Sample records for rwanda mh montserrat

  1. Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy...

  2. Montserrat: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey,Ohio:Montserrat:

  3. Development on the Margins: Rwanda Alternative Grassroots Economic Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Courtney

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Land scarcity in Rwanda has long been and continues to be a topic of concern for citizens and government officials alike. In a country where agricultural laborers account for an estimated 85% of the total work force (Rwanda ...

  4. Project EARTH-12-MH1: Quantifying mafic magma: the driver for arc volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    of mafic inclusions following magma mixing at Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat. Contrib Mineral Petrol

  5. M.H. Perrott An Efficient Approach to System Level,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrott, Michael

    Level Test Vectors Schematic Creation Code Creation Place & Route Extracted Layout Creation PVT Corners2 Vo/V1 f (Hz) fdom 20log 20log(K) fp 0dB fo #12;M.H. Perrott A Simple Block Diagram Model of Opamp- Vo vnoise 2 voff Nonlinearity #12;M.H. Perrott Overall Block Diagram Model Unilateral flow through

  6. Recycling of used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, T.; Ono, H.; Shirai, R. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd., Ageo, Saitama (Japan). Corporate R and D Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ni-MH (nickel metal hydride) rechargeable battery was developed several years ago. Its higher electrochemical capacity and greater safety compared with the Ni-Cd rechargeable battery have resulted in very rapid increase in its production. The Ni-MH rechargeable battery consists of Ni, Co and rare earth metals, so that recycling is important to recover these valuable mineral resources. In this study, a basic recycling process for used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries has been developed, in which the Ni, Co and rare earth elements are recovered through a combination of mechanical processing and hydrometallurgical processing.

  7. Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications on pre-eruptive conduit conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications of the eruptive products. We used quantitative analysis of water content in residual glasses (matrix glass. To better link water content to structural level, we performed new water solubility experiments at low

  8. Rwanda-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information Rwanda

  9. China's Presence in Rwanda and Africa, through the Lens of the Product Life Cycle Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sofiani, Lily

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    >. "Looking-East-Rwanda-China-case-study." Home | ACET.849662/special-report-china-storms-africa>. "The Birth ofGift: The Real Story of China in Africa [Paperback]." N.p. ,

  10. Analysis and design of household rainwater catchment systems for rural Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cresti, Daria

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International (DFGFI) contacted MIT in September 2006 for technical assistance to analyze the water-supply potential within the Bisate Sector, Musanze District, Rwanda. The present study focuses ...

  11. A case study of the management of coffee cooperatives in Rwanda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goff, Samuel Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assess the management practices of three coffee cooperatives in Rwanda and, subsequently, modify existing educational curricular modules in order to address the identified areas of need. ...

  12. A case study of the management of coffee cooperatives in Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goff, Samuel Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assess the management practices of three coffee cooperatives in Rwanda and, subsequently, modify existing educational curricular modules in order to address the identified areas of need. Societal and institutional...

  13. Seismic and hydroacoustic analysis relevant to MH370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stead, Richard J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The vicinity of the Indian Ocean is searched for open and readily available seismic and/or hydroacoustic stations that might have recorded a possible impact of MH370 with the ocean surface. Only three stations are identified: the IMS hydrophone arrays H01 and H08, and the Geoscope seismic station AIS. Analysis of the data from these stations shows an interesting arrival on H01 that has some interference from an Antarctic ice event, large amplitude repeating signals at H08 that obscure any possible arrivals, and large amplitude chaotic noise at AIS precludes any analysis at higher frequencies of interest. The results are therefore rather inconclusive but may point to a more southerly impact location within the overall Indian Ocean search region. The results would be more useful if they can be combined with any other data that are not readily available.

  14. MH-TRACE: MULTI-HOP TIME RESERVATION USING ADAPTIVE CONTROL FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    - TRACE is better than the throughput of CSMA type protocols under high trafic loads. INTRODUCTION EnergyMH-TRACE: MULTI-HOP TIME RESERVATION USING ADAPTIVE CONTROL FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY Bulent Tavli, Rochester, NY 14627 Abstract- Multi-Hop Time Reservation Using Adaptive Control for Energy Efficiency (MH

  15. COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES Jean by applying the LCA methodology to evaluate the environmental footprint of alkaline cells and Ni-MH batteries phase. Besides, the emphasis on rechargeable batteries is only justified from an environmental point

  16. Implications of NiMH Hysteresis on HEV Battery Testing and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motloch, Chester George; Belt, Jeffrey R; Hunt, Gary Lynn; Ashton, Clair Kirkendall; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Miller, Ted J.; Coates, Calvin; Tataria, H. S.; Lucas, Glenn E.; Duong, T.Q.; Barnes, J.A.; Sutula, Raymond

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel Metal-Hydride (NiMH) is an advanced high-power battery technology that is presently employed in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) and is one of several technologies undergoing continuing research and development by FreedomCAR. Unlike some other HEV battery technologies, NiMH exhibits a strong hysteresis effect upon charge and discharge. This hysteresis has a profound impact on the ability to monitor state-of-charge and battery performance. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have been investigating the implications of NiMH hysteresis on HEV battery testing and performance. Experimental results, insights, and recommendations are presented.

  17. Rwanda-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information Rwanda Eastern Africa

  18. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information Rwanda Eastern Africa|

  19. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change and Low

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information Rwanda Eastern

  20. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change and Low

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information Rwanda EasternCarbon

  1. GROUPE D'ANALYSE ET DE THORIE CONOMIQUE LYON -ST TIENNE Rural electrification in Rwanda : A measure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    from Lake Kivu and generate electrical power, that would benefit Rwandan people. The project has two in Rwanda valuing people's contribution for electrification, an innovative design is pro- posed, giving in which they would contribute their money. Results show that people prefer to contribute in time rather

  2. Factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies by cooperative-oriented agribusinesses in Rwanda: evidence from the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative of Maraba.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haba, Sharon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to identify the factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies among the farmers in the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative located in Butare, Rwanda. Three hundred and six...

  3. An experimental and modeling study of isothermal charge/discharge behavior of commercial NiMH cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­MH) battery model is applied in conjunction with experimental characterization. Important geometric parameters and incorporated in the model. The kinetic parameters of the oxygen evolution reaction are also characterized using and discharge. The Ni electrode kinetic parameters are re-calibrated for the battery studied. The Ni­MH cell

  4. 1600 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2007 Solar Battery Chargers for NiMH Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    1600 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 22, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2007 Solar Battery Chargers for NiMH Batteries Florent Boico, Brad Lehman, Member, IEEE, and Khalil Shujaee Abstract--This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. First, it is shown that existing charge

  5. Criticality assessment of basket designs for use in the MH-1A shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study is made of a proposed stainless steel basket to be used in the MH-1A cask for the shipment of National Bureau of Standards reactor fuel elements. The use of B/sub 4/C in the basket as a primary control for the prevention of criticality is shown to be effective but not necessary. A basket fabricated of 0.635-cm-thick stainless steel provides a sufficient margin of subcriticality.

  6. Maxim > App Notes > BATTERY MANAGEMENT INTERFACE CIRCUITS Keywords: USB, USB Charger, Li+ USB charger, Lithium Ion USB charger, NiMH USB charger, USB battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    charger, Lithium Ion USB charger, NiMH USB charger, USB battery charger, charging batteries from USB, and cabling. An overview of nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium battery technologies, charging methodsMaxim > App Notes > BATTERY MANAGEMENT INTERFACE CIRCUITS Keywords: USB, USB Charger, Li+ USB

  7. Formaldehyde as a Basis for Residential Ventilation Rates1 M.H. Sherman (MHSherman@lbl.gov) and A.T. Hodgson (ATHodgson@lbl.gov)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49577 Formaldehyde as a Basis for Residential Ventilation Rates1 M.H. Sherman (MHSherman, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number

  8. Bilayer Graphene Photon Detector J. Y. Yan, M.-H. Kim, J. A. Elle, A. B. Sushkov, G. S. Jenkins, H. M. Milchberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Bilayer Graphene Photon Detector J. Y. Yan, M.-H. Kim, J. A. Elle, A. B. Sushkov, G. S. Jenkins, H in graphene suggests that "hot electrons" created by incident light can provide the basis for a fast graphene in a "dual-gated" structure. This new "bolometer" has ultralow noise, besting existing detectors

  9. M.H. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B.C. Singer, Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches -LBNL Report Number 3978-E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches - LBNL Report Number 3978-E M.H. Sherman, J and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches - LBNL Report Number 3978-E 1 Infiltration Effects Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3978-E #12;M.H. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B

  10. Phenomenology of a very light scalar (100 MeV $<m_h<$ 10 GeV) mixing with the SM Higgs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson D. Clarke; Robert Foot; Raymond R. Volkas

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the phenomenology of a very light scalar, $h$, with mass 100 MeV $<m_h<$ 10 GeV, mixing with the SM Higgs. As a benchmark model we take the real singlet scalar extension of the SM. We point out apparently unresolved uncertainties in the branching ratios and lifetime of $h$ in a crucial region of parameter space for LHC phenomenology. Bounds from LEP, meson decays and fixed target experiments are reviewed. We also examine prospects at the LHC. For $m_h \\lesssim m_B$ the dominant production mechanism is via meson decay; our main result is the calculation of the differential $p_T$ spectrum of $h$ scalars originating from B mesons and the subsequent prediction of up to thousands of moderate (triggerable) $p_T$ displaced dimuons possibly hiding in the existing dataset at ATLAS/CMS or at LHCb. We also demonstrate that the subdominant $Vh$ production channel has the best sensitivity for $m_h \\gtrsim m_B$ and that future bounds in this region could conceivably compete with those of LEP.

