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Sample records for rwanda mh montserrat

  1. Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy...

  2. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Montserrat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Montserrat, a British overseas territory located in the northern half of the Lesser Antilles.

  3. Montserrat: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Montserrat Population 4,900 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MS 3-letter ISO code MSR Numeric ISO...

  4. Rwanda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Rwanda Population 10,515,973 GDP 7,431,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code RW 3-letter ISO code RWA Numeric ISO...

  5. Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  6. Rwanda-Developing a Strategic Climate Change Framework | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over nine months as a collaborative effort among the Government of Rwanda, the Smith School of Enterprise and Environment (SSEE), DFID and CDKN. It stimulated high-level...

  7. Implications of NiMH Hysteresis on HEV Battery Testing and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motloch, Chester George; Belt, Jeffrey R; Hunt, Gary Lynn; Ashton, Clair Kirkendall; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Miller, Ted J.; Coates, Calvin; Tataria, H. S.; Lucas, Glenn E.; Duong, T.Q.; Barnes, J.A.; Sutula, Raymond

    2002-08-01

    Nickel Metal-Hydride (NiMH) is an advanced high-power battery technology that is presently employed in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) and is one of several technologies undergoing continuing research and development by FreedomCAR. Unlike some other HEV battery technologies, NiMH exhibits a strong hysteresis effect upon charge and discharge. This hysteresis has a profound impact on the ability to monitor state-of-charge and battery performance. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have been investigating the implications of NiMH hysteresis on HEV battery testing and performance. Experimental results, insights, and recommendations are presented.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Hippea maritima type strain (MH2T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntemann, Marcel; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2011-01-01

    Hippea maritima (Miroshnichenko et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus Hippea, which belongs to the family Desulfurellaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The anaerobic, moderately thermophilic marine sulfur-reducer was first isolated from shallow-water hot vents in Matipur Harbor, Papua New Guinea. H. maritima was of interest for genome se- quencing because of its isolated phylogenetic location, as a distant next neighbor of the ge- nus Desulfurella. Strain MH2T is the first type strain from the order Desulfurellales with a com- pletely sequenced genome. The 1,694,430 bp long linear genome with its 1,723 protein- coding and 57 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. fileYnyMhS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. zhang-mh-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The actual measurements contain information of all scales including those that the observational network cannot resolve. Thus, it is not always appropriate to directly use...

  11. fileI8MhKP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. Rwanda-Developing a Strategic Climate Change Framework | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in a stronger position not only to face the twin challenges of climate change and poverty, but to take advantage of the opportunities presented by a low-carbon growth path in...

  13. Rwanda-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  14. Rwanda-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Middle East, including the following: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Burkina Faso, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,...

  15. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  16. LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

    1999-03-30

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2nd Qtr 2010 Presentation _compressed tt mh.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Second Quarter 2010 Surveillance and Maintenance Report for the LM Rocky Flats Site 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Second Quarter 2010 3 Pond Operations - Second Quarter 2010 Terminal Pond Discharges: * Pond A-4: May 1 through May 19, 2010, 32.4 MG * Pond B-5: April 23 through May 16, 2010, 20.8 MG Transfers: * A-3 to A-4: intermittently during the quarter; total of 24.2 MG Pond Levels: * As of June 1, 2010, Ponds A-3, A-4, B-5, and C-2 and the Landfill Pond were holding approximately

  18. LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Fultz, Brent; Bowman, Robert; Surampudi, Subra Rao; Witham, Charles K.; Hightower, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB.sub.(Z-Y) X.sub.(Y) is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB.sub.5 alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  19. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from SSEE-Project to Develop a Rwandan National Strategy on Climate Change and Low Carbon Development)...

  20. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for International Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Smith School for Enterprise and Environment, University of Oxford Sector Climate, Energy,...

  1. Ihangire Sun Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Ihangire Sun Energy Place: Rwanda Sector: Solar Product: Rwanda-based solar start-up. References: Ihangire Sun Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. South Africa-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa and Ukraine." References "UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services" Retrieved from "http:...

  3. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  4. SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme Sea State Contour...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  5. Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  6. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  7. MELCOR / CSARP / MCAP / IMUG Meetings 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  8. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy National Science Foundation Contracts CHE and ACI National Institute of Health Contract P20 MH60975 A2 National Institute of Mental Health and National Science...

  9. Mutant Fatty Acid Desaturase and Method for Directed Mutagenesis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby...

  10. Hong Kong Highpower Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518111 Product: Shenzhen-based manufacturer of NiMH Batteries for various applications including electric bikes and power tools. References: Hong...

  11. Kayo Battery Industries Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    started by Hong Kong Highpower Technology and Japan Kayo Group, active in producing Lithium and NiMH batteries for various applications including batteries suitable for...

  12. TCL Hyperpower Batteries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Batteries, Inc Place: China Product: China-based subsidiary of TCL Group, they make Lithium Polymer, NiMH and Primary batteries, primarily for smaller devices. References: TCL...

  13. LA-UR-

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J.C., Turietta, M.H., Fischer, e. (1992), "Geothermal resources at the Pueblo of Jemez, Phase II: Reservoir Assessment and Feasibility of Geothermal Applications: Final Report...

  14. Marshall Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Marshall Islands Population 56,429 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MH 3-letter ISO code MHL Numeric ISO code...

  15. Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal

  16. メタンハイドレート資源開発研究コンソーシアム平成...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    First Offshore MH Production Test Takami Kawamoto JOGMEC June 7, 2013 1 To ... Offshore Production Tests * 1 st Production Test - FY2012 * 2 nd Production Test - FY2014 ...

  17. Intellect Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Intellect Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Intellect Battery Co Ltd Place: Guangdong Province, China Product: Producer of NiMH rechargeable batteries and...

  18. DOE SSL Postings: November 10, 2015, issue

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West Parking Garage combined 252 metal halide (MH) luminaires that operated after dark with fluorescent luminaires that operated during daylight hours. In early 2013, the...

  19. Energreen Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Seoul, Seoul, Korea (Republic) Sector: Solar Product: Korea-based manufacturer of Ni-MH power storage and the like specifically designed to store solar power. References:...

  20. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER REVIEW John D. Boyes Sandia National Laboratories ESS ... Energy Project - EEI - BiPolar Ni-MH Battery Development - Sprint - Storage for ...

  1. Ovonic Battery Company Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Ovonic Battery Company Inc Place: Michigan Zip: 48309 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Focused on commercializing its patented and proprietary NiMH battery...

  2. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  3. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Vetenskaps-Academiens nya Handlingar, 1 Stockholm (1780) 116-124. 33. Hartmann, M.H. in: Kaplan, D.L. (Ed.), Biopolymers from Renewal Resources, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1998, pp. ...

  4. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Foundation ContractACI-9624034 and ACI 9982251, National Institutes of Health Contract P20MH60975-06A2","12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE...

  5. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Foundation Contracts CHE-0205170 and ACI 9624034, National Institute of Health Contract P20 MH60975-06A2. National Institute of Mental Health and National Science...

  6. Nilar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nilar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nilar Place: Sweden Product: NiMH Batteries, designed such that good performance of individual cells does not come at the cost of the...

  7. Hunan Shenzhou Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shenzhou Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hunan Shenzhou Science & Technology Co, Ltd Place: China Sector: Vehicles Product: A China-based maker of NiMh...

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... March 14-18, 2005 Mlawer, EJ, TR Shippert, CN Long, MA Miller, KL Johnson, DT Troyan, GG Mace, SA Clough, MH Zhang, SC Xie, RT Cederwall, JJ Yio, DR Doelling, DA Rutan, DD ...

  9. Harbin Coslight Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicles Product: China-based subsidiary of the Coslight Group, they make NiMH, Lithium-Ion and Lithium Iron batteries for a variety of applications including electric...

  10. Electritek AVT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Electritek AVT Place: Littleton, Colorado Zip: CO 80122 Product: Manufacturer of Lithium Ion, Lithium Polymer, Lithium Sulfur, NiMH, NiCd, Sealed Lead Acid, Alkaline and...

  11. Tianjin Lantian High Tech Power Sources Joint Stock Co Ltd |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Zip: 300381 Product: Engaged in the research, manufacture and development of Lithium-ion, Nickel Cadmium, NiMH and sealed lead-acid batteries. Coordinates: 39.231831,...

  12. Guangzhou Wintonic Battery Magnet Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Province, China Zip: 510800 Product: Guangzhou City - based producer of NiMH, NiCd and Lithium-Ion rechargeable batteries. References: Guangzhou Wintonic Battery & Magnet Co Ltd1...

  13. Rose Electronics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and enclosure products. Ni-Cd, Ni-MH, Li-Ion, Li-Polymer, Sealed Lead, Alkaline and Lithium Primary chemistries. References: Rose Electronics1 This article is a stub. You can...

  14. Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M.H. ; Washington U., St. Louis Delaware U. Hawaii U. Caltech, JPL Hawaii U. NASA, Goddard Minnesota U. Hawaii U. Ohio State U. Hawaii U. Caltech, JPL SLAC...

  15. Linkages of DOE'S Energy Storage R & D to Batteries and Ultracapacitor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and EVs, and NiMH and Li-ion batteries and ultracapacitors. ... by expert and document review, supplemented by selected ... the Stability of Aromatic Redox Shuttles for Overcharge ...

  16. VBA-0060- In the Matter of Robert Burd

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 16, 2001, BWXT Pantex, as successor to Mason & Hanger Corporation (M&H) (collectively referred to as “the contractor”), filed an appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD)...

  17. DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER Authors: Wang, M.-H. ; Nosochkov, Y. ; Cai, Y. ; SLAC ; Palmer, M. ;...

  18. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Pomphrey, N.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-{beta} disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, {omega}{sub *i} stabilization and nonlinear island rotation studies using the two-fluid level MH3D-T code, studies of nonlinear saturation of TAE modes using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D{sup ++} code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree well with experimental data.

  19. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kistler, R.W.; Doe and B.R. Published Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 111984 DOI 10.1007BF01150293 Citation Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler,...

  20. CX-013675: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuels Complex MH50 Fiber Optic Installation Project CX(s) Applied: B4.7Date: 05/19/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  1. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Power Battery Co., Ltd Place: China Product: Guangzhou - based maker of Li-Ion, Li-Polymer, LiFePO4, NiCd, and NiMH...

  2. SANIK Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SANIK Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SANIK Battery Co., Ltd. Place: China Product: Foshan City-based NiCd and NiMH rechargeable batteries producer for smaller...

  3. JYH Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JYH Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: JYH Battery Co, Ltd Place: China Product: China-based maker of NiMH rechargeable batteries, also with some NiCd and Li-ion...

  4. Dongguan Victory Battery Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dongguan Victory Battery Technology Co, Ltd Place: China Product: China-based maker of NiMh, Li-Poly and LiFePO4...

  5. Union Suppo Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suppo Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Union Suppo Battery Co Ltd Place: Shenyang, China Zip: 110015 Product: Liaoning-based manufacturer of rechargeable NiMH...

