Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Conversion Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

2

METRIC CONVERSION TABLE Unit B to A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,mass)/ yard3 1329 0.0007525 Kilogram/meter3 POWER Foot-pound- force/hour 3.766x10-4 2655 Watt Horsepower 550 0 Measure multiply by: To convert Unit B to A multiply by: Unit B Measure ACCELERATION Foot/second2 0.3048 3-4 Meter2 Acre 1.563x10-3 640 Square miles Acre 43,560 Square feet Foot2 0.0929 10.764 Meter2 Inch2 6.452 0

US Army Corps of Engineers

3

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS v CONTENTS COVER SHEET.................................................................................................................... iii NOTATION .......................................................................................................................... xxv ENGLISH/METRIC AND METRIC/ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS..................................... xxx SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 Introduction........................................................................................................... S-1 S.1.1 Background Information........................................................................... S-1

4

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS v CONTENTS COVER SHEET.................................................................................................................... iii NOTATION .......................................................................................................................... xxv ENGLISH/METRIC AND METRIC/ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS..................................... xxx SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................ S-1 S.1.1 Background Information........................................................................... S-1 S.1.1.1

5

Appendix B Metric  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Metric Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1992 through 1996 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1992 through 1996. A brief documentation for the thermal conversion factors follows: * Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calcu- lated by adding the total heat content of dry production to the total heat content of extraction loss and dividing the resulting sum by the total quantity of dry production and extraction

6

Un exemple de conversion d'une table de production en volume en tables de production en biomasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Un exemple de conversion d'une table de production en volume en tables de production en biomasse secteur ligérien, proposée par PARD? en 1962, est convertie en quatre tables de production en biomasse correspondant chacune à une partie de l'arbre ou à l'arbre entier, biomasse foliaire exclue. La conversion est

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 165 3 165 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1999 through 2003 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1999 through 2003. A brief documentation for the thermal conversion factors follows: * Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calculated by adding the total heat content of dry

8

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2005-2009 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 425,887 440,516 452,945 R 476,652 493,100 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 494,748 509,577 483,238 R 442,265 420,197 From Oil Wells ................................................ 169,476 156,860 164,759 R 162,742 164,611 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA 50,400 R 56,249 55,990 From Shale Gas Wells .................................... NA NA NA 64,682 95,811 Total ................................................................. 664,223 666,438 698,397 R 725,938 736,609

9

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2004-2008 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 406,147 425,887 440,516 R 452,945 478,562 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,454 494,748 509,577 R 483,238 510,019 From Oil Wells ................................................ 172,292 169,476 156,860 R 164,759 165,506 From Coalbed Wells ....................................... NA NA NA 50,400 53,757 Total ................................................................. 678,746 664,223 666,438 R 698,397 729,282 Repressuring .................................................... 104,819 104,759

10

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2003-2007 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year .... 393,327 406,147 425,887 R 440,516 452,768 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 506,356 506,454 494,748 R 509,577 530,629 From Oil Wells ................................................ 176,617 172,292 169,476 R 156,860 165,699 Total ................................................................. 682,973 678,746 664,223 R 666,438 696,328 Repressuring .................................................... 100,462 104,819 104,759 92,453 107,274 Vented and Flared ............................................

11

Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 2002-2006 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 387,772 393,327 406,147 R 425,887 448,641 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 503,894 506,356 506,454 R 494,748 508,075 From Oil Wells ................................................ 174,047 176,617 172,292 R 169,476 157,583 Total ................................................................. 677,942 682,973 678,746 R 664,223 665,657 Repressuring .................................................... 97,839 100,462 104,819 R 104,759 92,453 Vented and Flared

12

Extended contingency table: Performance metrics for satellite observations and climate model simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

severe weather environments and the relationship of these environments layer bulk wind shear, are linked to SPC convective watches and verification metrics Weather Service 2005). Severe convection is defined to be associated with at least one of the following

AghaKouchak, Amir

13

Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2008-2012 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 428,565 408,167 375,127 348,044 360,663 From Oil Wells 158,841 160,673 165,220 167,294 140,725 From Coalbed Wells 57,263 56,922 54,277 50,377 43,591 From Shale Gas Wells 81,268 112,087 164,723 240,721 291,566 Total 725,938 737,849 759,347 806,436 836,545 Repressuring 103,034 99,734 97,172 95,295 92,304 Vented and Flared 4,726 4,682 4,699 5,931 6,027 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 20,351 20,431 23,693 24,577 21,573

14

NEWTON's Metric System Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Please select any link below. Search this page, using your web browser's search function. Please select any link below. Search this page, using your web browser's search function. Metric System References Do you have a great metric reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Metric (SI) References Metric (SI) References Having trouble with the metric system? Visit the National Institute of Standards and Technology's site about the rules and style conventions of the International System of Units (SI). The Metric System The Metric System Need another reference? Try this site provided by Wikipedia that discusses the metric system and its history in depth. Metric Converter Metric Converter Need to convert to Metric? OnlineConversion.com allows you to convert just about anything to just about anything else. This will let you easily from metric to US Standard notation, and vice versa.

15

SI Handbook for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Committee on metric transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook is a guide to the use of the International System of Units (SI) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It describes the reasons for the United States converting to the metric system, legislation related to metric conversion, why the Laboratory is converting to the metric system, how international standards are established, the structure of SI, rules for using SI units and symbols, allowable non-SI units, and other important information about SI units and international standards. This handbook also demonstrates techniques for converting between inch-pound and metric units, and it contains tables of conversion factors. This Handbook is intended for the person who needs a practical working knowledge of the units of the modernized metric system, SI. The text and figures will be useful also to those who have had some experience with the metric system and want to update their knowledge, as well as to all who are interested in overcoming the normal human tendency to dislike a new system that they do not understand. The material is presented with the intent to implant the awareness of the simplifications possible with the new units, to warn of potential pitfalls associated with their use, and to guide in the recognition of which metric units and practices are correct. The text and figures are organized for ease of orientation. The sequence of units follows the natural progression from the everyday topics to the specialized ones.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ATTACHMENT A PROJECT PERFORMANCE METRICS (DRAFT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metrics submission. The focus areas are: weather, climate change and variability, atmospheric compositionATTACHMENT A PROJECT PERFORMANCE METRICS (DRAFT) REASoN projects are required to collect and report on the metrics noted in Table A. These data will be reported from the projects on a monthly basis with six month

Christian, Eric

17

STAR METRICS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy continues to define Phase II of the STAR METRICS program, a collaborative initiative to track Research and Development expenditures and their outcomes. Visit the STAR METRICS website for...

18

Table Search (or Ranking Tables)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Table Search #3 #12;Outline · Goals of table search · Table search #1: Deep Web · Table search #3 search Table search #1: Deep Web · Table search #3: (setup): Fusion Tables · Table search #2: WebTables ­Version 1: modify document search ­Version 2: recover table semantics #12;Searching the Deep Web store

Halevy, Alon

19

Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annex A Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report A.iii Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... A.1 Metric #1: The Fraction of Customers and Total Load Served by Real-Time Pricing, Critical Peak Pricing, and Time-of-Use Pricing ........................................................................................ A.2 Metric #2: Real-Time System Operations Data Sharing ...................................................................... A.9 Metric #3: Standard Distributed Resource Connection Policies .......................................................... A.18 Metric #4: Regulatory Recovery for Smart Grid Investments ............................................................. A.23

20

Metric Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MODERN GRID MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Smart Grid Metrics Monitoring our Progress Smart Grid Implementation Workshop Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team June 19, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Many are working on the Smart Grid FERC DOE-OE Grid 2030 GridWise Alliance EEI NERC (FM) DOE/NETL Modern Grid Strategy GridWise Program GridWorks NW GridWise Testbed GridApps CERTS DOE-OE CEC PIER NYSERDA CPUC AMI Galvin Initiative EPRI Intelligrid PSERC NIST GWAC Utility AMI Open AMI CEC PIER EPACT05 Nat'al Labs EISA-2007 IEEE DOE Smart Grid Task Force 3 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Kerr Metric Black Holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a = J/cM. Written in a form5 which reduces to the standard form of Schwarzschild metric when a = 0, the Kerr metric is

JAMES M. BARDEEN

1970-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

Conversion of Units of Measurement Gordon S. Novak Jr. \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the programmer; this can be both burdensome and error­prone, since the conversion factors used by the programmer guidelines for use of SI units and tables of conversion factors. Several books provide conversion factors, the accuracy of the conversion factors, and the algorithms that some books present for unit conversion

Novak Jr., Gordon S.

23

CPMS Tables  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QA Performance Metrics QA Performance Metrics Quality Program Criteria Summary Site: Period: FY09 Performance Score Excellent Good Investigate Define Actions N/A 1 Critical Decision 10 CFR 830.122 Score 1 2 3 4 Criterion Previous Period Current Period 1. Program 2. Personnel Training and Qualification 3. Quality Improvement Management 4. Documents and Records

24

Metrics for enterprise transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to depict the role of metrics in the evolving journey of enterprise transformation. To this end, three propositions are explored: (i) metrics and measurement systems drive transformation, ...

Blackburn, Craig D. (Craig David), S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

ARM - 2008 Performance Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Performance Metrics 8 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2008 Performance Metrics Each year, the ARM Program must submit to DOE an overall performance measure related to scientific achievement. The overall performance measure includes specific metrics for reporting progress each quarter. This reporting process includes support documentation (usually a report or data file) appropriate for the metric. Overall Performance Measures

26

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

27

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Table B2. Thermal conversion factors and data, 2009-2013 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed 1,101 1,098 1,142 R 1,091 1,100 NGPL Production 2,627 2,598...

28

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

29

MUTUAL CONVERSION SOLAR AND SIDEREAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TABLES FOR THE MUTUAL CONVERSION OF SOLAR AND SIDEREAL TIME BY EDWARD SANG, F.R.S.E. EDINBURGH in the third example. Sang converts 3.27 seconds of solar time into 3.26 seconds of sidereal time. But sidereal time elapses faster than solar time, and the correct value is 3.28 sec- onds. In the fourth example

Roegel, Denis

30

FY 2014 Metric Summary | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Metric Summary FY 2014 Metric Summary FY 2014 Q1 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q2 Metric Summary.pdf FY 2014 Q3 Metric Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2014 Q3 Metric...

31

Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ARM - 2009 Performance Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 Performance Metrics 9 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2009 Performance Metrics Improve Climate Models - Develop a coupled climate model with fully interactive carbon and sulfur cycles, as well as dynamic vegetation to enable simulations of aerosol effects, carbon chemistry, and carbon sequestration by the land surface and oceans and the interactions between the carbon cycle and climate. In fiscal year 2009: Provide improved climate

34

ARM - 2007 Performance Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Performance Metrics 7 Performance Metrics Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings User Meetings Annual Meetings of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team and Fall Working Groups Accomplishments Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 2007 Performance Metrics A Single Column Model (SCM) represents the evolution of the atmosphere in a single grid box of a Global Climate Model (GCM). This illustration represents the observing strategy of ARM, which takes continuous atmospheric observations from fixed sites in three climate regimes around the world. A Single Column Model (SCM) represents the evolution of the atmosphere in a

35

Generalized utility metrics for supercomputers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007:112 Generalized utility metrics for supercomputers 12.ISSUE PAPER Generalized utility metrics for supercomputersproblem of ranking the utility of supercom- puter systems

Strohmaier, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format Excel logo Spreadsheets are provided in excel 1 to117 - Complete set of Supplemental Tables PDF Energy Consumption by Sector (Census Division) Table 1. New England XLS PDF Table 2. Middle Atlantic XLS PDF Table 3. East North Central XLS PDF Table 4. West North Central XLS PDF Table 5. South Atlantic XLS PDF Table 6. East South Central XLS PDF Table 7. West South Central XLS PDF Table 8. Mountain XLS PDF Table 9. Pacific XLS PDF Table 10. Total United States XLS PDF Energy Prices by Sector (Census Division) Table 11. New England XLS PDF Table 12. Middle Atlantic XLS PDF Table 13. East North Central XLS PDF Table 14. West North Central XLS PDF Table 15. South Atlantic XLS PDF Table 16. East South Central

37

Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy's Commercial Building Initiative Page 1 Energy's Commercial Building Initiative Page 1 January 2009 Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology To clarify how the terms are used in the Department of Energy's Performance Metrics Research Project, a list of terms related to performance metrics are defined and include examples and comments. Visit www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/performance_metrics.html to learn more. Baseline - a standard reference case used as a basis for comparison Examples: a simulation model of an ASHRAE 90.1 compliant building, control building, measurement of energy consumption prior to application of an energy conservation measure Comments: Establishing a clearly defined baseline very important and is often the most difficult task. Defining a repeatable baseline is essential if the work is to be compared to results of other

38

Quotients of Metric Spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the properties of quotient spaces of metric spaces. We will use "iff" as an abbreviation for "if and only if". If f is a function from X onto Y, we will write f: X --->> Y....

Herman, Robert A.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

E2I EPRI Assessment Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E2I EPRI Assessment Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Report: E2I EPRI WP ­ 004 ­ US ­ Rev 1 #12;E2I EPRI Assessment - Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Table of Contents Introduction Assessment - Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Introduction E2I EPRI is leading a U.S. nationwide

40

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for all of the factors that go into energy demand (population, vehicle miles traveled per ... capita, vehicle efficiency) and land required for energy production (biomass land yields, biomass conversion

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

42

Profiling Retail Web Site Functionalities and Conversion Rates: A Cluster Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Web site's conversion rate (the proportion of visitors who complete a desired action) is an important competitive metric. Web retailers invest significant effort in managing functionalities that can attract and convert visitors. Retailers' decisions ... Keywords: Cluster Analysis, Conversion Rates, E-Commerce, Web Performance Metrics, Web Retailing, Web Site Functionalities

Anteneh Ayanso; Reena Yoogalingam

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Weighting and Bayes Nets for Rollup of Surveillance Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LANL IKE team proposes that the surveillance metrics for several data stream that are used to detect the same failure mode be weighted. Similarly, the failure mode metrics are weighted to obtain a subsystem metric. E.g., if there n data streams (nodes 1-n), the failure mode (node 0) metric is obtained as M{sub 0} = w{sub 1}M{sub 1} + {hor_ellipsis} + w{sub n}M{sub n}, where {Sigma}{sub i=1}{sup n} w{sub i} = 1. This proposal has been implemented with Bayes Nets using the Netica/IKE software by specifying an appropriate conditional probability table (CPT). This CPT is calculated using the same form as (1), where the data stream metrics for the true (T) and false (F) states are replaced by 1 and 0, respectively. Then using this CPT, the failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1). This result has two nice features. First, the rollup Bayes nets is doing can be easily explained. Second, because Bayes Nets can implement this rollup using Netica/IKE, then data marshalling (allocating next year's budget) can be studied. A proof that the claim 'failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1)' for n = 2 and n = 3 follows as well as the sketch of a proof by induction for general n.

Henson, Kriste [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

1992 CBECS Detailed Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables To download all 1992 detailed tables: Download Acrobat Reader for viewing PDF files. Yellow Arrow Buildings Characteristics Tables (PDF format) (70 tables, 230 pages, file size 1.39 MB) Yellow Arrow Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables (PDF format) (47 tables, 208 pages, file size 1.28 MB) Yellow Arrow Energy End-Use Tables (PDF format) (6 tables, 6 pages, file size 31.7 KB) Detailed tables for other years: Yellow Arrow 1999 CBECS Yellow Arrow 1995 CBECS Background information on detailed tables: Yellow Arrow Description of Detailed Tables and Categories of Data Yellow Arrow Statistical Significance of Data 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Detailed Tables Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables:

45

Table 25  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89 89 Table 25 Created on: 1/3/2014 3:10:33 PM Table 25. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days, New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic Month/Year/Type of data CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT NJ, NY, PA IL, IN, MI, OH, WI IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD DE, FL, GA, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA, WV November Normal 702 665 758 841 442 2012 751 738 772 748 527 2013 756 730 823 868 511 % Diff (normal to 2013) 7.7 9.8 8.6 3.2 15.6 % Diff (2012 to 2013) 0.7 -1.1 6.6 16.0 -3.0 November to November Normal 702 665 758 841 442 2012 751 738 772 748 527 2013 756 730 823 868 511 % Diff (normal to 2013) 7.7 9.8 8.6 3.2 15.6 % Diff (2012 to 2013) 0.7 -1.1 6.6 16.0 -3.0

46

chapter 5. Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Detailed Tables 5. Detailed Tables Chapter 5. Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) tables of per-vehicle statistics, such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model-year data or family-income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table.

47

Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for EM Corporate Performance Metrics Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics Quality Program Criteria Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics More Documents &...

48

Metrication of ASME Pressure Technology Codes and Standards: Status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is not universal agreement on metrication. Most agree that it is necessary--sometime, maybe for the next generation, but not now; some agree that it is eventually necessary, and even desirable, but that it is too early; some believe that it is too late, already. Currently, for many pressure technology code users, metrication is neither needed nor wanted; for some, the opposite is true. However, Society leadership indicates that such may not hold for the future, and it is unlikely that the rest of the world will decide to convert to the inch-pound system. Therefore, it seems logical to at least begin the metrication process, which will take years to complete. The first step is accomplished by providing a dual system for reference and familiarity, using the soft side of hard conversion. This leaves the inch-pound system essentially intact, while affording the opportunity for limited use of metric standards and time for true metric sizes and products to become part of PTCS. The eventual goal, is not being metric for the sake of being metric, but to be globally consistent for economic reasons, and to facilitate the movement towards a smaller number of standard sizes worldwide.

Hollinger, G.L. [Babcock and Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Notices TABLE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Federal Register 7 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 160 / Thursday, August 18, 2011 / Notices TABLE 2-NET BURDEN CHANGE-Continued 2011-2012 2012-2013 Change % Change Burden disposition Total Applicants .................................... 23,611,500 24,705,864 +1,094,364 +4.63 Net decrease in burden. The increase in applicants is offset by the results of the Department's simplification changes. This has created an over- all decrease in burden of 8.94% or 2,881,475 hours. Total Applicant Burden ......................... 32,239,328 29,357,853 ¥2,881,475 ¥8.94 Total Annual Responses ....................... 32,239,328 46,447,024 +14,207,696 +44.07 Cost for All Applicants .......................... $159,370.20 $234,804.24 $75,434.04 +47.33 The Department is proud that efforts to simplify the FAFSA submission

50

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Mean Annual Electricity Expenditures for Lighting, by Number of 4. Mean Annual Electricity Expenditures for Lighting, by Number of Household Members by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Dollars) Number of Rooms Number of Household Members All Households One to Three Four Five Six Seven Eight or More RSE Column Factors: 0.5 1.8 1.1 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.2 RSE Row Factors All Households................................... 83 49 63 76 87 104 124 2.34 One..................................................... 55 44 51 54 69 78 87 5.33 Two..................................................... 80 56 63 77 82 96 107 3.38 Three.................................................. 92 60 73 82 95 97 131 4.75 Four.................................................... 106 64 78 93 96 124 134 4.53 Five or More....................................... 112 70 83 98 99 117 150 5.89 Notes: -- To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the

51

Metric adjusted skew information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the concept of Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew information to something we call ``metric adjusted skew information'' (of a state with respect to a conserved observable). This ``skew information'' is intended to be a non-negative quantity bounded by the variance (of an observable in a state) that vanishes for observables commuting with the state. We show that the skew information is a convex function on the manifold of states. It also satisfies other requirements, proposed by Wigner and Yanase, for an effective measure-of-information content of a state relative to a conserved observable. We establish a connection between the geometrical formulation of quantum statistics as proposed by Chentsov and Morozova and measures of quantum information as introduced by Wigner and Yanase and extended in this article. We show that the set of normalized Morozova-Chentsov functions describing the possible quantum statistics is a Bauer simplex and determine its extreme points. We determine a particularly simple skew information, the ``lambda-skew information,'' parametrized by a lambda in (0,1], and show that the convex cone this family generates coincides with the set of all metric adjusted skew informations. Key words: Skew information, convexity, monotone metric, Morozova-Chentsov function, lambda-skew information.

Frank Hansen

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

1995 Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Detailed Tables 1995 Detailed Tables Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Summary Table—All Principal Buildings Activities (HTML Format) Background information on detailed tables: Description of Detailed Tables and Categories of Data Statistical Significance of Data

53

Degenerate Metric Phase Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of boundaries between degenerate and nondegenerate solutions of Ashtekar's canonical reformulation of Einstein's equations is studied. Several examples are given of such "phase boundaries" in which the metric is degenerate on one side of a null hypersurface and non-degenerate on the other side. These include portions of flat space, Schwarzschild, and plane wave solutions joined to degenerate regions. In the last case, the wave collides with a planar phase boundary and continues on with the same curvature but degenerate triad, while the phase boundary continues in the opposite direction. We conjecture that degenerate phase boundaries are always null.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Ted Jacobson

1999-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Property:OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metrics Metrics Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics Property Type Text Description Environmental aspects and performance metrics associated with the resource. Pages using the property "OpenEI/CETSI/Metrics" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A An Overview of Existing Wind Energy Ordinances + The objective of these communities is to facilitate and regulate the development of Wind Energy Conversion Systems. Animal Farm Powers Village + The plant will produce 350 kilowatts per hour, "enough to supply 175 homes with electricity). C City of Aspen Climate Action Plan + The Climate Action Plan calls for greenhouse gas reductions of 30 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050 from its 2004 baseline. Performance metrics are quantified by tons of CO2-e reduced. Based on a 2007 update to the baseline emissions inventory, the community achieved emissions reductions of 68,380 tons. The energy and environmental achievements as of the Plan's adoption in 2007 are outlined as updates within the Plan. To date, there has been no progress report on the Climate Action Plan per se, however the City's environmental achievements are described in the biennial Sustainability Report available at: http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Portals/0/docs/City/GreenInitiatives/enviro_sustainability_report_2008.pdf

55

RESEARCH ARTICLE Surface metrics: an alternative to patch metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Surface metrics: an alternative to patch metrics for the quantification Abstract Modern landscape ecology is based on the patch mosaic paradigm, in which landscapes are conceptualized and analyzed as mosaics of discrete patches. While this model has been widely success- ful

56

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2.921 inHg at 0 C Energy 1 J = 1 N·m = 107 ergs = 107 dyne·cm = 2.778?10-7 kW·h 1 J = 0.23901 cal = 0·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

Ashurst, W. Robert

57

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format. Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format. MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Errata - August 25, 2004 1 to117 - Complete set of of Supplemental Tables PDF Table 1. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (New England) XLS PDF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Middle Atlantic) XLS PDF Table 3. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East North Central) XLS PDF Table 4. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West North Central) XLS PDF Table 5. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (South Atlantic) XLS PDF Table 6. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East South Central) XLS PDF Table 7. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West South Central) XLS PDF Table 8. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Mountain)

58

1999 CBECS Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. A table of Relative Standard Errors (RSEs) is included as a worksheet tab in each Excel tables. Complete sets of RSE tables are also available in .pdf format. (What is an RSE?) Preliminary End-Use Consumption Estimates for 1999 | Description of 1999 Detailed Tables and Categories of Data

59

VOC Exposure Metrics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 VOC Exposure Metrics ... and "Sick Building Syndrome" Figure1: The elevated odds ratios (above unity) in this figure suggest that exposures to VOCs from water-based points and solvents are associated with a variety of sick building symptions (* indicates the OR is significant at p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01). The indoors is often regarded as safe haven from problems associated with outdoor air pollution, but a growing number of reports have suggested that exposures in indoor environments may lead to health problems. One area in which evidence has been accumulating is the relationship between working in office buildings (as opposed to industrial exposure conditions) and a variety of health effects, such as eye, nose, and throat irritation and

60

Contraction semigroups on metric graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of the present work is to study contraction semigroups generated by Laplace operators on metric graphs, which are not necessarily self-adjoint. We prove criteria for such semigroups to be continuity and positivity preserving. Also we provide a characterization of generators of Feller semigroups on metric graphs.