  11. A Reversible Structural Interconversion Involving [M(H2pdc)2(H2O)2] 2H2O (M Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, H3pdc 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid) and the Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    A Reversible Structural Interconversion Involving [M(H2pdc)2(H2O)2] ´ 2H2O (M Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, H3pdc 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid) and the Role of A Reactive Intermediate [Co(H2pdc)2] Long Pan, Nancy Ching, Xiaoying Huang, and Jing Li*[a] Abstract: A new type of hydrogen bonded networks [M(H2pdc)2

  12. Very Low-Cost Internet Access Using KioskNet S. Guo, M.H. Falaki, E.A. Oliver, S. Ur Rahman, A. Seth, M.A. Zaharia, and S. Keshav

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    ) and appears to be economically viable. We estimate that our system requires a capital expenditure of $100Very Low-Cost Internet Access Using KioskNet S. Guo, M.H. Falaki, E.A. Oliver, S. Ur Rahman, A kiosks in developing regions can cost-effectively provide communication and e-governance services

  13. Congrs Mondial de l Energie 2010, FLETY Y., ANTONI J.-P., VUIDEL G., SEDE-MARCEAU (de) M.-H. Des tiquettes nergtiques pour les territoires : une premire approche fonde sur les mobilits urbaines 1/18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Congrès Mondial de l Energie 2010, FLETY Y., ANTONI J.-P., VUIDEL G., SEDE-MARCEAU (de) M.-H. Des-Philippe ANTONI, Gilles VUIDEL, Marie-Hélène de SÈDE-MARCEAU, Doctorant, Maître de conférences, Ingénieur d études

  14. 4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocity and attenuation in liquid Fe-Ni-S, Science, 277, 219-221.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocityForschungsZentrum, Potsdam, Germany, 6-16. 4502. Blewett, D.T., P.G. Lucey, and B.R. Hawke, 1997, Clementine images., 132, 119-132. 4504. Yu, Z.-P., P.-S. Chu, and T. Schroeder, 1997, Predictive skills of seasonal

  15. zhang-mh-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1Metal Monolithic7

  16. Montserrat-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:Strategy | Open Energy

  17. Montserrat-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:Strategy | Open

  18. My Background Our Journey to Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for four to six months. We had minimal radiology facilities but a well-equipped modern surgical suite. One

  19. Rwanda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY) JumpLand Focus Area

  20. mh-codecompare | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 Upper TroposphericI Prepared by

  1. 1. Erste Erfahrungen mit Bienenweide auf stillgelegten Flchen. MH BauerMH Bauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    tanacetifolia, Sinapis alba (Senf), Raphanus sativus (Ölrettich), Trifo- lium repens (Wei and climate, Phacelia tanacet- ifolia, Sinapis alba, Raphanus sativus, Tri- folium repens, Anthriscus the microscope and a pollen analysis was made of the honey samples. Sinapis, Phacelia, Raphanus and Centaurea

  2. Genocide, Nuptiality, and Fertility in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staveteig, Sarah Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bosnia and Herzegovina." Croatian Medical Journal 48(2):167-demonyms (Serbian, Croatian, and Bosnian nationals). OttomanNation 2001). The fascist Croatian Army for independence,

  3. Genocide, Nuptiality, and Fertility in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staveteig, Sarah Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia. Minneapolis: Universityand gender attitudes in Croatia." Journal of Marriage andin Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Slovenia - The Labor

  4. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  5. Rural groundwater supply for the Volcanoes National Park region, Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoghbi, Christiane A. (Christiane Antoine)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity is a major issue faced by both developed and developing countries. According to the Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations, the number of people that do not have access to an improved water ...

  6. Rwanda-Developing a Strategic Climate Change Framework | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:

  7. Rwanda-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY) JumpLand Focus Area ForestryRuthton(CTI

  8. Rwanda-Developing a Strategic Climate Change Framework | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont:Kentucky:Wisconsin: Energy Resources

  9. Microsoft Word - 150121_NPR3_Programmatic_Agreement_AG_MH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    35 mi (56 km) north of the City of Casper, is a Federal government-owned and operated oilfield comprising 9,481 acres (3,837 hectares) currently under the jurisdiction of DOE...

  10. MH4D Development Plasma Science and Innovation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Normally: Cx b= For rotated vectors 'x and 'b : ' ' ' ' ' T T T T CR x R b RCR x b C RCR t = - + - v n ion rec t = - + ( )( )i i e i rec cx i ip p m t + + = × - + v j B v ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 2 1 1 ion cx n ion rec cx i p p p m t m p + = - + - - - + - + v v j 15 #12;Atomic Physics

  11. `.h -WJR-94-3MH? Submitted k

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRILLING SY~ FOR IMPBOVED EOL STABILITY IK ~ WELLS WE J. G(WF :ILLES Y. BUSSOD XMALD s. WUR2SEN KDUARD G Alamos, Specialized drilling, rock melting, stabilized well bore, glass lining. Abstract A Los Alamos - ~uta -n, .. ---- .A . .. .. .. -.--­.- #12;r . ROCK MELTING: A SPECIALTY DRILLING SYSTEM

  12. % hgdr&*mh*E* !..=;t . i r:5'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    using the large-scale rotating Coriolis tank at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology Q zone where it forms a current flowing along the coast. Typical examples are, for instance, the Columbia The experiments part of the present study was conducted on the Coriolis turntable at the Norwegian University

  13. Chemistry Publications 2007 1. Palmer, MH; Walker, IC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    interaction methods CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 2007, 340, 158-170 2. Leyva-Bailen, P; Powell, AV; Vaqueiro, P acid bases JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 2007, 127, 174309 4. Smith, KJ; Baillie, GS; Hyde, EI; Li, X

  14. MR-byMIT-MH-1011 Mental Health Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    treatment for mental illness, alcohol or drug abuse/treatment, domestic/sexual assault, or AIDS testing or 3 for release of information on care provided after the date of the patient's signature, unless you (the patient not fax records. c. There is no fee for records released directly to other health care providers. However

  15. The 26 December (Boxing Day) 1997 sector collapse and debris avalanche at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    , Russia 5 Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), 4 Place Jussieu, B 89, 75252 Cedex 05 Paris & Mullineaux 1981). At Soufriere Hills, an andesilic lava dome had grown over the unstable, hydro- thermally dome was exposed and depressurized, and it exploded to generate a powerful pyroclastic density current

  16. biodiversity surveys of the nyungwe forest reserveIn S.W. Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fashing, Peter J.

    #12;The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) is dedicated to saving wildlife and wildlands to assure president, William Hornaday initiated a program to save the white rhinos of South Africa. Since this time it also faces the extreme challenges of poverty, high human population growth, and rapidly changing

  17. China's Presence in Rwanda and Africa, through the Lens of the Product Life Cycle Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sofiani, Lily

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Africa where infrastructure and communication are more attractive to investors. Obstacles such as energy

  18. Deploying a Medical Record System in Rural Rwanda University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Tapan S.

    into a community of developers and users working toward better systems for managing health information. Our work to implement appropriate technology solutions. 2. INFRASTRUCTURE Rwinkwavu Hospital is in a remote town and has on solar power and generator and have no running water. All the sites have intermittent cellular coverage

  19. China's Presence in Rwanda and Africa, through the Lens of the Product Life Cycle Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sofiani, Lily

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by trading in oil and natural resources. I cannot make mycountries rich in resources like oil benefit more from thethe oil, energy, water and many other natural resources its

  20. Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for International Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Smith School for Enterprise and Environment, University of Oxford Sector Climate, Energy,...

  1. Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont:Kentucky:Wisconsin: Energy ResourcesEnergy

  2. Structured Inspections of Code \\Lambda M.H. van Emden y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Emden, Maarten

    the one of Linger, Mills, and Witt \\Lambda First edition, August 1991. Second edition, February 1993 of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, B.C., Canada V8W 3P6. E­mail: vanemden@csr.uvic.ca 1 #12; 2 [17]. Other

  3. LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

  4. Energy Efficient Architectures for Optical Networks Balagangadhar G. Bathula, Mohammed Alresheedi, Jaafar M.H Elmirghani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bathula, Balagangadhar G

    Energy Efficient Architectures for Optical Networks Balagangadhar G. Bathula, Mohammed Alresheedi of energy efficient strategies for optical networks is important, as they are the backbone networks off between the requests lost and energy efficiency. Anycasting is used in a number of scenarios where

  5. MED-Vol. 2-1 MH-Vol. 3-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    I(r) radial intensity distribution I(O) peak intensity K thermal conductivity k proportionality constant L workpiece length Lf latent heat of fusion m melt removal rate Pb(r) radial absorbed beam power Pexo exothermic power Pine incident beam power Pmelt melting power Ptrans transmitted power q heat

  6. Survey of the COCOON Project ? M.H. Scholl ?? , H.J. Schek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Marc H.