  6. Forever Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Forever Battery Co, Ltd Place: China Product: China-based producer of NiMH, NiCd and Li-ion batteries and packs primarily for smaller...

  7. Shenzhen Better Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Better Power Battery Co, Ltd Place: China Product: China-based maker of NiMH batteries. References: Shenzhen Better...

  8. Shida Battery Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shida Battery Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shida Battery Technology Co, Ltd Place: China Product: Shida is a China-based maker of NiMH and Li-Poly batteries...

  9. Zhejiang KAN Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KAN Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang KAN Battery Co Ltd Place: Suichang, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 323300 &1228 Product: Zhejiang - based NiMH battery...

  10. Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

  11. Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. (1 January 1986) Temperature,...

  12. TWD Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TWD Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: TWD Technology Co, Ltd Place: China Product: Guangdong Province - based maker of NiCd and NiMH batteries. References: TWD...

  13. ALSNews Vol. 295

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. Osipov, S. Lee, M.H. Prior, A. Belkacem, A.L. Landers, H. Schmidt-Bcking, Th. Weber, and R. Drner; "Ultrafast probing of core hole localization in N2," Science 320, 920...

  14. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review FY07 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review John ... Earmark Projects - EEI - BiPolar Ni-MH Battery Development - Sprint - Storage for ...

  15. i. . : : I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    or forms cw be prepared, prior to the last day of the m&h. to brin&the inventory at Sperm end SYL to the correct amOUnt. Of aourae. the difference in amints received AA...

  16. VBX-0060- In the Matter of Robert Burd

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 16, 2001, BWXT Pantex, as successor to Mason & Hanger Corporation (M&H) (collectively referred to as “the contractor”), filed an appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD)...

  17. The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay Leentvaar, Jan

    2011-04-15

    This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

  18. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light

  19. Thermal Evaluation of the Honda Insight Battery Pack: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolot, M.D.; Kelly, K.; Keyser, M.; Mihalic, M.; Pesaran, A.; Hieronymus, A.

    2001-06-18

    The hybrid vehicle test efforts at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with a focus on the Honda Insight's battery thermal management system, are presented. The performance of the Insight's high voltage NiMH battery pack was characterized by conducting in-vehicle dynamometer testing at Environmental Testing Corporation's high altitude dynamometer test facility, on-road testing in the Denver area, and out-of-car testing in NREL's Battery Thermal Management Laboratory. It is concluded that performance does vary considerably due to thermal conditions the pack encounters. The performance variations are due to both inherent NiMH characteristics, and the Insight's thermal management system.

  20. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

  1. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L.; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2016-03-10

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 11A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two 1A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 11A1 state and the 21A1 state were calculated at the 11A1 open minimum, the 11A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 21A1more » state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of CorrelationEnergy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 11A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum—open minimum) ~45–50 mh and (transition state—open minimum) ~85–90 mh. For the (21A1–1A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ~130–170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270–310 mh at the ring minimum. At the transition state, the difference (21A1–1A1) is found to be between 1 and 10 mh. The geometry of the transition state on the 11A1 surface and that of the minimum on the 21A1 surface nearly coincide. More accurate predictions of the energydifferences also require CI expansions to at least sextuple excitations with respect to the valence space. Furthermore, for every wave function considered, the omission of the correlations of the 2s oxygen orbitals, which is a widely used approximation, was found to cause errors of about ±10 mh with respect to the energy differences.« less

  2. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  3. R. C. Hag&an: Chief. Operatione Division, DUE: Deoember Ecuford...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    dSem&w &.r&dom ie&tbanot less 8inoh6s long of gamma e-i%ruded bars, to finish machine to . .T-+mh.dismetar for the full length OS eaohbar., . . "T -. Would y6u please...

  4. DOE/NV/11718-594

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 231 FRENCH, N.R., C.D. JORGENSEN, M.H. SMITH, and B.G. MAZA. 1971. Comparison of Some ... E.P., T.E. HUXMAN, M.E. LOIK, and S.D. SMITH. 2000. Effects of extreme high ...

  5. Sandia Energy - Lincoln Lauhon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.E. Allen, E.R. Hemesath, D.E. Perea, J.L. Lensch-Falk, Z.Y. Li, F. Yin, M.H. Gass, P. Wang, A.L. Bleloch, R.E. Palmer, L.J. Lauhon, Nature Nanotechnology 3, 168 (2008)....

  6. Composite metal-hydrogen electrodes for metal-hydrogen batteries. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Weismann, H.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding those of commercially available metal hydride materials and fast hydrogen charging and discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films and multilayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 {mu}m thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  7. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  8. The Higgs transverse momentum distribution at NNLL and its theoretical errors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neill, Duff; Rothstein, Ira Z.; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-12-15

    In this letter, we present the NNLL-NNLO transverse momentum Higgs distribution arising from gluon fusion. In the regime p⊥ << mh we include the resummation of the large logs at next to next-to leading order and then match on to the α2s fixed order result near p⊥~mh. By utilizing the rapidity renormalization group (RRG) we are able to smoothly match between the resummed, small p⊥ regime and the fixed order regime. We give a detailed discussion of the scale dependence of the result including an analysis of the rapidity scale dependence. Our central value differs from previous results, in themore » transition region as well as the tail, by an amount which is outside the error band. Lastly, this difference is due to the fact that the RRG profile allows us to smoothly turn off the resummation.« less

  9. Process for production of a metal hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  10. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H → WW → ℓνℓν and H → WW → ℓνqq decay channels using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σH × BR(H → WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, onemore » for a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is mH = 1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and mH = 1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200–300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each signal interpretation, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. Thus, at mH = 1500 GeV, the highest-mass point tested, σH × BR(H → WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22fb and 6.6fb at 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively.« less

  11. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  12. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  13. Hybrid Vehicle Comparison Testing Using Ultracapacitor vs. Battery Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.; Lustbader, J.; Tataria, H.

    2010-02-01

    With support from General Motors, NREL researchers converted and tested a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) with three energy storage configurations: a nickel metal-hydride battery and two ultracapacitor (Ucap) modules. They found that the HEV equipped with one Ucap module performed as well as or better than the HEV with a stock NiMH battery configuration. Thus, Ucaps could increase the market penetration and fuel savings of HEVs.

  14. Benefits of rapid solidification processing of modified LaNi{sub 5} alloys by high pressure gas atomization for battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, I.E.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Ting, J.; Witham, C.; Bowman, R.C.

    1997-12-31

    A high pressure gas atomization approach to rapid solidification has been employed to investigate simplified processing of Sn modified LaNi{sub 5} powders that can be used for advanced Ni/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries. The current industrial practice involves casting large ingots followed by annealing and grinding and utilizes a complex and costly alloy design. This investigation is an attempt to produce powders for battery cathode fabrication that can be used in an as-atomized condition without annealing or grinding. Both Ar and He atomization gas were tried to investigate rapid solidification effects. Sn alloy additions were tested to promote subambient pressure absorption/desorption of hydrogen at ambient temperature. The resulting fine, spherical powders were subject to microstructural analysis, hydrogen gas cycling, and annealing experiments to evaluate suitability for Ni/MH battery applications. The results demonstrate that a brief anneal is required to homogenize the as-solidified microstructure of both Ar and He atomized powders and to achieve a suitable hydrogen absorption behavior. The Sn addition also appears to suppress cracking during hydrogen gas phase cycling in particles smaller than about 25 {micro}m. These results suggest that direct powder processing of a LaNi{sub 5{minus}x}Sn{sub x} alloy has potential application in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries.

  15. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Junk, Thomas R.; Juste, Aurelio

    2015-02-17

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DØ. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV < mH < 200 GeV in all main production modes at the Tevatron: gluon–gluon fusion, WH and ZH associated production, vector boson fusion, and tt- H production, and in five main decay modes: H→ bb-, H→τ+τ-, H→WW(*), H→ZZ(*) and H→γγ. An excess of events was seen in the H→ bb- searches consistent with a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass inmore » the range 115 GeV < mH < 135 GeV. We assume a Higgs boson mass of mH = 125 GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times the branching ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.« less

  16. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  17. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  18. MSSM Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC: Benchmark Scenarios after the Discovery of a Higgs-like Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Stål, O.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Weiglein, G.

    2013-09-01

    A Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 125.5 GeV has been discovered at the LHC. Within the current experimental uncertainties, this new state is compatible with both the predictions for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson and with the Higgs sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We propose new low-energy MSSM benchmark scenarios that, over a wide parameter range, are compatible with the mass and production rates of the observed signal. These scenarios also exhibit interesting phenomenology for the MSSM Higgs sector. We propose a slightly updated version of the well-known mh-max scenario, and a modified scenario (mh-mod), where the light CP-even Higgs boson can be interpreted as the LHC signal in large parts of the MA-tan \\beta\\ plane. Furthermore, we define a light stop scenario that leads to a suppression of the lightest CP-even Higgs gluon fusion rate, and a light stau scenario with an enhanced decay rate of h to \\gamma\\gamma\\ at large tan \\beta. We also suggest a \\tau-phobic Higgs scenario in which the lightest Higgs can have suppressed couplings to down-type fermions. We propose to supplement the specified value of the \\mu\\ parameter in some of these scenarios with additional values of both signs. This has a significant impact on the interpretation of searches for the non SM-like MSSM Higgs bosons. We also discuss the sensitivity of the searches to heavy Higgs decays into light charginos and neutralinos, and to decays of the form H to hh. Finally, in addition to all the other scenarios where the lightest CP-even Higgs is interpreted as the LHC signal, we propose a low-MH scenario, where instead the heavy CP-even Higgs boson corresponds to the new state around 125.5 GeV.

  19. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

  20. Published Papers - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Published Papers Cao, R., Chen, J., Han, K.S., Xu, W., Mei, D., Bhattacharya, P., Engelhard, M.H., Mueller, K.T., Liu, J., and Zhang, J-G, "Effect of the Anion Activity on the Stability of Li Metal Anode in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries", Advanced Functional Materials, March 29, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201505074. View Chen, J., Han, K.S., Henderson, W.A., Vijayakumar, M., Lau, K.C., Dzwiniel, T., Pan, H., Curtiss, L.A., Xiao, J., Mueller,K.T., Shao, Y., Liu, J., "Restricting the

  1. The Crystal Structure of Human, Nicotine Metabolizing Cytochrome P450 2A6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Crystal Structure of Human, Nicotine Metabolizing Cytochrome P450 2A6 J.K. Yano1, M.-H. Hsu1, K.J. Griffin1, C.D. Stout2, and E.F. Johnson1 1Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 2Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 Figure 1. Stereo views of sA-weighted 2|Fo|-|Fc| composite omit electron density maps contoured at 1 s and rendered within 1 Å of the heme and substrate for the P450

  2. Battery Electrode Materials with High Cycle Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Brent Fultz

    2001-06-29

    In an effort to understand the capacity fade of nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries, we performed a systematic study of the effects of solute additions on the cycle life of metal hydride electrodes. We also performed a series of measurements on hydrogen absorption capacities of novel carbon and graphite-based materials including graphite nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotubes. Towards the end of this project we turned our attention to work on Li-ion cells with a focus on anode materials.