Vadim Kostrykin; Jurgen Potthoff; Robert Schrader

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 24. Refining Industry Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- Corrections to Tables 24 to 32 - Corrections to Tables 24 to 32 Table 24. Refining Industry Energy Consumption 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2002- 2025 Carbon Dioxide Emissions 4/ (million metric tons) 190.4 185.7 188.0 191.3 207.3 215.6 220.0 222.8 225.1 226.3 228.0 230.7 234.1 237.5 238.5 239.4 239.4 238.6 240.6 240.5 242.2 244.2 245.9 246.3 246.6 1.2% Table 25. Food Industry Energy Consumption 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2002- 2025 Carbon Dioxide Emissions 3/ (million metric tons) 87.8 89.4 87.5 87.8 89.2 90.2 90.9 91.4 92.2 93.5 94.5 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.6 99.6 100.8 101.9 102.9 104.1 105.4 107.0 108.7 110.3 112.1 1.0% Table 26. Paper Industry Energy Consumption 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

62

Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the standard conversion factors at Annex 1. If, however, you export energy or heat to another business (or2007 Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007 results #12;Annex 1 - Fuel Conversion Factors Last updated: Jun-07 Table 1 Fuel Type Amount used per year

63

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 22, 2000 (Next Release: December, 2001) Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Assumptions to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference Contacts Forecast Homepage EIA Homepage AEO Supplement Reference Case Forecast (1999-2020) (HTML) Table 1. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (New England) Table 2. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Middle Atlantic) Table 3. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East North Central) Table 4. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West North Central) Table 5. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (South Atlantic) Table 6. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (East South Central) Table 7. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (West South Central) Table 8. Energy Consumption by Source and Sector (Mountain)

64

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Table | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Technologies Awards Table Vehicle Technologies Awards Table Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Table The table contains a listing of the applicants, their locations, the amounts of the awards, and description of each project. The sub-categories of the table include: Advanced fuels and lubricants Light-weighting materials Demonstration Project for a Multi-Material Light-Weight Prototype Vehicle Advanced cells and design technology for electric drive batteries Advanced power electronics and electric motor technology Solid State Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Devices Fleet Efficiency Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation Microsoft Word - VTP $175 Advanced Vehicle Tech project descriptions draft v5 8-2-11 More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards advanced vehicle technologies awards table

65

FY 2005 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) Table of Contents Summary...................................................................................................... 1 Mandatory Funding....................................................................................... 3 Energy Supply.............................................................................................. 4 Non-Defense site acceleration completion................................................... 6 Uranium enrichment D&D fund.................................................................... 6 Non-Defense environmental services.......................................................... 6 Science.........................................................................................................

66

Quality metrics for intranet applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the number of intranet application increases, software developers face a new software paradigm and possibly a new set of quality requirement. The work discussed here attempts to identify practical software metrics for intranet applications. The six software quality characteristics and 32 quality sub-characteristics of the Extended ISO model are used as a basis to identify the key quality characteristics of intranet applications. From the results of a user survey, three key quality characteristics are identified; they are reliability, functionality, and efficiency. Five sub-characteristics (availability, accuracy, security, suitability and time behaviour) are found to be the key attributes of intranet applications. Finally, a set of three metrics is developed. In order to verify their validity and applicability to intranet projects, an experiment was performed by computing these metrics in five intranet applications. The metric values were then compared with the results from a user satisfaction survey. The metric values and the survey results were closely correlated; a larger score in software metrics leads to a higher user satisfaction score. It is very likely that these software metrics can effectively reflect the quality of an intranet application.

Hareton K.N. Leung

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance Metrics Performance Metrics Tiers to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Performance Metrics Tiers on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software

68

Moisture Metrics Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.

Schuchmann, Mark

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Microsoft Word - Data Center Metrics Task Force Recommendations V2 5-17-2011.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recommendations for Measuring and Reporting Overall Data Center Efficiency Version 2 - Measuring PUE for Data Centers 17 May 2011 Table of Contents 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Purpose - Recommendations for Measuring and Publishing PUE at All Data Centers ... 1 1.2 Background - Guiding Principles for Data Center Efficiency Metrics ................................ 1 1.3 Scope of Recommendations ....................................................................................................... 2 2 Definitions ............................................................................................................................................... 2

70

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1999 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2002, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2002 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seven tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2002 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2000-2002 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current

71

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Supplement Tables to the AEO2001 The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1999 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2001, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2001 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-five tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2001 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 1999 and 2000 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

72

Segmental alternations and metrical theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on phonological alternations that are influenced or constrained by word-internal prosody, i.e. prominence and foot structure, and what these alternations can tell us about metrical theory. Detailed ...

Vaysman, Olga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

List of SEP Reporting Metrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE State Energy Program List of Reporting Metrics, which was produced by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program for SEP and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) programs.

74

Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Ass  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 1998 August 1998 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Related National Environmental Policy Act Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.0 PROPOSED PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION DEMONSTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.0 NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.1 History and Current Mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory

75

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1998 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2000, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2000 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-six tables are presented. AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1998 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2000, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2000 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-six tables are presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO200 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 1998, and 2000 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, Fourth Quarter 1999 or Short Term Energy Outlook, First Quarter 2000, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

76

FY 2005 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Congressional Budget Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropria ted as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress.

77

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 EIA Glossary Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Release date: February 2005 Next release date: February 2006 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2003 to 2025. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2005, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2005 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seventeen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2005 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2003-2005 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

78

Horizon thermodynamics and composite metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the conditions under which the thermodynamic behaviour of gravity can be explained within an emergent gravity scenario, where the metric is defined as a composite operator. We show that due to the availability of a boundary of a boundary principle for the quantum effective action, Clausius-like relations can always be constructed. Hence, any true explanation of the thermodynamic nature of the metric tensor has to be referred to an equilibration process, associated to the presence of an H-theorem, possibly driven by decoherence induced by the pregeometric degrees of freedom, and their entanglement with the geometric ones.

Lorenzo Sindoni

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

BETO Conversion Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2AConversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing BETO Conversion Program Bryna Berendzen, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

80

Photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper the progress in the field of solar energy conversion for the production of electricity and storable ... critically analyzed in view of their stability and conversion efficiency. A number of factors

Rdiger Memming

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER NanoEngineering Group Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Gang Chen, 1 Daniel Kraemer, 1 Bed Poudel, 2 Hsien-Ping Feng, 1 J....

82

Beyond Language Independent Object-Oriented Metrics: Model Independent Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@iam.unibe.ch Software Composition Group Universit´a di Berna, Svizzera St´ephane Ducasse ducasse@iam.unibe.ch Software Composition Group Universit´e de Berne, Suisse ABSTRACT Software Metrics have become essential in software engi- neering for several reasons, among which quality assessment and reengineering. In the context

Ducasse, Stéphane

83

Louisiana Block Grant Tables | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Louisiana Block Grant Tables Louisiana Block Grant Tables This table details funding for state, city, and county governments in the state of Louisiana. Louisiana Block Grant Tables...

84

Mississippi Block Grant Tables | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mississippi Block Grant Tables Mississippi Block Grant Tables A table describing where state funding is being distributed Mississippi Block Grant Tables More Documents &...

85

2003 CBECS RSE Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003rsetables_files/plainlink.css" cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003rsetables_files/plainlink.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet> Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > RSE Tables 2003 CBECS Relative Standard Error (RSE) Tables Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100. (More information on RSEs)

86

Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Common Carbon Metric Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Common Carbon Metric Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/Common-Carbon-Metric-for_Pilot_Testing_220410.p Common Carbon Metric Screenshot References: Common Carbon Metrics [1] "This paper is offered by the United Nations Environment Programme's Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative (UNEP-SBCI), a partnership between the UN and public and private stakeholders in the building sector, promoting sustainable building practices globally. The purpose of this

87

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a novel method of solar energy conversion that can lead tofundamentals of plasmonic energy conversion are reviewed in3. Plasmonic energy conversion fundamentals Surface plasmons

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE/EIS-0225-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components (October 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

i i Table of Contents List of Figures ...............................................................................................................................................ii List of Tables ................................................................................................................................................ii List of Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii Metric Conversion Chart..............................................................................................................................iv Chapter 1 Introduction .........................................................................................................................

89

Why is the metric invertible?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We raise, and provide an (unsatisfactory) answer to, the title's question: why, unlike all other fields, does the gravitational "metric" variable not have zero vacuum? After formulating, without begging it, we exhibit additions to the conventional action that express existence of the inverse through a field equation.

S. Deser

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lorentzian Metrics from Characteristic Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following issue is raised and discussed; when do families of foliations by hypersurfaces on a given four dimensional manifold become the null surfaces of some unknown, but to be determined, metric $g_{ab}(x)$? It follows from these results that one can use these surfaces as fundamental variables for GR.

Simonetta Frittelli; Carlos Kozameh; Ted Newman

1995-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Use Tables Buildings Use Tables (24 pages, 129 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 12. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 13. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1995 Table 14. Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 15. Weekly Operating Hours, Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 17. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the

93

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A micro definition of sprawl involving land-use patterns, development and land conversion, identify and map prime agricultural land, land preservation and property rights, a...

94

ARM - Instrument Location Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsLocation Table govInstrumentsLocation Table Instruments Location Table Contacts Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument Locations Site abbreviations explained in the key. Instrument Name Abbreviation NSA SGP TWP AMF C1 C2 EF BF CF EF IF C1 C2 C3 EF IF Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor ACSM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AERI Aethalometer AETH Ameriflux Measurement Component AMC Aerosol Observing System AOS Meteorological Measurements associated with the Aerosol Observing System AOSMET Broadband Radiometer Station BRS

95

EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corporate QA Performance Metrics EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics Quality Program Criteria Summary EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics More Documents & Publications QA Corporate...

96

METRIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF SPHERICAL AND EUCLIDEAN BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDINGS Ruth Charney and Alexander Lytchak 0 of spaces satisfying CAT-inequalities are spherical and Euclidean buildings which come equipped with a natural piecewise spherical or Euclidean metric. Buildings also satisfy other nice metric properties

Charney, Ruth

97

Technical Workshop: Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Metrics J. Mark Drexel Presentation: Risk Assessment for Storm Hardening Anders Johnson Presentation: Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency Christina Sames Presentation:...

98

FY 2009 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper State Index Page Number FY 2009 Congressional Budget 1/30/2008 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 9:01:45AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2007 Appropriation FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Request State Table 1 1 $27,588

99

FY 2005 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Management, Budget Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Preliminary Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number

100

FY 2010 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper State Index Page Number FY 2010 Congressional Budget 5/4/2009 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 2:13:22PM Page 1 of 2 FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Appropriation FY 2010 Request State Table 1 1 $46,946 $48,781 $38,844 Alabama 2 $6,569

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supplement Tables - Supplemental Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage supplemental.gif (7420 bytes) (Errata as of 9/13/99) The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 1997 to 2020. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO99, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO99 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of ninety-five tables are presented.

102

FY 2006 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 State Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number FY 2006 Congressional Budget 1/27/2005 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 3:32:58PM Page 1 of 2 FY 2004 Comp/Approp FY 2005 Comp/Approp FY 2006 Request State Table

103

FY 2010 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2010 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 2:08:56PM Department Of Energy 5/4/2009 Page Number FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Appropriation FY 2010 Request Laboratory Table 1 1 $1,200

104

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOEIG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ......

105

FY 2008 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Table State Table Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Table Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number FY 2008 Congressional Budget 2/1/2007 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 6:53:08AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request State Table 1 1 $28,332 $30,341

106

METRIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF SPHERICAL AND EUCLIDEAN BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METRIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF SPHERICAL AND EUCLIDEAN BUILDINGS Ruth Charney and Alexander Lytchak 0-inequalities are spherical and Euclidean buildings which come equipped with a natural piecewise spherical or Euclidean metric. Buildings also satisfy other nice metric properties. A spherical building X, for example, is easily seen

Charney, Ruth

107

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

81 81 Table B2. Thermal Conversion Factors and Data, 2004-2008 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed...................................................... R 1,104 R 1,104 1,103 1,104 1,100 Extraction Loss ............................................ 2,666 2,660 2,639 2,648 2,643 Total Dry Production.................................. R 1,026 R 1,028 1,028 1,029 1,027 Supply Dry Production ............................................. R 1,026 R 1,028 1,028 1,029 1,027 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports....................................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts ....................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage.................................

108

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

81 81 Table B2. Thermal Conversion Factors and Data, 2005-2009 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed...................................................... 1,104 1,103 1,104 1,100 1,101 Extraction Loss ............................................ 2,660 2,639 2,648 2,643 2,627 Total Dry Production.................................. 1,028 1,028 1,029 1,027 1,025 Supply Dry Production ............................................. 1,028 1,028 1,029 1,027 1,025 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports....................................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts ....................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage.................................

109

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table B2. Thermal Conversion Factors and Data, 2006-2010 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed...................................................... 1,103 R 1,102 1,100 1,101 1,097 Extraction Loss ............................................ 2,639 2,648 2,643 2,627 2,590 Total Dry Production.................................. 1,028 R 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 Supply Dry Production ............................................. 1,028 R 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports....................................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts ....................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage.................................

110

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

81 81 Table B2. Thermal Conversion Factors and Data, 2003-2007 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed...................................................... 1,106 1,105 1,105 1,103 1,104 Extraction Loss ............................................ 2,747 2,666 2,660 2,639 2,648 Total Dry Production.................................. 1,031 1,027 1,029 1,028 1,029 Supply Dry Production ............................................. 1,031 1,027 1,029 1,028 1,029 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports....................................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts ....................................... 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage.................................

111

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table B2. Thermal Conversion Factors and Data, 2002-2006 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed...................................................... 1,106 1,106 1,105 R 1,105 1,103 Extraction Loss ............................................ 2,671 2,747 2,666 2,660 2,639 Total Dry Production.................................. 1,027 1,031 1,027 1,029 1,028 Supply Dry Production ............................................. 1,027 1,031 1,027 1,029 1,028 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports....................................................... 1,022 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts ....................................... 1,022 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage.................................

112

Multi-Metric Sustainability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A readily accessible framework that allows for evaluating impacts and comparing tradeoffs among factors in energy policy, expansion planning, and investment decision making is lacking. Recognizing this, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) funded an exploration of multi-metric sustainability analysis (MMSA) to provide energy decision makers with a means to make more comprehensive comparisons of energy technologies. The resulting MMSA tool lets decision makers simultaneously compare technologies and potential deployment locations.

Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.; Macknick, J.; Mann, M.; Pless, J.; Munoz, D.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Processing and Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The strategic goal of Conversion Research and Development (R&D) is to develop technologies for converting feedstocks into commercially viable liquid transportation fuels, as well as bioproducts...

114

Algae Harvest Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolution of many workshops on algae harvest energy conversion is that low productivity, high capital intensity ... and maintenance, respiration, and photoinhibition are few factors militating against viability ...

Yung-Tse Hung Ph.D.; P.E.; DEE; O. Sarafadeen Amuda Ph.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Januaryas it occurs in modern photosynthesis can only take place inof the problem or photosynthesis, or any specific aspect of

Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Notation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS xxv NOTATION The following is a list of acronyms and abbreviations, chemical names, and units of measure used in this document. Some acronyms used only in tables may be defined only in those tables. GENERAL ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AEA Atomic Energy Act of 1954 AEC U.S. Atomic Energy Commission AIHA American Industrial Hygiene Association ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ANL Argonne National Laboratory ANP Advanced Nuclear Power (Framatone ANP, Inc.) ANSI American National Standards Institute AQCR Air Quality Control Region BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics CAA Clean Air Act CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 CFR Code of Federal Regulations CRMP cultural resource management plan

117

Performance Metrics Tiers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Metrics Tiers Performance Metrics Tiers Performance Metrics Tiers The performance metrics defined by the Commercial Buildings Integration Program offer different tiers of information to address the needs of various users. On this page you will find information about the various goals users are trying to achieve by using performance metrics and the tiers of metrics. Goals in Measuring Performance Many individuals and groups are involved with a building over its lifetime, and all have different interests in and requirements for the building. Although these interests differ, the value in using metrics reflects a small number of driving factors: Controlling energy costs and energy consumption Minimizing environmental impacts Enhancing the image through marketing Improving load forecasting, energy management, and reliability.

118

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Frank Zimmermann #12;Solar Electricity Generation Consumes no fuel Make solar cells more efficient Theoretical energy conversion efficiency limit of single junction-bandgap photons are not absorbed: Carrier relaxation to band edges: Photon energy exceeding bandgap is lost

Glashausser, Charles

119

FY 2011 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0054 March 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0054 State Index Page Number FY 2011 Congressional Budget 1/29/2010 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 6:34:40AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2009 Appropriation

120

FY 2007 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory tables Laboratory tables preliminary Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory tables preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2007 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 12:10:40PM Department Of Energy 1/31/2006 Page Number FY 2005 Appropriation FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FY 2011 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0055 March 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0055 Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2011 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 6:24:57AM Department Of Energy 1/29/2010 Page

122

FY 2008 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Table Laboratory Table Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Laboratory Table Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2008 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 6:51:02AM Department Of Energy 2/1/2007 Page Number FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request

123

FY 2006 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2006 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 3:43:16PM Department Of Energy 1/27/2005 Page Number FY 2004 Comp/Approp FY 2005 Comp/Approp

124

Fy 2009 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2009 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 8:59:25AM Department Of Energy 1/30/2008 Page Number FY 2007 Appropriation FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009

125

FY 2013 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Current Enacted Congressional Approp. Approp. * Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy........................................ 1,771,721 1,809,638 2,337,000 +527,362 +29.1% Electricity delivery and energy reliability......................................... 138,170 139,103 143,015 +3,912 +2.8% Nuclear energy................................................................................ 717,817 765,391 770,445 +5,054 +0.7% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology.................................................................. -16,500 -- --

126

FY 2009 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 Current Current Congressional Op. Plan Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy.......................... -- 1,722,407 1,255,393 -467,014 -27.1% Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................... -- 138,556 134,000 -4,556 -3.3% Nuclear energy................................................................. -- 961,665 853,644 -108,021 -11.2% Legacy management........................................................ -- 33,872 -- -33,872 -100.0% Energy supply and conservation Operation and maintenance..........................................

127

Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the penetration of variable generation (wind and solar) increases around the world, there is an accompanying growing interest and importance in accurately assessing the contribution that these resources can make toward planning reserve. This contribution, also known as the capacity credit or capacity value of the resource, is best quantified by using a probabilistic measure of overall resource adequacy. In recognizing the variable nature of these renewable resources, there has been interest in exploring the use of reliability metrics other than loss of load expectation. In this paper, we undertake some comparisons using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council in the western United States.

Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Table of Contents Page i Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table of Contents Page i Table of Contents 4. Building HVAC Requirements ....................................................................................1 4.1.2 What's New for the 2013 Standards.............................................................................................3 4.1.4 California Appliance Standards and Equipment Certification

129

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: October 6, 2014 FY 2016 September 2014 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

131

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/2011 /2011 Decades of Discovery Decades of Discovery Page 2 6/1/2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 6 2 BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES .................................................................................................. 7 2.1 Adenosine Triphosphate: The Energy Currency of Life .............................................. 7 2.2 Making Better Catalysts .............................................................................................. 8 2.3 Understanding Chemical Reactions............................................................................ 9 2.4 New Types of Superconductors ................................................................................ 10

132

Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity is discussed. I introduce a generalized approximate metric element, inclusive of both post-post-Newtonian contributions and a gravitomagnetic field. Following Fermats principle and standard hypotheses, I derive the time delay function and deflection angle caused by an isolated mass distribution. Several astrophysical systems are considered. In most of the cases, the gravitomagnetic correction offers the best perspectives for an observational detection. Actual measurements distinguish only marginally different metric theories from each other.

Mauro Sereno

2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jones and w.s. Fong, Biomass Conversion of Biomass to Fuels11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII RonaldLBL-11902 Biomass Energy Conversion in Hawaii Ronald 1.

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1991. The Potential for Electricity Efficiency Improvementswww.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html>. FigureA STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS Jonathan Koomey*,

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

136

Avatar augmented online conversation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important roles played by technology is connecting people and mediating their communication with one another. Building technology that mediates conversation presents a number of challenging research and ...

Vilhjlmsson, Hannes Hgni

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RIS? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RIS?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

139

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of applications, notably energy conversion. As researchnanowires for energy conversion. Chemical Reviews, 2010.Implications for solar energy conversion. Physical Review

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conversion Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

document the conversion plan that clearly defines the system or project's conversion procedures; outlines the installation of new and converted filesdatabases; coordinates the...

142

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar energy into electricity in photovoltaic cells orsolar energy conversion aimed at photovoltaic applicationsenergy conversion, opening a new venue for photovoltaic and

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carriers allows maintaining the energy conversionenergy conversion 8 Timescale of charge separation, carrierin this energy conversion method, i.e. carrier regeneration

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

FY 2006 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 Comparable Comparable Request to FY 2006 vs. FY 2005 Approp Approp Congress Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply Operation and maintenance................................................. 787,941 909,903 862,499 -47,404 -5.2% Construction......................................................................... 6,956 22,416 40,175 17,759 +79.2% Total, Energy supply................................................................ 794,897 932,319 902,674 -29,645 -3.2% Non-Defense site acceleration completion............................. 167,272 157,316 172,400 15,084 +9.6%

145

FY 2013 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables y Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0078 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables P li i Preliminary h b d i d i hi d h l l f b d h i f h The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2013 Congressional Budget

146

FY 2010 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2009 FY 2010 Current Current Current Congressional Approp. Approp. Recovery Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy....................................... 1,704,112 2,178,540 16,800,000 2,318,602 +140,062 +6.4% Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................................ 136,170 137,000 4,500,000 208,008 +71,008 +51.8% Nuclear energy.............................................................................. 960,903 792,000 -- 761,274 -30,726 -3.9% Legacy management..................................................................... 33,872 -- -- --

147

FY 2012 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0066 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request State Tables P li i Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Printed with soy ink on recycled

148

FY 2012 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Statistical Table by Appropriation 2Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2011 FY 2012 Current Congressional Annualized Congressional Approp. Request CR Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy efficiency and renewable energy....................................... 2,216,392 2,355,473 2,242,500 3,200,053 +983,661 +44.4% Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................................ 168,484 185,930 171,982 237,717 +69,233 +41.1% Nuclear energy............................................................................. 774,578 824,052 786,637 754,028 -20,550 -2.7% Fossil energy programs Fossil energy research and development................................... 659,770 586,583 672,383 452,975

149

FY 2007 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 Current Current Congressional Approp. Approp. Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply and conservation Operation and maintenance............................................ 1,779,399 1,791,372 1,917,331 +125,959 +7.0% Construction................................................................... 22,416 21,255 6,030 -15,225 -71.6% Total, Energy supply and conservation.............................. 1,801,815 1,812,627 1,923,361 +110,734 +6.1% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology..................................................... -160,000 -20,000 -- +20,000 +100.0% Fossil energy research and development.......................