    ) beyond nested relational to object­oriented ones. Based upon the nested relational DBMS kernel DASDBS, we be characterized by the term evolution instead of revolution [SS91a], that is, the guideline has been to try with persistency and transactions. Rather, we have emphasized the preservation of established DBMS advantages

  7. he U.S. Coast Guard expects all of its Sikorsky Aircraft MH-60T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    to have an Aircraft Diagnostic Vibration Management System (ADVMS) installed by 2018. It chose Honeywell also save Vol. 59, No. 3 1 The U.S.Coast Guard selected Honeywell late last year to supply the Aircraft

  8. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION G.T. Hong and M.H. Spritzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water content of the medium is effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal water content of the medium is effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal Oxidation (SWPO), a gasification process involving oxidative reactions in a supercritical water environment

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2nd Qtr 2010 Presentation _compressed tt mh.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7635U:MESSAGE:

  10. http://hsx.sagepub.com/ Homicide Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foroosh, Hassan

    and were enacted. Similarities and differences between Rwanda and Bosnia are described to explain how theory, Rwanda, Bosnia, Serbia Introduction Hagan and Rymond-Richmond (2009) pointed out

  11. Sizing the first flush and its effect on the storage-reliability-yield behavior of rainwater harvesting in Rwanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Kelly C. (Kelly Carroll)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rainwater harvesting is a technology used to supply water for domestic purposes in developing countries. Rooftop rainwater harvesting involves collection of rainwater from a rooftop via a guttering system and storage in a ...

  12. L'ANTHROPOLOGIE GENETIQUE ET LA QUESTION DE LA CITOYENNETE DANS LA REGION DES GRANDS LACS (RWANDA -BURUNDI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    factions. Le conflit engagé concerne le droit à la citoyenneté, à vivre sur la terre de cette région

  13. Anne Cornet, Politiques de sant et contrle social au Rwanda. 1920-1940, Karthala, 2011, 472p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'origine militaire. Les médecins (ils sont 8 en 1930), les agents sanitaires et infirmiers européens sont aidés par des auxiliaires locaux, de mieux en mieux formés, soit à l'école d'infirmiers de Kitega (au Burundi

  14. Affronter le dfi nergtique et alimentaire au Burkina Faso Dabat M.-H., Blin J., Rivier M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 AFFRONTER LE DEFI ENERGETIQUE ET ALIMENTAIRE AU BURKINA FASO the problem of access to energy and the issue of feeding the population. It promotes the interest

  15. LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA); Fultz, Brent (Pasadena, CA); Bowman, Robert (La Mesa, CA); Surampudi, Subra Rao (Glendora, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Hightower, Adrian (Pasadena, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB.sub.(Z-Y) X.sub.(Y) is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB.sub.5 alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  16. PUBLICIDAD Y RELACIONES PBLICAS LISTADO DEFINITIVO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    , ELISABETH ADMAN PRIMERO DANIEL RODRIGUEZ CHINCHILLA MARTINEZ, ADELAIDA TARSA VERANO JUAN MONSERRAT CIUDAD, AMANDA FUNDACIÓN GRAL. UA SEGUNDO JUAN MONTSERRAT DOMENECH CHINCHILLA, NEREIDA RENUNCIA DONOSO , HERNAN

  17. Off-State Breakdown in Power pHEMTs: the Impact of the Source M.H. Somerville", J.A. del Alamo", and Paul Saunieri.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    the current back down to 1 mA/mm, the drain to gate voltage must be decreased, so that the field at the drain transistors (pHEMTs), the field between the drain and the gate determines off-state breakdown, and that the drain to gate voltage therefore sets the breakdown voltage of the device. Thus, the two terminal

  18. Prospects for logic-on-a-wire K.E. Moselund *, D. Bouvet, M.H. Ben Jamaa, D. Atienza, Y. Leblebici,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    fabricated along a single silicon rib. The inverter consists of two enhancement mode body-strapped X for a better control of short- channel effects, and thus increased scalability. The body-strap in the X

  19. 1.07 -Secure Data Center Access Policy Page | 1 1.07 -Secure Data Center Access Policy D-2012-12-18 QS LF RG MH QS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    be used to contain or process information subject to export control laws. Reason for Policy / Implication involved. Covered Parties IS&T data centers, systems, and services that may be used to store or process Security. Procedures I. Physical Access Physical access (key or badge) to systems in the IS&T data center

  20. Configurable Process Models A Foundational F. Gottschalk, W.M.P. van der Aalst, and M.H. Jansen-Vullers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    and the Institute for Information Systems (IWi) of the Saarland University in a collaborative re- search project.d.aalst|m.h.jansen-vullers}@tm.tue.nl Abstract. Off-the-shelf packages such as SAP need to be configured to suit the requirements of an organization. Reference models support the configuration of these systems. Existing reference models use rather

  1. The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D.J. and Sherman, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter, and the supply/return leakage split that is difficult and time consuming to obtain from pressurization tests difference between supply and house (Ps), and between the return and the house (Pr), the supply leakage flow

  2. Proceedings of the 2007 Winter Simulation Conference S. G. Henderson, B. Biller, M.-H. Hsieh, J. Shortle, J. D. Tew, and R. R. Barton, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manu- facturing and decision systems. To achieve optimal inventory of parts, efficient proc- essing in an industrial scale pilot study to control actual material flow over a period of sev- eral months. We conclude

  3. Proceedings of the 2007 Winter Simulation Conference S. G. Henderson, B. Biller, M.-H. Hsieh, J. Shortle, J. D. Tew, and R. R. Barton, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Ecuyer, Pierre

    , Juneja, and Glasserman 2004, #12;De Boer, L'Ecuyer, Rubino, and Tuffin Ahamed, Borkar, and Juneja 2006

  4. MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR THE SPIRAL2 FACILITY M-H. Moscatello, C. Berthe, C. Jamet, G. Normand, GANIL, Caen, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and a superconducting linac. One of its specificities is to be designed to accelerate high power deuteron and heavy ion

  5. 1 Pending ISIS discretionary tasks Whenever you take data for any of the following tests, please email mh@ing.iac.es and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 Pending ISIS discretionary tasks Whenever you take data for any of the following tests, please always when ISIS in in use and if there is time. Please try to do this test especially if the ISIS slit temperature is below 8 degrees. You can check the temperature from the ISIS Mimic and ISIS fits headers. Set

  6. Original article Genetic profiles from coat genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as well as in other islands, there is a statistically significant genetic heterogeneity between most, Carrena, 1E, Bogota DC, Colombia; 2 CICEEM Avd Virgen Montserrat 207 ! lQ. Barcelona 08026, Spain

  7. Working Paper SchweizerischeFriedensstiftung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    results by Rina Alluri and Karsten Palme. They both undertook excellent research in Rwanda and Croatia in peacebuilding______ 9 4 The tourism sector's engagement in peacebuilding in Croatia, Rwanda and Sri Lanka __________________________________________________ 27 #12;List of Graphs Graph 1: Tourist arrivals in Croatia, 1983-2007 16 Graph 2: Tourist arrivals

  8. Vleugels J.M., Kok J.N., Overmars M.H. , A SelfOrganizing Neural Net work for Robot Motion Planning, proc. ICANN93 Amsterdam, pp. 281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putten, Peter van der

    ­91­01 dept. of Computational Linguistics, University of Amsterdam, 1992 Sirosh J., Miikkulainen R

  9. Design and Implementation of the KioskNet System S. Guo, M.H. Falaki, E.A. Oliver, S. Ur Rahman, A. Seth, M.A. Zaharia, U. Ismail, and S. Keshav

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    viable. We estimate that our system requires a capital expenditure of $100- $700/kiosk, depending on the configuration1 , and an operating expenditure of $70/kiosk/month. These rough estimates include the cost, keshav}@uwaterloo.ca Abstract-- Rural Internet kiosks in developing countries can cost

  10. Computers M~h. Applic. Vol. 21, No. 10, pp. 39-52, 1991 0097-4943/91 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved Copyright(~ 1991 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Britain. All rights reserved Copyright(~ 1991 Pergamon Press plc SYMMETRY IN ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

  11. Drivers of surgery for the degenerative hip, knee, and spine: a systematic review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bederman, S Samuel; Rosen, Charles D; Bhatia, Nitin N; Kiester, P Douglas; Gupta, Ranjan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medullary locking hip prosthesis. Clin Orthop Relat Res.MA. The total condylar prosthesis. 10- to 12-year results ofReplacement[mh] OR Hip Prosthesis[mh] OR Spinal fusion[mh

  12. Contra : A Code for Adiabatic Contraction of Dark Matter Halos Oleg Y. Gnedin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    is defined as mh(x) = (1- fb) Mh(x) Mh(1) , (4) where x r/Rvir, c Rvir/rs, and DM = 1 : Mh(x) = ln(1+cx)- cx 1+cx (5a) DM = 2 : Mh(x) = 3n,2n(cx)1/n (5b) DM = 3 : Mh(x) = (3-,cx) (5c) where n ndm, and (a

  13. Data:C6eb28a2-d266-48f6-88b8-3f0c94ce73d5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effective date: 20140101 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Fixtures, Acorn: Concrete 150W MH, Contribution Paid Sector: Lighting Description: Wattage: 150 Source: MH**...