  3. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  4. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A.E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  5. Doping Experiments on Low-Dimensional Oxides and a Search for Unusual Magnetic Properties of MgAlB14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julienne Marie Hill

    2002-12-31

    Doping experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} and SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were performed with the intent of synthesizing new metallic low-=dimensional cuprate oxide compounds. Magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) measurements on a polycrystalline La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} sample chemically oxidized at room temperature in aqueous NaClO showed superconductivity with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 42.6 K and a Meissner fraction of 26%. They were unable to electrochemically oxidize La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in a nonaqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and methanol. Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} was found to decompose upon exposure to air and water. Electron paramagnetic resonance, isothermal magnetization M(H), and {chi}(T) measurements on the primary decomposition product, Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6}, were consistent with a nearly isolated, spin S = 1/2, local moment model for the Cu{sup +2} spins. From a fit of {chi}(T) by the Curie-Weiss law and of the M(H) isotherms by a modified Brillouin function, the weakly antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between adjacent Cu{sup +2} spins in Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6} was found to be J/k{sub B} = 1.06(4) K. Doping studies on SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were inconclusive. {chi}(T) measurements on an undoped polycrystalline sample of SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, a sample treated with distilled water, and a sample treated with aqueous NaClO showed no qualitative differences between the samples. In addition, {chi}(T) and M(H, T) studies of the ultra-hard material MgAlB{sub 14} were carried out in search of superconductivity or ferromagnetism in this compound. {chi}(T) measurements on a powder sample revealed temperature-independent diamagnetism from 1.8 K up to room temperature with a Curie-Weiss impurity concentration equivalent to {approx} 1 mol% of spin-1/2 ions. In contrast, M(H, T) data on hot pressed samples showed evidence of ferromagnetic transitions above {approx} 330 K. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis of the hot pressed samples indicated that the observed ferromagnetism was likely due to Fe impurities.

  6. Enhanced Photon Recycling in Multijunction Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Recycling in Multijunction Solar Cells Work w as p erformed a t U IUC a nd B erkeley X. Sheng, M.H. Yun, C. Zhang, A.M. Al---Okaily, M. Masouraki, L. Shen, S. Wang, W.L. Wilson, J.Y. Kim, P. Ferreira, X. Li, E. Yablonovitch, a nd J .A. R ogers, " Device A rchitectures f or E nhanced Photon Recycling in Thin---Film MulQjuncQon Solar Cells." Adv. Energy M ater. (2014). DOI: 1 0.1002/aenm.201400919 Scientific Achievement We demonstrate improved mul1junc1on (MJ) solar cell

  7. Method Of Charging Maintenance-Free Nickel Metal Hydride Storage Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlureau, Thierry; Liska, Jean-Louis

    1999-11-16

    A method of charging an industrial maintenance-free Ni-MH storage cell, the method comprising in combination a first stage at a constant current I.sub.1 lying in the range I.sub.c /10 to I.sub.c /2, and a second stage at a constant current I.sub.2 lying in the range I.sub.c /50 to I.sub.c /10, the changeover from the first stage to the second stage taking place when the time derivative of the temperature reaches a threshold value which varies as a function of the temperature at the time of the changeover.

  8. I'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fou4 ,...-, ,/' / / I' ,/* ,I ,/' 4 ft ,,/- ,/ ./ "' /, 3: :GSD : mh Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Cantiague Z.oad, P.O. Uox 75 iiicksvill~, I.cng Island. :!.a~ York <; 1. 5,756 lbs. of Fernsld rojeot slugs. 2. 10,000 lbs. rujeoted powder metallurgy slugs. 3. 5,3!;5 lbs. uranium scrap and sludge*. *Th'Ls material, we unc?srstanct, h4S alreedy been shi$ped and this cmfims nuthor.jeatioiito do 80.. %rthar,~in ncxord with the conver&ntion with bir. IStz ws are cancelling your order

  9. V-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Unexpected characteristics of the isoscalar monopole resonance in the A≈90 region: Implications for nuclear incompressibility, D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, Krishichayan, J. Button, M.R. Anders, M. L. Gorelik, M.H. Urin, and S. Shlomo, Phys. Rev. C 88, 021301(R) (2013). Astrophysical reaction rate for 17 F(p,γ) 18 Ne from the transfer reaction 13 C( 17 O, 18 O) 12 C, T. Al- Abdullah, F. Carstoiu, X. Chen, H.L. Clark, C.A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A. Mukhamedzhanov, G. Tabacaru,

  10. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TO File rn w. 1 1311 300 s ~ b p ~ t B&T Metals Site Scoping Trip Report mh November 22, 1995 hwr J.G. Braun 01 FUSRAP - Geotech ~ l t 4D12 f i t 241-5296 C ~ M S T O Distribution This trip report summarizes the information obtained by b t h the New York and MissourifOhio Teams during visits to the B&T Metals site. The scoping trips were - . - . performed to provide information to aid in the detailed ptanning, design, and preparation for site characterization and remedial action. The

  11. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-07-13

    This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

  12. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $$\\tau$$ leptons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance largermore » than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.« less

  13. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-17

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 and 19.4 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The Higgs boson candidates are selected in events with two or three charged leptons. An excess of events above background is observed, consistent with the expectation from the standard model Higgs boson with a mass of around 125 GeV. The probability to observe an excess equal or larger than the one seen,more » under the background-only hypothesis, corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations for mH = 125.6 GeV. The observed signal cross section times the branching fraction to WW for mH = 125.6 GeV is 0.72+0.20-0.18 times the standard model expectation. The spin-parity JP=0+ hypothesis is favored against a narrow resonance with JP=2+ or JP=0– that decays to a W-boson pair. Lastly, this result provides strong evidence for a Higgs-like boson decaying to a W-boson pair.« less

  14. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Tou, T. Y.; Yap, S. S.

    2015-04-24

    ‘SimOLED’ simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq{sub 3}) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq{sub 3} of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  15. Predictions for the Higgs Mass from the Stability and Triviality Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solis R, H. Gabriel; Juarez W, S. Rebeca; Kielanowski, P.

    2006-09-25

    In the context of the Standard Model (SM), we use the one-loop and two-loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGE) in order to analyze the evolution of the Higgs quartic coupling {lambda}H in the interval [mt, EGU], where mt is the mass of the top quark and EGU = 1014GeV. The analytical solution for the one-loop differential equation (Riccati type) is obtained and analyzed and in the two-loop case we obtain a numerical solution which takes into account all the parameters (couplings) at the same order of approximation. In both cases, we restrict the possible initial values for {lambda}H by means of imposing the triviality and stability conditions which determine the range of energies where the SM is valid. We obtain the following bounds: 0.387 < {lambda}H < 0.623 for the one-loop case and 0.360 < {lambda}H < 0.628 for the two-loop case. These results determine the interval of the possible Higgs mass values: 151.9 < MH < 192.3 GeV, 143.8 < MH < 190.3 GeV for the one-loop and two-loop cases, respectively.

  16. Search for WH associated production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-13

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L≈5.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp̄ Collider. Events containing a W→lν candidate (with l corresponding to e or μ) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product ofmore » the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.« less

  17. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

    1985-02-22

    The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  18. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  19. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  20. Manufactured Homes Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-09

    The MH Tool software is designed to evaluate existing and new manufactured homes for structural adequacy in high winds. Users define design elements of a manufactured home and then select the hazard(s) for analysis. MH Tool then calculates and reports structural analysis results for the specified design and hazard Method of Solution: Design engineers input information (geometries, materials, etc.) describing the structure of a manufactured home, from which the software automatically creates a mathematical model.more » Windows, doors, and interior walls can be added to the initial design. HUD Code loads (wind, snow loads, interior live loads, etc.) are automatically applied. A finite element analysis is automatically performed using a third party solver to find forces and stresses throughout the structure. The designer may then employ components of strength (and cost) most appropriate for the loads that must be carried at each location, and then re-run the analysis for verification. If forces and stresses are still within tolerable limits (such as the HUD requirements), construction costs would be reduced without sacrificing quality.« less

  1. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore » are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  2. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, James J.; Grohse, Edward W.; Johnson, John R.; Winsche, deceased, Warren E.

    1988-01-01

    The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  3. Characterizing the AB Doradus moving group via high-resolution spectroscopy and kinematic traceback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 10 proposed F and G members of the nearby, young moving group AB Doradus (ABD). Our sample was obtained using the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory with the coude echelle spectrograph, achieving R ? 60,000 and signal-to-noise ratio ?200. We derive spectroscopic T {sub eff}, log(g), [Fe/H], and microturbulance (v{sub t} ) using a bootstrap method of the TGVIT software resulting in typical errors of 33K in T {sub eff}, 0.08 dex in log(g), 0.03 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.13 km s{sup 1} in v{sub t} . Characterization of the ABD sample is performed in three ways: (1) chemical homogeneity, (2) kinematic traceback, and (3) isochrone fitting. We find the average metal abundance is [M/H] = 0.03 0.06 with a traceback age of 125 Myr. Our stars were fit to three different evolutionary models and we found that the best match to our ABD sample is the YREC [M/H] = 0.1 model. In our sample of 10 stars, we identify 1 star that is a probable non-member, 3 enigmatic stars, and 6 stars with confirmed membership. We also present a list of chemically coherent stars from this study and the Barenfeld et al. study.

  4. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  5. MiniBooNE darkmatter collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE-DM Collaboration A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo,1 B. Batell,2 B.C. Brown,3 R. Carr,4 R. Cooper,5 P. deNiverville,6 R. Dharmapalan,7 R. Ford,3 F.G. Garcia,3 G. T. Garvey,8 J. Grange,9 W. Huelsnitz,8 I. L. de Icaza Astiz,1 R.A. Johnson,10 G. Karagiorgi,4 T. Katori,11 T. Kobilarcik,3 W. Ketchum,8 Q. Liu,8 W.C. Louis,8 C. Mariani,12 W. Marsh,3 D. McKeen,13 C.D. Moore,3 G.B. Mills,8 J. Mirabal,8 P. Nienaber,14 Z. Pavlovic,8 D. Perevalov,3 M. Pospelov,6 H. Ray,9 A. Ritz,6 B.P. Roe,15 M.H. Shaevitz,4

  6. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual H and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.

  7. Magnetic properties of double perovskite La2BMnO6 (B = Ni or Co) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Yuanbing; Parsons, Jason; McCloy, John S.