150

FY 2012 Laboratory Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables y Preliminary February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer DOE/CF-0065 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables P li i Preliminary h b d i d i hi d h l l f b d h i f h The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2012 Congressional Budget

151

FY 2008 Statistical Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statistical Table by Appropriation Statistical Table by Appropriation (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 Current Congressional Congressional Approp. Request Request $ % Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply and conservation Operation and maintenance........................................... 1,781,242 1,917,331 2,187,943 +270,612 +14.1% Construction.................................................................... 31,155 6,030 -- -6,030 -100.0% Total, Energy supply and conservation............................. 1,812,397 1,923,361 2,187,943 +264,582 +13.8% Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology.................................................... -20,000 -- -58,000 -58,000 N/A Fossil energy research and development......................

152

EXTREMAL METRIC FOR THE FIRST EIGENVALUE ON A KLEIN BOTTLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXTREMAL METRIC FOR THE FIRST EIGENVALUE ON A KLEIN BOTTLE DMITRY JAKOBSON, NIKOLAI NADIRASHVILI extremal metrics. The only known extremal metrics are a round sphere, a standard projective plane, a Clifford torus and an equilateral torus. We construct an extremal metric on a Klein bottle. It is a metric

Leclercq, Remi

153

EXTREMAL METRIC FOR THE FIRST EIGENVALUE ON A KLEIN BOTTLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXTREMAL METRIC FOR THE FIRST EIGENVALUE ON A KLEIN BOTTLE DMITRY JAKOBSON, NIKOLAI NADIRASHVILI extremal metrics. The only known extremal metrics are a round sphere, a standard projective plane, a Cli#11;ord torus and an equilateral torus. We construct an extremal metric on a Klein bottle. It is a metric

Jakobson, Dmitry

154

Channel Coding Diversity with Mismatched Decoding Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Channel Coding Diversity with Mismatched Decoding Metrics Trung Thanh Nguyen, Student Member diversity with general decoding metrics in terms of the gener- alized mutual information (GMI). We show of weather-induced fading scenarios where the quality of a single (either FSO or RF) channel could

Lampe, Lutz

155

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS OF SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES October 5, 2010 i Table of Contents I. Introduction and Executive Summary.......................................................... 1 a. Overview of Smart Grid Benefits and Communications Needs................. 2 b. Summary of Recommendations .................................................................... 5 II. Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives ................................................ 7 a. DOE Request for Information ....................................................................... 7 b. Other Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives .................................... 9 III. Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Applications .................. 11 a. Advanced Metering Infrastructure ............................................................12

156

Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grids capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Geographic Location Tables Geographic Location Tables (24 pages, 136kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1995 Table 6. Climate Zone, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 7. Metropolitan Status, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

158

2003 CBECS Detailed Tables: Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003 Detailed Tables 2003 Detailed Tables 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables most recent available Released: September 2008 Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures | End-Use Consumption In the 2003 CBECS, the survey procedures for strip shopping centers and enclosed malls ("mall buildings") were changed from those used in previous surveys, and, as a result, mall buildings are now excluded from most of the 2003 CBECS tables. Therefore, some data in the majority of the tables are not directly comparable with previous CBECS tables, all of which included mall buildings. Some numbers in the 2003 tables will be slightly lower than earlier surveys since the 2003 figures do not include mall buildings. See "Change in Data Collection Procedures for Malls" for a more detailed explanation.

159

The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is probably better than having no value at all. A summary of the complete ECF and DCF values are given in Table 2.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Response to Documents and References  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Responses to Comments and References  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

162

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Dataset Summary Description Monthly electricity generation figures (and the fuel consumed to produce it). Source information available at EIA. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated July 20th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords consumption EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon generation_state_mon.xls (xls, 32.5 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon consumption_state_mon.xls (xls, 14.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

165

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 3. (2) Steam turbine efficiency for average existingdistillate oil steam turbine efficiencies so we assume theseturbine, gas turbine, and combined cycle efficiencies for

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing coal = 1.0 Gas turbine Distillateoil Gas turbine Natural gas Combined cycle Distillate oilTable 1. (3) Steam turbine, gas turbine, and combined cycle

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NT0005638 NT0005638 Cruise Report 1-19 July 2009 HYFLUX Sea Truth Cruise Northern Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Dr. Corpus Christi, TX 78412 Principal Authors: Ian R. MacDonald and Thomas Naehr Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 30, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy HYFLUX Seatruth Cruise Report -1- Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi Table of Contents Summary ............................................................................................................................. 2 Participating Organizations ................................................................................................. 3 Major Equipment ................................................................................................................ 4

168

State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History The mission of the State Energy Program (SEP) is to provide leadership to maximize...

169

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 2. Total Energy Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 5. Total Coal Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 6. Total Electricity Sales, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 7. Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 8. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 9. Coal Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 12. Net Coal Exports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 13. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 15. Coal Prices to Electric Utilities, Actual vs. Forecasts

170

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Download Adobe Acrobat Reader Printer friendly version on our site are provided in Adobe Acrobat Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Actual vs. Forecasts Formats Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF Table 12. World Oil Prices Excel, PDF Table 13. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices

171

Help:Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tables Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tables may be authored in wiki pages using either XHTML table elements directly, or using wikicode formatting to define the table. XHTML table elements and their use are well described on various web pages and will not be discussed here. The benefit of wikicode is that the table is constructed of character symbols which tend to make it easier to perceive the table structure in the article editing view compared to XHTML table elements. As a general rule, it is best to avoid using a table unless you need one. Table markup often complicates page editing. Contents 1 Wiki table markup summary 2 Basics 2.1 Table headers 2.2 Caption 3 XHTML attributes 3.1 Attributes on tables 3.2 Attributes on cells 3.3 Attributes on rows 3.4 HTML colspan and rowspan

172

Energy Conversion to Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Energy Conversion to Electricity D. Clark...continuing growth in the demand for energy, and of electricity as the route...the electricity share of the total energy market and of the substitution of electricity...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Solar Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity fuel and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology materials and especially nanoscience.

George W. Crabtree; Nathan S. Lewis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

175

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Tables Conservation Tables (16 pages, 86 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 41. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 42. Building Shell Conservation Features, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 43. Building Shell Conservation Features, Floorspace, 1995 Table 44. Reduction in Equipment Use During Off Hours, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

176

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structure Tables Structure Tables (16 pages, 93 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 8. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 9. Building Size, Floorspace, 1995 Table 10. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 11. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. The 1995 data are available for the four Census

177

Solar energy conversion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces an equally rich future, with nanoscience enabling the discovery of the guiding principles of photonic energy conversion and their use in the development of cost-competitive new technologies.

Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S. (Materials Science Division); (California Inst. of Tech.)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Table 4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Report Name Sector Reduction Type Project Level Entity Level A&N Electric Cooperative Electric Providers Indirect 6,243 AES Hawaii, Inc. Electric Providers Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 AES SeaWest, Inc. Electric Providers Direct 16 Indirect 220,420 AES Shady Point, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 AES Thames, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 410,000 410,000 AES Warrior Run, LLC Electric Providers Direct 41,386 41,386 Alabama Biomass Partners, Ltd Alternative Energy Unspecified (EZ) 77,012 Alcan Primary Products Corporation, Sebree Works Industrial Direct 457,800 457,800 Algonquin Power - Cambrian Pacific Genco LLC Alternative Energy

179

CARINA Data Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cruise Summary Table and Data Cruise Summary Table and Data Users are requested to report any data or metadata errors in the CARINA cruise files to CDIAC. Parameter units in all CARINA data files are in CCHDO exchange format. No Cruise Namea (Alias) Areab Number of Stations Datec Ship Chief Scientist Carbon PI Oxygen Nutrients TCO2d TALK pCO2e pHf CFC Other Measurements Data Files 1 06AQ19920929g (06ANTX_6) (See map) 2 118 9/29-11/30/1992 Polarstern V. Smetacek M. Stoll, J. Rommets, H. De Baar, D. Bakker 62 114h 53 54i U C 0 Choloroa,b Fluorescence, NH4 Data Files (Metadata) 2 06AQ19930806 (06ARKIX_4) (See map) 4 64 8/6-10/5/1993 Polarstern D.K. Fütterer L. Anderson 64 63 63j, bb 0 0 0 59he 3H, 3He, 18O, 14C, 85Kr, Bak Data Files

180

Supplement Tables - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplement Tables to the AEO99 Supplement Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage furtherinfo.gif (5474 bytes) The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441), Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; or Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Appendix B: Summary Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman Appendix B: Summary Tables Table B1. The BCES and alternative cases compared to the Reference case, 2025 2009 2025 Ref Ref BCES All Clean Partial Credit Revised Baseline Small Utilities Credit Cap 2.1 Credit Cap 3.0 Stnds + Cds Generation (billion kilowatthours) Coal 1,772 2,049 1,431 1,305 1,387 1,180 1,767 1,714 1,571 1,358 Petroleum 41 45 43 44 44 44 45 45 45 43 Natural Gas 931 1,002 1,341 1,342 1,269 1,486 1,164 1,193 1,243 1,314 Nuclear 799 871 859 906 942 889 878 857 843 826 Conventional Hydropower 274 306 322 319 300 321 316 298 312 322 Geothermal 15 25 28 25 31 24 27 22 23 24 Municipal Waste 18 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 Wood and Other Biomass 38 162 303 289 295 301 241 266

182

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page 1 Page 1 Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Global Taskforce Reaches Agreement on Measurement Protocols for PUE - Continues Discussion of Additional Energy Efficiency Metrics February 28th, 2011 The data center has become an increasingly important part of most business operations in the twenty-first century. With escalating demand and rising energy prices, it is essential for the owners and operators of these mission critical facilities to assess and improve their performance with energy efficiency metrics. However, even with the global presence of many companies, these metrics are often not applied consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders has been meeting regularly to agree

183

Geodesic completeness of diagonal $G_2$ metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk a sufficient condition for a diagonal orthogonally transitive cylindrical $G_2$ metric to be geodesically complete is given. The condition is weak enough to comprise all known diagonal perfect fluid cosmological models that are non-singular.

L. Fernndez-Jambrina

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spatial Error Metrics for Oceanographic Model Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A common problem with modern numerical oceanographic models is spatial displacement, including misplacement and misshapenness of ocean circulation features. Traditional error metrics, such as least squares methods, are ineffective in many such ...

Sean B. Ziegeler; James D. Dykes; Jay F. Shriver

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CS 537: Software Metrics Students will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements. Demonstrate the knowledge of software metrics. Demonstrate the knowledge of using software the knowledge of statistical analysis in software measurement. Demonstrate the knowledge of developing and calibrating predication systems. Demonstrate the knowledge of developing and maintaining a measurement program

Heller, Barbara

186

Microsoft Word - QER Resilience Metrics - Technical Workshp ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on developing a long-term roadmap on resilience metrics for electric power, gas, and oil infrastructure and their proposed uses. Location The session will be held on be held...

187

Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

Johnson, C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Generalization Of The Gross-Perry Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A class of SO(n+1) symmetric solutions of the (N+n+1)-dimensional Einstein equations is found. It contains 5-dimensional metrics of Gross and Perry and Millward.

M. Jakimowicz; J. Tafel

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

Physical metric and the nature of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A physical metric is defined as one which gives a measurable speed of light throughout the whole space time continuum. It will be shown that a metric which satisfies the condition that speed of light on the spherical direction is that in a vacuum gives a correct result. All the metric functions thus obtained are positive definite and exhibits a repulsive force at short distances. The horizon in the sense of vanishing of the speed of light still exists in the radial direction. It is located at 2.60 times of the Schwarzschild radius. This radius corresponds to the size of a black hole, as well as the photon sphere radius. The metric can be used to calculate general relativistic predictions in higher order for any process.

Yukio Tomozawa

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Physical metric and the nature of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A physical metric is defined as one which gives a measurable speed of light throughout the whole space time continuum. It will be shown that a metric which satisfies the condition that speed of light on the spherical direction is that in a vacuum gives a correct result. All the metric functions thus obtained are positive definite and exhibits a repulsive force at short distances. The horizon in the sense of vanishing of the speed of light still exists in the radial direction. It is located at 2.60 times of the Schwarzschild radius. This radius corresponds to the size of a black hole, as well as the photon sphere radius. The metric can be used to calculate general relativistic predictions in higher order for any process.

Tomozawa, Yukio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microsoft Word - table_B2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table B2. Thermal conversion factors and data, 2007-2011 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed 1,102 1,100 1,101 R 1,098 1,094 Extraction Loss 2,648 2,643 2,627 R 2,598 2,550 Total Dry Production 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,022 Supply Dry Production 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,022 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Intransit Receipts 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 1,025 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,022 LNG Storage 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,022 Supplemental Gas Supplies 1,027 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,022 Balancing Item 1,093 548 1,272 R 793 1,163 Total Supply NA NA NA NA NA

192

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

193

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Session: Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microsoft Word - table_87  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 6. Natural gas processed, liquids extracted, and natural gas plant liquids production, by state, 2012 Alabama 87,269 5,309 7,110 Alabama Onshore Alabama 33,921 2,614 3,132 Alabama Offshore Alabama 53,348 2,695 3,978 Alaska 2,788,997 18,339 21,470 Alaska 2,788,997 18,339 21,470 Arkansas 6,872 336 424 Arkansas 6,872 336 424 California 169,203 9,923 12,755 California Onshore California 169,203 9,923 12,755 California Offshore California NA NA NA Federal Offshore California NA NA NA

196

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 5 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 8 1.2 Vacuum System 12 1.3 Power Supplies 14 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 19 1.8 Facilities 19 1.9 Installation 20 2.1 Accelerator Physics 21 2 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress The progress and highlights of each major technical system are summarized below. Additional details are provided in Section B. Magnets - As of the end of this quarter (March 31, 2002), the status of magnet fabrication is as follows: Magnet Type Number Received % of Total Received Dipoles 40 100% Quadrupoles 102 100% Sextupoles 76 100%

197

Reviews, Tables, and Plots  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Review of Particle Physics 4 Review of Particle Physics Please use this CITATION: S. Eidelman et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Lett. B 592, 1 (2004) (bibtex) Standalone figures are now available for these reviews. Categories: * Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear Properties * Standard Model and Related Topics * Particle Properties * Hypothetical Particles * Astrophysics and Cosmology * Experimental Methods and Colliders * Mathematical Tools * Kinematics, Cross-Section Formulae, and Plots * Authors, Introductory Text, History plots PostScript help file PDF help file Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear Properties Physical constants (Rev.) PS PDF (1 page) Astrophysical constants (Rev.) PS PDF (2 pages) International System of units (SI) PS PDF (2 pages) Periodic table of the elements (Rev.) errata PS PDF (1 page)

198

Table G3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1905-0194 1905-0194 Expiration Date: 07/31/2013 May 28, 2010 Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases 14 Table G3. Decision Chart for a Start Year Report for a Large Emitter Intending To Register Reductions Report Characteristics Reporting Requirements Schedule I Schedule II (For Each Subentity) Schedule III Schedule IV Sec. 1 Sec. 2 Sec. 3 Sec. 4 Sec. 1 Sec. 2 & Add. A Sec. 3 Sec. 1 Sec. 2 Sec. 1 Sec. 2 Part A Part B Part C Part D Part E Part A Part B Part C Independent Verification? All A- or B-Rated Methods? Foreign Emissions? Entity-Wide Reductions Only? Entity Statement Aggregated Emissions by Gas (Domestic and Foreign) † Emissions Inventory by Source

199

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

through June 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 9 1.2 Vacuum System 16 1.3 Power Supplies 21 1.4 RF System 25 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 26 1.6 Cable Plant 28 1.8 Facilities 28 2.0 Accelerator Physics 29 2.1 ES&H 31 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Magnet System - The project has received three shipments of magnets from IHEP. A total of 55 dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnets out of 218 have arrived. All main magnets will arrive by December. The additional mechanical and electrical checks of the magnets at SSRL have been successful. Only minor mechanical problems were found and corrected. The prototype

200

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AC05-00OR22800 AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295, 290, 284, 280, 270, 257, 239, 238, 219, M201, M180, M162, M153, M150, M141, M132, M103, M092, M080, M055, M051, M049, M034, M022, M003, A002) ..........................................................B-2 SECTION C - DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/WORK STATEMENT DESCRIPTION OF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table of Contents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U U U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y O O F F F F I I C C E E O O F F I I N N S S P P E E C C T T O O R R G G E E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOE/IG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ..................................................... 2 Impacts Key Accomplishments ............................................................................................... 3 Positive Outcomes ...................................................................................................... 3 Reports Investigative Outcomes .............................................................................................. 6 Audits ......................................................................................................................... 8

202

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October October through December 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 7 1.2 Vacuum System 9 1.3 Power Supplies 13 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.9 Installation 19 2.0 Accelerator Physics 20 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress In the magnet area, the production of all major components (dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles) has been completed on schedule. This results from a highly successful collaboration with our colleagues at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing. The production of corrector magnets is still in progress with completion scheduled for May 2002.

203

2003 CBECS Detailed Tables: Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel c2-pdf c2.xls c2.html Table C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels c3.pdf c3.xls c3.html Table C4. Expenditures for...

204

Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation proposes a suite of metrics for evaluating the performance of solar power forecasting.

Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H.; Banunarayanan, V.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On Metamodel-Based Design of Software Metrics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metric values can be used in order to compare and evaluate software entities, find defects, and predict quality. For some programming languages there are much more known metrics than for others. It would be helpful, if one could use existing metrics ... Keywords: Data model, Measure, Metamodel, Metric, Object-relational database, Reusability, UML

Erki Eessaar

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Table of Contents 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents June 2014 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents The Table of...

207

FY 2014 Budget Request Summary Table | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Summary Table FY 2014 Budget Request Summary Table Summary Table by Appropriations Summary Table by Organization More Documents & Publications FY 2014 Budget Request Statistical...

208

ARM - Instrument - s-table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentss-table govInstrumentss-table Documentation S-TABLE : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports S-TABLE : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Stabilized Platform (S-TABLE) Instrument Categories Ocean Observations For ship-based deployments, some instruments require actively stabilized platforms to compensate for the ship's motion, especially rotations around the long axis of the ship (roll), short axis (pitch), and, for some instruments, vertical axis (yaw). ARM currently employs two types of stabilized platforms: one electrically controlled for lighter instruments that includes yaw control (dubbed RPY for Roll, Pitch, Yaw) and one

209

Conversion of Questionnaire Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann, 'Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications,' NUREG/CR-1278). This conversion produces the basic event risk of failure values required for the fault tree calculations. The fault tree is a deductive logic structure that corresponds to the operational nuclear MC&A system at a nuclear facility. The conventional Delphi process is a time-honored approach commonly used in the risk assessment field to extract numerical values for the failure rates of actions or activities when statistically significant data is absent.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion By MelissaNanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion by MelissaNanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion by Melissa

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop DOE introduction slides to the Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop webinar. ctabwebinardoe.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion...

213

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) MS Excel Viewer PDF (Acrobat Reader required Download Acrobat Reader ) Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF

214

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) PDF (Acrobat Reader required) Table 2. Total Energy Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales HTML, Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 12. Net Coal Exports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 13. World Oil Prices HTML, Excel, PDF

215

Microsoft Word - front_matter_Dec12.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 2007 through 2011 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in nominal dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 2007 through 2011. A brief documentation for the thermal conversion factors follows:

216

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .other pyroelectric energy conversion methods . . . . Chapter6 Pyroelectric Energy Conversion using PLZT and

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

table14.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30 2.44 2.60 2.85 3.12 3.47 3.84 4.31 4.81 5.28

218

Code Tables | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Code Tables Code Tables U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

219

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

Sugama, T.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table 2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Indirect 1 85 621 699 3,129 3,411 4,120 3,850 5,988 4,211 6,193 4,890 4,102 6,243 Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 Direct 16 Indirect 16,191 14,656 17,745 17,748 17,859 19,897 18,925 21,070 85,711 118,115 156,534 236,368 215,033 214,678 220,420 Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 Sequestration 550,000 70,000 290,000 370,000 480,000 440,000 440,000 590,000 530,000 370,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 Direct 1,091 38,702 44,227

222

MECS Fuel Oil Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas : Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas Year Distillate Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 185 148 1224 3.4% 1994 152 125 1020 3.1% Residual Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 505 290 1577 16.7% 1994 441 241 1249 19.8% Natural Gas (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 4656 2702 5233 77.2% 1994 6141 4435 6758 73.4% Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys. Table 2: Establishments That Actually Switched Between Natural Gas and Residual Fuel Oil Type of Switch Number of Establishments in Population Number That Use Original Fuel Percentage That Use Original Fuel Number That Can Switch to Another Fuel Percentage That Can Switch to Another Fuel Number That Actually Made a Switch Percentage That Actually Made a Switch

223

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turbines The Gas Turbine Handbook The Gas Turbine Handbook TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements Updated Author Contact Information Introduction - Rich Dennis, Turbines Technology Manager 1.1 Simple and Combined Cycles - Claire Soares 1.1-1 Introduction 1.1-2 Applications 1.1-3 Applications versatility 1.1-4 The History of the Gas Turbine 1.1-5 Gas Turbine, Major Components, Modules, and systems 1.1-6 Design development with Gas Turbines 1.1-7 Gas Turbine Performance 1.1-8 Combined Cycles 1.1-9 Notes 1.2 Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) - Massod Ramezan and Gary Stiegel 1.2-1 Introduction 1.2-2 The Gasification Process 1.2-3 IGCC Systems 1.2-4 Gasifier Improvements 1.2-5 Gas Separation Improvements 1.2-6 Conclusions 1.2-7 Notes 1.2.1 Different Types of Gasifiers and Their Integration with Gas Turbines - Jeffrey Phillips

224

Flowing Liquid Crystal Simulating the Schwarzschild Metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how to simulate the equatorial section of the Schwarzschild metric through a flowing liquid crystal in its nematic phase. Inside a liquid crystal in the nematic phase, a traveling light ray feels an effective metric, whose properties are linked to perpendicular and parallel refractive indexes, $n_o$ e $n_e$ respectively, of the rod-like molecule of the liquid crystal. As these indexes depend on the scalar order parameter of the liquid crystal, the Beris-Edwards hydrodynamic theory is used to connect the order parameter with the velocity of a liquid crystal flow at each point. This way we calculate a radial velocity profile that simulates the equatorial section of the Schwarzschild metric, in the region outside of Schwarzschild's radius, in the nematic phase of the liquid crystal. In our model, the higher flow velocity can be of the order of some meters per second.

Erms R. Pereira; Fernando Moraes

2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

22 - Conversion Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter details the viscosity and pressure conversion chart. To convert absolute or dynamic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column then multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also explains that to convert kinematic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column and multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also defines how the conversion from natural gas to other fuels has progressed from possibility to reality for many companies and will become necessary for many others in months and years ahead. Fuels that are considered practical replacements for gas include coal, heavy fuel oils, middle distillates (such as kerosinetypeturbo fuel and burner fuel oils) and liquefied petroleum gas.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, L.M.