  14. Copyrighted Material INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    in eastern Bosnia where, on a hot August day in 2000, I stood witness to the first day that fo rensics lated bodies and missing souls of girls, boys, women, and men of Bosnia, Rwanda, eastern Congo

  15. Professor Paul van Gardingen Presentations & Invited Talks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Location 2008 Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage. British Embassy Washington DC. 2008 International building and research. Universitas 21. Annual Symposium Dublin. 2008 Sustainability in research and Research, Rwanda Kigali. 2007 International development. Activities and opportunities for Scottish higher

  16. The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership Conference is presented by NDIA with technical support from ONR The Naval Postgraduate School's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Directed Energy Systems · Software Engineering · Combat System Physics · Electronic Warfare · SIGINT 1 Kenya 1 Nigeria 1 Rwanda 1 Senegal 1 Tanzania 1 Tunisia 4 11 #12;The 2006 Naval S&T Partnership

  17. 2010-2011 ANNUAl REPoRt O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    , Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. ·Each year, Einstein faculty members and some 50 medical, Einstein's Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus pulses with energy. Our research centers are where our world

  18. Prospects for Peace: Student Perceptions of Transitional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ­ Independence from Belgium · 1973 ­ Military Coup by Juvenal Habyarimana · 1989 ­ Years of drought; agriculture chances Rwanda has." Is Gacaca effective? Are Rwandans reconciling? Can Hutu and Tutsi live peacefully

  19. Fixing Failed States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Islands 15. Timor-Leste 16. Haiti 17. Sao Tome and PrincipePakistan 11. Ivory Coast 12. Haiti 13. Burma 14. Kenya 15.In Somalia, Rwanda, Haiti, and the former Yugoslavia, failed

  20. Mobile health for cancer in low to middle income countries: priorities for research and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holeman, Isaac; Evans, Jay; Kane, Dianna; Grant, Liz; Pagliari, Claudia; Weller, David

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    health insurance programmes in Mexico and Colombia have demonstrated that coordinated financing and procurement can reduce prices and expand access. Successful programmes in Malawi, Rwanda and Haiti have shown that effective diagnosis and treatment can...

  1. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    inhabitants per square kilometer. Land scarcity issues will increase with a growing population. Currently, 46% of Rwanda is cultivated (TechnoServe Rwanda, 2008). Of that land, the average farm household cultivates plots of one and a quarter acres (World Food...) revealed that 85% of the households were agriculturally based. Those households cultivate land and rely on agriculture as the primary or only source of income (World Food Programme, 2012). Food security and poverty issues persist with the current levels...

  2. The Scales of Sustainable Design in Developing Nations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, S.; Cho, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Source (L): United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Ababa; Global Environment Outlook 2000 (GEO), UNEP, Earthscan, London, 1999. ESL-HH-10-08-04 IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN RWANDA Current Impacts... Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Ababa; Global Environment Outlook 2000 (GEO), UNEP, Earthscan, London, 1999. Mukankomeje, Rose. Impact of Climate Change in Rwanda. 2009. World Meteorological Organization (WMO), United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP...

  3. BRITISHINDIAN OCEANTERRITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Department, Ministry of Agriculture, P.O. Box 292, Government Headquarters, Brades Tel: 1-664-491- 2546 E-mail Montserrat, Tel: 1-664-491-3086 Email: mnatrust@candw.ag http://www.montserratnationaltrust.com/ Marine scene, Brendan Godley/MTRG · Green turtle and jellyfish, Doug Perrine/seapics.com · Turtle track

  4. Basic and Applied Ecology 6 (2005) 119--131 A functional method for classifying European

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar-Salvador, Pedro

    of abandonment. These mathematical relationships between an ecological attribute and a perception of economicBasic and Applied Ecology 6 (2005) 119--131 A functional method for classifying European grasslands for use in joint ecological and economic studies J.G. Hodgsona,�,1 , G. Montserrat-Marti´b , B

  5. Pollution Ecology: ERSC 355 page 1/4 POLLUTION ECOLOGY: ERSC 355

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    Pollution MH/TH 2 Sept 17 London Smog & LA Smog (photochemical smog) TH 3 Sept 24 Acid Rain effects on Aquatic Ecosystems MH 4 Oct 1 Acid Rain effects on Terrestrial Ecosystems & Air Pollution in the Kawartha

  6. Isovalent Anion Substitution in Ga-Mn-pnictide Ferromagnetic Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow chart illustrating the process by which M(H) curves are calculated by the free energyFlow chart illustrating the process by which M(H) curves are calculated by the free energy

  7. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe and B.R. Published Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 111984 DOI 10.1007BF01150293 Citation Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.;...

  8. Animal Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels appear to be homologous to and derived from the ubiquitous cation diffusion facilitators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matias, Madeleine G; Gomolplitinant, Kenny M; Tamang, Dorjee G; Saier, Milton H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MH Jr: The bile/ arsenite/riboflavin transporter (BART)the Bile acid/Arsenite/Riboflavin Transporter (BART) Super-

  9. DILEPTON SIGNATURE IN e+e- ->He+e-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, R.L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    define normalized coefficients PLM anintegrated productionreaction (1) the coefficients pLM are functions of MH/M ,

  10. Whittecar, G.R., Daniels, W.L., and Carter, C.H.III, 2007, Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Sediments at Shirley Plantation: Hydrostratigraphy, Groundwater Flow Patterns, and Water Quality Studies In: Bailey, C.M. and Lamoreaux, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Whittecar, G.R., Daniels, W.L., and Carter, C.H.III, 2007, Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference Guidebook. Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Sediments Limited Partners (WLLP) constructed sediment disposal basins with the intent of returning dredged

  11. The Scales of Sustainable Design in Developing Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, S.; Cho, S.

    Commissioner for Regugees (UNHCR); International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), www.ibcl.org/lm; Spatial data produced by FAO Africover ESL-HH-10-08-04 IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN RWANDA Overview Source: Google Earth ESL-HH-10-08-04 IMPACT OF CLIMATE...th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition, 6-10 June 2005, Barcelona, Spain, http://re.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pvgis/. ESL-HH-10-08-04 RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES Hydropower Atlas of Rwanda ESL-HH-10-08-04 AKILAH INSTITUTE ? PHASE I...

  12. Adaptive Multiresolution Denoising Filter for 3D MR Images Pierrick Coup1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Adaptive Multiresolution Denoising Filter for 3D MR Images Pierrick Coupé1 , José V. Manjon2 method has been applied on a T1-w MR image of 170x256x256 voxels acquired on a 1.5T Philips Gyroscan , Montserrat Robles2 , D. Louis Collins1 . 1 McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montréal Neurological Institute

  13. Eos,Vol. 85, No. 34, 24 August 2004 made valuable contributions to CALIPSO,and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    ,Montserrat,Eos Trans.AGU,84(46), Fall Meet.Suppl.,Abstract U31B-0002. Linde,A.,S.I.Sacks,B.Voight,P.E.Malin,E.Shalev, G. Kokelaar,Geol.Soc.London Mem.,21,467­481. Shalev,E.,P.E.Malin,S.Sacks,A.T.Linde,B.Voight, G Sciences,Duke Univer- sity,Durham,N.C.;Alan Linde,Department of Terres- trial Magnetism

  14. Congreso Internacional 1810-2010: 200 aos de Iberoamrica -747 TARASCA, GIGANTES, DIABLILLOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    M�SICA EN LA CELEBRACI�N DEL CORPUS CHRISTI DE LA PROVINCIA ESPA�OLA DE VENEZUELA1 Montserrat Capelán Fernández USC España En el presente escrito se estudiará la realización del Corpus Christi en la Venezuela más importantes y esplendorosas en todo el mundo hispánico. Así ocurrirá en la provincia de Venezuela

  15. The Weight of Words Construction and Implications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    The Weight of Words Construction and Implications of Genocide Discourse in Bosnia and Sudan #12 Genocide 1975-1979 - 2,000,000 Deaths Rwanda 1994 - 800,000 Deaths Bosnia Genocide 1992-1995 - 200 INEVITABLITY #12;Bosnia- background #12;"Ethnic Cleansing" Massacres Plundering of villages Rape Camps #12

  16. UNC Public Policy Faculty Receives $2.5 Million from NIEHS UNC Public Policy Professor Sudhanshu Handa and Assistant Professor Pamela Jagger received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to support their project, The Health and Poverty Effects of a Large-Scale Cookstove Initiative in Rwanda. The project evaluates the impact of a private sector cookstove and fuel distribution intervention on exposure to airborne pollutants, health, and poverty. Household air pollution (HAP

  17. Florida Atlantic University Division of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    research involve activities related to the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons, Cuba, Cyprus, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Libya, N. Korea, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo), Zimbabwe. Yes No Does

  18. The Innocent Habiyaremye Fellowship Information Networking Institute --Carnegie Mellon | 4616 Henry Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 | Phone: 412.268.7195 | www.ini.cmu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Henry Street · Pittsburgh, PA 15213 | Phone: 412.268.7195 | www.ini.cmu.edu Information Networking Institute (INI) who embodies a sense of community spirit in his or her everyday actions, while also meeting of an INI alumnus and a native of Rwanda who inspired others through his kindness and volunteer activities

  19. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , sponsored by NOAA, California Energy Commission, and CalFed; #12;EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: USGS (Burundi, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) and is used their information needs. In the US, INFORM is a project that is motivated by the water and energy shortages

  20. An Unsupervised Approach to Recognizing Discourse Relations Daniel Marcu and Abdessamad Echihabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcu, Daniel

    , the sentence/clause pairs below. a. Such standards would preclude arms sales to states like Libya, which, for example, infer from sentence 1.a that "can- not buy arms legally(libya)", infer from sen- tence 1.b that "can buy arms legally(rwanda)", use our background knowledge in order to infer that "similar(libya