    2013-03-31

    Double perovskite La2BMnO6 (B = Ni and Co) nanoparticles with average particle size of ~50 nm were synthesized using a facile, environmentally friendly, scalable molten-salt reaction at 700 C in air. Their structural and morphological properties were characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic properties were evaluated using dc magnetic M-T and M-H, and ac magnetic susceptibility versus frequency, temperature, and field. The magnetization curve shows a paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition at TC ~275 and 220 K for La2NiMnO6 (LNMO) and La2CoMnO6 (LCMO) nanoparticles, respectively. ac susceptibility revealed that the LCMO had a single magnetic transition indicative of Co2+-O2--Mn4+ ordering, whereas the LNMO showed more complex magnetic behavior suggesting a re-entrant spin glass.

  8. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Nakamura, Kenji; Au, Ming; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  9. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb -1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; et al

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in collisions at a center of mass energy of in 5.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for mH=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branchingmore » fraction of H → bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.« less

  10. Numerical Simulation of Horizontal Continuous Casting Process of C194 Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei; Cheng Zhenkang [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Processing of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, China, 100088 (China)

    2007-05-17

    Horizontal Continuous Casting (H.C.C) is an important method to cast C194 copper ingot. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the H.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1383K{approx}1463K, the casting speed is between 7.2m/h{approx}10.8m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 3.6m/s{approx}4.6m/s. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the subsequent experiments.

  11. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Process of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, 100088 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 Kapprox1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/happrox10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/sapprox4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  12. Introduction to energy storage with market analysis and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Robert; Pillot, Christophe

    2014-06-16

    At first, the rechargeable battery market in 2012 will be described by technology - lead acid, NiCd, NiMH, lithium ion - and application - portable electronics, power tools, e-bikes, automotive, energy storage. This will be followed by details of the lithium ion battery market value chain from the raw material to the final application. The lithium ion battery market of 2012 will be analyzed and split by applications, form factors and suppliers. There is also a focus on the cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator market included. This report will also give a forecast for the main trends and the market in 2020, 2025. To conclude, a forecast for the rechargeable battery market by application for 2025 will be presented. Since energy storage plays an important role for the growing Electric Vehicle (EV) market, this EV issue is closely considered throughout this analysis.

  13. The Design and Development of The EBIS LEBT Solenoid Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Y.; Addessi, J.; Alessi, J.; Lambiase, R.; Liaw, C.J.; Pikin, A.; Sandberg, J.; Zhang, W.; Zubets, V.

    2010-05-23

    This power supply was designed and developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as part of a new ion preinjector system called EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source). It consists of a charging power supply, a capacitor bank, a discharge and recovery circuit and control circuits. The output is fed through cables into a solenoid magnet. The magnet's inductance is 1.9mH. The maximum charging voltage is 1000V. The power supply output is a half sine wave of 13ms duration. The repetition rate is 5Hz. The power supply output can be set to any value between 250A and 1900A in one second in order to accommodate the varying species of ions specified by different machine users.

  14. Characterization of the Nuclear Barge Sturgis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honerlah, H. B.; Hearty, B. P.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of the Army is authorized to build and operate nuclear reactors for defense purposes under Paragraph 91b of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (1). As part of the Army Reactor Program, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for nuclear reactor engineering and design, reactor construction, and decommissioning design and implementation (2). The Corps is currently focused on ensuring the safety and security of the Army's three deactivated power reactors and planning for their final decommissioning. To support decommissioning cost projections, the Corps is gathering information on the residual radiological and chemical hazards associated with each reactor, starting with the MH-1A reactor on the Sturgis Barge (3). Because the Sturgis Barge is moored in the James River Reserve Fleet, there were unique challenges that had to be overcome during the characterization survey and others that will become a concern when final decommissioning is to be per formed.

  15. Search for a Higgs boson in the mass range from 145 to 1000 GeV decaying to a pair of W or Z bosons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-22

    A search for a heavy Higgs boson in the H → WW and H → ZZ decay channels is reported. The search is based upon proton-proton collision data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and up to 19.7fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Several final states of the H → WW and H → ZZ decays are analyzed. The combined upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction exclude a Higgs bosonmore » with standard model-like couplings and decays in the range 145 < mH < 1000 GeV. In addition, we interpret the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model.« less

  16. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN

    2013-11-22

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual Hmore » and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.« less

  17. 2011-2012 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASTROPHYSICS The isoscalar monopole resonance in the A~90 region D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, Krishichayan, J. Button, M.R. Anders, M.L. Gorelik, M.H. Urin, and S. Shlomo Superallowed beta decay J.C. Hardy, I.S. Towner, V.E. Iacob, H.I. Park, L. Chen, V. Horvat, N. Nica, J Goodwin, M. Bencomo, L. Trache and R.E. Tribble Measurement of branching-ratios in the beta decay of 38Ca H.I. Park, J.C. Hardy, V.E. Iacob, M. Bencomo, L. Chen, J.R. Goodwin, V. Horvat, N. Nica, B.T. Roeder, L. Trache and

  18. Search for a very light NMSSM Higgs boson produced in decays of the 125 GeV scalar boson and decaying into $\\tau$ leptons in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-23

    Our search for a very light Higgs boson decaying into a pair of t leptons is presented within the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. This search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The signal is defined by the production of either of the two lightest scalars, h1 or h2, via gluon-gluon fusion and subsequent decay into a pair of the lightest Higgs bosons, a1 or h1. The h1 or h2 boson is identified with the observed state at a mass of 125 GeV. The analysis searches for decays of the a1 (h1) states into pairs of t leptons and covers a mass range for the a1 (h1) boson of 4 to 8 GeV. Furthermore, the search reveals no significant excess in data above standard model background expectations, and an upper limit is set on the signal production cross section times branching fraction as a function of the a1 (h1) boson mass. The 95% confidence level limit ranges from 4.5 pb at ma1 (mh1 ) = 8 GeV to 10.3 pb at ma1 (mh1 ) = 5 GeV.

  19. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-12-24

    Our measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 4.5 fb₋1 of proton-proton collisions data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb₋1 at √s=8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be μ=1.17±0.27 at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, mH=125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at thismore » value of mH. They are found to be μggF=1.32±0.38, μVBF=0.8±0.7, μWH=1.0±1.6, μZH=0.1+3.7₋0.1, and μtt¯H=1.6+2.7₋1.8, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a W or Z boson or a top-quark pair, respectively. In conclusion, compared with the previously published ATLAS analysis, the results reported here also benefit from a new energy calibration procedure for photons and the subsequent reduction of the systematic uncertainty on the diphoton mass resolution. We found no significant deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  20. Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

  1. IonCCD for direct position-sensitive charged-particle detection: from electrons and keV ions to hyperthermal biomolecular ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjar, Omar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Kibelka, Gottfried; Shill, Scott M.; Kuhn, Ken; Cameron, Chad; Kassan, Scott

    2011-04-01

    A novel charged-particle sensitive, pixel based detector array is described and its usage is demonstrated for a variety of applications, from detection of elemental particles (electrons) to hyper-thermal large biomolecular positive and negative ions including keV light atomic and molecular ions. The array detector is a modified light-sensitive charged coupled device (CCD). The IonCCDTM was engineered for direct charged particle detection by replacing the semi-conductor part of the CCD pixel by a conductor1. In contrast with the CCD, where the semi-conductive pixel is responsible for electron-hole pair formation upon photon bombardment, the IonCCD uses a capacitor coupled to the conductive electrode for direct charge integration. The detector can be operated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum since no high voltages are needed. The IonCCD, presented in this work is an array of 2126 active pixels with 21 um pixel width and 3 um pixel gap. The detection area is 1.5x51mm2 where 1.5 mm and 51 mm are pixel and detector array length, respectively. The result is a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector with 24 um spatial resolution and 88 % pixel area ratio (PAR). In this work we demonstrate the capabilities and the performance of the detector. For the first time we show the direct detection of 250 eV electrons providing linearity response and detection efficiency of the IonCCD as function of electron beam current. Using positive ions from and electron impact source (E-I), we demonstrate that the detection efficiency of the IonCCD is virtually independent of particle energy [250 eV, 1250 eV], particle impact angle [45o, 90o] and particle flux. By combining the IonCCD with a double focusing sector field of Mattauch-Herzog geometry (M-H), we demonstrate fast acquisition of mass spectra in direct air sniffing mode. A first step towards fast in vivo breath analysis is presented. Detection of hyper-thermal biomolecular ions produced using an electrospray ionization source (ESI) is presented. The IonCCD was used as beam profiler to characterize the beam shape and intensity of 15 eV protonated and deprotonated biomolecular ions at the exit of an RF only collisional quadrupole. We present simultaneous detection of 140 eV doubly protonated biomolecular ions when the IonCCD is combined with the M-H analyzer. The latter, demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous separation and micro-array deposition of biological material using a miniature sector field.

  2. Antiferromagnetism in EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.

    2015-05-07

    Single crystals of EuCu2As2 and EuCu2Sb2 were grown from CuAs and CuSb self-flux, respectively. The crystallographic, magnetic, thermal, and electronic transport properties of the single crystals were investigated by room-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T, isothermal magnetization M versus magnetic field H, specific heat Cp(T), and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements. EuCu2As2 crystallizes in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm), whereas EuCu2Sb2 crystallizes in the related primitive tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm). The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and XRD data for the EuCu2Sb2 crystals showed the presence of vacancies on the Cu sites, yielding themore » actual composition EuCu1.82Sb2. The ρ(T) and Cp(T) data reveal metallic character for both EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering is indicated from the χ(T),Cp(T), and ρ(T) data for both EuCu2As2 (TN = 17.5 K) and EuCu1.82Sb2 (TN = 5.1 K). In EuCu1.82Sb2, the ordered-state χ(T) and M(H) data suggest either a collinear A-type AFM ordering of Eu+2 spins S = 7/2 or a planar noncollinear AFM structure, with the ordered moments oriented in the tetragonal ab plane in either case. This ordered-moment orientation for the A-type AFM is consistent with calculations with magnetic dipole interactions. As a result, the anisotropic χ(T) and isothermal M(H) data for EuCu2As2, also containing Eu+2 spins S = 7/2, strongly deviate from the predictions of molecular field theory for collinear AFM ordering and the AFM structure appears to be both noncollinear and noncoplanar.« less

  3. Mid-infrared followup of cold brown dwarfs: diversity in age, mass and metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Burningham, Ben; Marley, Mark S; Waren, S J; Jones, H R A; Pinfield, D J; Smart, R L

    2009-01-01

    We present new Spitzer IRAC [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry of nine very late-type T dwarfs. Combining this with previously published photometry, we investigate trends with type and color that are useful for both the planning and interpretation of infrared surveys designed to discover the coldest T or Y dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with effective temperature (T{sub eff}) below 700 K emit more than half their flux at wavelengths longer than 3 {micro}m, and the ratio of the mid-infrared flux to the near-infrared flux becomes very sensitive to T{sub eff} at these low temperatures. We confirm that the color H (1.6 {micro}m) - [4.5] is a good indicator of T{sub eff} with a relatively weak dependence on metallicity and gravity. Conversely, the colors H - K (2.2 {micro}m) and [4.5] - [5.8] are sensitive to metallicity and gravity. Thus near- and mid-infrared photometry provide useful indicators of the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs, and if temperature and gravity are known, then mass and age can be reliably determined from evolutionary models. There are twelve dwarfs currently known with H - [4.5] > 3.0, and {approx} 500 < T{sub eff} K {approx}< 800, which we examine in detail. The ages of the dwarfs in the sample range from very young (0.1 - 1.0 Gyr) to relatively old (3 - 12 Gyr). The mass range is possibly as low as 5 Jupiter masses to up to 70 Jupiter masses, i.e. near the hydrogen burning limit. The metallicities also span a large range, from [m/H]= -0.3 to [m/H]= +0.2. The small number of T8 - T9 dwarfs found in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey to date appear to be predominantly young low-mass dwarfs. Accurate mid-infrared photometry of cold brown dwarfs is essentially impossible from the ground, and extensions to the mid-infrared space missions warm-Spitzer and WISE are desirable in order to obtain the vital mid-infrared data for cold brown dwarfs, and to discover more of these rare objects.