1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - chapter Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chapter Tables Chapter Tables Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Chapter Tables Table 1. Estimated fuel economy for light-duty vehicles, based on proposed CAFE standards, 2010-2015 Table 2. State appliance efficiency standards and potential future actions Table 3. State renewable portfolio standards Table 4. Key analyses from "issues in Focus" in recent AEOs Table 5. Liquid fuels production in three cases, 2007 and 2030 Table 6. Assumptions used in comparing conventional and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Table 7. Conventional vehicle and plug-in hybrid system component costs for mid-size vehicles at volume production Table 8. Technically recoverable resources of crude oil and natural gas in the Outer Continental Shelf, as of January 1, 2007

229

Discussion for Metrics and Benefits Data Collection  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Metrics and Benefits Analysis for Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA Smart Grid Programs Joe Paladino Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy OE Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting March 10, 2011 140 ARRA-Funded Smart Grid Projects 1 Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems Customer Systems SGIG/SGDP/RDSI Areas of Smart Grid Technology Deployment Customer Systems Advance Metering Infrastructure Electric Distribution Systems Electric Transmission Systems * Displays * Portals * Energy management * Direct load controls * Smart meters * Data management * Back office integration * Switches * Feeder optimization * Equipment monitoring * Energy Storage * Wide area monitoring and visualization * Synchrophasor Technology * Energy Storage Customer Systems Equipment Manufacturing

230

A theory of metrics with maximal acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a geometric theory for spacetimes whose world lines associated with physical particles have an upper bound for the proper acceleration. After some fundamental remarks on the requirements that classical dynamics for point particles must hold good, the notion of generalized metric and a theory of maximal acceleration are introduced. A perturbative approach to metrics of maximal acceleration is discussed. Then several of their physical and kinematical properties are investigated. These include a discussion of the fundamental causal theory concepts and the introduction of the associated notions of Euclidean length and celerity function. Finally, we discuss the corresponding modification of the Einstein's mass-energy relation.

Ricardo Gallego Torrom

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

231

MECS 1991 Publications and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Figure showing the Largest Energy Consumers in the Manufacturing Sector You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (file size 17.2 MB) pages:566 Selected Sections Main Text (file size 380,153 bytes) pages: 33, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector: An Overview Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector, 1991 Manufacturing Capability To Switch Fuels Appendices Appendix A. Detailed Tables Appendix B. Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates (file size 141,211 bytes) pages: 22. Appendix C. Quality of the Data (file size 135,511 bytes) pages: 8.

232

TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................... 12 Water-Source Heat Pump Performance ............................ 18 Air-Source Heat Pump OF PERFORMANCE OF WATER-SOURCE HEAT PUMP .............................. ................. 23 FIGURE 2. NODAL. MONTHLY HEAT GAIN/LOSS FACTORS ........................... 5 TABLE 2. BASE TEMPERATURES

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

233

Wind energy conversion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a wind energy conversion system comprising: a propeller rotatable by force of wind; a generator of electricity mechanically coupled to the propeller for converting power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load; means coupled between the generator and the electric load for varying the electric power drawn by the electric load to alter the electric loading of the generator; means for electro-optically sensing the speed of the wind at a location upwind from the propeller; and means coupled between the sensing means and the power varying means for operating the power varying means to adjust the electric load of the generator in accordance with a sensed value of wind speed to thereby obtain a desired ratio of wind speed to the speed of a tip of a blade of the propeller.

Longrigg, P.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Quantum optical waveform conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

D Kielpinski; JF Corney; HM Wiseman

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

Johnson, C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

Johnson, C.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Indefinite-Metric Quantum Field Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Umezawa H. Quantum Field Theory (1956) North Holland...Wightman L. Arch. Fysik (1964) 28:129. Y...indefinite-metric quantum field theory, which was published...book, except for some basic points. The use of the...space in quantum field theory has been motivated for......

Noboru Nakanishi

1972-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ranking Metric Anomaly in Invariant Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The management of large-scale distributed information systems relies on the effective use and modeling of monitoring data collected at various points in the distributed information systems. A traditional approach to model monitoring data is to discover ... Keywords: Metric anomaly ranking, invariant networks, link analysis

Yong Ge; Guofei Jiang; Min Ding; Hui Xiong

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Internal conversion coefficients of high multipole transitions: Experiment and theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compilation of the available experimental internal conversion coefficients (ICCs), {alpha}{sub T}, {alpha}{sub K}, {alpha}{sub L}, and ratios K/L and K/LM of high multipole (L > 2) transitions for a number of elements in the range 21 {<=} Z {<=} 94 is presented. Our listing of experimental data includes 194 data sets on 110 E3 transitions, 10 data sets on 6 E4 transitions, 11 data sets on 7 E5 transitions, 38 data sets on 21 M3 transitions, and 132 data sets on 68 M4 transitions. Data with less than 10% experimental uncertainty have been selected for comparison with the theoretical values of Hager and Seltzer [R.S. Hager, E.C. Seltzer, Nucl. Data Tables A 4 (1968) 1], Rosel et al. [F. Roesel, H.M. Fries, K. Alder, H.C. Pauli, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21 (1978) 91], and BRICC. The relative percentage deviations (%{delta}) have been calculated for each of the above theories and the averages (%{delta}-bar) are estimated. The Band et al. [I.M. Band, M.B. Trzhaskovskaya, C.W. Nestor Jr., P.O. Tikkanen, S. Raman, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 81 (2002) 1] tables, using the BRICC interpolation code, are seen to give theoretical ICCs closest to experimental values.

Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Planck Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Vijay Sai, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai University, Prasanthinilayam 515134 (India)], E-mail: vjsai.phy.psn@sssu.edu.in; Sainath, M.; Gowrishankar, R.; Venkataramaniah, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai University, Prasanthinilayam 515134 (India)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _LBL-11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Biochemical Conversion | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

by enhancing fuel yields in integrated biorefineries which combine conversion types with heat and power efficiencies to produce fuel and products. Lignocellulose (mainly lignin,...

243

Energy conversion by gravitational waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... out that if such particles are charged, the accelerations will constitute a mechanism for the conversion of gravitational ... of gravitational energy into electromagnetic ...

H. BONDI; F. A. E. PIRANI

1988-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

EIA - Appendix A - Reference Case Projection Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tables (2005-2035) Tables (2005-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Reference Case Projections Tables (2005-2035) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 14 complete) Reference Case Projections Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix A. Reference Case Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table A1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table A1. World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table A2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table A2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

245

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversion Regulations Conversion Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on AddThis.com... Conversion Regulations All vehicle and engine conversions must meet standards instituted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and state agencies like the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

246

Lifetime exergy consumption as a sustainability metric for information technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes recent explorations of the use of lifetime exergy consumption as a thermodynamically based metric for sustainability of information technologies. Other proposed thermodynamic metrics are described and compared with life cycle exergy ...

David J. Lettieri; Christopher R. Hannemann; Van P. Carey; Amip J. Shah

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Application Potential of Four Nontraditional Similarity Metrics in Hydrometeorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a review and assessment of four nontraditional similarity metrics that can be applied to hydrological and meteorological data. These metrics are 1) the uncentered correlation coefficient, 2) the HodgkinRichards index, 3) the ...

Ruping Mo; Chengzhi Ye; Paul H. Whitfield

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human-automation performance to facilitate metric selection, as well as understanding and comparison of research results. However, there is still lack of an objective ...

Pina, Patricia Elena

249

Competing complexity metrics and adults' production of complex sentences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adequacy of 11 metrics for measuring linguistic complexity was evaluated by applying each metric to language samples obtained from 30 different adult speakers, aged 60-90 years. The analysis then determined how well ...

Kemper, Susan; Cheng, Hintat

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapter 2: Comment Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 2 COMMENT DOCUMENTS This section provides copies of the actual letters or other documents containing public comments on the draft EISs that were submitted to DOE, including comments extracted from the transcripts of the public hearings. Table 2.1 contains an index of the comment documents by document number. Table 2.2 provides an index of comment documents by the commentors last name. Table 2.3 contains an index of comment documents by company or organization. Individual comments are denoted with vertical lines in the right margin. TABLE 2.1 Index of Commentors by Document Number Document Number Name Company/Organization Page D0001 Driver, Charles M. Individual 2-5 D0002 Kilrod, John Individual 2-7 D0003 Colley, Vina Portsmouth/Piketon Residents for Environmental Safety and Security

251

EIA - Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Regional Energy Consumption and Prices by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 1. New England Excel Gif Table 2. Middle Atlantic Excel Gif Table 3. East North Central Excel Gif Table 4. West North Central Excel Gif Table 5. South Atlantic Excel Gif Table 6. East South Central Excel Gif Table 7. West South Central Excel Gif Table 8. Mountain Excel Gif Table 9. Pacific Excel Gif Table 10. Total United States Excel Gif Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 11. New England Excel Gif Table 12. Middle Atlantic Excel Gif Table 13. East North Central Excel Gif Table 14. West North Central Excel Gif Table 15. South Atlantic Excel Gif Table 16. East South Central Excel Gif Table 17. West South Central Excel Gif Table 18. Mountain Excel Gif Table 19. Pacific

252

EIA - Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09 09 Regional Energy Consumption and Prices by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 1. New England Excel Gif Table 2. Middle Atlantic Excel Gif Table 3. East North Central Excel Gif Table 4. West North Central Excel Gif Table 5. South Atlantic Excel Gif Table 6. East South Central Excel Gif Table 7. West South Central Excel Gif Table 8. Mountain Excel Gif Table 9. Pacific Excel Gif Table 10. Total United States Excel Gif Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 11. New England Excel Gif Table 12. Middle Atlantic Excel Gif Table 13. East North Central Excel Gif Table 14. West North Central Excel Gif Table 15. South Atlantic Excel Gif Table 16. East South Central Excel Gif Table 17. West South Central Excel Gif Table 18. Mountain Excel Gif Table 19. Pacific

253

5, 35333559, 2005 Catalytic conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement technique, employing selective gas- phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde it the second most abundant organic trace gas after methane. Methanol can play an important role in upper tropoACPD 5, 3533­3559, 2005 Catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde S. J. Solomon et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

An empirical study of aspect-oriented metrics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metrics for aspect-oriented software have been proposed and used to investigate the benefits and the disadvantages of crosscutting concerns modularisation. Some of these metrics have not been rigorously defined nor analytically evaluated. Also, there ... Keywords: Aspect-oriented software development, AspectJ, Empirical evaluation, Metrics

Eduardo Kessler Piveta; Ana Moreira; Marcelo Soares Pimenta; Joo Arajo; Pedro Guerreiro; R. Tom Price

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Resolvent metrics and heat kernel estimates Andrs Telcs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are generalization of the resistance metric and provide uni...ed treatment of heat kernel estimates of sub), called resistance metric, which is quite natural in the analysis of the heat propagation. The particular beauty in his ...nding is that the the proof that function R (x; y) is a metric boils down to elementary

Telcs, András

256

Nature Bulletin Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Table of Contents: Table of Contents: Here is our table of contents for the Forset Preserve District of Cook Country Nature Bulletins. To search, go to the Natuere Bulletin's Search Engine and type in your topic. You can also use your browser's "FIND" command to search the 750+ article titles here for a specific subject! Fish Smother Under Ice Coyotes in Cook County Tough Times for the Muskrats Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North Squirrels Spring Frogs Snapping Turtles A Phenomenal Spring Good People Do Not Pick Wildflowers Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Crows Earthworms Bees Crayfish Floods Handaxes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Ant Sanctuary Conservation Mosquitoes More About Mosquitoes Fishing in the Forest Preserve Our River Grasshoppers Chiggers Ticks Poison Ivy Fireflies

257

COST AND QUALITY TABLES 95  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Tables 5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) will no longer be pub- lished by the EIA. The tables presented in this docu- ment are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should be directed to: Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division

258

MTS Table Top Load frame  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTS Table Top Load frame MTS Table Top Load frame The Non-destructive Evaluation group operates an MTS Table Top Load frame for ultimate strength and life cycle testing of various ceramic, ceramic-matrix (FGI), carbon, carbon fiber, cermet (CMC) and metal alloy engineering samples. The load frame is a servo-hydraulic type designed to function in a closed loop configuration under computer control. The system can perform non-cyclic, tension, compression and flexure testing and cyclic fatigue tests. The system is comprised of two parts: * The Load Frame and * The Control System. Load Frame The Load Frame (figure 1) is a cross-head assembly which includes a single moving grip, a stationary grip and LVDT position sensor. It can generate up to 25 kN (5.5 kip) of force in the sample under test and can

259

CBECS 1992 - Building Characteristics, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 The following 70 tables present extensive cross-tabulations of commercial buildings characteristics. These data are from the Buildings Characteristics Survey portion of the 1992 CBECS. The "Quick-Reference Guide," indicates the major topics of each table. Directions for calculating an approximate relative standard error (RSE) for each estimate in the tables are presented in Figure A1, "Use of RSE Row and Column Factor." The Glossary contains the definitions of the terms used in the tables. See the preceding "At A Glance" section for highlights of the detailed tables. Table Organization

260

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 1 to 116 Complete set of Supplemental Tables Complete set of Supplemental Tables. Need help, please contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Regional Energy Consumption and Prices by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Table 1. New England Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 2. Middle Atlantic Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 3. East North Central Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 4. West North Central

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

0 Annual 0 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52714 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Prepared under Task No. VTP.20020 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-52714 October 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

262

Dynamic C-metrics in (Gauged) Supergravities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct an exact time-dependent charged dilaton C-metric in four-dimensional ${\\cal N}=4$ gauged supergravity. The scalar field drives the time evolution by transferring energy to the black holes, thereby causing their masses to increase and their acceleration to decrease. The values of the electric/magnetic and scalar charges determine three regions of potential time evolution. This solution holographically describes a strongly-coupled three-dimensional conformal field theory on the background of an evolving black hole. We also find new static charged dilaton C-metrics, which arise in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories whose scalar potential can be expressed in terms of a superpotential.

H. Lu; Justin F. Vazquez-Poritz

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Complex geometry and pre-metric electromagnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intimate link between complex geometry and the problem of the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism is explored. In particular, the relationship between 3+1 decompositions of R4 and the decompositions of the vector space of bivectors over R4 into real and imaginary subspaces relative to a choice of complex structure is emphasized. The role of the various scalar products on the space of bivectors that are defined in terms of a volume element on R4 and a complex structure on the space of bivectors that makes it C-linear isomorphic to C3 is discussed in the context of formulation of a theory of electromagnetism in which the Lorentzian metric on spacetime follows as a consequence of the existence of electromagnetic waves, not a prior assumption.

D. H. Delphenich

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

1 Annual 1 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56091 December 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson Prepared under Task No. VTP2.0020 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56091 December 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

265

Optical metrics and birefringence of anisotropic media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The material tensor of linear response in electrodynamics is constructed out of products of two symmetric second rank tensor fields which in the approximation of geometrical optics and for uniaxial symmetry reduce to "optical" metrics, describing the phenomenon of birefringence. This representation is interpreted in the context of an underlying internal geometrical structure according to which the symmetric tensor fields are vectorial elements of an associated two-dimensional space.

Alexander B. Balakin; Winfried Zimdahl

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grids capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Non-metric gravity: A status report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the status of a certain (infinite) class of four-dimensional generally covariant theories propagating two degrees of freedom that are formulated without any direct mention of the metric. General relativity itself (in its Plebanski formulation) belongs to the class, so these theories are examples of modified gravity. We summarize the current understanding of the nature of the modification, of the renormalizability properties of these theories, of their coupling to matter fields, and describe some of their physical properties.

Kirill Krasnov

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Management and Uses Conversion Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Conversion DOE is planning to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs) to evaluate project alternatives. The Final Plan for Conversion and the Programmatic EIS The eventual disposition of depleted UF6 remains the subject of considerable interest within the U.S. Congress, and among concerned citizens and other stakeholders. Congress stated its intentions in Public Law (P. L.) 105-204, signed by the President in July 1998. P. L. 105-204 required DOE to develop a plan to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, one each at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. DOE submitted the required plan, Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, to Congress in July 1999. This document provided a discussion of DOE's technical approach and schedule to implement this project. Although much of the information provided in this report is still valid, a few aspects of this plan have changed since its publication.

269

EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

EPA Redesigns EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's Enforcement Office. The meeting, attended by representatives of more than 60 organizations, was held to discuss actions addressing AFV emission certification. Specifically, topics included * Conversion emissions perfor- mance data * Status of environmental laws pertaining to alternative fuel

270

FRAUD POLICY Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRAUD POLICY Table of Contents Section 1 - General Statement Section 2 - Management's Responsibility for Preventing Fraud Section 3 - Consequences for Fraudulent Acts Section 4 - Procedures for Reporting Fraud Section 5 - Procedures for the Investigation of Alleged Fraud Section 6 - Protection Under

Shihadeh, Alan

271

CHP NOTEBOOK Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Specific Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) Section 8 Employee Training Section 9 Inspections and Exposure1 CHP NOTEBOOK Table of Contents Section 1 Safety Program Key Personnel Section 2 Laboratory Protective Equipment (PPE) Assessment Section 18 Hazard Assessment Information and PPE Selection Information

Braun, Paul

272

Microsoft Word - table_04.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Table 4. Offshore gross withdrawals of natural gas by state and the Gulf of Mexico, 2009-2013 (million cubic feet) 2009 Total 259,848 327,105 586,953 1,878,928 606,403 2,485,331...

273

PARENT HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARENT HANDBOOK 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS The Parent's Role 3 Academics 7 Academic Advising 7 Academic Services 26 Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation 28 Campus Resources and Student Services 30 to seeing you in person and connecting with you online! PARENT HANDBOOK THEPARENT'SROLE PARENT HANDBOOK 3

Adali, Tulay

274

Automatic Construction of Diagnostic Tables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......more usual, at least in microbiology.) Keys and diagnostic tables...Mechanization and Data Handling in Microbiology, Society for Applied Bacteriology...by A. Baillie and R. J. Gilbert, London: Academic Press...cultures, Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 14, pp. 271-279......

W. R. Willcox; S. P. Lapage

1972-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...multiple carrier generation...renewable energy|solar energy conversion|photovoltaic...photovoltaic energy conversion process...minority carriers in the p-type...efficiency carrier multiplication...for solar energy conversion. Phys...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversions Conversions Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... Vehicle Conversions Photo of converted to run on propane. What kinds of conversions are available? Natural Gas Propane Electric Hybrid Ethanol An aftermarket conversion is a vehicle or engine modified to operate using

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversions to someone by E-mail Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Conversions Related Information Conversion Basics Regulations Vehicle conversions provide alternative fuel options beyond what is

278

Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL Publications NETL Publications 2001 Conference Proceedings Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Workshop March 29-30, 2001 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Plenary Session Selected Presentations on Current DOE Work Supporting SECA Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

279

Chemical Conversions of Natural Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many products from the flavour industry are primary products from renewable resources or secondary products obtained by chemical conversions of the primary products. In general these secondary products are key...

Peter H. van der Schaft

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Solar Energy Conversion Efficiency Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Report of a discussion on possible collaborative experimentation to test and refine biomass production models based on the conversion of solar energy by plant stands, and to evaluate alternative models.

J. S. Pereira; J. J. Landsberg

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, BasicS. Pillai and M. A. Green, Solar Energy Materials and SolarPlasmonic conversion of solar energy Csar Clavero Plasma

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An optimal filtering algorithm for table constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Filtering algorithms for table constraints are constraint-based, which means that the propagation queue only contains information on the constraints that must be reconsidered. This paper proposes four efficient value-based algorithms for table constraints, ...

Jean-Baptiste Mairy; Pascal Van Hentenryck; Yves Deville

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Table Name query? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Table Name query? Home > Groups > Databus Is there an API feature which returns the names of tables? Submitted by Hopcroft on 28 October, 2013 - 15:37 1 answer Points: 0 if you are...

284

Energy Conversion Devices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Conversion Devices Place: Rochester Hills, MI Website: http:www.energyconversiondev References: Energy Conversion Devices1...

285

Chemistry Department Assessment Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Chemistry Department Assessment May, 2006 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary 1 Prelude 1 Mission Statement and Learning Goals 1 Facilities 2 Staffing 3 Students: Chemistry Majors and Student Taking Service Courses Table: 1997-2005 graduates profile Table: GRE Score for Chemistry Majors, 1993

Bogaerts, Steven

286

Global hyperbolicity for spacetimes with continuous metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the definition of global hyperbolicity in terms of the compactness of the causal diamonds and non-total imprisonment can be extended to spacetimes with continuous metrics, while retaining all of the equivalences to other notions of global hyperbolicity. In fact, global hyperbolicity is equivalent to the compactness of the space of causal curves and to the existence of a Cauchy hypersurface. Furthermore, global hyperbolicity implies causal simplicity, stable causality and the existence of maximal curves connecting any two causally related points.

Clemens Smann

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Microsoft Word - table_11.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25 25 Table 11 Created on: 12/12/2013 2:10:53 PM Table 11. Underground natural gas storage - storage fields other than salt caverns, 2008-2013 (volumes in billion cubic feet) Natural Gas in Underground Storage at End of Period Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Storage Activity Year and Month Base Gas Working Gas Total Volume Percent Injections Withdrawals Net Withdrawals a 2008 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 2,900 2,976 76 2009 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 2,856 2,563 -293 2010 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 2,781 2,822 41 2011 January 4,166 2,131 6,298 -63 -2.9 27 780 753 February 4,166 1,597 5,763 -10 -0.6 51 586 535 March 4,165 1,426 5,591 -114 -7.4 117 288 172

289

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 8 Created on: 12/12/2013 2:07:39 PM Table 8. Underground natural gas storage - all operators, 2008-2013 (million cubic feet) Natural Gas in Underground Storage at End of Period Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Storage Activity Year and Month Base Gas Working Gas Total a Volume Percent Injections Withdrawals Net Withdrawals b 2008 Total c -- -- -- -- -- 3,340 3,374 34 2009 Total c -- -- -- -- -- 3,315 2,966 -349 2010 Total c -- -- -- -- -- 3,291 3,274 -17 2011 January 4,303 2,306 6,609 2 0.1 50 849 799 February 4,302 1,722 6,024 39 2.3 82 666 584 March 4,302 1,577 5,879 -75 -4.6 168 314 146 April 4,304 1,788 6,092 -223 -11.1 312 100

290

Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Action Codes Table Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms > Code Tables > Action Codes Table

291

Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) MISSION: The mission of the Performance Metrics and Budget Division (HC-51) is to support the effective and efficient implementation of the Department of Energy's human capital initiatives and functions through the strategic integration of corporate human capital performance metrics and the budget of the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (HC). FUNCTIONS: Human capital performance measurement and strategic functions at the DOE and interagency levels include: Provides analytical support and strategic advice to internal and external HC stakeholders on the appropriate and effective use of performance metrics as a key to effective strategic human capital management.