  1. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  2. ICTs as a tool for Gender socio-economic empowerment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    level e-government applications Projects under identification Advanced China, Nepal, Rwanda, Malawi ... offering a full range of services #12;3 Our Vision "To unleash the power of human capital and give to increase efficiency, and usefulness of services for the various sectors utilizing ICTs in Public

  3. EPROM Update 10 Countries and Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    30% of the households in Rwanda that have electricity; a venture described on page 2. ENTREPRENEURIAL applications have been unique to the Rwandan market, ranging from auto insurance to local market price the service annually. This year he launched a mobile electricity payment system that has been adopted by over

  4. C E N T R E D 'E T U D E S E T D E R E C H E R C H E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a property with an existing connection is often the only way for low income households to access piped water years. Keywords: Africa, Rwanda, water access, hedonic price, real estate, non-market valuation halshs, water access, electricity, transport and telecommunications. Meeting this dramatic rise in demand

  5. The 2008 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ).The1950- 2000 averages are 11 NS, six H, and two MH. For 2008, theAccumulated CycloneEnergy(ACE;2 16 NS, 6-9 H, 2-5 MH, and anACE range of 100%-210% of the median (red bars, Fig. 2). The updated-10 H, 3-6 MH, and an ACE range of 140%-230% of the median. NOAAalsoincreasedtheprobabilityofan above

  6. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  the effective natural ventilation rate with weather to  Residential  Ventilation  Requirements”.  LBNL  57236.  and  M.H.   Sherman  "Ventilation  Behavior  and  Household 

  7. On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements”. LBNLP.N. and M.H. Sherman "Ventilation Behavior and HouseholdReview of Residential Ventilation Technologies”, LBNL 57730.

  8. J. Electrochem. Soc., in press (1998) Micro-Macroscopic Coupled Modeling of Batteries and Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Department of Mechanical Engineering & Pennsylvania Transportation Institute The Pennsylvania State-metal hydride (Ni-MH) cells. The model integrates important microscopic phenomena such as proton or hydrogen

  9. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lumen maintenance Non-MH fixtures can be controlled with occupancy sensors or daylight sensors Image Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 25 | Interior...

  10. Data:5b44a54d-2284-43db-acbf-981f07d169e3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Utility name: Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) Effective date: 20091204 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting MH 1000 W Sector: Lighting...

  11. SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential use of geothermal energy for power generation47. Boldizsar, T. , 1970, "Geothermal energy production fromCoast Geopressure Geothermal Energy Conference, M.H. Dorfman

  12. Data:5de2ae17-b167-4eb0-8e9b-1909b901720f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effective date: 20140101 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Fixtures, Acorn: Concrete 150W MH, Contribution NOT Paid Sector: Lighting Description: Wattage: 150 Source:...

  13. Data:E262d011-f6df-49ff-a37f-2d813f5f5e92 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Farmers' Electric Coop, Inc (New Mexico) Effective date: 20100501 End date if known: Rate name: Security Light 400 W MH...

  14. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finsterle, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pore-space for reservoir characterization. AAPG Bull. , 79 (Holtz, M.H. , Reservoir characterization apply- ing residualways, such as reservoir characterization (Xiao and Jones,

  15. abuse seit working: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Submission of the pre30.9.2014 mh Seite 11 Funding for Individuals and Projects University of Zurich Funding-proposal and internal selection For detailed information...

  16. Data:A4423bc0-5f8d-4ef2-a967-bea6ed1f5fc9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  17. Data:6dc1030a-abed-4dfe-b2f9-d75fab35a251 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LIGHT SERVICE (400W MH) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments...

  18. Data:7cb5082d-2c17-402a-a838-6e188e384f6f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LIGHT SERVICE (250W MH) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments...

  19. Data:89f6d69a-85f5-4a51-936d-0f72768c0a56 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  20. Data:18e20c46-69d0-4690-8c21-bfb6018a68b7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SERVICE (1000W MH) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments...

  1. Data:B86ebcf3-870c-4233-9e75-a0471a221774 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ( 400W MH - Shoebox ) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicable...

  2. Data:71d6b6fd-5996-4692-8470-e8e9fd2cea39 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ( 250W MH - Shoebox ) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicable...

  3. Data:13c51b15-5cae-49e3-9ee6-400f38d52613 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ( 175W MH - Torch ) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicable...

  4. Data:Da8c4406-ba6e-4564-aa77-7003d74bee60 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ( 1000W MH - Shoebox ) Sector: Lighting Description: Additional fees for poles and transformers may apply Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicable...

  5. 304 SYMPO,g~L'M XXXv the extent of the MiiUer fiber. /t is [dt ~of exa.mpie~ ~ih~:,iib V~c>~-,4"c.~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubel, David

    ~nesl~or: (~n~!a~di~:g av~.:.>c~ of special interest m the p~!y,zhologixl ¢onc#,'~ atw -~m~.~}h~' ~a

  6. Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy. Citation: Windisch CF, Jr, CH Henager, MH Engelhard, and WD Bennett.2011."Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature Oxidation of...

  7. Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOX fuel mixtures. Citation: Windisch CF, Jr, CH Henager, Jr, MH Engelhard, and WD Bennett.2009."Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions using miniature...

  8. N incorporation and electronic structure in N-doped TiO2(110...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    result from using cation-rich conditions. Citation: Cheung SH, P Nachimuthu, AG Joly, MH Engelhard, MK Bowman, and SA Chambers.2007."N incorporation and electronic...

  9. Data:A804fbaf-6c7f-420a-97e1-eb57e9ffa2e1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W MH Directional Flood Lighting on existing 38 ft. steel Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is...

  10. Data:4ee48fa9-dcae-496b-b213-b3bb96a480ea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W MH Directional Flood Lighting on existing 38 ft. steel pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is...

  11. Template-based combinatorial enumeration of virtual compound libraries for lipids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P, Fleming PJ, Green DV: Combinatorial library design usingGreen DVS, Hann MH, Delany JJ III: Implementation of a system for reagent selection and library

  12. CTAHR Faculty Research Portfolio 200955 Dr. Ali Fares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -533. · Ryder, M.H. and A. Fares. 2008. Evaluating Cover Crops (Sudex, Sunn Hemp, Oats) for Use as Vegetative

  13. Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Nanoclusters: Co-doped Cu2O. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exhibits a temperature dependent decrease. Citation: Antony J, Y Qiang, F Muhammad, D Meyer, DE McCready, and MH Engelhard.2007."Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Nanoclusters:...

  14. Publications of Martin H. Escardo, last updated November 27, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escardó, Martín

    . [3] M.H. Escard´o, A. Jung, and T. Streicher, editors. Special issue in hon- our of Klaus Keimel's 65(2):117­124, 2003. 2002 References [1] A. Bauer, M.H. Escard´o, and A. Simpson. Comparing functional paradigms

  15. Studienjahr 2013/2014 | Modellstudiengang HannibaL | MHH | Hygiene, Mikrobiologie, Virologie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Studienjahr 2013/2014 | Modellstudiengang HannibaL | MHH | Hygiene, Mikrobiologie, Virologie MSE.thomas@mh-hannover.de (Virologie) Prof.in Dr. med. F. Iris Chaberny, Telefon: 0511 532-3675, chaberny.iris@mh-hannover.de (Hygiene. med. Ella Ott, Institut für Med. Mikrobiologie und Krankenhaushygiene (Hygiene) Studienjahr / Tertial

  16. Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot Alg`ebre Annee 2007-08 M1 mathematiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merel, Loïc - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    ¦§i ¡¥ ¼ E¸ °5° ¾¤Eh°Q«E%ªEºV¦§¤E¥6 m¥¥b¤h%ªE¦§h¾« o¢¤h °y m¦®T¦ m¦§h ¡ib5 ¡r¤h³¥ Ãæf¾° Ë 5°¹ m¥«h º

  17. Hot Topics in BABAR Jo~ao Firmino da Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) predicts the existence of the Higgs boson to account for the different masses of elementary particles. A single SM Higgs boson is required to be heavy (mH > 114.4 GeV and mH = 170 GeV) 1. This model suffers

  18. Moore County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey,Ohio:Montserrat:Moore

  19. Mieux nourrir le monde:Mieux nourrir le monde: notre dfi l'internationalnotre dfi l'international

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    Appui institutionnel au centre Ivoirien de recherches économiques et sociales (CIRES) (COTE D'IVOIRE COOP�RATION Amérique du Nord (�tats-Unis, Mexique) Amérique du Sud (Brésil, Nicaragua, Argentine, Uruguay, Mexique, Cuba, Haïti) Afrique (Sénégal, Rwanda, Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, Congo, Niger, Mozambique, Malawi

  20. The importance of context in delivering effective EIA: Case studies from East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marara, Madeleine; Okello, Nick; Kuhanwa, Zainab; Douven, Wim; Beevers, Lindsay, E-mail: l.beevers@hw.ac.uk; Leentvaar, Jan

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews and compares the condition of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) system in three countries in the East Africa region: Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania. The criteria used for the evaluation and the comparison of each system are based on the elements of the legal, administrative and procedural frameworks, as well as the context in which they operate. These criteria are adapted from the evaluation and quality control criteria derived from a number of literature sources. The study reveals that the EIA systems of Kenya and Tanzania are at a similar stage in their development. The two countries, the first to introduce the EIA concept into their jurisdiction in this part of Africa, therefore have more experience than Rwanda in the practice of environmental impact assessment, where the legislation and process requires more time to mature both from the governmental and societal perspective. The analysis of the administrative and procedural frameworks highlights the weakness in the autonomy of the competent authority, in all three countries. Finally a major finding of this study is that the contextual set up i.e. the socio-economic and political situation plays an important role in the performance of an EIA system. The context in developing countries is very different from developed countries where the EIA concept originates. Interpreting EIA conditions in countries like Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania requires that the analysis for determining the effectiveness of their systems should be undertaken within a relevant framework, taking into account the specific requirements of those countries.