  4. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; et al

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnosticmore » lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.« less

  5. Ferromagnetic response of multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3} films mediated by epitaxial strain and chemical pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, J.; Morn, O.; Astudillo, A.; Bolaos, G.; Arnache, O.

    2014-05-07

    High quality Tb{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x?=?0, 0.3) films have been grown under different values of compressive/tensile strain using (001)-oriented SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates. The films were grown by means of rf sputtering at substrate temperature of 800??C. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that films are single phase, preferentially oriented in the (111) and (122) directions for films deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates, respectively. Although the TbMnO{sub 3} target shows antiferromagnetic order, the films deposited on both substrates show weak ferromagnetic phase at low temperature coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase. The introduction of Al in the films clearly enhances their ferromagnetic behavior, improving the magnetic performance of this material. Indeed, M(H) measurements at 5?K show a well-defined hysteresis for films grown on both substrates. However, a stronger magnetic signal (larger values of remanence and coercive field) is observed for films deposited on MgO substrates. The chemical pressure generated by Al doping together with the substrate-induced strain seem to modify the subtle competition between magnetic interactions in the system. It is speculated that such modification could lead to a non-collinear magnetic state that may be tuned by strain modifications. This may be performed by varying the thickness of the films and/or considering other substrate materials.

  6. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  7. Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in pp collisions at √s = 8 with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Barklow, T.

    2015-07-18

    A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb⁻¹ of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson (V = W or Z) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain V H production followed by H decaying to invisible particles for themore » Higgs boson mass range 115 < mH < 300 GeV. The 95 % confidence-level observed upper limit on σVH × BR(H → inv.) varies from 1.6 pb at 115 GeV to 0.13 pb at 300 GeV. Assuming Standard Model production and including the gg → H contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78% at 95% confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons decays to invisible particles at a mass of 125 GeV.« less

  8. Search for new phenomena in events with at least three photons collected in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-01

    Results of a search for new phenomena in events with at least three photons are reported. Data from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, were collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model. Limits at the 95 % confidence level on new phenomena are presented based on the rate of events in an inclusive signal region and a restricted signal region targeting the rare decay Z→3γ, as well as di-photon and tri-photon resonance searches. For a Standard Model Higgsmore » boson decaying to four photons via a pair of intermediate pseudoscalar particles (a), limits are found to be σ× BR (h→aa)× BR (a→γγ)2<10-3σSM for 10 GeV a< 62 GeV. Finally, limits are also presented for Higgs boson-like scalars (H) for mH> 125 GeV, and for a Z' decaying to three photons via Z'→a+γ→3γ. Additionally, the observed limit on the branching ratio of the Z boson decay to three photons is found to be BR(Z→3γ)<2.2×10-6, a result five times stronger than the previous result from LEP.« less

  9. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  10. High precision predictions for exclusive VH production at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Ye; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-06-04

    We present a resummation-improved prediction for pp → VH + 0 jets at the Large Hadron Collider. We focus on highly-boosted final states in the presence of jet veto to suppress the tt¯ background. In this case, conventional fixed-order calculations are plagued by the existence of large Sudakov logarithms αnslogm(pvetoT/Q) for Q ~ mV + mH which lead to unreliable predictions as well as large theoretical uncertainties, and thus limit the accuracy when comparing experimental measurements to the Standard Model. In this work, we show that the resummation of Sudakov logarithms beyond the next-to-next-to-leading-log accuracy, combined with the next-to-next-to-leading ordermore » calculation, reduces the scale uncertainty and stabilizes the perturbative expansion in the region where the vector bosons carry large transverse momentum. Thus, our result improves the precision with which Higgs properties can be determined from LHC measurements using boosted Higgs techniques.« less

  11. A 200-A, 500-Hz, triangle current-wave modulator and magnet used for particle beam rastering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, C.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a simple 2D beam-rastering system to uniformly spread a 100-mA 6.7-MeV cw proton beam over a 50-cm by 50-cm beam stop. The basic circuit uses a 20-mF capacitor bank, a IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) full-wave inverter, and a 1-mH ferrite dipole magnet to produce a {+-} 500-Gauss peak triangular-waveform deflection field at 500 Hz. A dc input voltage of 200 volts at 2.6 amps (520 watts) produces a 160-ampere peak-to-peak triangular current waveform in the ferrite magnet at 500 Hz. For dual-axis rastering, two ferrite dipoles are used, one at 500 Hz, and the other at 575 Hz, to produce a uniform 2D beam distribution at the beam stop. The paper will discuss the IGBT modulator and ferrite deflector in detail, including current and voltage waveforms, and the ferrite magnet B-dot (dB/dt) signal.

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H -> WW -> lepton+neutrino+q'qbar Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2011-04-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in events containing a charged lepton (ell), missing transverse energy, and at least two jets, using 5.4 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primarily to Higgs bosons produced through the fusion of two gluons or two electroweak bosons, with subsequent decay H->WW->ell+nu+q'qbar, where ell is an electron or muon. The search is also sensitive to contributions from other production channels, such as WH->ell+nu+bbbar In the absence of signal, we set limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section for H production sigma(ppbar->H+X) in these final states. For a mass of MH=160 GeV, the limit is a factor of 3.9 larger than the cross section in the standard model, and consistent with expectation.

  13. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the decay channel $H$ to $Z Z$ to 4 leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    A search for a Higgs boson in the four-lepton decay channel H to ZZ, with each Z boson decaying to an electron or muon pair, is reported. The search covers Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 < mH < 600 GeV. The analysis uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS detector in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV from the LHC. Seventy-two events are observed with four-lepton invariant mass m[4 leptons] > 100 GeV (with thirteen below 160 GeV), while 67.1 +/- 6.0 (9.5 +/-1.3) events are expected from background. The four-lepton mass distribution is consistent with the expectation of standard model background production of ZZ pairs. Upper limits at 95% confidence level exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the ranges 134-158 GeV, 180-305 GeV, and 340 -465 GeV. Small excesses of events are observed around masses of 119, 126, and 320 GeV, making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal.

  14. Two new frameworks of potassium saccharate obtained from acidic and alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Yao-Kang; Feng, Yun-Long; Liu, Ji-Wei; Jiang, Zhan-Guo

    2011-05-15

    Two chiral K(I) complexes based on D-saccharic acid (H{sub 2}sac), [K(Hsac)]{sub n} (1) and [K{sub 2}(sac)]{sub n} (2) were obtained from acidic and alkaline solution. The 3D framework of 1 includes K(I) polyhedral rods and typical pairwise coaxial right- and left-handed helical chains, and displays binodal 6-connected pcu topology. 2 contains 2D polyhedral sheets consisting of left-handed helical chains, and generates 3D network with an unprecedented (7,11)-connected net. Cyclic voltammetry tests and charge-discharge tests indicate that the addition of complex 2 to the electrolyte could improve the electrochemical properties of the nickel hydroxide electrode. -- Graphical abstract: Two K(I) complexes based on D-saccharic acid (H{sub 2}sac), [K(Hsac)]{sub n} (1) and [K{sub 2}(sac)]{sub n} (2) were obtained and characterized. Electrochemical studies indicate the potential use of 2 in Ni-MH battery. Display Omitted highlights: > Two novel chiral K(I) frameworks based on D-saccharic acid were obtained. > The structure of 1 includes K(I) polyhedral rods and typical helical chains. > 2 contains 2D polyhedral sheets and generates an unprecedented (7,11)-connected net. > Addition of 2 to electrolyte could improve the nickel hydroxide electrode's property.

  15. The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth program. IV. A low-mass planet orbiting an M dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wright, Jason T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-10-10

    We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msin i = 5.35 0.75 M {sub ?}, orbital period P = 11.4433 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ?0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H and K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = 0.22, [Fe/H] = 0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 0.0021 R {sub ?} based on interferometry from CHARA.

  16. Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J. Da; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. 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G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Saadi, D. Shoaleh; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-07-01

    A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson (V=WV=W or Z) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain VH production followed by H decaying to invisible particles for the Higgs boson mass range 115<mH<300115H<300 GeV. The 95 % confidence-level observed upper limit on σVH×BR(H→inv.) varies from 1.6 pb at 115 GeV to 0.13 pb at 300 GeV. Assuming Standard Model production and including the gg→H contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78 % at 95 % confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons decays to invisible particles at a mass of 125 GeV.

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH→l⁺l⁻bb̄ Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z→e⁺e⁻ or Z→μ⁺μ⁻ candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZHmore » production cross section times branching ratio for H→bb̄ at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90≤MH≤150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.« less

  18. NEW ATLAS9 AND MARCS MODEL ATMOSPHERE GRIDS FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meszaros, Sz.; Allende Prieto, C.; De Vicente, A.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Castelli, F.; Garcia Perez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R.; Plez, B.; Schiavon, R.; Shetrone, M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new grid of model photospheres for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey of stellar populations of the Galaxy, calculated using the ATLAS9 and MARCS codes. New opacity distribution functions were generated to calculate ATLAS9 model photospheres. MARCS models were calculated based on opacity sampling techniques. The metallicity ([M/H]) spans from -5 to 1.5 for ATLAS and -2.5 to 0.5 for MARCS models. There are three main differences with respect to previous ATLAS9 model grids: a new corrected H{sub 2}O line list, a wide range of carbon ([C/M]) and {alpha} element [{alpha}/M] variations, and solar reference abundances from Asplund et al. The added range of varying carbon and {alpha}-element abundances also extends the previously calculated MARCS model grids. Altogether, 1980 chemical compositions were used for the ATLAS9 grid and 175 for the MARCS grid. Over 808,000 ATLAS9 models were computed spanning temperatures from 3500 K to 30,000 K and log g from 0 to 5, where larger temperatures only have high gravities. The MARCS models span from 3500 K to 5500 K, and log g from 0 to 5. All model atmospheres are publicly available online.