292

DOE Uranium Leasing Program - Lease Tract Metrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Leasing Program -- Lease Tract Metrics Uranium Leasing Program -- Lease Tract Metrics Lease Tract Lessee Lease Date Bid (%) Reclamation Bond a Total Acres Acres Excluded b Comment C-JD-5 Gold Eagle Mining, Inc. 04/30/08 12.00 37,000 150.71 C-JD-5A Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 20.10 5,000 24.54 C-JD-6 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 14.20 19,000 530.08 C-JD-7 c Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 27.30 1,206,000 493.01 C-JD-8 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 36.20 4,000 954.62 C-JD-8A No bids received - remains inactive N/A N/A N/A 77.91 C-JD-9 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 24.30 72,000 1,036.50 C-SR-10 Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 13.10 5,000 637.64 C-SR-11 Cotter Corporation 04/30/08 11.67 43,000 1,303.22 200.25 Summit Canyon area excluded from lease tract C-SR-11A Golden Eagle Uranium, LLC 06/27/08 14.30 5,000 1,296.81 C-SR-12 Colorado Plateau Partners 06/27/08

293

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Complex Level Complex Level July, 2013 Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2013 Lifecycle Values 2013 Target 2014 Target Pu packaged for long-term disposition Number of Containers 5,089 5,089 5,089 5,089 eU packaged for disposition Number of Containers 8,198 8,016 8,016 8,016 Pu/U residues packaged for disposition Kilograms of Bulk 107,828 107,828 107,828 107,828 DU & U packaged for disposition Metric Tons 736,801 32,452 45,317 76,817 Liquid Waste eliminated Thousands of Gallons 91,907 5,340 6,260 6,812 Liquid Waste Tanks closed Number of Tanks 239 11 11 13 HLW packaged for disposition Number of Containers 24,183 3,802 4,077 4,283 SNF packaged for disposition Metric Tons of Heavy Metal 2,450 2,128 2,128 2,128

294

Superradiance on the Reissner-Nordstrom metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we study the superradiance of charged scalar fields on the sub-extremal Reissner-Nordstrom metric, a mechanism by which such fields can extract energy from a static spherically symmetric charged black hole. A geometrical way of measuring the amount of energy extracted is proposed. Then we investigate the question numerically. The toy-model and the numerical methods used in our simulations are presented and the problem of long time measurement of the outgoing energy flux is discussed. We provide a numerical example of a field exhibiting a behaviour analogous to the Penrose process: an incoming wave packet which splits, as it approaches the black hole, into an incoming part with negative energy and an outgoing part with more energy than the initial incoming one. We also show another type of superradiant solution for which the energy extraction is more important. Hyperradiant behaviour is not observed, which is an indication that the Reissner-Nordstrom metric is linearly stable in the sub-extrem...

Di Menza, Laurent

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",27638,13 " Electric Utilities",23008,8 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",4630,23 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",125180739,11 " Electric Utilities",107852560,5 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",17328179,20 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",385,4 " Nitrogen Oxide",120,4 " Carbon Dioxide",116283,5 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",6.8,4 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.1,12 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2048,4

296

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Nuclear" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",18424,22 " Electric Utilities",460,43 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",17964,6 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",65682494,23 " Electric Utilities",-186385,50 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",65868878,6 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",14,40 " Nitrogen Oxide",15,41 " Carbon Dioxide",19160,37 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",0.5,45 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.5,48 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",643,43

297

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "NERC Region(s)",,"WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",26392,15 " Electric Utilities",20115,14 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",6277,16 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",111750957,12 " Electric Utilities",91232664,11 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",20518293,17 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",33,33 " Nitrogen Oxide",57,17 " Carbon Dioxide",55683,15 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",0.7,43 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.1,31 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1099,35

298

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC/SPP" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",26744,14 " Electric Utilities",16471,17 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",10272,10 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",102884940,16 " Electric Utilities",51680682,19 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",51204258,8 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",126,15 " Nitrogen Oxide",75,11 " Carbon Dioxide",58706,14 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.7,21 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.6,21 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1258,27

299

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",27674,12 " Electric Utilities",25553,6 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",2121,34 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",128678483,10 " Electric Utilities",121251138,3 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",7427345,34 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",131,14 " Nitrogen Oxide",57,16 " Carbon Dioxide",73241,13 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.2,31 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1,34 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1255,28

300

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "NERC Region(s)",,"WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Hydroelectric" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3990,44 " Electric Utilities",3035,36 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",955,42 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",12024564,44 " Electric Utilities",8589208,37 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3435356,40 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",7,45 " Nitrogen Oxide",4,48 " Carbon Dioxide",1213,49 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1.2,39 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.8,43 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",222,50

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/SPP" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",7857,38 " Electric Utilities",7647,30 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",210,50 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",36630006,36 " Electric Utilities",36242921,30 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",387085,50 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",65,24 " Nitrogen Oxide",40,30 " Carbon Dioxide",24461,34 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.9,12 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.4,9 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1472,19

302

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/SPP" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",12543,32 " Electric Utilities",11732,20 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",812,45 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",47923762,32 " Electric Utilities",45270047,24 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",2653716,44 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",41,30 " Nitrogen Oxide",46,26 " Carbon Dioxide",36321,26 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1.9,33 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.1,13 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1671,14

303

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "NERC Region(s)",,"WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Hydroelectric" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14261,29 " Electric Utilities",10846,27 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3415,28 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",55126999,27 " Electric Utilities",41142684,26 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",13984316,26 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",16,37 " Nitrogen Oxide",15,42 " Carbon Dioxide",10094,40 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",0.6,44 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.6,47 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",404,48

304

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",29831,11 " Electric Utilities",21639,10 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",8192,14 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",111551371,13 " Electric Utilities",89666874,13 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",21884497,16 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",254,6 " Nitrogen Oxide",89,6 " Carbon Dioxide",74480,11 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5,8 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.8,19 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1472,20

305

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC/SPP" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",21739,18 " Electric Utilities",20360,12 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1378,39 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",92312989,18 " Electric Utilities",90176805,12 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",2136184,46 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",233,8 " Nitrogen Oxide",56,18 " Carbon Dioxide",78815,10 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5.6,6 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.3,26 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1882,7

306

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Virginia" West Virginia" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",16495,24 " Electric Utilities",11719,21 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",4775,19 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",80788947,20 " Electric Utilities",56719755,18 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",24069192,13 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",105,20 " Nitrogen Oxide",49,23 " Carbon Dioxide",74283,12 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.9,20 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.3,25 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2027,5

307

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Petroleum" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",790,51 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",790,46 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",199858,51 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",199858,51 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",1,49 " Nitrogen Oxide","*",51 " Carbon Dioxide",191,50 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",8.8,2 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",4,3 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2104,1 "Total Retail Sales (megawatthours)",11876995,43 " Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours)",3388490,50

308

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "NERC Region(s)",,"--" "Primary Energy Source",,"Petroleum" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",2536,47 " Electric Utilities",1828,40 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",708,47 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",10836036,45 " Electric Utilities",6416068,38 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",4419968,38 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",17,36 " Nitrogen Oxide",21,36 " Carbon Dioxide",8287,42 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.4,16 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",4.3,2 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1686,13

309

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",20453,21 " Electric Utilities",18945,16 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1507,38 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",98217658,17 " Electric Utilities",97472144,7 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",745514,48 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",249,7 " Nitrogen Oxide",85,7 " Carbon Dioxide",93160,7 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5.6,5 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.9,15 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2091,3

310

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "NERC Region(s)",,"SPP" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",21022,20 " Electric Utilities",16015,18 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",5006,17 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",72250733,22 " Electric Utilities",57421195,17 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",14829538,24 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",85,21 " Nitrogen Oxide",71,12 " Carbon Dioxide",49536,17 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.6,24 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.2,11 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1512,17

311

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3389,46 " Electric Utilities",55,48 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3334,29 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",5627645,50 " Electric Utilities",30059,46 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",5597586,36 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",13,41 " Nitrogen Oxide",5,47 " Carbon Dioxide",4187,45 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5.2,7 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.9,16 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1640,15 "Total Retail Sales (megawatthours)",11605932,44

312

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "NERC Region(s)",,"WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",11421,34 " Electric Utilities",8713,29 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",2708,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",35146248,38 " Electric Utilities",23710917,34 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",11435331,29 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",7,44 " Nitrogen Oxide",15,40 " Carbon Dioxide",17020,38 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",0.4,46 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1,37 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1068,37 "Total Retail Sales (megawatthours)",33772595,33

313

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",36636,7 " Electric Utilities",26639,3 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",9998,11 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",137576941,8 " Electric Utilities",120425913,4 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",17151028,21 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",265,5 " Nitrogen Oxide",79,10 " Carbon Dioxide",82592,8 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",4.2,10 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.3,28 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1324,25

314

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",21417,19 " Electric Utilities",20968,11 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",450,49 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",82348625,19 " Electric Utilities",79816049,15 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",2532576,45 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",138,13 " Nitrogen Oxide",33,31 " Carbon Dioxide",48196,18 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.7,14 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.9,40 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1290,26

315

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Hydroelectric" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3623,45 " Electric Utilities",2994,37 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",629,48 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",10049636,46 " Electric Utilities",8682448,36 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1367188,47 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",12,43 " Nitrogen Oxide",12,43 " Carbon Dioxide",3611,47 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.6,23 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.6,8 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",792,41

316

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",108258,1 " Electric Utilities",26533,4 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",81724,1 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",411695046,1 " Electric Utilities",95099161,9 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",316595885,1 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",430,2 " Nitrogen Oxide",204,1 " Carbon Dioxide",251409,1 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.3,28 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.1,32 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1346,22

317

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "NERC Region(s)",,"WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",7986,37 " Electric Utilities",6931,31 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1056,41 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",48119254,31 " Electric Utilities",44738543,25 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3380711,42 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",67,23 " Nitrogen Oxide",61,15 " Carbon Dioxide",45703,21 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.1,19 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",2.8,7 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2094,2

318

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",17836,23 " Electric Utilities",13098,19 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",4738,20 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",64314067,24 " Electric Utilities",45579970,22 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",18734097,18 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",145,12 " Nitrogen Oxide",49,25 " Carbon Dioxide",47238,19 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",5,9 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.7,20 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1619,16

319

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14592,28 " Electric Utilities",11282,24 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3310,30 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",57508721,26 " Electric Utilities",46188988,21 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",11319733,30 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",108,18 " Nitrogen Oxide",50,22 " Carbon Dioxide",47211,20 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",4.1,11 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.9,14 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1810,10

320

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "NERC Region(s)",,"FRCC/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",59147,3 " Electric Utilities",50853,1 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",8294,13 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",229095935,3 " Electric Utilities",206062185,1 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",23033750,15 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",160,11 " Nitrogen Oxide",101,5 " Carbon Dioxide",123811,2 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1.5,37 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1,35 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1191,31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "NERC Region(s)",,"NPCC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",13697,31 " Electric Utilities",937,42 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",12760,8 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",42804824,34 " Electric Utilities",802906,43 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",42001918,10 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",35,31 " Nitrogen Oxide",17,38 " Carbon Dioxide",20291,36 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1.8,34 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.9,39 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1045,38

322

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "NERC Region(s)",,"NPCC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Nuclear" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",4180,43 " Electric Utilities",1132,41 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3048,32 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",22195912,42 " Electric Utilities",3979333,41 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",18216579,19 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",34,32 " Nitrogen Oxide",6,46 " Carbon Dioxide",5551,43 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.4,17 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.6,46 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",551,47

323

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "NERC Region(s)",,"SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",32417,9 " Electric Utilities",23642,7 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",8775,12 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",152150512,6 " Electric Utilities",122766490,2 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",29384022,12 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",218,10 " Nitrogen Oxide",66,14 " Carbon Dioxide",79375,9 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.2,18 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1,36 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1150,33

324

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14715,27 " Electric Utilities",11547,22 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3168,31 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",53670227,29 " Electric Utilities",45428599,23 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",8241628,32 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",57,27 " Nitrogen Oxide",44,27 " Carbon Dioxide",32946,29 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.3,27 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.8,18 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1353,21

325

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "NERC Region(s)",,"SPP/WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",8130,36 " Electric Utilities",6345,33 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1785,36 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",36251542,37 " Electric Utilities",30848406,33 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",5403136,37 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",15,38 " Nitrogen Oxide",56,19 " Carbon Dioxide",29379,31 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",0.9,42 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",3.4,5 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1787,11

326

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/RFC/SERC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Nuclear" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",44127,5 " Electric Utilities",4800,35 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",39327,3 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",201351872,5 " Electric Utilities",12418332,35 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",188933540,3 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",232,9 " Nitrogen Oxide",83,8 " Carbon Dioxide",103128,6 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",2.5,25 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.9,38 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1129,34

327

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "NERC Region(s)",,"NPCC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1782,49 " Electric Utilities",7,50 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1775,37 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",7738719,47 " Electric Utilities",10827,47 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",7727892,33 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide","*",50 " Nitrogen Oxide",3,49 " Carbon Dioxide",3217,48 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)","*",50 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",0.8,42 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",916,39

328

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "NERC Region(s)",,"--" "Primary Energy Source",,"Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",2067,48 " Electric Utilities",1889,39 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",178,51 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",6759576,48 " Electric Utilities",6205050,40 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",554526,49 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",3,46 " Nitrogen Oxide",16,39 " Carbon Dioxide",4125,46 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1,41 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",5.2,1 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1345,23 "Total Retail Sales (megawatthours)",6247038,50

329

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "NERC Region(s)",,"RFC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",45575,4 " Electric Utilities",455,44 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",45120,2 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",229752306,2 " Electric Utilities",1086500,42 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",228665806,2 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",387,3 " Nitrogen Oxide",136,2 " Carbon Dioxide",122830,3 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",3.7,13 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.3,27 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1179,32

330

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO/WECC" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",5866,41 " Electric Utilities",2340,38 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3526,27 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",29791181,41 " Electric Utilities",6271180,39 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",23520001,14 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",22,35 " Nitrogen Oxide",21,35 " Carbon Dioxide",20370,35 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1.6,35 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",1.6,22 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1507,18

331

Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "NERC Region(s)",,"MRO" "Primary Energy Source",,"Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",6188,40 " Electric Utilities",4912,34 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1276,40 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",34739542,39 " Electric Utilities",31343796,32 " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",3395746,41 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)" " Sulfur Dioxide",116,17 " Nitrogen Oxide",52,21 " Carbon Dioxide",31064,30 " Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",7.3,3 " Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)",3.3,6 " Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh)",1971,6 "Total Retail Sales (megawatthours)",12956263,42

332

Description of Energy Intensity Tables (12)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables 3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables There are 12 data tables used as references for this report. Specifically, these tables are categorized as tables 1 and 2 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1985, 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1985 and the three subsequent years (1988, 1991, and 1994) tables 3 and 4 present 1988, 1991, and 1994 energy-intensity ratios that have been adjusted to the mix of products shipped from manufacturing establishments in 1985 tables 5 and 6 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1988 and the two subsequent

333

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: IBA Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) Periodic Table (HTML) IBA Table (HTML) | IBA Table (135KB GIF) | IBA Table (1.2MB PDF) | IBA Table (33MB TIF) | Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) | Virtual Lab Tour (6MB) The purpose of this table is to quickly give the visitor to this site information on the sensitivity, depth of analysis and depth resolution of most of the modern ion beam analysis techniques in a single easy to use format: a periodic table. Note that you can click on each panel of this

334

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2003 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2006, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2006 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seventeen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2006 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2004-2006 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

335

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2007, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2007 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and eighteen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2007 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Projections for 2006 and 2007 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term projections and are based on more current information than the AEO.

336

Spherically Symmetric, Metrically Static, Isolated Systems in Quasi-Metric Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational field exterior respectively interior to a spherically symmetric, isolated body made of perfect fluid is examined within the quasi-metric framework (QMF). It is required that the gravitational field is "metrically static", meaning that it is static except for the effects of the global cosmic expansion on the spatial geometry. Dynamical equations for the gravitational field are set up and an exact solution is found for the exterior part. Besides, equations of motion applying to inertial test particles moving in the exterior gravitational field are set up. By construction the gravitational field of the system is not static with respect to the cosmic expansion. This means that the radius of the source increases and that distances between circular orbits of inertial test particles increase according to the Hubble law. Moreover it is shown that if this model of an expanding gravitational field is taken to represent the gravitational field of the Sun (or isolated planetary systems), this has no serious consequences for observational aspects of planetary motion. On the contrary some observational facts of the Earth-Moon system are naturally explained within the QMF. Finally the QMF predicts different secular increases for two different gravitational coupling parameters. But such secular changes are neither present in the Newtonian limit of the quasi-metric equations of motion nor in the Newtonian limit of the quasi-metric field equations valid inside metrically static sources. Thus standard interpretations of space experiments testing the secular variation of G are explicitly theory-dependent and do not apply to the QMF.

Dag stvang

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Kerr-NUT-AdS metrics and string theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

achieved in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by making a simplifying ansatz for a static metric with spherical symmetry. An interesting feature of this solution is that the metric has an event horizon which separates the spacetime into two regions. Nothing, even... light, can escape from inside the horizon. This introduces a new object into theoretical physics, the black hole. Schwarzschilds metric carries only one parameter, the mass. Two years after his discovery, Reissner [3] and Nordstrom [4] found a charged...

Chen, Wei

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Kerr-NUT-AdS metrics and string theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

achieved in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by making a simplifying ansatz for a static metric with spherical symmetry. An interesting feature of this solution is that the metric has an ?event horizon? which separates the spacetime into two regions. Nothing, even... light, can escape from inside the horizon. This introduces a new object into theoretical physics, the black hole. Schwarzschild?s metric carries only one parameter, the mass. Two years after his discovery, Reissner [3] and Nordstr?om [4] found a charged...

Chen, Wei

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 1: Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 1 INTRODUCTION Over the last five decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has enriched large quantities of uranium for nuclear applications by means of gaseous diffusion. This enrichment has taken place at three DOE sites located at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP, formerly known as the K-25 site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1-1). "Depleted" uranium hexafluoride (commonly referred to as DUF 6 ) is a product of this process. It is being stored at the three sites. The total DUF 6 inventory at the three sites weighs approximately 700,000 metric tons (t) (770,000 short tons [tons]) 1 and is stored in about 60,000 steel cylinders. This document is a site-specific

340

Office of HC Strategy Budget and Performance Metrics (HC-50)...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and partner agencies on strategic human capital management, performance metrics, workforce analysis and succession planning. Leadership Tony Nguyen Director of the Office...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

On isotropic metric of Schwarzschild solution of Einstein equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The known static isotropic metric of Schwarzschild solution of Einstein equation cannot cover with the range of r<2MG, a new isotropic metric of Schwarzschild solution is obtained. The new isotropic metric has the characters: (1) It is dynamic and periodic. (2) It has infinite singularities of the spacetime. (3) It cannot cover with the range of 0metric.

T. Mei

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Resilient Control Systems Practical Metrics Basis for Defining Mission Impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

"Resilience describes how systems operate at an acceptable level of normalcy despite disturbances or threats. In this paper we first consider the cognitive, cyber-physical interdependencies inherent in critical infrastructure systems and how resilience differs from reliability to mitigate these risks. Terminology and metrics basis are provided to integrate the cognitive, cyber-physical aspects that should be considered when defining solutions for resilience. A practical approach is taken to roll this metrics basis up to system integrity and business case metrics that establish proper operation and impact. A notional chemical processing plant is the use case for demonstrating how the system integrity metrics can be applied to establish performance, and

Craig G. Rieger

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 - Low Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4-2030) 4-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Low Price Case Tables (2004-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Low Price Case Tables Low Price Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity Table 10. Electricity Trade Table 11. Petroleum Supply and Disposition Balance

344

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 - Low Economic Growth Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Low Economic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Low Economic Growth Case Tables Low Economic Growth Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

345

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 6: Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Permits and Compliance Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PERMITS AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 6.1 DUF 6 CYLINDER MANAGEMENT AND CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DUF 6 CONVERSION FACILITY DUF 6 cylinder management as well as construction and operation of the proposed DUF 6 conversion facility would be subject to many federal, state, and local requirements. In accordance with such legal requirements, a variety of permits, licenses, and other consents must be obtained. Table 6.1 at the end of this chapter lists those that may be needed. The status of each is indicated on the basis of currently available information. However, because the DUF 6 project is still at an early stage, the information in Table 6.1 should not be considered comprehensive or

346

Conversion Electrons of Radium D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conversion electrons of radium D have been studied with thin sources on thin backings in a beta-ray spectrograph using calibrated photographic emulsions. The number of conversion electrons due to the 47-kev gamma-ray has been measured to be 745 per hundred disintegrations. The L:M:N ratio is 1:0.26:0.077. This implies a complex decay scheme for radium D, since earlier results give 3.5 unconverted 47-kev gamma-rays per hundred disintegrations.