  1. The proteasome distinguishes between heterotypic and homotypic lysine-11 linked polyubiquitin chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grice, Guinevere L.; Lobb, Ian T.; Weekes, Michael P.; Gygi, Steven P.; Antrobus, Robin; Nathan, James A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., Sommer, T., Fushman, D., and Glickman, M.H. (2014). Disassembly of Lys11- and mixed-linkage polyubiquitin conjugates provide insights into function of proteasomal deubiquitinases Rpn11 and Ubp6. The Journal of biological chemistry. Matsumoto, M...

  2. EcoCAR the Next Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 event rules Develop Custom Control for 2MH Develop Custom Control for Project Driveway Fuel Cells Develop HIL models and systems for schools Design Year 2 Dynamic Events Develop...

  3. Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relatively large with an installed capacity of about 110,000For example, MH has an installed capacity of about 15,000 MW20% of the total installed capacity in the country. The

  4. College/University: 2000-2005 Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Education College/University: 2000-2005 Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany Highest degree: Diploma Date of birth: 07.08.1979 Country: Germany E-mail: maetzig.tobias@mh- hannover.de Supervisor: Prof. Dr

  5. COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplement au no18, Tome 51, 15 septembre 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HYDROCARBURES ALIPHATIQUES PAR VOIE PLASMA-LIT FLUIDISÉ. MODELISATION ET INTERPR~TATIONDES R~SULTATS M-H2 dans le but d'obtenir une distribution en hydrocarbures riche en éthylène et en fraction Cg - Cg

  6. 4, 28392866, 2004 Mixing height for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    focuses on specific problems in describing the sur- face energy balance and MH in urban areas (Piringer et in surface5 roughness and heating from rural to central city areas. So, the UBL is considered as a specific

  7. UNCORRECTED 2 QoS and energy efficiency in network wide broadcasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    protocols (IEEE 802.11, CPS, and MH-TRACE) in terms of QoS (packet delivery ratio, packet delay, 12Characterizing the effects of medium access control on 50the behavior of network-wide broadcasting is essential

  8. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff or adequacy of the information in this report. #12;Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Ozone Reductions Using

  9. Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chu, A. (2007). Nanophosphate Lithium-Ion Technology forYomoto (2007). Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries for Plug- inhydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (Li-Ion), comparing their

  10. Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reform in the U.S. Electricity Sector. ” Journal of EconomicCrises in the Electricity Sector: The Case of Maharashtra.of the MH state electricity sector that create unique

  11. J. Electrochem. Soc., in press (1998) MicroMacroscopic Coupled Modeling of Batteries and Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Department of Mechanical Engineering & Pennsylvania Transportation Institute The Pennsylvania State­metal hydride (Ni­MH) cells. The model integrates important microscopic phenomena such as proton or hydrogen

  12. A postsource decay study of bradykinin by Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Xiaona

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins. Fragmentation reactions of the protonated analyte molecule, [M+H]+ ions...

  13. College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    to the Assistant Dean's Office, MH- 488, (657) 278-4158. Application Deadline: March 14 A. James Diefenderfer. James Diefenderfer, the former Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Open to

  14. Deformation and Failure in Stochastic Fibrous Networks: Scale, Dimension and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, Ann Marie

    . In Fig. 1, microstructural evolution of an NiMH positive cell substrate is shown, in which a corrosion) contacting atomic force microscope image of negative substrates of the Panasonic CGP30486 lithium-ion battery

  15. arXiv:hep-ph/0208209v313Dec2002 FERMILAB-Pub-02/114-T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    as the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. Low-energy supersymmetry provides a natural electroweak symmetry breaking. Assuming that mhSM energies) Higgs boson. Alternatively, strong breaking of electroweak symmetry is accomplished by new strong

  16. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems M.H. Sherman and I.S.a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimumair as part of ventilation system operation changes with

  17. Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

  18. HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features:...

  19. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner Recycling In FY...

  20. Recycling | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Each self service...

  1. College/University: 1995-2001 Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Education College/University: 1995-2001 Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota Colombia Highest of birth: 11.07.1978 Country: Colombia E-mail: Salgvero.Gustavo@ MH-Hannover.de Supervisor: PD. Bernhard

  2. Data:F41f2063-da07-414c-8c6b-431dcdae21a1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0315 End date if known: Rate name: MU-1 - a1b - 400 watt MH - Metal Column Sector: Lighting Description: Lamps in enclosed fixtures, mounted on metal or fiberglass columns and...

  3. Data:1608f1e2-f9fa-4f97-a612-b97eb4d202d0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20110315 End date if known: Rate name: MU-1 - a1b - 2-400 watt MH - Shoebox Sector: Lighting Description: Lamps in enclosed fixtures, mounted on metal or fiberglass columns and...

  4. Data:Fd797889-4f39-4b7c-97ee-fbb08ea5f625 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20110315 End date if known: Rate name: MU-1 - a1b - 400 watt MH - Shoebox Sector: Lighting Description: Lamps in enclosed fixtures, mounted on metal or fiberglass columns and...

  5. Technological assessment and evaluation of high power batteries and their commercial values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Seh Kiat

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium Ion (Li-ion) battery technology has the potential to compete with the more matured Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) battery technology in the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) energy storage market as it has higher specific ...

  6. Park City/ANS 1 EVOLVE LITHIUM TRAY THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Park City/ANS 1 EVOLVE LITHIUM TRAY THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS M.H. Anderson, J.G. Murphy, M is viable, thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed on the outboard liquid lithium blanket trays. Various

  7. Computerized cognitive training restores neural activity within the reality monitoring network in schizophrenia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    grant R01MH068725 to Sophia Vinogradov and R01 grants DC4855Institute, Inc. , and Sophia Vinogradov is a consultant to2 Srikantan Nagarajan, 2 and Sophia Vinogradov 1 1 San

  8. apparent mineralocorticoid excess: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the LHC: New Physics or QCD uncertainties? HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: The Higgs boson with a mass MH approx 126 GeV has been observed by the ATLAS and CMS...

  9. anomaly mediated susy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mixed modulus-anomaly mediated soft terms realize the little hierarchy between the Higgs boson masses mH and the sparticle masses mSUSY. It is noted that for some type of...

  10. 1. MOST SIGNIFICANT RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN POWER SOURCES Currently, Dr. Popov is professor at USC and Director of the Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Research Novel high performance anode materials were developed for Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and corrosion resistance. From this research one step electroless process was discovered for deposition of Ni

  11. Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cylability of Li...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EN, W Xu, BL Mehdi, EC Thomsen, MH Engelhard, RC Masse, P Bhattacharya, M Gu, WD Bennett, Z Nie, CM Wang, ND Browning, and J Zhang.2014."Formation of Interfacial Layer and...

  12. Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001, 292:1915-1918. 9. Bennett BJ, Farber CR, Orozco L, MinChudin E, Lieu MH, Oeser S, Bennett H, Rigault P, Barker D,Ghazalpour 3 , Brian J Bennett 4 , Charles R Farber 3,7 ,

  13. Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, F.X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ unitary central air and heat pumps — and secondary ~ roomSystem MH SF MF Central Air Heat Pump No Central Air Source:MF SSF LSF North Central Air Heat Pump No Central Air South

  14. Abstract--This paper outlines the design of an autonomous flying vehicle (AFV) for use in researching formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    with a full suite of integrated peripherals. Today, Nickel- Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries can source more predators and efficiently forage for food [6]. Both the Air Force and NASA have identified autonomous

  15. Data:8812191f-96e9-43aa-b810-a6aeb2dd90e4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 19970201 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 1000 Watt MH Flood Light* Sector:...

  16. Data:44a738dd-c7f5-4eeb-98e0-b543d3e6c208 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 19970201 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 1500 Watt MH Flood Light* Sector:...

  17. Firearm Retailers’ Willingness to Participate in an Illegal Gun Purchase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wintemute, Garen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PJ, Kennedy DM, Moore MH. The illegal supply of ?rearms. In:Show Undercover: Report on Illegal Sales at Gun Shows. Newand dynamics of illegal ?rearms markets: implications for a

  18. Ferromagnetism in Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoclusters above Room Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increase of temperature. Citation: Antony J, S Pendyala, DE McCready, MH Engelhard, D Meyer, AM Sharma, and Y Qiang.2006."Ferromagnetism in Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoclusters above Room...

  19. Predicting risk for the appearance of melanoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyskens, Frank L Jr; Ransohoff, David F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for projecting the absolute risk of breast cancer. J NatlD, Gail MH, et al: Cancer risk prediction models: A workshopal model of breast cancer risk prediction and implications

  20. Living and Fossil Macrocyprididae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddocks, R. F.

    1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . = Macramckenziea; Mx. = Macropyxis; Ma. = Macro- cypria; Mc. = Macrocyprissa; Ms. = Macrosarisa; Mh. = Mac- roscapha; Mn. = Macrocyprina. Individual drawings within the Figures and Plates are designated by decimals (e.g., Fig. 1.3 = part 3 of Fig. 1, Plate 2.... = Macramckenziea; Mx. = Macropyxis; Ma. = Macro- cypria; Mc. = Macrocyprissa; Ms. = Macrosarisa; Mh. = Mac- roscapha; Mn. = Macrocyprina. Individual drawings within the Figures and Plates are designated by decimals (e.g., Fig. 1.3 = part 3 of Fig. 1, Plate 2...