  19. RUPRECHT 147: THE OLDEST NEARBY OPEN CLUSTER AS A NEW BENCHMARK FOR STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Jason L.; Wright, Jason T.; Wolfgang, Angie; Brewer, John M.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-05-15

    Ruprecht 147 is a hitherto unappreciated open cluster that holds great promise as a standard in fundamental stellar astrophysics. We have conducted a radial velocity survey of astrometric candidates with Lick, Palomar, and MMT observatories and have identified over 100 members, including 5 blue stragglers, 11 red giants, and 5 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s). We estimate the cluster metallicity from spectroscopic analysis, using Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), and find it to be [M/H] = +0.07 {+-} 0.03. We have obtained deep CFHT/MegaCam g'r'i'z' photometry and fit Padova isochrones to the (g' - i') and Two Micron All Sky Survey (J - K{sub S} ) color-magnitude diagrams, using the {tau}{sup 2} maximum-likelihood procedure of Naylor, and an alternative method using two-dimensional cross-correlations developed in this work. We find best fits for Padova isochrones at age t = 2.5 {+-} 0.25 Gyr, m - M = 7.35 {+-} 0.1, and A{sub V} = 0.25 {+-} 0.05, with additional uncertainty from the unresolved binary population and possibility of differential extinction across this large cluster. The inferred age is heavily dependent on our choice of stellar evolution model: fitting Dartmouth and PARSEC models yield age parameters of 3 Gyr and 3.25 Gyr, respectively. At {approx}300 pc and {approx}3 Gyr, Ruprecht 147 is by far the oldest nearby star cluster.

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  1. Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between ? ? ?(x,t)/aH and ?. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean (???), together with the fluctuations of ? around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10% at kmorerelation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, M ? 5 x 10Mh?, compared to the dark matter at z 0 and 1. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean (???) away from the linear theory prediction fLT?, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k LT from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between ? and ? is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.less

  2. Spectroscopic analysis of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma and fast growth rate of diamond single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derkaoui, N.; Rond, C. Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A.

    2014-06-21

    One of the best ways to increase the diamond growth rate is to couple high microwave power to the plasma. Indeed, increasing the power density leads to increase gas temperature the atomic hydrogen density in the plasma bulk, and to produce more hydrogen and methyl at the diamond surface. Experimental and numerical approaches were used to study the microwave plasma under high power densities conditions. Gas temperature was measured by optical emission spectroscopy and H-atom density using actinometry. CH{sub 3}-radical density was obtained using a 1D model that describes temperatures and plasma composition from the substrate to the top of the reactor. The results show that gas temperature in the plasma bulk, atomic hydrogen, and methyl densities at the diamond surface highly increase with the power density. As a consequence, measurements have shown that diamond growth rate also increases. At very high power density, we measured a growth rate of 40??m/h with an H-atom density of 5 10{sup 17} cm{sup ?3} which corresponds to a H{sub 2} dissociation rate higher than 50%. Finally, we have shown that the growth rate can be framed between a lower and an upper limit as a function depending only on the maximum of H-atom density measured or calculated in the plasma bulk. The results also demonstrated that increasing fresh CH{sub 4} by an appropriate injection into the boundary layer is a potential way to increase the diamond growth rates.

  3. Superconductivity and Physical Properties of CaPd2Ge2 Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A; Prozorov, Ruslan; Johnston, David C

    2014-10-08

    We present the superconducting and normal state properties of CaPd2Ge2 single crystals investigated by magnetic susceptibility ?, isothermal magnetization M, heat capacity Cp, in-plane electrical resistivity ? and London penetration depth ? versus temperature T and magnetic field H measurements. Bulk superconductivity is inferred from the ?(T) and Cp(T) data. The ?(T) data exhibit metallic behavior and a superconducting transition with Tc onset = 1.98 K and zero resistivity at Tc 0 = 1.67 K. The ?(T) reveals the onset of superconductivity at 2.0 K. For T > 2.0 K, the ?(T) and M(H) are weakly anisotropic paramagnetic with ?ab > ?c. The Cp(T) data confirm the bulk superconductivity below Tc = 1.69(3) K. The superconducting state electronic heat capacity is analyzed within the framework of a single-band ?-model of BCS superconductivity and various normal and superconducting state parameters are estimated. Within the ?-model, the Cp(T) data and the ab plane ?(T) data consistently indicate a moderately anisotropic s-wave gap with ?(0)/kBTc ? 1.6, somewhat smaller than the BCS value of 1.764. The relationship of the heat capacity jump at Tc and the penetration depth measurement to the anisotropy in the s-wave gap is discussed.

  4. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; Awe, Thomas James; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B; Haill, Thomas A.; Jones, Peter Andrew; Argo, Jeffrey W; Dalton, Devon; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Meissner, Joel; Milhous, Mark; Nguyen, Doan; Mielke, Chuck

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (1030 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (13 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 27 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  5. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  6. Testing Low-Energy, High-Power Energy Storage Alternatives in a Full-Hybrid Vehicle (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosgrove, J.; Gonger, J.

    2014-01-01

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle gasoline use. However, the battery cost in HEVs contribute to higher incremental cost of HEVs (a few thousand dollars) than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. Significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can improve the vehicle-level cost vs. benefit relationship for HEVs. Such an improvement could lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate gasoline savings. After significant analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage program suggested a new set of requirements for ESS for power-assist HEVs for cost reduction without impacting performance and fuel economy significantly. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This poster will describe development of the LEESS HEV test platform, and LEESS laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results. The first LEESS technology tested was lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) - i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon). We will discuss the performance and fuel saving results with LIC with comparison with original NiMH battery.

  7. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-10-01

    Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

  8. WASP-19b: THE SHORTEST PERIOD TRANSITING EXOPLANET YET DISCOVERED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebb, L.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Horne, K.; Triaud, A.H.M.J.; Gillon, M.; Queloz, D.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Lister, T.A.; Smalley, B.; Maxted, P.F.L.; Hellier, C.; Anderson, D.R.; Bentley, S.; Pollacco, D.; West, R.G.; Haswell, C.A.; Skillen, I.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass M{sub pl} = 1.15 +- 0.08 M{sub J} , radius R{sub pl} = 1.31 +- 0.06 R{sub J} , and orbital period P = 0.7888399 +- 0.0000008 days. Through spectroscopic analysis, we determine the host star to be a slightly super-solar metallicity ([M/H] = 0.1 +- 0.1 dex) G-dwarf with T{sub eff} = 5500 +- 100 K. In addition, we detect periodic, sinusoidal flux variations in the light curve which are used to derive a rotation period for the star of P{sub rot} = 10.5 +- 0.2 days. The relatively short stellar rotation period suggests that either WASP-19 is somewhat young (approx 600 Myr old) or tidal interactions between the two bodies have caused the planet to spiral inward over its lifetime resulting in the spin-up of the star. Due to the detection of the rotation period, this system has the potential to place strong constraints on the stellar tidal quality factor, Q'{sub s}, if a more precise age is determined.

  9. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10–30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovang, D. C. Lamppa, D. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Owen, A. C.; McKenney, J.; Johnson, D. W.; Radovich, S.; Kaye, R. J.; McBride, R. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Awe, T. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Haill, T. A.; Jones, P. A.; Argo, J. W.; Dalton, D. G.; Robertson, G. K.; Waisman, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  10. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observedmore » Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.« less

  11. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  12. Mitigation of harmonic disturbance at pumped storage power station with static frequency converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, J.C.; Wu, C.J.; Yen, S.S.

    1997-09-01

    This paper investigates the harmonic distortion problem and mitigation method at the Mingtan Pumped Storage Power Station in Taiwan, where six 300 MVA synchronous generators/motors are started by a static frequency converter (SFC) before the pumping stage. Since the SFC uses 6-pulse rectifier technique, a large amount of harmonic currents are produced during the starting period. The harmonic distortion level at each bus of the power plant was very high. Especially, the total harmonic distortion (THD) of current at the lighting feeder reached up to 184%, so that power fuses were burned out. At first a 5 mH reactor was inserted in the SFC feeder and a 5th order and high pass filter was installed. However, the harmonic distortion levels were still too high, but there is no space for additional higher-order filters. Finally, the SFC is fed with an individual transformer, and the harmonic disturbance problem is avoided. This paper also gives computer simulations to investigate the harmonic distortion problems and verify the mitigation methods.

  13. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (?¢????38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (?¢????17.0%), and diel rate of travel (?¢????18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  14. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb⁻¹ of pp collision data at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-03-01

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb⁻¹ to 4.9 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions collected at √s=7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9–115.5 GeV, 131–238 GeV and 251–466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124–519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around mH~126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations (σ ). The local significances of H → γγ, Hmore » → ZZ(⁎) → ℓ⁺ℓ⁻ℓ′⁺ℓ′⁻ and H → WW(⁎) → ℓ⁺νℓ′⁻ν¯, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8σ, 2.1σ and 1.4σ, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110–600 GeV is estimated to be ~1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2σ.« less

  15. Nonwoven fabrics made from nickel and stainless steel fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepro, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Nonwoven fabrics made from metal fiber have uses in a variety of applications due to their alloy composition, heat resistivity, conductivity and durability. Applications include: filtration media, battery current collectors, EMI/RFI shielding, insulation and conductive fillers. The ability to form metal fibers into fabrics of non-directionalized fiber webs has led to improved materials in a variety of applications. The non-orientation of the fibers provides a three dimensional structure that is filled with materials such as nickel hydroxide, cadmium oxide and MH alloy used for battery applications or to act as a contaminate trap for filtration. Fibers made from nickel, stainless steel, iron, cobalt, monel and copper are all possibilities for use in nonwoven fabrics. The density, porosity and thickness are all controllable during the web formation process. Fiber diameter is also a critical consideration when specific pore sizes are targeted. Fiber diameters are controlled during the fiber formation process. Diameters as low as 6 microns in stainless steel and 9 microns in other alloys are possible.

  16. Preparation and characterization of selenide semiconductor particles in surfactant vesicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ancheng; Pfeiffer, W.F.; Guillaume, B.; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-05-17

    Cadmium, lead, indium, and zinc selenide particles have been in situ generated on the surfaces of negatively charged dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) and positively charged dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) vesicles. Selenide particles were formed by two different methods. In method A, MSe particles were in situ generated from M{sup 2+}-coated DHP or (MH{sub 2}EDTA){sup 2{minus}}-coated DODAB vesicles by exposure to gaseous H{sub 2}Se. In method B, MSe particles were formed by the chemical reduction of SeO{sub 2} and M{sup 2+} in the presence of DHP vesicles. Selenide particle formation was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. Increasing the amount of H{sub 2}Se added and decreasing the pH of the solution shifted the absorption edge to higher wavelengths, which indicated the formation of larger particles. On standing particles, generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to their precursors attached to DHP vesicles, underwent time-dependent growth. Selenide particles, formed by chemical reductions, and those generated by the addition of H{sub 2}Se to Cd/EDTA-coated DODAB vesicles appeared to be small and more stable than their counterparts in DHP vesicles.