Lawrence Cranberg

1950-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Recirculation in multiple wave conversions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in B-100 Bone-equivalent plastic Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.52740 1.450 85.9 0.05268 3.7365 0.1252 3.0420 3.4528 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.435 7.435 7.443 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.803 5.803 1.360 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.535 4.535 2.543 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.521 3.521 5.080 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.008 3.008 8.173 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.256 2.256 2.401 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.115 2.115 3.319 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.971 1.971 5.287 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.889 1.889 8.408 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.859 0.000 1.859 1.376 × 10 2 314. MeV 4.065 × 10 2 1.859 0.000 1.859 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.866 0.000 1.866 1.913 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.940 0.000 0.000 1.940 4.016 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.973 0.000 0.000 1.974 5.037 × 10 2 1.40

349

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Sodium monoxide Na 2 O Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.48404 2.270 148.8 0.07501 3.6943 0.1652 2.9793 4.1892 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.330 6.330 8.793 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 4.955 4.956 1.601 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.883 3.884 2.984 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.024 3.024 5.943 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.588 2.588 9.541 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.954 1.954 2.789 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.840 1.840 3.846 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.725 1.725 6.102 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.663 1.664 9.656 × 10 1 283. MeV 3.738 × 10 2 1.646 0.000 1.647 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.647 0.000 1.647 1.571 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.659 0.000 1.660 2.177 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.738 0.000 0.000 1.738 4.531 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.771 0.000 0.000 1.772 5.670 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

350

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Tissue-equivalent gas (Propane based) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.55027 1.826 × 10 -3 59.5 0.09802 3.5159 1.5139 3.9916 9.3529 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 8.132 8.132 6.782 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.337 6.337 1.241 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.943 4.944 2.326 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.831 3.831 4.656 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.269 3.269 7.500 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.450 2.450 2.209 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.303 2.303 3.053 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.158 2.158 4.855 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.084 2.084 7.695 × 10 1 263. MeV 3.527 × 10 2 2.068 0.000 2.069 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 2.071 0.000 2.072 1.252 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 2.097 0.000 2.097 1.732 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.232 0.000 0.000 2.232 3.580 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.289 0.000 0.000 2.290

351

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Lead oxide (PbO) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.40323 9.530 766.7 0.19645 2.7299 0.0356 3.5456 6.2162 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.046 4.046 1.411 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.207 3.207 2.532 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.542 2.542 4.656 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.003 2.003 9.146 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.727 1.727 1.455 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.327 1.327 4.176 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.256 1.256 5.729 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.188 1.189 9.017 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.158 1.158 1.415 × 10 2 236. MeV 3.250 × 10 2 1.155 0.000 1.155 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.161 0.000 0.000 1.161 2.279 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.181 0.000 0.000 1.181 3.133 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.266 0.001 0.000 1.267 6.398 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.299 0.001 0.000 1.301 7.955 × 10 2 1.40

352

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Liquid argon (Ar) Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 18 (Ar) 39.948 (1) 1.396 188.0 0.19559 3.0000 0.2000 3.0000 5.2146 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 5.687 5.687 9.833 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 4.461 4.461 1.786 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.502 3.502 3.321 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.731 2.731 6.598 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.340 2.340 1.058 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.771 1.771 3.084 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.669 1.670 4.250 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.570 1.570 6.732 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.518 1.519 1.063 × 10 2 266. MeV 3.567 × 10 2 1.508 0.000 1.508 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.509 0.000 1.510 1.725 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.526 0.000 0.000 1.526 2.385 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.610 0.000 0.000 1.610 4.934 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.644 0.000 0.000 1.645 6.163

353

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Freon-13 (CF 3 Cl) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.47966 0.950 126.6 0.07238 3.5551 0.3659 3.2337 4.7483 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.416 6.416 8.659 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.019 5.019 1.578 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.930 3.930 2.945 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.057 3.057 5.870 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.615 2.615 9.430 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.971 1.971 2.760 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.857 1.857 3.809 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.745 1.745 6.041 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.685 1.685 9.551 × 10 1 283. MeV 3.738 × 10 2 1.668 0.000 1.668 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.668 0.000 1.668 1.553 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.681 0.000 1.681 2.151 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.762 0.000 0.000 1.763 4.473 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.796 0.000 0.000 1.797 5.596 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

354

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Lutetium silicon oxide [Lu 2 SiO 5 ] Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.42793 7.400 472.0 0.20623 3.0000 0.2732 3.0000 5.4394 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.679 4.679 1.209 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.692 3.693 2.181 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.916 2.916 4.029 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.287 2.287 7.953 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.968 1.968 1.270 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.503 1.503 3.666 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.421 1.422 5.038 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.344 1.344 7.944 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.308 1.308 1.248 × 10 2 242. MeV 3.316 × 10 2 1.304 1.304 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.309 0.000 0.000 1.309 2.014 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.329 0.000 0.000 1.329 2.773 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.415 0.001 0.000 1.416 5.684 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.449 0.001 0.000 1.450 7.080

355

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49839 1.812 99.6 0.11548 3.3832 0.1843 2.7379 3.6027 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.889 6.889 8.045 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.381 5.381 1.468 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.208 4.208 2.744 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.269 3.269 5.477 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.794 2.794 8.807 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.102 2.103 2.583 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.975 1.975 3.567 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.843 1.843 5.674 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.768 1.768 9.010 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.742 0.000 1.742 1.472 × 10 2 307. MeV 3.990 × 10 2 1.742 0.000 1.742 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.750 0.000 1.750 2.045 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.822 0.000 0.000 1.823 4.285 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.854 0.000 0.000 1.855 5.373 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

356

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Liquid H-note density shift (H 2 ) Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 1 (H) 1.00794 (7) 7.080 × 10 -2 21.8 0.32969 3.0000 0.1641 1.9641 2.6783 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 16.508 16.508 3.316 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 12.812 12.812 6.097 × 10 -1 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 9.956 9.956 1.147 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 7.684 7.684 2.307 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 6.539 6.539 3.727 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 4.870 4.870 1.105 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 4.550 4.550 1.531 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 4.217 4.217 2.448 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 4.018 0.000 4.018 3.912 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 3.926 0.000 3.926 6.438 × 10 1 356. MeV 4.497 × 10 2 3.919 0.000 3.919 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 3.922 0.000 3.922 8.988 × 10 1 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 4.029 0.000 4.030 1.906 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 4.084 0.001

357

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Cortical bone (ICRP) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.52130 1.850 106.4 0.06198 3.5919 0.1161 3.0919 3.6488 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.142 7.142 7.765 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.581 5.581 1.417 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.366 4.366 2.646 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.393 3.393 5.281 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.900 2.901 8.489 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.179 2.179 2.489 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.044 2.044 3.440 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.907 1.907 5.475 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.830 1.830 8.700 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.803 0.000 1.803 1.422 × 10 2 303. MeV 3.950 × 10 2 1.803 0.000 1.803 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.812 0.000 1.812 1.976 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.888 0.000 0.000 1.889 4.138 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.922 0.000 0.000 1.923 5.187 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

358

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Freon-13B1 (CF 3 Br) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.45665 1.500 210.5 0.03925 3.7194 0.3522 3.7554 5.3555 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 5.678 5.678 9.844 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 4.454 4.454 1.788 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.498 3.498 3.325 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.729 2.729 6.606 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.339 2.339 1.059 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.771 1.771 3.086 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.671 1.671 4.251 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.574 1.574 6.729 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.524 1.524 1.062 × 10 2 266. MeV 3.567 × 10 2 1.513 0.000 1.513 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.515 0.000 1.515 1.721 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.531 0.000 0.000 1.532 2.378 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.616 0.000 0.000 1.616 4.919 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.650 0.001 0.000 1.651 6.142 × 10 2 1.40 GeV

359

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49062 2.532 125.0 0.08715 3.5638 0.1287 2.8591 3.7178 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.575 6.575 8.449 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.142 5.142 1.540 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.026 4.026 2.874 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.131 3.131 5.729 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.679 2.679 9.204 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.017 2.017 2.695 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.895 1.895 3.721 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.771 1.772 5.914 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.703 1.703 9.381 × 10 1 298. MeV 3.894 × 10 2 1.681 0.000 1.681 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.681 0.000 1.681 1.531 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.690 0.000 1.691 2.125 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.764 0.000 0.000 1.764 4.440 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.796 0.000 0.000 1.797 5.563 × 10 2 1.40

360

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.42976 2.400 354.4 0.03658 3.5134 0.3020 4.2602 5.9881 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.928 4.928 1.143 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.880 3.880 2.067 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.057 3.057 3.828 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.393 2.393 7.574 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.056 2.056 1.211 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.565 1.565 3.509 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.479 1.479 4.827 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.396 1.396 7.623 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.353 1.353 1.200 × 10 2 253. MeV 3.431 × 10 2 1.346 0.000 1.346 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.349 0.000 0.000 1.349 1.942 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.367 0.000 0.000 1.367 2.679 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.451 0.001 0.000 1.452 5.516 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.485 0.001 0.000 1.486 6.877

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Standard rock Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.50000 2.650 136.4 0.08301 3.4120 0.0492 3.0549 3.7738 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.619 6.619 8.400 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.180 5.180 1.530 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.057 4.057 2.854 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.157 3.157 5.687 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.701 2.702 9.133 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.028 2.029 2.675 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.904 1.904 3.695 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.779 1.779 5.878 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.710 1.710 9.331 × 10 1 297. MeV 3.884 × 10 2 1.688 0.000 1.688 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.688 0.000 1.688 1.523 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.698 0.000 1.698 2.114 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.774 0.000 0.000 1.775 4.418 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.808 0.000 0.000 1.808 5.534 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502 × 10

362

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Ceric sulfate dosimeter solution Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.55279 1.030 76.7 0.07666 3.5607 0.2363 2.8769 3.5212 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.909 7.909 6.989 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.170 6.170 1.278 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.819 4.819 2.391 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.739 3.739 4.779 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.193 3.193 7.693 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.398 2.398 2.261 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.255 2.255 3.123 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.102 2.102 4.968 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.013 2.014 7.896 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.980 0.000 1.980 1.292 × 10 2 317. MeV 4.096 × 10 2 1.979 0.000 1.979 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.986 0.000 1.986 1.797 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.062 0.000 0.000 2.062 3.774 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.096 0.000 0.000 2.097 4.735 × 10

363

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Silicon Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 14 (Si) 28.0855 (3) 2.329 173.0 0.14921 3.2546 0.2015 2.8716 4.4355 0.14 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.363 6.363 8.779 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 4.987 4.987 1.595 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.912 3.912 2.969 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.047 3.047 5.905 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.608 2.608 9.476 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.965 1.965 2.770 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.849 1.849 3.822 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.737 1.737 6.064 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.678 1.678 9.590 × 10 1 273. MeV 3.633 × 10 2 1.664 0.000 1.664 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.665 0.000 1.666 1.559 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.681 0.000 1.681 2.157 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.767 0.000 0.000 1.768 4.475 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.803 0.000 0.000 1.804 5.595 × 10 2 1.40 GeV

364

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Polyethylene terephthalate (Mylar) (C 10 H 8 O 4 ) n Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.52037 1.400 78.7 0.12679 3.3076 0.1562 2.6507 3.3262 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.420 7.420 7.451 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.789 5.789 1.362 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.522 4.522 2.548 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.509 3.509 5.093 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.997 2.997 8.197 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.250 2.250 2.409 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.108 2.108 3.329 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.963 1.964 5.305 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.880 1.880 8.440 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.849 0.000 1.849 1.382 × 10 2 317. MeV 4.096 × 10 2 1.848 0.000 1.849 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.855 0.000 1.855 1.922 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.926 0.000 0.000 1.926 4.039 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.958 0.000 0.000 1.959

365

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Dichlorodiethyl ether C 4 Cl 2 H 8 O Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.51744 1.220 103.3 0.06799 3.5250 0.1773 3.1586 4.0135 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.117 7.117 7.789 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.561 5.561 1.421 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.349 4.349 2.655 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.380 3.380 5.300 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.889 2.889 8.521 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.174 2.174 2.499 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.042 2.042 3.450 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.907 1.907 5.486 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.832 1.832 8.708 × 10 1 298. MeV 3.894 × 10 2 1.807 0.000 1.807 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.807 0.000 1.807 1.422 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.817 0.000 1.817 1.974 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.895 0.000 0.000 1.896 4.129 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.930 0.000 0.000 1.931 5.174 × 10

366

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Lead Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 82 (Pb) 207.2 (1) 11.350 823.0 0.09359 3.1608 0.3776 3.8073 6.2018 0.14 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 3.823 3.823 1.524 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.054 3.054 2.705 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.436 2.436 4.927 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 1.928 1.928 9.600 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.666 1.666 1.521 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.283 1.283 4.338 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.215 1.215 5.943 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.151 1.152 9.339 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.124 1.124 1.463 × 10 2 226. MeV 3.145 × 10 2 1.122 0.000 1.123 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.130 0.000 0.000 1.131 2.352 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.151 0.000 0.000 1.152 3.228 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.237 0.001 0.000 1.238 6.572 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.270 0.001 0.000 1.272 8.165 × 10 2 1.40

367

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Sodium iodide (NaI) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.42697 3.667 452.0 0.12516 3.0398 0.1203 3.5920 6.0572 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.703 4.703 1.202 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.710 3.710 2.169 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.928 2.928 4.009 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.297 2.297 7.917 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.975 1.975 1.264 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.509 1.509 3.652 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.427 1.427 5.019 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.347 1.348 7.916 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.310 1.310 1.245 × 10 2 243. MeV 3.325 × 10 2 1.305 1.305 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.310 0.000 0.000 1.310 2.010 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.329 0.000 0.000 1.330 2.768 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.417 0.001 0.000 1.418 5.677 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.452 0.001 0.000 1.453 7.070 × 10 2 1.40 GeV

368

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Polyvinyl alcohol (C 2 H3-O-H) n Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.54480 1.300 69.7 0.11178 3.3893 0.1401 2.6315 3.1115 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.891 7.891 6.999 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.153 6.153 1.280 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.804 4.804 2.396 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.726 3.726 4.793 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.181 3.181 7.717 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.383 2.384 2.270 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.231 2.232 3.140 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.076 2.076 5.007 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.986 1.986 7.974 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.950 0.000 1.950 1.307 × 10 2 324. MeV 4.161 × 10 2 1.949 0.000 1.949 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.955 0.000 1.955 1.820 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.026 0.000 0.000 2.026 3.830 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.059 0.000 0.000 2.059 4.809 × 10 2 1.40

369

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Cesium Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 55 (Cs)132.9054519 (2) 1.873 488.0 0.18233 2.8866 0.5473 3.5914 6.9135 0.14 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.464 4.464 1.277 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.532 3.532 2.294 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.794 2.794 4.224 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.195 2.195 8.315 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.890 1.890 1.325 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.444 1.444 3.820 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.366 1.366 5.248 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.291 1.291 8.274 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.257 1.257 1.300 × 10 2 236. MeV 3.250 × 10 2 1.254 1.254 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.261 0.000 0.000 1.261 2.096 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.284 0.000 0.000 1.285 2.882 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.378 0.001 0.000 1.380 5.881 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.415 0.001 0.000 1.417 7.311 × 10 2

370

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Propane (C 3 H 8 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.58962 1.868 × 10 -3 47.1 0.09916 3.5920 1.4339 3.8011 8.7939 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 8.969 8.969 6.137 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.982 6.982 1.125 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 5.441 5.441 2.109 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 4.212 4.213 4.228 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.592 3.592 6.815 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.688 2.688 2.010 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.525 2.526 2.780 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.365 2.365 4.424 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.281 2.281 7.018 × 10 1 267. MeV 3.577 × 10 2 2.262 0.000 2.263 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 2.265 0.000 2.265 1.143 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 2.291 0.000 2.291 1.582 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.434 0.000 0.000 2.435 3.275 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.495 0.000 0.000 2.496 4.086 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

371

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Polystyrene ([C 6 H 5 CHCH 2 ] n ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.53768 1.060 68.7 0.16454 3.2224 0.1647 2.5031 3.2999 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.803 7.803 7.077 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.084 6.084 1.294 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.749 4.749 2.424 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.683 3.683 4.848 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.144 3.144 7.806 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.359 2.359 2.296 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.210 2.211 3.174 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.058 2.058 5.059 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.970 1.971 8.049 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.937 0.000 1.937 1.318 × 10 2 318. MeV 4.105 × 10 2 1.936 0.000 1.936 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.942 0.000 1.943 1.834 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.015 0.000 0.000 2.015 3.856 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.048 0.000 0.000 2.049 4.841 × 10 2 1.40

372

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Air (dry, 1 atm) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49919 1.205 × 10 -3 85.7 0.10914 3.3994 1.7418 4.2759 10.5961 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.039 7.039 7.862 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.494 5.495 1.436 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.294 4.294 2.686 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.333 3.333 5.366 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.847 2.847 8.633 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.140 2.140 2.535 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.013 2.014 3.501 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.889 1.889 5.562 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.827 1.827 8.803 × 10 1 257. MeV 3.471 × 10 2 1.815 0.000 1.816 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.819 0.000 1.819 1.430 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.844 0.000 1.844 1.977 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.968 0.000 0.000 1.968 4.074 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.020 0.000 0.000 2.021 5.077 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

373

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.41315 8.300 600.7 0.22758 3.0000 0.4068 3.0023 5.8528 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 4.333 4.333 1.311 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.426 3.426 2.360 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.710 2.711 4.350 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.131 2.131 8.566 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.835 1.835 1.365 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.406 1.406 3.931 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.331 1.331 5.397 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.261 1.261 8.498 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.231 1.231 1.333 × 10 2 227. MeV 3.154 × 10 2 1.229 1.230 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.237 0.000 0.000 1.238 2.145 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.260 0.000 0.000 1.260 2.946 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.349 0.001 0.000 1.350 6.007 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.383 0.001 0.000 1.385 7.469 × 10 2 1.40

374

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Carbon (compact) Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 6 (C) [12.0107 (8)] 2.265 78.0 0.26142 2.8697 -0.0178 2.3415 2.8680 0.12 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.116 7.116 7.772 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.549 5.549 1.420 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.331 4.331 2.658 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.355 3.355 5.318 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.861 2.861 8.567 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.126 2.127 2.531 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.991 1.992 3.505 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.854 1.854 5.597 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.775 1.775 8.917 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.745 0.000 1.745 1.462 × 10 2 317. MeV 4.096 × 10 2 1.745 0.000 1.745 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.751 0.000 1.751 2.034 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.819 0.000 0.000 1.820 4.275 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.850 0.000 0.000 1.851 5.365 × 10

375

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Methanol (CH 3 OH) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.56176 0.791 67.6 0.08970 3.5477 0.2529 2.7639 3.5160 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 8.169 8.169 6.759 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.369 6.369 1.236 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.972 4.972 2.315 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.855 3.855 4.631 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.291 3.291 7.457 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.469 2.469 2.194 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.321 2.322 3.032 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.166 2.166 4.823 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.074 2.074 7.664 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 2.039 0.000 2.039 1.254 × 10 2 318. MeV 4.105 × 10 2 2.038 0.000 2.039 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 2.045 0.000 2.045 1.744 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.121 0.000 0.000 2.122 3.665 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.156 0.000 0.000 2.157 4.600 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502 ×

376

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Carbon (amorphous) Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 6 (C) 12.0107 (8) 2.000 78.0 0.20240 3.0036 -0.0351 2.4860 2.9925 0.10 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.117 7.117 7.771 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.550 5.551 1.420 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.332 4.332 2.658 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.357 3.357 5.317 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.862 2.862 8.564 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.129 2.129 2.529 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.994 1.994 3.502 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.857 1.857 5.591 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.778 1.779 8.905 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.749 0.000 1.749 1.459 × 10 2 313. MeV 4.055 × 10 2 1.749 0.000 1.749 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.755 0.000 1.756 2.030 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.824 0.000 0.000 1.825 4.266 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.855 0.000 0.000 1.856 5.353 × 10

377

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Mix D wax Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.56479 0.990 60.9 0.07490 3.6823 0.1371 2.7145 3.0780 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 8.322 8.322 6.628 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.485 6.486 1.213 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 5.060 5.060 2.273 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.922 3.922 4.549 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.347 3.347 7.327 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.505 2.506 2.158 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.346 2.346 2.985 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.182 2.182 4.761 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.087 2.087 7.584 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 2.049 0.000 2.049 1.243 × 10 2 328. MeV 4.201 × 10 2 2.048 0.000 2.048 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 2.053 0.000 2.053 1.731 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.125 0.000 0.000 2.125 3.647 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.158 0.000 0.000 2.159 4.581 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502 × 10 3 2.213

378

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Sodium nitrate NaNO 3 Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49415 2.261 114.6 0.09391 3.5097 0.1534 2.8221 3.6502 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.702 6.702 8.281 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.239 5.239 1.510 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.100 4.100 2.820 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.187 3.187 5.624 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.726 2.726 9.039 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.053 2.053 2.648 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.927 1.927 3.656 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.800 1.800 5.814 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.729 1.729 9.228 × 10 1 298. MeV 3.894 × 10 2 1.705 0.000 1.705 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.705 0.000 1.705 1.507 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.714 0.000 1.714 2.092 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.787 0.000 0.000 1.787 4.377 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.819 0.000 0.000 1.819 5.486 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

379

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Freon-12B2 (CF 2 Br 2 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.44901 1.800 284.9 0.05144 3.5565 0.3406 3.7956 5.7976 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 5.330 5.330 1.053 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 4.190 4.190 1.908 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 3.297 3.297 3.540 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 2.577 2.577 7.017 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.212 2.212 1.123 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.680 1.680 3.263 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.586 1.586 4.491 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.496 1.496 7.099 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.452 1.452 1.118 × 10 2 252. MeV 3.421 × 10 2 1.445 0.000 1.445 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.448 0.000 1.449 1.809 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.467 0.000 0.000 1.468 2.496 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.556 0.000 0.000 1.557 5.139 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.592 0.001 0.000 1.593 6.409 × 10 2 1.40 GeV

380

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Eye lens (ICRP) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.54977 1.100 73.3 0.09690 3.4550 0.2070 2.7446 3.3720 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.912 7.912 6.984 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 6.171 6.171 1.277 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.819 4.819 2.390 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.738 3.738 4.779 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.192 3.192 7.693 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.396 2.396 2.262 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.251 2.251 3.125 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 2.095 2.096 4.976 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 2.006 2.006 7.914 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.971 0.000 1.971 1.296 × 10 2 318. MeV 4.105 × 10 2 1.971 0.000 1.971 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.977 0.000 1.977 1.803 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 2.051 0.000 0.000 2.051 3.790 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 2.085 0.000 0.000 2.085 4.756 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502 × 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Compact bone (ICRU) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.53010 1.850 91.9 0.05822 3.6419 0.0944 3.0201 3.3390 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.406 7.406 7.477 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.783 5.783 1.365 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.521 4.521 2.552 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.511 3.511 5.097 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 3.000 3.000 8.199 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.247 2.247 2.408 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.106 2.106 3.330 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.962 1.962 5.307 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.880 1.880 8.444 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.849 0.000 1.850 1.382 × 10 2 314. MeV 4.065 × 10 2 1.849 0.000 1.849 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.856 0.000 1.857 1.922 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.930 0.000 0.000 1.930 4.036 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.963 0.000 0.000 1.964 5.063 × 10 2 1.40 GeV 1.502

382

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Polyimide film (C 22 H 10 N 2 O 5 ) n Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.51264 1.420 79.6 0.15972 3.1921 0.1509 2.5631 3.3497 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.299 7.299 7.576 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.695 5.695 1.385 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.449 4.449 2.590 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.453 3.453 5.177 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.949 2.949 8.332 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.214 2.214 2.448 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.074 2.074 3.384 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.932 1.932 5.392 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.851 1.851 8.577 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.820 0.000 1.820 1.404 × 10 2 314. MeV 4.065 × 10 2 1.820 0.000 1.820 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.826 0.000 1.827 1.953 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.897 0.000 0.000 1.898 4.102 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.929 0.000 0.000 1.930 5.147 × 10 2 1.40

383

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Silicon dioxide (fused quartz) (SiO 2 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49930 2.200 139.2 0.08408 3.5064 0.1500 3.0140 4.0560 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 6.591 6.591 8.438 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.158 5.158 1.537 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.041 4.041 2.866 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.145 3.145 5.710 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.691 2.691 9.170 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.030 2.030 2.682 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.908 1.908 3.701 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.786 1.786 5.878 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.719 1.719 9.315 × 10 1 288. MeV 3.788 × 10 2 1.699 0.000 1.699 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.699 0.000 1.699 1.518 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.711 0.000 1.711 2.105 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.789 0.000 0.000 1.790 4.391 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.823 0.000 0.000 1.824 5.497

384

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Radon Z A [g/mol] ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 86 (Rn) [222.01758 (2)]9.066 × 10 -3 794.0 0.20798 2.7409 1.5368 4.9889 13.2839 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 3.782 3.782 1.535 × 10 0 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 3.018 3.018 2.730 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 2.405 2.405 4.980 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 1.902 1.902 9.715 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 1.644 1.644 1.540 × 10 1 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 1.267 1.267 4.394 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 1.201 1.201 6.019 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.140 1.140 9.452 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.116 1.117 1.479 × 10 2 216. MeV 3.039 × 10 2 1.116 1.116 Minimum ionization 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.127 0.000 0.000 1.128 2.372 × 10 2 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.154 0.000 0.000 1.154 3.249 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.258 0.001 0.000 1.260 6.559 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.300 0.001 0.000 1.302 8.119

385

Table  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Muons Muons in Solid carbon dioxide (dry ice; CO 2 ) Z/A ρ [g/cm 3 ] I [eV] a k = m s x 0 x 1 C δ 0 0.49989 1.563 85.0 0.43387 3.0000 0.2000 2.0000 3.4513 0.00 T p Ionization Brems Pair prod Photonucl Total CSDA range [MeV/c] [MeV cm 2 /g] [g/cm 2 ] 10.0 MeV 4.704 × 10 1 7.057 7.057 7.841 × 10 -1 14.0 MeV 5.616 × 10 1 5.508 5.508 1.432 × 10 0 20.0 MeV 6.802 × 10 1 4.304 4.304 2.679 × 10 0 30.0 MeV 8.509 × 10 1 3.341 3.341 5.353 × 10 0 40.0 MeV 1.003 × 10 2 2.854 2.854 8.612 × 10 0 80.0 MeV 1.527 × 10 2 2.145 2.145 2.529 × 10 1 100. MeV 1.764 × 10 2 2.017 2.017 3.493 × 10 1 140. MeV 2.218 × 10 2 1.886 1.886 5.554 × 10 1 200. MeV 2.868 × 10 2 1.812 1.812 8.811 × 10 1 300. MeV 3.917 × 10 2 1.787 0.000 1.787 1.438 × 10 2 303. MeV 3.950 × 10 2 1.787 0.000 1.787 Minimum ionization 400. MeV 4.945 × 10 2 1.795 0.000 1.795 1.997 × 10 2 800. MeV 8.995 × 10 2 1.866 0.000 0.000 1.866 4.182 × 10 2 1.00 GeV 1.101 × 10 3 1.896 0.000 0.000 1.897 5.245 × 10

386

Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Energy Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-60274 December 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

387

Clean Cities 2013 Annual Metrics Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy asks its Clean Cities program coordinators to submit annual reports of their activities and accomplishments for the previous calendar year. Data and information are submitted via an online database that is maintained as part of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Coordinators submit a range of data that characterize the membership, funding, projects, and activities of their coalitions. They also submit data about sales of alternative fuels, deployment of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), idle-reduction (IR) initiatives, fuel economy activities, and programs to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT). NREL analyzes the data and translates them into petroleum-use reduction impacts, which are summarized in this 2013 Annual Metrics Report.