  1. Evaluation of subtropical and tropical quality protein maize hybrids in Texas for agronomic performance, resistance to aflatoxin and quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatnagar, Sandeep

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), (CML 186 X CML 142) and ([CML 142 X CML 150] X CML 176. Among the yellow hybrids (CMSQ 983010 CLQ-6601 x CML172), ([CML 161 X G26Qc18MH134-4-#-3-#-#-#-B-B-B] X DO 940Y) and (G26Qc18MH134-4-3-#-#-#-#-2-B-B X CML 161) showed promising results....

  2. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  3. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  4. Ryazan Metal Ceramics Instrumentation Plant Joint Stock Co RMCIP JSC | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergy

  5. Ryuseki Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyuseki

  6. S & P Opines on Securitizing Distributed Generation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyusekiS

  7. S C P S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyusekiSS C

  8. S R Biogas Energiesysteme AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyusekiSS

  9. S R Energy Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyusekiSSS

  10. S Tile SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energy Information RwandaEnergyRyusekiSSSS

  11. San Jose Accord: energy aid or petroleum-marketing strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Jose Accord was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica on August 3, 1980 by the Presidents of Venezuela and Mexico, whereby the two countries mutually committed to supply the net imported domestic oil consumption of several Central American and Caribbean countries. Countries initially participating in the program are: Barbados, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Seven eastern Caribbean countries were to meet on October 7 to petition for inclusion in the Accord, namely: Antigua, St. Kitt/Nevis, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Grenada. The official language of the Accord is presented, and the operative status of the Accord two years after signing is discussed. Specific briefs about some of the individual countries in the Accord are included. The fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries is updated.

  12. The extent of computation in Malament-Hogarth spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. D. Welch

    2006-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the extent of possible computations following Hogarth in Malament-Hogarth (MH) spacetimes, and Etesi and N\\'emeti in the special subclass containing rotating Kerr black holes. Hogarth had shown that any arithmetic statement could be resolved in a suitable MH spacetime. Etesi and Nemeti had shown that some \\forall \\exists relations on natural numbers which are neither universal nor co-universal, can be decided in Kerr spacetimes, and had asked specifically as to the extent of computational limits there. The purpose of this note is to address this question, and further show that MH spacetimes can compute far beyond the arithmetic: effectively Borel statements (so hyperarithmetic in second order number theory, or the structure of analysis) can likewise be resolved: Theorem A. If H is any hyperarithmetic predicate on integers, then there is an MH spacetime in which any query ? n \\in H ? can be computed. In one sense this is best possible, as there is an upper bound to computational ability in any spacetime which is thus a universal constant of the space-time M. Theorem C. Assuming the (modest and standard) requirement that space-time manifolds be paracompact and Hausdorff, for any MH spacetime M there will be a countable ordinal upper bound, w(M), on the complexity of questions in the Borel hierarchy resolvable in it.

  13. Updated Combination of Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the D0 Experiment in 9.7 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for standard model Higgs boson production at the D0 experiment in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (m_H) in the range 100Higgs boson. In absence of a significant excess above the background expectation, 95% confidence level upper limits are set on the production cross section for a standard model Higgs boson. The upper limits are found to be a factor of 2.11 (0.73) times the predicted standard model cross section for m_H=115 (165) GeV. Under the background-only hypothesis, the corresponding expected limit is 1.46 (0.72) times the standard model prediction. At the same confidence level, these analyses exclude a standard model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 159<m_H<170 GeV, while the a priori expected exclusion is 156<mH<173 GeV. In the range 120<mH<140 GeV, the data exhibit an excess over the background prediction of approximately two Gaussian standard deviations.

  14. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; DØ Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .L. (expected) upper limits on ?(pp¯ ? WH) × B(H ? b ¯b) ranging from 1.6 (2.2) pb to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 5 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson with mass mH = 115 Ge...V. fter combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for mH = 115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher an the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For mH = 160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected...

  15. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  16. Thermal Evaluation of the Honda Insight Battery Pack: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolot, M.D.; Kelly, K.; Keyser, M.; Mihalic, M.; Pesaran, A.; Hieronymus, A.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The hybrid vehicle test efforts at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with a focus on the Honda Insight's battery thermal management system, are presented. The performance of the Insight's high voltage NiMH battery pack was characterized by conducting in-vehicle dynamometer testing at Environmental Testing Corporation's high altitude dynamometer test facility, on-road testing in the Denver area, and out-of-car testing in NREL's Battery Thermal Management Laboratory. It is concluded that performance does vary considerably due to thermal conditions the pack encounters. The performance variations are due to both inherent NiMH characteristics, and the Insight's thermal management system.

  17. Approximation Techniques for Incompressible Flows with Heterogeneous Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado Gonzalez, Abner Jonatan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .21) and Mh := qh 2 C 0( ) : qhjT 2 Pk; 8T 2 Th : (3.22) For a proof the reader can consult standard references, for instance [16, 34, 27]. Finally, we de ne the discrete solution space Xh := Xh Mh; normed by k kX: Clearly, Xh X: For the sequel... (1.1) when the function is truncated above and below. We introduce a straightforward nite element scheme, such as Pk 1 for each component of the velocity and Pk for the pres- sure, similar to the scheme studied by J.E. Roberts and J.-M. Thomas...

  18. Chemical Defoliation and Regrowth Inhibition in Cotton.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, H. C.; Truchelut, G. B.; Hall, W. C.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ahead of the defoliant. MH was effective in reducing regrowth at concentrations above 3,000 parts per million (p.p.m.) but stimulated secondary growth at lower concentra- tions. Analyses of the leaf blades of the spring-summer 1951 plants show- ed... that Shed-A-Leaf reduced the total carbohydrate content by 5 per- cent 72 hours following application. Over the same period of time, MH at 1,500, 3,000 and 4,500 p.p.m. induced a progressive buildup in the leaf carbohydrates. The most marked carbohydrate...

  19. New binding materials for metal hydride electrodes which permit good recyclability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, T.; Yasuda, N. (Japan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd., Yokkaichi (Japan). Development Center); Takeuchi, Y. (Japan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Electronics Project Dept.); Sakai, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Miyamura, H.; Kuriyama, N.; Ishikawa, H. (Government Industrial Research Inst., Osaka (Japan))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoplastic elastomers such as styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were used successfully as binding materials for metal hydride (MH) electrodes of a nickel-metal hydride battery. These binding materials have a rubber-like nature and are soluble in organic solvents. It was easy to remove the alloy powder from a used electrode for recycling. The battery performance depended on both the kind and amount of binding materials. The best discharge capacity and rate capability were obtained for MH electrodes containing 2--5 weight percent (w/o) SEBS. The particle size distributions for the alloy were examined successfully.

  20. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebras (VI) --Vacuum representation of Heisenberg algebra--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Omori; Yoshiaki Maeda; Naoya Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weyl algebra (W_{2m}[h]; *) is the algebra generated by u=(u_1,...,u_m,v_1,.....,v_m) over C with the fundamental commutation relation [u_i,v_j]=-ih\\delta_{ij}, where h is a positive constant. The Heisenberg algebra (\\Cal H_{2m}[nu];*) is the algebra given by regarding the scalar parameter h in the Weyl algebra W_{2m}[h] to be a generator nu which commutes with all others.

  1. Harris 2: Harnessing Human Energy To: Penn State Learning Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    use to charge an internal NiMH battery. The internal battery lets us store the charge to be used senior design project was to create a device capable of harnessing human energy to charge a mobile device, and electromagnetic induction. We weighted these technologies against our customer needs and discovered

  2. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    thermal response Analytical thermal model Integral-transformation technique Lithium-ion battery a b s t r replacing nickelemetal hydride (NiMH) batteries. More recently, the strategy of electrifying vehicles's personal copy Transient three-dimensional thermal model for batteries with thin electrodes Peyman Taheri

  3. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppl6ment au n0ll, Tome 48, novembre 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppl6ment au n0ll, Tome 48, novembre 1987 VERY LARGE PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTS IN MODULATION-DOPED HETEROSTRUCTURES M.-H. MEYNADIER, N. TABATABAIE, R.E. NAHORY and J.P. HARBISON as high as several hundred millivolts between contacts centimeters away from the exciting spot. The effect

  4. Commercial Fertilizers in 1920-21.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

    1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................... Wi!ls Point Cotton Oil Company 4 ..................... Fidelity Chemical Corporation ... : ................ Henderson Cotton Oil and Gin Company Hope Fertilizer Compan ............................. Houston County Oil M~H and Manufacturing Company... ........................................ Analysis ........................................ Henderson Cotton Oil and Gin Co .. Henderson . Texas.- Henderson Acid Phosphate?Guarantee ............... Analysis ........................................ Henderson Half and Half...

  5. Development of a large format direct detection device for three dimensional transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M.H. Ellisman, andDuttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M. Ellisman, and N.H.Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, A.C. Milazzo, and M.

  6. Non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory: An application to semi-leptonic B-decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Della Morte; Jochen Heitger; Hubert Simma; Rainer Sommer

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We review a lattice strategy how to non-perturbatively determine the coefficients in the HQET expansion of all components of the heavy-light axial and vector currents, including 1/m_h-corrections. We also discuss recent preliminary results on the form factors parameterizing semi-leptonic B-decays at the leading order in 1/m_h.