  17. Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between ? ? ?(x,t)/aH and ?. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean (???), together with the fluctuations of ? around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10% at k<0.2hMpc? to 25% at k ~ 0.45hMpc? at z 0. Both the stochastic relation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, M ? 5 x 10Mh?, compared to the dark matter at z 0 and 1. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean (???) away from the linear theory prediction fLT?, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k < 0.1 hMpc?. The stochasticity in the ? ? relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of fLT from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between ? and ? is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.

  18. Significantly enhanced ferroelectricity and magnetic properties in (Sr{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}-modified BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Xiao Qiang E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn

    2015-05-07

    BiFeO{sub 3} multiferroic ceramics were modified by introducing (Sr{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3} to form solid solutions. The single phase structure was easy to be obtained in Bi{sub 1−x}(Sr{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}){sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.2, 0.25, 0.3, and 0.4) solid solutions. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data revealed a transition from rhombohedral R3c (x = 0.2, 0.25, and 0.3) to orthorhombic Pnma (x = 0.4). Current density-field (J-E) characteristics indicated that the leakage current density was reduced by three orders of magnitude in Bi{sub 1−x}(Sr{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}){sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics. Both the ferroelectricity and magnetic properties were significantly enhanced in the present solid solutions. P-E hysteresis loop measurements with dynamic leakage current compensation methods showed the significantly enhanced ferroelectric properties for x = 0.25 and 0.3 and the paraelectric behavior for x = 0.4. The best ferromagnetic characteristics were achieved in the composition of x = 0.25, where the saturated M-H loop was determined with M{sub r} = 34.8 emu/mol. The improvement of ferroelectricity was mainly due to the suppressed leakage current, and the enhanced magnetism originated from the partial substitution of Fe{sup 3+} by Ti{sup 4+}, which destroyed its previous spiral structure to allow the appearance of a macroscopic magnetization.

  19. The structure of CO{sub 2} hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulk, C. A.; Molaison, J. J.; Machida, S.; Klug, D. D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, M.

    2014-11-07

    A deuterated sample of CO{sub 2} structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO{sub 2}8.3 D{sub 2}O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO{sub 2} hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)] and Bollengier et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 119, 322 (2013)], but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO{sub 2} molecules filling the water channels. This CO{sub 2}+water system has also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts a MH-III like filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO{sub 2} molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears to be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al., our neutron diffraction data show that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1?MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150?K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO{sub 2} hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.

  20. Structural and magnetic properties and evidence of spin-glass behavior induced by Fe-doping in perovskite manganites B-site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tlili, M.T.; Bejar, M.; Dhahri, E.; Sajieddine, M.; Valente, M.A.; Hlil, E.K.

    2011-02-15

    AMn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (A = La{sub 0.75}Ca{sub 0.08}Sr{sub 0.17} and x = 0-0.23) compounds, sintered at 700 deg. C, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. Rietveld refinement has shown that samples can be indexed in the orthorhombic (Pnma) structure for low Fe-content (x {<=} 0.046) and rhombohedral (R-3c) structure for high Fe-content (x {>=} 0.115). The transmission Moessbauer spectra have revealed the same isomer shift {delta} value assigned to Fe{sup 3+} ion for all compounds. The magnetization behavior and the Curie temperature T{sub C} have shown a large dependence on the fractional composition x. In fact, the M(T) curves have revealed the presence of a long-range ferromagnetic state below T{sub C} for compounds with x {<=} 0.115, and a spin-glass state (SGS) at low temperature for high Fe-content (x {>=} 0.177). Research Highlights: {yields} La{sub 0.75}Ca{sub 0.08}Sr{sub 0.17}Mn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} compounds undergo a transition ortho-rhombo at x=0.046. {yields} On the rhombohedral phase, the magnetization is governed by the DE interaction {yields} The magnetization undergoes a strong decrease at high x-values (x{>=}0.115). {yields} Compounds show a strong AFM interaction with a spin-glass state at high Fe-content {yields} Hysteresis loops, M(H) confirm this behavior.

  1. Magnetic properties of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Seungkyu; Jin Kim, Sam; Sung Kim, Chul

    2013-05-07

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} samples, proton-irradiated with 0, 10, and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2}, were investigated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements. From the Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD patterns, the crystal structure of BiFeO{sub 3} is determined to be rhombohedral with the space group of R3c. We have observed the decrease in the lattice constant and oxygen occupancy with proton irradiation. The magnetization hysteresis (M-H) curves show the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior in the proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples. The Moessbauer spectra of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples at 295 K were analyzed with two-sextets (B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}) and doublet. From the isomer shift ({delta}) values, ionic states were determined to be Fe{sup 3+}. Compared to non-irradiated sample, having the antiferromagnetic area ratio (two-sextets) of 45.47, 54.53% the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic area ratios (doublet) of 10 and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples are 41.36, 51.26, and 7.38% and 41.03, 50.90, and 8.07%, respectively. Our experimental observation suggests that the increase in the paramagnetic area ratio is due to the disappearance of superexchange interaction, resulted from the removal of the oxygen with proton irradiation. Also, the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior is caused by the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling.

  2. Effect of Zn doping on structural, magnetic and dielectric properties of LaFeO{sub 3} synthesized through sol–gel auto-combustion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, Irshad; Husain, Shahid; Khan, Wasi; Patil, S.I.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have synthesized the samples of LaFe{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) using sol–gel auto-combustion process. • The doping of Zn{sup 2+} hugely enhances the dielectric constant (ε′) and it shows a colossal value. • The parent compound LaFeO{sub 3} does not show any relaxation peak, but the substitution of Zn at Fe{sup 3+} site brings the relaxation in the system. • The system shows a peak behavior thereby giving the Debye like dipolar relaxation response. - Abstract: We have studied the structural and dielectric properties of nano-crystalline LaFe{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) pervoskite samples synthesized through sol–gel auto-combustion technique. X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy are used to confirm the single phase characteristics. Microstructural features are investigated using scanning electron microscope and compositional analysis is performed through energy dispersive spectroscopy. The average grain sizes, calculated from the Scherrer formula, lie in the range below 30 nm. The hysteresis (M-H) curves display a weak magnetic order and a shift in the hysteresis loops. Dielectric response has been discussed, in the framework of “universal dielectric response” model. The value of dielectric constant (ε′) increases drastically on Zn doping. The dielectric loss factor (ε″) shows Debye like dipolar relaxation behavior. The observed peaks in loss factor (ε″) are attributed to the fact that a strong correlation between the conduction mechanism and the dielectric behavior exists in ferrites.

  3. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  4. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  5. Production of Hydrogen by Electrocatalysis: Making the H-H Bond by Combining Protons and Hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, R. Morris; Appel, Aaron M.; Helm, Monte L.

    2014-03-25

    Generation of hydrogen by reduction of two protons by two electrons can be catalysed by molecular electrocatalysts. Determination of the thermodynamic driving force for elimination of H2 from molecular complexes is important for the rational design of molecular electrocatalysts, and allows the design of metal complexes of abundant, inexpensive metals rather than precious metals (“Cheap Metals for Noble Tasks”). The rate of H2 evolution can be dramatically accelerated by incorporating pendant amines into diphosphine ligands. These pendant amines in the second coordination sphere function as protons relays, accelerating intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer reactions. The thermodynamics of hydride transfer from metal hydrides and the acidity of protonated pendant amines (pKa of N-H) contribute to the thermodynamics of elimination of H2; both of the hydricity and acidity can be systematically varied by changing the substituents on the ligands. A series of Ni(II) electrocatalysts with pendant amines have been developed. In addition to the thermochemical considerations, the catalytic rate is strongly influenced by the ability to deliver protons to the correct location of the pendant amine. Protonation of the amine endo to the metal leads to the N-H being positioned appropriately to favor rapid heterocoupling with the M-H. Designing ligands that include proton relays that are properly positioned and thermodynamically tuned is a key principle for molecular electrocatalysts for H2 production as well as for other multi-proton, multi-electron reactions important for energy conversions. The research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  6. METALLICITY AND TEMPERATURE INDICATORS IN M DWARF K-BAND SPECTRA: TESTING NEW AND UPDATED CALIBRATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS OF 133 SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.; Lloyd, James P.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2012-04-01

    We present K-band spectra for 133 nearby (d < 33 ps) M dwarfs, including 18 M dwarfs with reliable metallicity estimates (as inferred from an FGK type companion), 11 M dwarf planet hosts, more than 2/3 of the M dwarfs in the northern 8 pc sample, and several M dwarfs from the LSPM catalog. From these spectra, we measure equivalent widths of the Ca and Na lines, and a spectral index quantifying the absorption due to H{sub 2}O opacity (the H{sub 2}O-K2 index). Using empirical spectral type standards and synthetic models, we calibrate the H{sub 2}O-K2 index as an indicator of an M dwarf's spectral type and effective temperature. We also present a revised relationship that estimates the [Fe/H] and [M/H] metallicities of M dwarfs from their Na I, Ca I, and H{sub 2}O-K2 measurements. Comparisons to model atmosphere provide a qualitative validation of our approach, but also reveal an overall offset between the atomic line strengths predicted by models as compared to actual observations. Our metallicity estimates also reproduce expected correlations with Galactic space motions and H{alpha} emission line strengths, and return statistically identical metallicities for M dwarfs within a common multiple system. Finally, we find systematic residuals between our H{sub 2}O-based spectral types and those derived from optical spectral features with previously known sensitivity to stellar metallicity, such as TiO, and identify the CaH1 index as a promising optical index for diagnosing the metallicities of near-solar M dwarfs.

  7. ULAS J141623.94+134836.3: A BLUE T DWARF COMPANION TO A BLUE L DWARF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Looper, Dagny; Rayner, John T.

    2010-06-15

    We confirm the substellar nature of ULAS J141623.94+134836.3 (aka SDSS J1416+1348B), a common proper motion companion to the blue L dwarf SDSS J141624.08+134826.7 identified by Burningham et al. and Scholz. Low-resolution 0.8-2.4 {mu}m spectroscopy obtained with the Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX shows strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption bands, consistent with a T7.5 spectral type, and we see possible indications of NH{sub 3} absorption in the 1.0-1.3 {mu}m region. More importantly, the spectrum of SDSS J1416+1348B shows a broadened Y-band peak and highly suppressed K-band flux, both indicative of high surface gravity and/or subsolar metallicity. These traits are verified through spectral model fits, from which we derive atmospheric parameters T{sub eff} = 650 {+-} 60 K, log g = 5.2 {+-} 0.4 cgs, [M/H] {<=} -0.3, and K{sub zz} = 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, the temperature being significantly warmer than that estimated by Burningham et al. These fits also indicate a model-dependent spectroscopic distance of 10.6{sup +3.0}{sub -2.8} pc for SDSS J1416+1348B, formally consistent with the 7.9 {+-} 1.7 pc astrometric distance for SDSS J1416+1348A from Scholz. The common peculiarities of these two co-spatial, co-moving sources suggest that their unusual blue colors-and those of other blue L and T dwarfs in general-arise from age/gravity or metallicity effects, rather than cloud properties alone.

