyses at the region of ca. 1185-800 cm{sup -1} together with the AHCA and PCA were able to show that the barley seed inherent structures exhibited distinguishable differences among the barley varieties. CDC Helgason had differences from AC Metcalfe, MeLeod, CDC Cowboy and CDC Dolly in carbohydrate conformation in the seed. Clear molecular cluster classes could be distinguished and identified in AHCA analysis and the separate ellipses could be grouped in PCA analysis. But CDC Helgason had no distinguished differences from CDC Trey in carbohydrate conformation. These carbohydrate conformation/structure difference could partially explain why the varieties were different in digestive behaviors in animals. The molecular spectroscopy technique used in this study could also be used for other plant-based feed and food structure studies.

N Liu; P Yu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

SciTech Connect

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

198

THE EFFECT OF H{sub 2}O ON ICE PHOTOCHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

UV irradiation of simple ices is proposed to efficiently produce complex organic species during star formation and planet formation. Through a series of laboratory experiments, we investigate the effects of the H{sub 2}O concentration, the dominant ice constituent in space, on the photochemistry of more volatile species, especially CH{sub 4}, in ice mixtures. In the experiments, thin ({approx}40 ML) ice mixtures, kept at 20-60 K, are irradiated under ultra-high vacuum conditions with a broadband UV hydrogen discharge lamp. Photodestruction cross sections of volatile species (CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}) and production efficiencies of new species (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}CHO, and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH) in water-containing ice mixtures are determined using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy during irradiation and during a subsequent slow warm-up. The four major effects of increasing the H{sub 2}O concentration are: (1) an increase of the destruction efficiency of the volatile mixture constituent by up to an order of magnitude due to a reduction of back reactions following photodissociation, (2) a shift to products rich in oxygen, e.g., CH{sub 3}OH and H{sub 2}CO, (3) trapping of up to a factor of 5 more of the formed radicals in the ice, and (4) a disproportional increase in the diffusion barrier for the OH radical compared with the CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals. The radical diffusion temperature dependencies are consistent with calculated H{sub 2}O-radical bond strengths. All the listed effects are potentially important for the production of complex organics in H{sub 2}O-rich icy grain mantles around protostars and should thus be taken into account when modeling ice chemistry.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 42, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Linnartz, Harold [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Andersson, Stefan [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, P.O. Box 4760, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection  

SciTech Connect

The central theme of this dissertation is represented by the versatility of mesoporous silica nanomaterials in various applications such as catalysis and bio-applications, with main focus on biological applications of Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (MSN). The metamorphosis that we impose to these materials from catalysis to sensing and to drug and gene delivery is detailed in this dissertation. First, we developed a synthetic method that can fine tune the amount of chemically accessible organic functional groups on the pores surface of MSN by exploiting electrostatic and size matching between the cationic alkylammonium head group of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant and various anionic organoalkoxysilane precursors at the micelle-water interface in a base-catalyzed condensation reaction of silicate. Aiming nature imitation, we demonstrated the catalytic abilities of the MSNs, We utilized an ethylenediamine functional group for chelating Cu{sup 2+} as a catalytic functional group anchored inside the mesopores. Thus, a polyalkynylene-based conducting polymer (molecular wire) was synthesized within the Cu-functionalized MSNs silica catalyst. For sensing applications, we have synthesized a poly(lactic acid) coated mesoporous silica nanosphere (PLA-MSN) material that serves as a fluorescence sensor system for detection of amino-containing neurotransmitters in neutral aqueous buffer. We exploited the mesoporosity of MSNs for encapsulating pharmaceutical drugs. We examined bio-friendly capping molecules such as polyamidoamine dendrimers of generations G2 to G4, to prevent the drug leaching. Next, the drug delivery system employed MSNs loaded with Doxorubicin, an anticancer drug. The results demonstrated that these nano-Trojan horses have ability to deliver Doxorubicin to cancer cells and induce their death. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of MSN as an universal cellular transmembrane nanovehicle, we anchored positively charged dendrimers on the surface of MSN and utilize them to complex cationic DNA. The p-EGFP-CI gene-coated MSN nanocomposite was able to transfect cancer cell lines, such as human HeLa and CHO cancer cell lines. The gene carrier ability of MSNs was further proved by transfecting primary cells and cotransfecting of two different genes in cancer cell lines. In sum, MSN are versatile partners in several types of applications.