Johnson, C.; Singer, M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Bi-metric Gravity and "Dark Matter"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a bi-metric theory of gravity containing a length scale of galactic size. For distances less than this scale the theory satisfies the standard tests of General Relativity. For distances greater than this scale the theory yields an effective gravitational constant much larger than the locally observed value of Newton's constant. The transition from one regime to the other through the galactic scale can explain the observed rotation curves of galaxies and hence the effects normally attributed to the presence of dark matter. Phenomena on an extragalactic scale such as galactic clusters and the expansion of the universe are controlled by the enhanced gravitational coupling. This provides an explanation of the missing matter normally invoked to account for the observed value of Hubble's constant in relation to observed matter.

I. T. Drummond

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Merging electromagnetism with space-time metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work, it is shown that the electromagnetism may be directly associated to the four-dimensional space-time geometry. The starting point is an analysis of the geodesic equation of general relativity where it is verified that it contains implicitly the effects of the Coulomb and the Lorentz forces. Consequently, some components of the metric tensor are identified with the components of the four-vector electromagnetic potential. Then, it is constructed a low-field equation for the electromagnetism in the same structure of the Einstein field equations for the gravitation, relating the curvature of space-time to sources of charge and current density. In this framework, all the Maxwell equations are implicit. A proof of consistency with the framework of quantum mechanics is shown.

C. A. Duarte

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Variable White Dwarf Data Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Below, I give a brief explanation of the information in these tables. In all cases, I list the WD {number_sign}, either from the catalog of McCook {ampersand} Sion (1987) or determined by me from the epoch 1950 coordinates. Next, I list the most commonly used name (or alias), then I list the variable star designation if it is available. If not, I list the constellation name and a V** or?? depending on what the last designated variable star for that constellation is. I present epoch 2000 coordinates for all of the stars, which I precessed from the 1950 ones in most cases. I do not include proper motion effects; this is negligible for all except the largest proper motion DAV stars, such as L 19-2, BPM 37093, B 808, and G 29-38. Even in these cases, the error is no more than 30` in declination and 2 s in right ascension. I culled effective temperatures from the latest work (listed under each table); they are now much more homogeneous than before. I pulled the magnitude estimates from the appropriate paper, and they are mean values integrated over several cycles. The amplitude given is for the height of a typical pulse in the light curve. The periods correspond the dominant ones found in the light curve. In some cases, there is a band of power in a given period range, or the light curve is very complex, and I indicate this in the table. In the references, I generally list the paper with the most comprehensive pulsation analysis for the star in question. In some cases, there is more than one good reference, and I list them as well.

Bradley, P. A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

HELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a solar flare 11 2.3.1 Flare luminosity and mechanical energy 11 2.3.2 The impulsive phase (hard X with the term "solar flare" dominate our thinking about energy conversion from magnetic storage to other forms approaches to the problems involved in phys- ically characterizing the solar atmosphere; see also the lecture

Hudson, Hugh

392

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ......................... 0 2 0 6,256 6,258 Delaware ........................ 0 2 0 0 2 Georgia........................... 0 * 0 0 * Hawaii............................. 2,554 5 0 0 2,559 Illinois.............................. 0 15 0 0 15 Indiana............................ 0 30 0 0 30 Iowa ................................ 0 24 3 0 27 Kentucky......................... 0 15 0 0 15 Maryland ......................... 0 181 0 0 181 Massachusetts................ 0 13 0 0 13 Minnesota ....................... 0 46 0 0 46 Missouri .......................... * 6 0 0 6 Nebraska ........................ 0 28 0 0 28 New Hampshire .............. 0 44 0 0 44 New Jersey ..................... 0 0 0 489 489 New York ........................

393

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ......................... 0 3 0 7,525 7,527 Connecticut..................... 0 * 0 0 * Delaware ........................ 0 2 0 0 2 Georgia........................... 0 0 52 * 52 Hawaii............................. 2,438 9 0 0 2,447 Illinois.............................. 0 20 0 0 20 Indiana............................ 0 * 0 0 * Iowa ................................ 0 3 0 0 3 Kentucky......................... 0 18 0 0 18 Maryland ......................... 0 170 0 0 170 Massachusetts................ 0 10 0 0 10 Minnesota ....................... 0 47 0 0 47 Missouri .......................... * 10 0 0 10 Nebraska ........................ 0 18 0 0 18 New Jersey ..................... 0 0 0 454 454 New York ........................

394

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ......................... 0 4 0 5,144 5,148 Delaware ........................ 0 1 0 0 1 Georgia........................... 0 0 732 0 732 Hawaii............................. 2,465 6 0 0 2,472 Illinois.............................. 0 17 0 0 17 Indiana............................ 0 1 0 0 1 Iowa ................................ 0 2 0 0 2 Kentucky......................... 0 5 0 0 5 Louisiana ........................ 0 0 249 0 249 Maryland ......................... 0 115 0 0 115 Massachusetts................ 0 * 0 0 * Minnesota ....................... 0 12 0 0 12 Missouri .......................... * 18 0 0 18 Nebraska ........................ 0 12 0 0 12 New Jersey ..................... 0 0 0 457 457 New York ........................

395

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2007 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ......................... 0 3 0 6,866 6,869 Delaware ........................ 0 5 0 0 5 Georgia........................... 0 2 0 0 2 Hawaii............................. 2,679 4 0 0 2,683 Illinois.............................. 0 11 0 0 11 Indiana............................ 0 81 0 554 635 Iowa ................................ 0 2 38 0 40 Kentucky......................... 0 124 0 0 124 Maryland ......................... 0 245 0 0 245 Massachusetts................ 0 15 0 0 15 Minnesota ....................... 0 54 0 0 54 Missouri .......................... 7 60 0 0 66 Nebraska ........................ 0 33 0 0 33 New Hampshire .............. 0 9 0 0 9 New Jersey ..................... 0 0 0 379 379 New York ........................

396

Table-top job analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Low Economic Growth Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main Low Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary Low Economic Growth Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year Low Economic Growth Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions

398

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - High Economic Growth Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main High Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary High Economic Growth Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Excel Gif

399

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicle Conversion Vehicle Conversion Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on AddThis.com... Vehicle Conversion Basics Photo of a Ford Transit Connect converted to run on compressed natural gas. A Ford Transit Connect converted to run on compressed natural gas. A converted vehicle or engine is one modified to use a different fuel or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EINSTEIN METRICS AND YAMABE INVARIANTS OF WEIGHTED PROJECTIVE SPACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the singular set, such that near any singular point the metric locally lifts to a smooth -invariant metric on B. Introduction This article is concerned with certain orbifolds in dimension four with isolated singularities points if and only if (r, q, p) = (1, 1

Viaclovsky, Jeff

402

Optimal realizations of generic 5-point metrics Jack Koolen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.moulton@cmp.uea.ac.uk FAX: +44 1603 593345 5 October, 2007 1 #12;Abstract Given a metric d on a finite set X, a realization classes [12]. An explicit description of Type I,II and III metrics is presented in Section 2. Now, suppose

403

Metrics to Characterize Airport Operational Performance Using Surface Surveillance Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tower BOS Boston General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport EDCT Expected Departure Clearance International Airport, and are therefore evaluated and discussed using this airport as an example. These metricsMetrics to Characterize Airport Operational Performance Using Surface Surveillance Data Harshad

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

404

Heat kernel estimates and related inequalities on metric graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider metric graphs with Kirchhoff boundary conditions. We study the intrinsic metric, volume doubling and a Poincar\\'e inequality. This enables us to prove a parabolic Harnack inequality. The proof involves various techniques from the theory of strongly local Dirichlet forms. Along our way we show Sobolev and Nash type inequalities and related heat kernel estimates.

Sebastian Haeseler

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

METRICS FOR STRATEGIC ALLIANCE John Callahan, Carleton University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METRICS FOR STRATEGIC ALLIANCE CONTROL John Callahan, Carleton University and Scott MacKenzie, Nortel Networks Suggested keywords: Metrics; Strategic alliance; Product development; Control; Learning a feedback control model of product development alliance management. The model allows us to place alliance

Callahan, John

406

Conversations for a Smarter Planet: 4 in a Series Setting the table for a smarter planet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are now primary sources of our food supply. Many of those countries do not have consistent standards and industry bodies. As the world becomes smaller and "flatter," countries that at one time seemed distant global systems -- from energy to climate to healthcare to trade. The result is a whole host

407

4.1.10 List of frequently used symbols and abbreviations, table of energy conversion factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume B Phonon States of Alloys. Electron States and Fermi Surfaces of Strained Elements of Volume 13 Metals: Phonon States. Electron States and Fermi Surfaces of Landolt-Brns...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Regular Black Hole Metric with Three Constants of Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely characterized by their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Several parametric spacetimes which deviate from the Kerr metric have been proposed in order to test this theorem with observations of black holes in both the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra. Such metrics often contain naked singularities or closed timelike curves in the vicinity of the compact objects that can limit the applicability of the metrics to compact objects that do not spin rapidly, and generally admit only two constants of motion. The existence of a third constant, however, can facilitate the calculation of observables, because the equations of motion can be written in first-order form. In this paper, I design a Kerr-like black hole metric which is regular everywhere outside of the event horizon, possesses three independent constants of motion, and depends nonlinearly on four free functions that parameterize potential deviations from ...

Johannsen, Tim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Microsoft Word - table_09.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 9 Created on: 12/12/2013 2:08:24 PM Table 9. Underground natural gas storage - by season, 2011-2013 (volumes in billion cubic feet) Natural Gas in Underground Storage at End of Period Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Storage Activity Year, Season, and Month Base Gas Working Gas Total Volume Percent Injections Withdrawals Net Withdrawals a 2011 Refill Season April 4,304 1,788 6,092 -223 -11.1 312 100 -212 May 4,304 2,187 6,491 -233 -9.6 458 58 -399 June 4,302 2,530 6,831 -210 -7.7 421 80 -340 July 4,300 2,775 7,075 -190 -6.4 359 116 -244 August 4,300 3,019 7,319 -134 -4.2 370 126 -244 September 4,301 3,416 7,717 -92 -2.6 454 55

416

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) June 2013 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2011 2011 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.09 5.66 26.37 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.90 0.61 3.01 8.75 2.56 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.64 6.70 29.33 23.12 29.76 31.60 20.07 34.62 26.61 - 14.42 20.85 6.36 47.13 25.17 Arizona 1.99 7.07 27.73 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.71 0.75 6.31 10.79 2.16 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 1.93 6.94 26.37 22.45 26.66 27.35 17.35 33.22

417

Microsoft Word - table_13.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly 31 Table 13 Created on: 12/12/2013 2:28:44 PM Table 13. Activities of underground natural gas storage operators, by state, September 2013 (volumes in million cubic feet) State Field Count Total Storage Capacity Working Gas Storage Capacity Natural Gas in Underground Storage at End of Period Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Storage Activity Base Gas Working Gas Total Volume Percent Injections Withdrawals Alabama 2 35,400 27,350 8,050 21,262 29,312 2,852 15.5 1,743 450 Alaska a 5 83,592 67,915 14,197 20,455 34,652 NA NA 1,981 30 Arkansas 2 21,853 12,178 9,648 3,372 13,020 -1,050 -23.7 204 0 California 14 599,711 374,296

418

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

419

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

420

Microsoft Word - table_01.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 1 Table 1. Summary of natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2008-2013 (billion cubic feet) Year and Month Gross Withdrawals Marketed Production NGPL Production a Dry Gas Production b Supplemental Gaseous Fuels c Net Imports Net Storage Withdrawals d Balancing Item e Consumption f 2008 Total 25,636 21,112 953 20,159 61 3,021 34 2 23,277 2009 Total 26,057 21,648 1,024 20,624 65 2,679 -355 -103 22,910 2010 Total 26,816 22,382 1,066 21,316 65 2,604 -13 115 24,087 2011 January 2,299 1,953 92 1,861 5 236 811 R -24 R 2,889 February 2,104 1,729 82 1,647 4 186 594 R 20 R 2,452 March 2,411 2,002 95 1,908 5 171 151 R -4 R 2,230 April 2,350 1,961 93 1,868 5 R 152 -216 R 17 R 1,825 May 2,411 2,031

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - table_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. Natural gas production, transmission, and consumption, by state, 2012 (million cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 4 Table 2 Alabama 215,710 7,110 -162,223 617,883 0 -2,478 0 666,738 Alaska 351,259 21,470 22,663 0 -9,342 0 0 343,110 Arizona 117 0 -13,236 389,036 -43,838 0 0 332,079 Arkansas 1,146,168 424 -18,281 -831,755 0 -103 0 295,811 California 246,822 12,755 104,820 2,222,355 -109,787 48,071 0 2,403,385 Colorado 1,709,376 81,943 -107,940 -1,077,968 0 2,570 4,412 443,367 Connecticut 0 0 4,191 225,228 0 260 0 229,159 Delaware 0 0 21,035 80,692 0 51 * 101,676 District of Columbia 0 0 497 28,075 0 0 0 28,572 Florida 18,681 0 15,168 1,294,620 0 0 0 1,328,469

422

TableHC2.12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detached Attached 2 to 4 Units Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

423

TableHC10.13.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or More... 0.3 Q Q Q Q Lighting Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage...

424

TABLE54.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Administration (EIA) Forms EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," and EIA-813, Monthly Crude Oil Report." Table 54. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline...

425

TABLE19.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table 19. PAD District IV-Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels) January-July 2004 Products, Crude Oil...

426

TABLE15.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table 15. PAD District III-Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels) January-July 2004 Products, Crude Oil...

427

TABLE53.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table 53. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between July 2004 Crude Oil ... 0 383 0...

428

TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Thousand Barrels) Table 11. PAD District II-Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum January-July 2004 Products, Crude Oil...

429

2011 Annual Report Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ...................12 Smart Grid Cyber Security.....................................................13 ICT Supply ChainComputer Security Division 2011 Annual Report #12;Table of Contents Welcome ................................................................. 1 Division Organization .................................................2 The Computer Security

430

Summary Statistics Table 1. Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Cost Report." Figure Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 3 Table 2. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users (Cents per Gallon...

431

GIS DEVELOPMENT GUIDE Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS DEVELOPMENT GUIDE Volume II Table of Contents SURVEY OF AVAILABLE DATA Introduction ...................................................................................13 EVALUATING GIS HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE Introduction ...................................................................................14 Sources of Information About GIS......................................................14 GIS

Ghelli, Giorgio

432

Microsoft Word - Appendix B.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix B Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2004 165 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 2000 through 2004 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 2000 through 2004. A brief documentation for the

433

Siting handbook for small wind energy conversion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook was written to serve as a siting guide for individuals wishing to install small wind energy conversion systems (WECS); that is, machines having a rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts. It incorporates half a century of siting experience gained by WECS owners and manufacturers, as well as recently developed siting techniques. The user needs no technical background in meteorology or engineering to understand and apply the siting principles discussed; he needs only a knowledge of basic arithmetic and the ability to understand simple graphs and tables. By properly using the siting techniques, an owner can select a site that will yield the most power at the least installation cost, the least maintenance cost, and the least risk of damage or accidental injury.

Wegley, H.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Orgill, M.M.; Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - High Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6-2030) 6-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 XLS GIF Spreadsheets are provided in Excel High Price Case Tables (2006-2030) Table Title Formats Summary High Price Case Tables PDF GIF High Price Case Tables XLS GIF Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary XLS GIF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption XLS GIF Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions XLS GIF Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

435

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-119 Betweenness Centrality Metrics for Assessing Electrical Power Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-119 Betweenness Centrality Metrics for Assessing. Hawick}, title = {Betweenness Centrality Metrics for Assessing Electrical Power Network Robustness Metrics for Assessing Electrical Power Network Robustness against Fragmentation and Node Failure K

Hawick, Ken

436

Photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy Michael Gratzel * * ( michael...industry, have dominated photovoltaic solar energy converters. These systems have...promising perspectives. renewable energy|solar energy conversion|photovoltaic...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Grounded Situation Models for Situated Conversational Assistants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Situated Conversational Assistant (SCA) is a system with sensing, acting and speech synthesis/recognition abilities, which engages in physically situated natural language conversation with human partners and assists them ...

Mavridis, Nikolaos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Biofuel Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:31pm Addthis The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers are also exploring photobiological conversion processes. Biochemical Conversion Processes In biochemical conversion processes, enzymes and microorganisms are used as biocatalysts to convert biomass or biomass-derived compounds into desirable products. Cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes break down the carbohydrate fractions of biomass to five- and six-carbon sugars in a process known as hydrolysis. Yeast and bacteria then ferment the sugars into products such as ethanol. Biotechnology advances are expected to lead to dramatic

439

Photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy ... In this article, the author considers the use of inorganic photochemical reactions for the conversion and storage of solar energy. ... HOMO?LUMO energy difference values compared ... ...

Charles Kutal

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The National Conversion Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) is a recycling project under way at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Colorado. The recycling aim of the project is threefold: to reuse existing nuclear weapon component production facilities for the production of commercially marketable products, to reuse existing material (uranium, beryllium, and radioactively contaminated scrap metals) for the production of these products, and to reemploy former Rocky Flats workers in this process.

Roberts, A.V. [BNFL, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

Tabak, S.A. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States). Central Research Lab.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

The room noise criteria (RNC) metric.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent ANSI S12.2:2008 room noise criteria contains both a survey and an engineering method to specify room noise criteria. The methods use A?weighting and extended NC respectively. A new metric titled like the standard room noise criteria (RNC) is included as a diagnostic tool. It is based on human hearing and more correctly assesses low?frequency sound. In particular it is sensitive to the standard deviation to random noise and/or low?frequency surging in the 16125 Hz octave bands such as the sound that can be produced by HVAC systems or other devices. It provides a bridge between the NC and RC criteria by correctly predicting the need for the less stringent (at low frequencies) NC criteria when the HVAC system is well designed (no surging moderate standard deviation) and also correctly predicting the more stringent (at low frequencies) RC criteria when the HVAC system noise has a large standard deviation and/or surging.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Exhibit C Table of Contents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Dated 5-20-13 Subcontract No. 241314 Page 1 of 5 EXHIBIT "C" SCHEDULES AND LISTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Form Title A Schedule of Quantities and Prices B Milestone and Payment Schedule C Lower-Tier Subcontractor and Vendor List Exhibit C Schedules and Lists Dated 5-20-13 Subcontract No. 241314 Page 2 of 5 EXHIBIT "C" FORM A SCHEDULE OF QUANTITIES AND PRICES NOTE: This Exhibit "C" Form A is part of the model subcontract for Trinity and is provided to Offerors for informational purposes only. It is not intended that this form be returned with the Offeror's proposal. 1.0 WORK TO BE PERFORMED Work shall be performed strictly in accordance with requirements of the Subcontract

444

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2005 Alabama .................................. 255,157 9,748 13,759 37,048 Alaska...................................... 3,089,229 23,700 27,956 105,449 Arkansas.................................. 16,756 177 231 786 California ................................. 226,230 11,101 13,748 45,926 Colorado .................................. 730,948 25,603 34,782 95,881 Florida...................................... 3,584 359 495 1,400 Illinois....................................... 280 37 46 129 Kansas..................................... 476,656 22,165 31,521 85,737 Kentucky.................................. 38,792 1,411 1,716 5,725 Louisiana ................................. 2,527,636 73,035 103,381

445

Microsoft Word - table_05.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 5. Number of Producing Gas Wells by State and the Gulf of Mexico, December 31, 2006-2010 Alabama .......................................................... 6,227 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 Alaska.............................................................. 231 239 261 261 269 Arizona ............................................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Arkansas.......................................................... 3,814 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 California ......................................................... 1,451 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 Colorado .......................................................... 20,568 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 Gulf of Mexico.................................................. 2,419 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 Illinois...............................................................

446

Microsoft Word - table_06.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 6. Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas, 2004-2008, and by State, 2008 2004 Total ............................ 15,223,749 -- 5.46 19,517,491 106,521,974 2005 Total ............................ 15,425,867 -- 7.33 18,927,095 138,750,746 2006 Total ............................ 15,981,421 -- 6.39 19,409,674 124,074,399 2007 Total ............................ R 16,335,710 -- R 6.25 R 20,196,346 R 126,164,553 2008 Total ............................ 18,424,440 -- 7.96 21,239,516 169,038,089 Alabama ............................... 246,747 2,382,188 9.65 257,884 2,489,704 Alaska................................... 337,359 2,493,128 7.39 398,442 2,944,546 Arizona ................................. 503 3,568 7.09 523 3,710 Arkansas...............................

447

Microsoft Word - table_21.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 21. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers by Type of Service and State, 2008-2009 Alabama ...................... 2,476 281 2,757 2,789 271 3,060 Alaska.......................... 2 4 6 2 1 3 Arizona ........................ 285 98 383 274 116 390 Arkansas...................... 648 456 1,104 582 443 1,025 California ..................... 36,124 R 3,467 R 39,591 35,126 3,762 38,888 Colorado ...................... 341 4,475 4,816 297 4,787 5,084 Connecticut.................. 2,386 810 3,196 2,228 910 3,138 Delaware ..................... 96 69 165 39 73 112 Florida.......................... 161 288 449 123 484 607 Georgia........................ 1,003 1,887 2,890 956 1,298 2,254 Hawaii.......................... 27 0 27 25 0 25 Idaho............................ 108 91 199 109 78 187 Illinois...........................