  8. (Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten's of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  9. [Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology]. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten`s of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  10. THE APOKASC CATALOG: AN ASTEROSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC JOINT SURVEY OF TARGETS IN THE KEPLER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Elsworth, Yvonne; Chaplin, William J.; Hekker, Saskia; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis; Mszros, Sz.; Garca, Rafael A.; Beck, Paul; Mathur, Savita; Garca Prez, Ana; Girardi, Lo; Basu, Sarbani; Shetrone, Matthew; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of the order of 80K in T {sub eff}, 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with T {sub eff} and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0 and 200K cooler than that expected from the infrared flux method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in T {sub eff} and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.

  11. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the “Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile” (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditions—it is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  12. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  13. Towards tailoring the magnetocaloric response in FeRh-based ternary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Radhika Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Lewis, L. H.

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we demonstrate that the magnetocaloric response of FeRh-based compounds may be tailored for potential magnetic refrigeration applications by chemical modification of the FeRh lattice. Alloys of composition Fe(Rh{sub 1−x}A{sub x}) or (Fe{sub 1−x}B{sub x})Rh (A = Cu, Pd; B = Ni; 0 < x < 0.06) were synthesized via arc-melting and subsequent annealing in vacuum at 1000 °C for 48 h. The magnetocaloric properties of the FeRh-based systems were determined using isothermal M(H) curves measured in the vicinity of the magnetostructural temperature (T{sub t}). It is found that the FeRh working temperature range (δT{sub FWHM}) may be chemically tuned over a wide temperature range, 100 K ≤ T ≤ 400 K. While elemental substitution consistently decreases the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub mag}) of the FeRh-based ternary alloys from that of the parent FeRh compound (ΔS{sub mag},{sub FeRh} ∼ 17 J/kg K; ΔS{sub mag,FeRh-ternary =} 7–14 J/kg K at H{sub app} = 2 T), the net refrigeration capacity (RC), defined as the amount of heat that can be transferred during one magnetic refrigeration cycle, of the modified systems is significantly higher (RC{sub FeRh} ∼ 150 J/kg; RC{sub FeRh-ternary =} 170–210 J/kg at H{sub app} = 2 T). These results are attributed to stoichiometry-induced changes in the FeRh electronic band structure and beneficial broadening of the magnetostructural transition due to local chemical disorder.

  14. Characterization of glycidol-hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of exposure and in vivo dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Törnqvist, Margareta; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2014-03-15

    Hemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of exposure to reactive chemicals. Glycidol, an animal carcinogen, has been reported to form N-(2,3-dihydroxy-propyl)valine adducts to hemoglobin (diHOPrVal). To support the use of these adducts as markers of glycidol exposure, we investigated the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and its elimination in vitro and in vivo. Five groups of rats were orally administered a single dose of glycidol ranging from 0 to 75 mg/kg bw, and diHOPrVal levels were measured 24 h after administration. A dose-dependent increase in diHOPrVal levels was observed with high linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.943). Blood sampling at different time points (1, 10, 20, or 40 days) from four groups administered glycidol at 12 mg/kg bw suggested a linear decrease in diHOPrVal levels compatible with the normal turnover of rat erythrocytes (life span, 61 days), with the calculated first-order elimination rate constant (k{sub el}) indicating that the diHOPrVal adduct was chemically stable. Then, we measured the second-order rate constant (k{sub val}) for the reaction of glycidol with N-terminal valine in rat and human hemoglobin in in vitro experiments with whole blood. The k{sub val} was 6.7 ± 1.1 and 5.6 ± 1.3 (pmol/g globin per μMh) in rat and human blood, respectively, indicating no species differences. In vivo doses estimated from k{sub val} and diHOPrVal levels were in agreement with the area under the (concentration–time) curve values determined in our earlier toxicokinetic study in rats. Our results indicate that diHOPrVal is a useful biomarker for quantification of glycidol exposure and for risk assessment. - Highlight: • Glycidol-hemoglobin adduct (diHOPrVal) was characterized for exposure evaluation. • We studied the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and elimination in vitro and in vivo. • Dose dependent formation and chemical stability were confirmed in the rat study. • In vivo dose (AUC) of glycidol could be estimated from diHOPrVal levels. • diHOPrVal is considered a useful exposure and in vivo dose marker of G.

  15. The CMSSM and NUHM1 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; De Roeck, A.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Marrouche, J.; Martinez Santos, D.; et al

    2014-06-13

    We analyze the impact of data from the full Run 1 of the LHC at 7 and 8 TeV on the CMSSM with μ > 0 and < 0 and the NUHM1 with μ > 0, incorporating the constraints imposed by other experiments such as precision electroweak measurements, flavour measurements, the cosmological density of cold dark matter and the direct search for the scattering of dark matter particles in the LUX experiment. We use the following results from the LHC experiments: ATLAS searches for events with E/T accompanied by jets with the full 7 and 8 TeV data, the ATLASmore » and CMS measurements of the mass of the Higgs boson, the CMS searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons and a combination of the LHCb and CMS measurements of BR(Bs → μ+μ–) and BR(Bd → μ+μ–). Our results are based on samplings of the parameter spaces of the CMSSM for both μ > 0 and μ < 0 and of the NUHM1 for μ > 0 with 6.8×106, 6.2×106 and 1.6×107 points, respectively, obtained using the MultiNest tool. The impact of the Higgs-mass constraint is assessed using FeynHiggs 2.10.0, which provides an improved prediction for the masses of the MSSM Higgs bosons in the region of heavy squark masses. It yields in general larger values of Mh than previous versions of FeynHiggs, reducing the pressure on the CMSSM and NUHM1. We find that the global χ2 functions for the supersymmetric models vary slowly over most of the parameter spaces allowed by the Higgs-mass and the E/T searches, with best-fit values that are comparable to the χ2/dof for the best Standard Model fit. As a result, we provide 95% CL lower limits on the masses of various sparticles and assess the prospects for observing them during Run 2 of the LHC.« less

  16. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  17. Critical behavior and magnetocaloric effect of Pr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T. A.; Phan, The-Long; Yu, S. C.; Thanh, T. D.; Yu, Yikyung; Tartakovsky, D. M.; Ho, T. O.; Thang, P. D.; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2015-05-07

    The critical behavior of Pr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} samples with x = 0.25, 0.27, and 0.29 has been investigated. Detailed analyses of magnetic-field dependences of magnetization at temperatures around the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition, M(H, T), reveal that the samples undergo a second-order magnetic phase transition. The Arrott plot method predicts the values of critical parameters to be T{sub C}  ≈ 118 K, β = 0.351 ± 0.003, γ = 1.372 ± 0.002, and δ = 4.90 ± 0.02 for x = 0.25; T{sub C}  ≈ 116 K, β = 0.362 ± 0.002, γ = 1.132 ± 0.004, and δ = 4.09 ± 0.03 for x = 0.27; and T{sub C}  ≈ 110 K, β = 0.521 ± 0.002, γ = 0.912 ± 0.005, and δ = 2.71 ± 0.02 for x = 0.29. The values of β = 0.351 (for x = 0.25) and β = 0.362 (for x = 0.27) are close to the value β = 0.365 expected for the 3D Heisenberg model, proving an existence of short-range ferromagnetic interactions in these samples. A slight increase in Ca-doping content (x = 0.29) leads to the shift of the β value (=0.521) towards that of the mean-field theory (with β = 0.5) characteristic of long-range ferromagnetic interactions. The samples also exhibit a magnetocaloric effect: around T{sub C} of Pr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} compounds, magnetic-entropy change reaches the maximum values of about 5.0, 4.1, and 2.5 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} for x = 0.25, 0.27, and 0.29, respectively, under an applied-field change of 50 kOe. Magnetic-field dependences of the maximum magnetic-entropy change (ΔS{sub max}) obey a power law |ΔS{sub max}(H)| ∝ H{sup n}, where exponent values n = 0.68–0.74 are close to those obtained from the theoretical relation n = 1 + (β − 1)/(β + γ)

  18. PHEV-EV Charger Technology Assessment with an Emphasis on V2G Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisacikoglu, Mithat C; Bedir, Abdulkadir; Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-03-01

    More battery powered electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will be introduced to the market in 2011 and beyond. Since these vehicles have large batteries that need to be charged from an external power source or directly from the grid, their batteries, charging circuits, charging stations/infrastructures, and grid interconnection issues are garnering more attention. This report summarizes information regarding the batteries used in PHEVs, different types of chargers, charging standards and circuits, and compares different topologies. Furthermore, it includes a list of vehicles that are going to be in the market soon with information on their charging and energy storage equipment. A summary of different standards governing charging circuits and charging stations concludes the report. There are several battery types that are available for PHEVs; however, the most popular ones have nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) chemistries. The former one is being used in current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), but the latter will be used in most of the PHEVs and EVs due to higher energy densities and higher efficiencies. The chargers can be classified based on the circuit topologies (dedicated or integrated), location of the charger (either on or off the vehicle), connection (conductive, inductive/wireless, and mechanical), electrical waveform (direct current (dc) or alternating current (ac)), and the direction of power flow (unidirectional or bidirectional). The first PHEVs typically will have dedicated, on-board, unidirectional chargers that will have conductive connections to the charging stations or wall outlets and will be charged using either dc or ac. In the near future, bidirectional chargers might also be used in these vehicles once the benefits of practical vehicle to grid applications are realized. The terms charger and charging station cause terminology confusion. To prevent misunderstandings, a more descriptive term of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) is used instead of charging station. The charger is the power conversion equipment that connects the battery to the grid or another power source, while EVSE refers to external equipment between the grid or other power source and the vehicle. EVSE might include conductors, connectors, attachment plugs, microprocessors, energy measurement devices, transformers, etc. Presently, there are more than 40 companies that are producing EVSEs. There are several standards and codes regarding conductive and inductive chargers and EVSEs from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the Underwriter Laboratories (UL), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the National Electric Code (NEC). The two main standards from SAE describe the requirements for conductive and inductive coupled chargers and the charging levels. For inductive coupled charging, three levels are specified: Level 1 (120 V and 12 A, single-phase), Level 2 (208 V-240 V and 32 A, single-phase), and Level 3 (208-600 V and 400 A, three-phase) . The standard for the conductive-coupled charger also has similar charging ratings for Levels 1 and 2, but it allows higher current ratings for Level 2 charging up to 80 A. Level 3 charging for this standard is still under development and considers dc charging instead of three-phase ac. More details in these areas and related references can be found in this Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report on PHEV-EV charger technology assessment.

  19. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too