Daniela Rodica Radu

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF TURBULENT PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THE SOLAR NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

We study the influence of transport processes on the chemical evolution of DM Tau-like protoplanetary disks. Turbulent transport of gases and ices is implicitly modeled in full two dimensions (2D), using the mixing-length approximation, along with the time-dependent chemistry. We find that turbulent transport enhances abundances and column densities of many gas-phase species and ices, particularly, complex ones. The influence of turbulent mixing on disk chemistry is more pronounced in the inner, planet-forming disk region where gradients of temperature and high-energy radiation intensities are steeper than in the outer region. The molecules that are unresponsive to transport include, e.g., C{sub 2}H, C{sup +}, CH{sub 4}, CN, CO, HCN, HNC, H{sub 2}CO, OH, as well as water and ammonia ice. Their column densities computed with the laminar and 2D mixing model differ by a factor of {approx}< 2-5. Molecules whose vertical column densities in the laminar and dynamical models differ by up to two orders of magnitude include, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, some carbon chains, CS, H{sub 2}CS, H{sub 2}O, HCO{sup +}, HCOOH, HNCO, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, CO ice, H{sub 2}CO ice, CH{sub 3}OH ice, and electrons. Molecules whose column densities are altered by diffusion by more than two orders of magnitude include, e.g., C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}S, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SiO, SO, SO{sub 2}, long carbon chain ices, CH{sub 3}CHO ice, HCOOH ice, O{sub 2} ice, and OCN ice. We indicate several observable or potentially detectable tracers of transport processes in protoplanetary disks and the solar nebula, such as heavy hydrocarbon ices, complex organics, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO, SO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}S compared to CO and water ice.

Semenov, D. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wiebe, D., E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya St. 48, 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

A Study of Cosmic Ray Secondaries Induced by the Mir Space Station Using AMS-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.Aguilar a J.Alcaraz a J.Allaby b B.Alpat c G.Ambrosi d,c H.Anderhub e L.Ao f A.Arefiev g P.Azzarello d E.Babucci c L.Baldini h,i M.Basile h D.Barancourt j F.Barao k,? G.Barbier j G.Barreira k R.Battiston c R.Becker i U.Becker i L.Bellagamba h P.Bn d J.Berdugo a P.Berges i B.Bertucci c A.Biland e S.Bizzaglia c S.Blasko c G.Boella m M.Boschini m M.Bourquin d L.Brocco h G.Bruni h M.Bunerd j J.D.Burger i W.J.Burger c X.D.Cai i C.Camps n P.Cannarsa e M.Capell i G.Carosi i D.Casadei h J.Casaus a G.Castellini o,h C.Cecchi c Y.H.Chang p H.F.Chen q H.S.Chen r Z.G.Chen f N.A.Chernoplekov s T.H.Chiueh p K.Cho t M.J.Choi u Y.Y.Choi u Y.L.Chuang v F.Cindolo h V.Commichau n A.Contin h E.Cortina-Gil d M.Cristinziani d J.P.da Cunha w T.S.Dai i C.Delgado a B.Demirkz i J.D.Deus ? N.Dinu c,2 L.Djambazov e I.DAntone h Z.R.Dong x P.Emonet d J.Engelberg y F.J.Eppling i T.Eronen z G.Esposito c P.Extermann d J.Favier aa E.Fiandrini c P.H.Fisher i

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were found to have lower activities under S-free conditions, but did show less effect of S on performance, in this study. Imidazolium-based ILs, choline chloride compounds and low-melting eutectics of metal nitrates were evaluated, and it was found that, ILs have some capacity to dissolve cellulose and show thermal stability to temperatures where pyrolysis begins, have no vapor pressure, (simplifying product recoveries), and can dissolve ionic metal salts, allowing for the potential of catalytic reactions on breakdown intermediates. Clear evidence of photoactive commercial TiO2 was obtained, but in-house synthesis of photoactive TiO2 proved difficult, as did fixed-bed gasification, primarily due to the challenge of removing the condensable products from the reaction zone quickly enough to prevent additional reaction. Further investigation into additional non-PGM catalysts and ILs is recommended as a follow-up to this work.