448

Microsoft Word - table_21.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 21. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers by Type of Service and State, 2004-2005 Alabama ...................... 2,495 R 304 R 2,799 2,487 299 2,786 Alaska.......................... 6 4 10 7 5 12 Arizona ........................ 328 86 414 319 106 425 Arkansas...................... 782 R 441 R 1,223 671 449 1,120 California ..................... 39,426 2,061 41,487 38,150 2,076 40,226 Colorado ...................... 393 3,782 4,175 364 3,954 4,318 Connecticut.................. 2,625 845 3,470 2,618 819 3,437 Delaware ..................... 134 52 186 124 55 179 Florida.......................... R 174 224 R 398 159 273 432 Georgia........................ R 993 2,168 R 3,161 854 2,599 3,453 Hawaii.......................... 29 0 29 28 0 28 Idaho............................ 117 79 196 116 79 195

449

Microsoft Word - table_05.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 5. Number of Wells Producing Gas and Gas Condensate by State and the Gulf of Mexico, December 31, 2001-2005 Alabama .......................................................... 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 5,523 Alaska.............................................................. 170 165 195 224 227 Arizona ............................................................ 8 7 9 6 6 Arkansas.......................................................... 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 2,878 California ......................................................... 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 Colorado .......................................................... 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 22,691 Gulf of Mexico.................................................. 3,271 3,245 3,039 2,781 2,123 Illinois...............................................................

450

EM International Program Action Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 E M I n t e r n a t i o n a l P r o g r a m s Page 1 ACTION TABLE Subject Lead Office Engaging Country Meeting Location Purpose Status Date of Event 3 rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operations N. Buschman, EM-22 Germany Albuquerque & Carlsbad, NM Continue collaboration with Germans on salt repository research, design and operations. Draft agenda prepared. October 8-12, 2012 International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Ministerial R. Elmetti, EM- 2.1 Multilateral Marrakech, Morocco To support the development of nuclear energy infrastructure globally through workforce training, information sharing, and approaches related to the safe, secure and responsible use of

451

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2009 Alabama .................................. 248,232 11,667 17,232 42,984 Alaska...................................... 2,830,034 19,542 22,925 86,767 Arkansas.................................. 2,352 125 168 541 California ................................. 198,213 11,042 13,722 45,669 Colorado .................................. 1,233,260 47,705 67,607 174,337 Illinois....................................... 164 24 31 84 Kansas..................................... 370,670 18,863 26,948 72,922 Kentucky.................................. 60,167 2,469 3,270 9,982 Louisiana ................................. 2,175,026 67,067 95,359 250,586 Michigan .................................. 23,819 2,409

452

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2006 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ...................... 0 11 0 0 6,138 6,149 Connecticut.................. 0 91 0 0 0 91 Delaware ..................... 0 * 0 0 0 * Georgia........................ 0 3 0 0 0 3 Hawaii.......................... 2,610 3 0 0 0 2,613 Illinois........................... 0 13 0 0 0 13 Indiana......................... 0 2 0 0 1,640 1,642 Iowa ............................. 0 * 0 0 46 46 Kentucky...................... 0 3 0 0 0 3 Maryland ...................... 0 41 0 0 0 41 Massachusetts............. 0 51 0 0 0 51 Minnesota .................... 0 13 0 0 0 13 Missouri ....................... 0 78 0 0 0 78 Nebraska ..................... 0 19 0 0 0 19 New Hampshire ........... 0 92 0 0 0 92 New Jersey .................. 0 0 0 0 175 175 New York .....................

453

Microsoft Word - table_09.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Table 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 2004-2008 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada a .................................................... 3,606,543 3,700,454 3,589,995 3,782,708 3,589,221 Mexico ...................................................... 0 9,320 12,749 54,062 43,314 Total Pipeline Imports............................. 3,606,543 3,709,774 3,602,744 3,836,770 3,632,535 LNG Algeria....................................................... 120,343 97,157 17,449 77,299 0 Australia.................................................... 14,990 0 0 0 0 Egypt......................................................... 0 72,540 119,528 114,580 54,839 Equatorial Guinea .....................................

454

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2007 Alabama .................................. 257,443 13,381 19,831 48,922 Alaska...................................... 2,965,956 22,419 26,332 99,472 Arkansas.................................. 11,532 126 162 552 California ................................. 206,239 11,388 13,521 47,045 Colorado .................................. 888,705 27,447 38,180 102,563 Florida...................................... 2,422 103 132 423 Illinois....................................... 235 38 48 131 Kansas..................................... 391,022 19,600 28,063 74,941 Kentucky.................................. 38,158 1,455 1,957 5,917 Louisiana ................................. 2,857,443 77,905 110,745

455

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

456

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2008 Alabama .................................. 253,028 11,753 17,222 43,191 Alaska...................................... 2,901,760 20,779 24,337 92,305 Arkansas.................................. 6,531 103 139 446 California ................................. 195,272 11,179 13,972 46,176 Colorado .................................. 1,029,641 37,804 53,590 139,332 Florida...................................... 300 16 22 65 Illinois....................................... 233 33 42 115 Kansas..................................... 397,587 19,856 28,302 76,021 Kentucky.................................. 58,899 1,783 2,401 7,233 Louisiana ................................. 2,208,920 66,369 94,785 245,631

457

Microsoft Word - table_09.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 2002-2006 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada a .................................................... 3,784,978 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,700,454 3,589,995 Mexico ...................................................... 1,755 0 0 9,320 12,749 Total Pipeline Imports............................. 3,786,733 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,709,774 3,602,744 LNG Algeria....................................................... 26,584 53,423 120,343 97,157 17,449 Australia.................................................... 0 0 14,990 0 0 Brunei ....................................................... 2,401 0 0 0 0 Egypt.........................................................

458

Microsoft Word - table_09.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 2001-2005 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada a .................................................... 3,728,537 3,784,978 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,700,454 Mexico ...................................................... 10,276 1,755 0 0 9,320 Total Pipeline Imports............................. 3,738,814 3,786,733 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,709,774 LNG Algeria....................................................... 64,945 26,584 53,423 120,343 97,157 Australia.................................................... 2,394 0 0 14,990 0 Brunei ....................................................... 0 2,401 0 0 0 Egypt.........................................................

459

Microsoft Word - table_05.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 5. Number of Wells Producing Gas and Gas Condensate by State and the Gulf of Mexico, December 31, 2002-2006 Alabama .......................................................... 4,803 5,157 5,526 5,523 6,227 Alaska.............................................................. 165 195 224 227 231 Arizona ............................................................ 7 9 6 6 7 Arkansas.......................................................... 6,755 7,606 3,460 R 3,462 3,811 California ......................................................... 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 Colorado .......................................................... 23,554 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 Gulf of Mexico.................................................. 3,245 3,039 2,781 2,123 1,946 Illinois...............................................................

460

Microsoft Word - table_21.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 21. Number of natural gas commercial consumers by type of service and state, 2011-2012 R Revised data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential and commercial customers located on the second page of Appendix A of this report. Alabama R 67,561 135 R 67,696 67,099 135 67,234 Alaska R 12,724 303 R 13,027 13,073 61 13,134 Arizona 56,349 198 56,547 56,252 280 56,532 Arkansas 67,454 361 67,815 68,151 614 68,765

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - table_05.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 5. Number of Wells Producing by State and the Gulf of Mexico, December 31, 2003-2007 Alabama .......................................................... 5,157 5,526 5,523 6,227 6,591 Alaska.............................................................. 195 224 227 231 239 Arizona ............................................................ 9 6 6 7 7 Arkansas.......................................................... 7,606 3,460 3,462 R 3,814 4,773 California ......................................................... 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 1,540 Colorado .......................................................... 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 22,949 Gulf of Mexico.................................................. 3,039 2,781 2,123 R 2,419 2,552 Illinois...............................................................

462

Microsoft Word - table_09.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 2003-2007 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada a .................................................... 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,700,454 3,589,995 3,782,708 Mexico ...................................................... 0 0 9,320 12,749 54,062 Total Pipeline Imports............................. 3,437,230 3,606,543 3,709,774 3,602,744 3,836,770 LNG Algeria....................................................... 53,423 120,343 97,157 17,449 77,299 Australia.................................................... 0 14,990 0 0 0 Egypt......................................................... 0 0 72,540 119,528 114,580 Equatorial Guinea .....................................

463

Microsoft Word - table_21.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 21. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers by Type of Service and State, 2007-2008 Alabama ...................... 2,409 295 2,704 2,476 281 2,757 Alaska.......................... 7 4 11 2 4 6 Arizona ........................ 296 99 395 285 98 383 Arkansas...................... 637 418 1,055 648 456 1,104 California ..................... 35,814 3,320 39,134 36,124 3,533 39,657 Colorado ...................... 298 4,294 4,592 341 4,475 4,816 Connecticut.................. 2,472 845 3,317 2,386 810 3,196 Delaware ..................... 125 60 185 96 69 165 Florida.......................... 156 311 467 161 288 449 Georgia........................ R 1,013 1,900 R 2,913 1,003 1,887 2,890 Hawaii.......................... 27 0 27 27 0 27 Idaho............................ 109 79 188 108 91 199 Illinois...........................

464

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2006 Alabama .................................. 287,278 14,736 21,065 54,529 Alaska...................................... 2,665,742 20,993 24,638 93,346 Arkansas.................................. 13,702 166 212 734 California ................................. 223,580 11,267 14,056 46,641 Colorado .................................. 751,036 26,111 36,317 97,697 Florida...................................... 3,972 357 485 1,416 Illinois....................................... 242 37 47 128 Kansas..................................... 453,111 21,509 30,726 83,137 Kentucky.................................. 39,559 1,666 2,252 6,763 Louisiana ................................. 2,511,802 73,551 105,236

465

Microsoft Word - table_06.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 6. Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas by State, 2005-2009 2005 Total ............................ 15,425,867 -- 7.33 18,927,095 138,750,746 2006 Total ............................ 15,981,421 -- 6.39 19,409,674 124,074,399 2007 Total ............................ 16,335,710 -- 6.25 20,196,346 126,164,553 2008 Total ............................ R 18,305,411 -- R 7.97 R 21,112,053 R 168,342,230 2009 Total ............................ 18,763,726 -- 3.67 21,604,158 79,188,096 Alabama ............................... 225,666 975,789 4.32 236,029 1,020,599 Alaska................................... 397,077 1,163,555 2.93 397,077 1,163,554 Arizona ................................. 695 2,214 3.19 712 2,269 Arkansas............................... 680,613 2,332,956 3.43

466

Microsoft Word - table_21.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 21. Number of natural gas commercial consumers by type of service and state, 2010-2011 R Revised data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential and commercial customers located on the second page of Appendix A of this report. Alabama R 68,017 146 R 68,163 67,522 135 67,657 Alaska 12,673 325 12,998 12,721 303 13,024 Arizona 56,510 166 56,676 56,349 198 56,547 Arkansas 67,676 311 67,987 67,454 361 67,815 California 399,290 40,282

467

Microsoft Word - table_06.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 6. Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas by State, 2006-2010 2006 Total ............................ 15,981,421 -- 6.39 19,409,674 124,074,399 2007 Total ............................ 16,335,710 -- 6.25 20,196,346 126,164,553 2008 Total ............................ 18,305,411 -- 7.97 21,112,053 168,342,230 2009 Total ............................ 18,763,726 -- 3.67 R 21,647,936 R 79,348,561 2010 Total ............................ 19,262,198 -- 4.48 22,402,141 100,272,654 Alabama ............................... 212,769 949,340 4.46 222,932 994,688 Alaska................................... 316,546 1,002,566 3.17 374,226 1,185,249 Arizona ................................. 165 676 4.11 183 753 Arkansas............................... 936,600 3,594,843 3.84

468

Microsoft Word - table_10.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Created on: 12/12/2013 2:09:15 PM Table 10. Underground natural gas storage - salt cavern storage fields, 2008-2013 (volumes in billion cubic feet) Natural Gas in Underground Storage at End of Period Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Storage Activity Year and Month Base Gas Working Gas Total Volume Percent Injections Withdrawals Net Withdrawals a 2008 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 440 398 -42 2009 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 459 403 -56 2010 Total b -- -- -- -- -- 511 452 -58 2011 January 137 174 311 65 59.3 23 69 46 February 137 125 262 48 62.5 30 80 49 March 137 151 288 39 34.8 51 25 -25 April 140 172 312 17 11.2 42 21 -22 May 140 211 352

469

Microsoft Word - table_08.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 8. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 2005 (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado ...................... 0 2 0 0 5,283 5,285 Connecticut.................. 0 273 0 0 0 273 Delaware ..................... 0 * 0 0 0 * Georgia........................ 0 * 0 0 0 * Hawaii.......................... 2,593 14 0 0 0 2,606 Illinois........................... 0 11 0 4 0 15 Indiana......................... 0 30 0 0 1,958 1,988 Iowa ............................. 0 2 0 30 0 31 Kentucky...................... 0 15 0 0 0 15 Maryland ...................... 0 382 0 0 0 382 Massachusetts............. 0 46 0 0 0 46 Minnesota .................... 0 154 0 0 0 154 Missouri ....................... 0 15 0 0 0 15 Nebraska ..................... 0 16 0 * 0 16 New Hampshire ........... 0 84 0 0 0 84 New Jersey .................. 0 0 0 0 435 435 New York

470

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

471

Microsoft Word - table_06.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 6. Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas, 2003-2007, and by State, 2007 2003 Total ............................ 14,589,545 -- 4.88 19,974,360 97,555,375 2004 Total ............................ 15,223,749 -- 5.46 19,517,491 106,521,974 2005 Total ............................ 15,425,867 -- 7.33 18,927,095 138,750,746 2006 Total ............................ R 15,981,421 -- R 6.39 R 19,409,674 R 124,074,399 2007 Total ............................ 16,031,199 -- 6.37 20,019,321 127,530,680 Alabama ............................... 259,062 1,926,374 7.44 270,407 2,010,736 Alaska................................... 368,344 2,072,647 5.63 433,485 2,439,193 Arizona ................................. 634 3,791 5.98 655 3,913 Arkansas...............................

472

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 7. Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State, 2010 Alabama .................................. 242,444 13,065 19,059 47,741 Alaska...................................... 2,731,803 17,798 20,835 79,355 Arkansas.................................. 9,599 160 213 692 California ................................. 204,327 10,400 13,244 42,509 Colorado .................................. 1,434,003 57,924 82,637 209,191 Kansas..................................... 341,778 18,424 26,251 70,425 Kentucky.................................. 66,579 3,317 4,576 13,311 Louisiana ................................. 2,207,760 71,231 102,448 262,178 Michigan .................................. 23,449 2,207 2,943 8,272 Mississippi ...............................

473

Microsoft Word - table_07.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7. Supplemental gas supplies by state, 2012 (million cubic feet) Colorado 0 99 0 4,313 4,412 Georgia 0 0 660 0 660 Hawaii 2,491 20 0 0 2,510 Illinois 0 1 0 0 1 Indiana 0 1 0 0 1 Kentucky 0 1 0 0 1 Louisiana 0 0 553 0 553 Maryland 0 116 0 0 116 Minnesota 0 9 0 0 9 Missouri * 0 0 0 * Nebraska 0 4 0 0 4 New Jersey 0 0 0 139 139 North Dakota 52,541 0 0 0 52,541 Ohio 0 6 360 0 366 Pennsylvania 0 2 0 0 2 Vermont 0 3 0 0 3 Virginia 0 48 0 0 48 Total 55,032 309 1,573 4,452 61,366 State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane-Air Biomass Gas Other Total * Volume is less than 500,000 cubic feet.

474

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2004 2004 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2004 (Nominal Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector d,e Retail Electricity Total Energy d,f Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass c Total d,e,f Distillate Fuel Jet Fuel LPG a Motor Gasoline Residual Fuel Other b Total Alabama 1.57 7.72 11.91 8.82 15.78 13.68 4.78 8.25 12.28 0.43 1.81 5.32 1.68 18.01 11.29 Alaska 1.91 3.59 12.43 9.61 19.64 15.55 3.63 12.09 11.05 - 6.68 9.07 3.18 32.29 11.09 Arizona 1.31 6.84 13.59 9.53 18.40 15.33 5.29 7.23 13.92 0.45 5.90 6.68 2.18 21.83 15.24 Arkansas 1.25 8.09 12.01 8.30 14.80 13.97 4.67 11.02 12.77 0.49 1.79 6.59 1.43 16.76 11.89 California 1.82 7.63 13.58

475

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) August 2009 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2007 2007 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2007 (Nominal Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector e,f Retail Electricity Total Energy e,g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total e,f,g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel LPG b Motor Gasoline Residual Fuel Oil Other c Total Wood and Waste d Alabama 2.17 9.06 19.43 16.20 21.84 21.26 8.46 14.19 19.62 0.42 2.71 7.47 2.29 22.46 16.01 Alaska 2.34 5.76 19.43 16.35 28.63 22.14 11.51 23.69 17.97 - 10.51 14.88 4.94 38.96 17.87 Arizona 1.61 8.44 19.84 16.24 27.16 21.95 10.04 11.27 20.50 0.57 10.86 9.61 2.78 25.02 20.72 Arkansas 1.65 9.33 19.63 15.73 21.10 21.54 8.65 18.76 20.42 0.57 2.66 9.45 1.98 20.57

476

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SECTION B: HOUSING TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SECTION C: HOME HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 SECTION D: AIR CONDITIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SECTION E: WATER HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SECTION F: LIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 SECTION G: APPLIANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Refrigerators and Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

477

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Tables in Context: Integrating Horizontal Displays with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design challenges for tabletop interfaces: integrating access to public and private information, managing a cooperative gesture to organize digital documents on an interactive table. Our tabletop interface designTables in Context: Integrating Horizontal Displays with Ubicomp Environments Abstract Our work

Klemmer, Scott

479

Tafel Musik: Formatting algorithm of tables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a description on the formatting algorithm of tables that the authors have developed. This algorithm is an important component of the so called TafeMusik (Tafel Musik) environment. TafeMusikprovides the user with an environment to ... Keywords: First-fit algorithm, Linear programming, Optimization, Tables, Tabular formatting, Tabular layout

K. -H. Shin; K. Kobayashi; A. Suzuki

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process Energy Conversion. At first, OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine power cables, to shore

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tables metric conversions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

3. Energy conversion, balances, efficiency, equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/124 3. Energy conversion, balances, efficiency, equilibrium (Introduction to Thermodynamics) Ron h�dm, h = u + p/ Picture: SEHB06 56/124 3.5: Energy balances; Conversion work work, work heat 96/124 Energy conversion heat work /1 "the essential rules" Picture:IO06 #12;97/124 Energy

Zevenhoven, Ron

482

Energy Conversion Technologies 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy Conversion Technologies 1.0 Introduction In these notes, we describe the infrastructure. By "energy conversion," we mean the conversion of energy into some form of electric energy. By "available now that is available to be considered in the generation and planning functions. We classify this information by Energy

McCalley, James D.

483

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS FOR THE 2014 FISHING YEAR NOAA FISHERIES, ALASKA via the GAF electronic reporting system. If no GAF were harvested in a year, the conversion factor is the first calendar year that GAF regulations will be in effect. Therefore, the conversion factors are based

484

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Regional Energy Consumption and Prices by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Table 1. New England Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 2. Middle Atlantic Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 3. East North Central Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 4. West North Central Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 5. South Atlantic Consumption & Prices by Sector & Census Division. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

485

Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Catalytic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the development of biomass conversion technologies, it isefficient and selective biomass conversion technologies is athe conversion of both carbohydrate components of biomass.

Dee, Sean Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Semiconductor nanowires for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost and improve the energy conversion efficiency, to enableefficiency solar energy conversion devices. AcknowledgementsPhotoelectrochemical Energy Conversion Neil P. Dasgupta and

Dasgupta, Neil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Steady-State Energy Conversion. Applied ScientificElectrokinetic energy conversion efficiency in nanofluidicElectrokinetic energy conversion efficiency in nanofluidic

Duffin, Andrew Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary engineeringCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion AArticles: 1. Thermal to electrical energy conversion , Yu

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the standard conversion factors at Annex 1. If, however, you export energy or heat to another business (or2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors yellow = Calculation results Page 1 of 15 #12;2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Annex 1

494

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

495

A Modification of the Standard Cosmological Metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we firstly present an explicit dynamical equation satisfying the general principle of relativity under the framework of classical mechanics. In light of this fact, the necessity of Einstein's equivalence principle for the gravity being geometrized should be reexamined. Especially, Einstein's (strong) equivalence principle claims that the inertial force is equivalent to the gravitational force. But in fact the new dynamical equation proves that the essence of the inertial force is the real force exerted on the reference object, which can actually be all kinds of forces such as the gravitational force, electromagnetic force and so on. Therefore, in this context we only retain the numerical equality between the inertial mass and gravitational mass and abandon Einstein's (strong) equivalence principle. Consequently, the candidate for the standard clock should be corrected into the mathematical clock which duplicates the real clock equipped by the observer himself. Then a new physical picture for how to convert the gravitational force into a geometric description on spacetime is presented. On the other hand, we point out that all cosmological observations are made by the observer at present on the earth, instead of any other observers including the comoving observers in the earlier unverse. On this basis, we introduce an extra factor $b(t)$ in $FRW$ cosmological metric to depict the gravitational time dilation effect since the local proper clock may run in a faster and faster rate with the expanding of the universe. In this way, we may obtain a positive value of $\\rho+3p$ and avoid the introduction of dark energy in the current universe.

ChiYi Chen

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

496

Analyses Of Two End-User Software Vulnerability Exposure Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk due to software vulnerabilities will not be completely resolved in the near future. Instead, putting reliable vulnerability measures into the hands of end-users so that informed decisions can be made regarding the relative security exposure incurred by choosing one software package over another is of importance. To that end, we propose two new security metrics, average active vulnerabilities (AAV) and vulnerability free days (VFD). These metrics capture both the speed with which new vulnerabilities are reported to vendors and the rate at which software vendors fix them. We then examine how the metrics are computed using currently available datasets and demonstrate their estimation in a simulation experiment using four different browsers as a case study. Finally, we discuss how the metrics may be used by the various stakeholders of software and to software usage decisions.

Jason L. Wright; Miles McQueen; Lawrence Wellman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Technical Workshop: Resilience Metrics for Energy Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

During this workshop, EPSA invited technical experts from industry, national laboratories, and NGOs to discuss the need for resilience metrics and how they vary by natural gas, liquid fuels and electric grid infrastructures.

498

Consistent metric combinations in cosmology of massive bigravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive bigravity models are interesting alternatives to standard cosmology. In most cases however these models have been studied for a simplified scenario in which both metrics take homogeneous and isotropic forms (Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker; FLRW) with the same spatial curvatures. The interest to consider more general geometries arises in particular in view of the difficulty so far encountered in building stable cosmological solutions with homogeneous and isotropic metrics. Here we consider a number of cases in which the two metrics take more general forms, namely FLRW with different spatial curvatures, Lema\\^{i}tre, Lema\\^{i}tre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB), and Bianchi I, as well as cases where only one metric is linearly perturbed. We discuss possible consistent combinations and find that only some special cases of FLRW-Lema\\^{i}tre, LTB-LTB and FLRW-Bianchi I combinations give consistent, non-trivial solutions.

Henrik Nersisyan; Yashar Akrami; Luca Amendola

2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Improving enterprise decision-making : the benefits of metric commonality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to identify a new approach in managing, and making internal program-level decisions from, externally tracked performance metrics. Industry observations indicate the increasing challenge ...

Friedman, Alissa H. (Alissa Heather)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

PROPAGATION OF SINGULARITIES FOR ROUGH METRICS HART F. SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPAGATION OF SINGULARITIES FOR ROUGH METRICS HART F. SMITH Abstract. We use a wave packet the Simons Foundation (# 266371 to Hart Smith). 1 #12;2 HART F. SMITH H¨ormander's theorem [9] on propagation

Smith, Hart F.