Kelly Jezierski; Andrew Tadd; Johannes Schwank; Roland Kibler; David McLean; Mahesh Samineni; Ryan Smith; Sameer Parvathikar; Joe Mayne; Tom Westrich; Jerry Mader; F. Michael Faubert

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report collects information on cathode contaminants we have gathered in the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand. Information on contaminants is compiled from several sources. The attachment, ''Practical Aspects of Modern Dispenser Cathodes'', is from Heat Wave Corp. (TB-134) and was originally published in Microwave Journal, September 1979. Cathode contamination depends on both material choices and residual gases. Table 1 of TB-134 lists materials that can poison dispenser cathodes. These include reactive residual gases or vapors such as oxygen, water vapor, benzene, chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, silicon, and most metals other than molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and copper. The metals interact with the cathode surface through their vapor pressure. A paper by Nexsen and Turner, J. Appl. Phys. 68, 298-303 (1990) shows the threshold effects of some common residual gases or vapors on cathode performance. The book by Walter H. Kohl, Handbook of Materials and Techniques for Vacuum Devices, also contains useful information on cathodes and poisoning agents. A plot of the vapor pressures and poisoning effect of certain metals (from Kohl) is shown below. Note that the vapor pressure of zinc is 1.1 x 10{sup -8} Torr at 400 K = 127 C, and 2.7 x 10{sup -5} at 500 K = 227 C. By contrast iron reaches a vapor pressure 1 x 10{sup -8} between 800 and 900 C. Therefore it is important to eliminate any brass parts that could exceed a temperature of 100 C. Many structural components of the cathode assembly contain steel. At 500-600 C in an oxygen atmosphere chromium oxide may outgas from the steel. [Cho, et.al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, p. 998 (2001)]. Steel may also contain silicon, and sulfur at low concentrations. Therefore use of steel should be limited or avoided at high temperature near the cathode. Materials that should be avoided in the vicinity of the cathode include brass, silver, zinc, non-OFHC copper, silicates, and sulfur-containing lubricants such molybdenum disulfide. Macor is an aluminosilicate-based insulator that is not stable at high temperature. Macor near the cathode should be replaced by a high-temperature insulator such as alumina ceramic. Other insulating materials that contain silicates, such as fiber insulating sleeves, should be avoided. Copper that is not OFHC contains oxygen and other impurities and should be avoided. Lubricating screw coatings should be chosen carefully to have no sulfur content. Common sources of contamination that can cause low emission include water, saliva, silicates such as glass dust, etc. Cathodes should be handled in near clean-room conditions to minimize the amount of water vapor on the cathode surface from breathing, etc. Cathodes should also be stored in such as a way as to avoid contact with materials such as glass dust and water vapor. Attached are plots of SEM data for several test pieces that were taken from the LBNL test stand after activation of the 311x scandate DARHT cathode. Several copper pieces in the anode region were tested, showing the presence of zinc. Two stainless steel nuts coated with a contaminant were also tested. The SEM data indicates the presence of zinc and some sulfur. The zinc has been traced to a brass piece, and the sulfur to the possible use of molybdenum disulfide lubricant on a nut in the system. Finally a swipe of contaminant on the vacuum vessel wall analyzed by a commercial testing laboratory shows again the presence of zinc. In order to improve system cleanliness, we have implemented the following modifications to the test stand: replaced the brass piece with copper-tungsten; replaced Macor insulators with alumina ceramic; used boron nitride lubricant; replaced copper beam stop with OFHC copper; and replaced steel pieces near the cathode where possible with copper or copper-tungsten. A clean fire of high-temperature components and a high-current filament test have shown no evidence to date for contaminants since the modifications.

Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.; Leitner, M.; Kwan, J.W.

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

Klobukowski, Erik

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z