  7. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  8. Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials Nanocarbon Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Indranath

    nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation." Chemistry of Materials 23 on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes, Nanoparticles, and Nanowires." Chapter 4 in Handbook of ElectrochemicalSynthesis of Functional Nanomaterials Nanocarbon Materials o Graphene · Zhang S, Y Shao, H Liao, MH

  9. Europhysics Letters PREPRINT Influence of pore-scale disorder on viscous fingering during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Europhysics Letters PREPRINT Influence of pore-scale disorder on viscous fingering during drainage formation. PACS. 47.55.Mh ­ Flows through porous media. Abstract. ­ We study viscous fingering during, an effective law v ( P)2 relates the average interface growth rate and the local pressure gradient. Viscous

  10. Magnetic Patterning of Permanent-Magnet Rotors for Microscale Motor/Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetic Patterning of Permanent-Magnet Rotors for Microscale Motor/Generators I. Zana* , F, USA Abstract We present and characterize a process to pattern magnetic poles on small permanent-magnet, this approach uses a ferromagnetic magnetizing head (MH) and an externally applied magnetic field, and it offers

  11. E951 POWER SUPPLY SAFETY REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    E951 POWER SUPPLY SAFETY REVIEW 9/06/02 IOANNIS MARNERIS Brookhaven National Labs. #12;Project. · To do this we will use 4 existing SCR type dc power supplies from the experimental area in series 3644 Voltage (V) 150 300 300 Peakcurrent (A) 3600 7200 7200 Field (T) 5.0 10.0 14.5 Inductance (mH) 138

  12. Leliaert et al. 2011 Tda: Chlorophyceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Botryococcus #12;Biopaliva z as transesterifikace #12;Solazyme Part of was a test, in collaboration with the U Solazyme's 100% algal-derived jet fuel, Solajet(R) HRJ-5, in an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter test flight:40 mix of conventional jet fuel and Solajet. Solazyme, a California startup, makes Solajet by feeding

  13. MT3DMS, A Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model User Guide to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    .M. Cozzarelli, M.H. Lahvis, and B.A. Bekins. 1998. Ground water contamination by crude oil near Bemidji (LNAPL) contaminant through the unsaturated zone and the formation of an oil lens on the water table ................................................................................................................. 18 #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION Leaks of fuels that release contaminants such as BTEX, MTBE and other fuel

  14. Integrated, Low Voltage, DynamicallyIntegrated, Low Voltage, Dynamically Adaptive BuckAdaptive Buck--Boost ConverterBoost Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    Improvement in battery life Low voltage Single cell operation (Li-ion/NiCd/NiMH/Fuel Cell) Integrated frequency 1 MHz ± 20% Closed-loop bandwidth 50 kHz 1-dB step change response time 20 µsec Full-load efficiency 90 % Control signal Output voltageTpower_change Tresponse Time 1 dB Typical transient response

  15. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 0 3 3 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 0 7 7 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 7 135 142 Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 10 140 150 POST-31 JULY

  16. EXTENDED RANGE FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 PROBABILITIES FOR AT LEAST ONE MAJOR (CATEGORY 3 percent of the long-period average. We expect Atlantic basin Net Tropical Cyclone (NTC) activity in 2013

  17. EXTENDED RANGE FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.3) 5 5 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (5.0) 10 10 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (96.1) 165 160 Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (100%) 180 175 PROBABILITIES FOR AT LEAST ONE MAJOR (CATEGORY. We expect Atlantic basin Net Tropical Cyclone (NTC) activity in 2011 to be approximately 175 percent

  18. SUMMARY OF 2009 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHOR'S SEASONAL AND 15-DAY FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    , hurricanes and major hurricanes, respectively. 3 #12;DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE Energy (ACE) (96.2) 125 100 85 80 50 Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (100%) 135 105 90 85 66 Figure.25 Major Hurricanes (MH) (2.3) 3 2 2 2 2 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (5.0) 7 5 4 4 3.25 Accumulated Cyclone

  19. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 17 (1998) 20832086 Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on SiO2 aerogel lms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    aerogel ®lms H.-H. PARK, M.-H. JO, H.-R. KIM, S.-H. HYUN Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei with a lower dielectric constant material as an intermetal dielectric (IMD). SiO2 aerogel is a promising aerogel ®lm with 70% porosity exhibited the static dielectric constant of 2 at 1 MHz, and a leakage

  20. Identification and initial characterization of circadian clock mutants in Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March, Irene Jennifer

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . , . . Race tube analysis Northern analysis . Plasmid construction . . Transformation of N. crassa strains . . . . Homokaryon selection. . DNA manipulations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kill curves and UV mutagenesis... . . . . . . Reconstruction experiments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UV mutagenesis and mutant selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . Characterization of 4MH2 mutant strains . . . . . . . 30 32 38 41 45 IV DISCUSSION AND SUMMARY . . . . . 53...

  1. In-Vehicle Testing and Computer Modeling of Electric Vehicle Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    In-Vehicle Testing and Computer Modeling of Electric Vehicle Batteries B. Thomas, W.B. Gu, J was performed for both VRLA and NiMH batteries using Penn State University's electric vehicle, the Electric Lion and hybrid-electric vehicles. A thorough understanding of battery systems from the point of view

  2. Directed evolution tools in bioproduct and bioprocess development 49 Chapter 3. Directed Evolution Tools in Bioproduct and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Directed evolution tools in bioproduct and bioprocess development 49 Chapter 3. Directed Evolution Tools in Bioproduct and Bioprocess Development Sheryl B. Rubin-Pitela , Catherine M-H. Chob , Wilfred process conditions and customize the reactions they catalyze. Directed evolution tools have been used

  3. Identification of a new pseudo-binary hydroxide during calendar corrosion of (La, Mg)2Ni7-type hydrogen storage alloys for Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hydrogen storage alloys for Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries J. Monnier 1 , H. Chen 1 , S. Joiret2,3 , J-MH batteries have been extensively studied during calendar storage and cycling [6-8]. In these alloys To improve the performances of Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries, an important step is the understanding

  4. Mid-to Late Holocene climate change: an overview Heinz Wanner a,*, Ju rg Beer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    forclimate changes from the Mid-Holocene (MH) to pre-industrial time. The redistribution of solar energy, due, Berlin, Germany l German Archeological Institute, Eurasia Department, Berlin, Germany m School of the last millennium. On decadal to multi-century timescales, a worldwide coincidence between solar

  5. Mid-to Late Holocene climate change: an overview Heinz Wanner a,*, Ju rg Beer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    from the Mid-Holocene (MH) to pre-industrial time. The redistribution of solar energy, due to orbital, Berlin, Germany l German Archeological Institute, Eurasia Department, Berlin, Germany m School of the last millennium. On decadal to multi-century timescales, a worldwide coincidence between solar

  6. HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+ M.H. Khan, 74078, USA ABSTRACT This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems

  7. Dirac Type Gauge Theories and the Mass of the Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Tolksdorf; Torsten Thumstaedter

    2007-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the mass of the (physical component of the) Higgs boson in one-loop and top-quark mass approximation. For this the minimal Standard Model is regarded as a specific (parameterized) gauge theory of Dirac type. It is shown that the latter formulation, in contrast to the usual description of the Standard Model, gives a definite value for the Higgs mass. The predicted value for the Higgs mass depends on the value addressed to the top mass m_T. We obtain m_H= 186 \\pm 8 GeV for m_T = 174 \\pm 3 GeV (direct observation of top events), resp. m_H = 184 \\pm 22 GeV for m_T = 172 \\pm 10 GeV (Standard Model electroweak fit). Although the Higgs mass is predicted to be near the upper bound, m_H is in full accordance with the range 114 \\leq m_H < 193 GeV that is allowed by the Standard Model. We show that the inclusion of (Dirac) massive neutrinos does not alter the results presented. We also briefly discuss how the derived mass values are related to those obtained within the frame of non-commutative geometry.

  8. SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract -This paper proposes new solar battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    SOLAR BATTERY CHARGERS FOR NIMH BATTERIES1 Abstract - This paper proposes new solar battery chargers for NiMH batteries. Used with portable solar panels, existing charge control methods are shown of consumer portable solar arrays. These new arrays are lightweight, durable, and flexible and have been

  9. Abstract ID: 1070 Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    present Plain Network-wide broadcasting through Time Reservation using Adaptive Control for Energy routing protocol, and Multi-Hop Time Reservation using Adaptive Control for Energy Efficiency (MH requirements for voice is to use periodic time-frame based medium access with automatic renewal of channel

  10. Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 1 Precision Top Mass Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galtieri, Lina

    Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 1 Precision Top Mass Measurement Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 2 Motivation Mw~ Mt 2 Mw~ log(MH) ­ Quantum loop the combination of many EWK observable #12;Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 3 Top

  11. Studienjahr 2014/2015 | Medizin -Modellstudiengang HannibaL | MHH | Hygiene, Mikrobiologie, Virologie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Studienjahr 2014/2015 | Medizin - Modellstudiengang HannibaL | MHH | Hygiene, Mikrobiologie-8029, bange.franz@mh-hannover.de (Hygiene) Vertreter: Prof. Dr. Ralf-Peter Vonberg, Institut für Med Krankenhaushygiene (Hygiene) Studienjahr / Tertial / Zeiten: 3. Studienjahr / Tertial 1­3 Art und Umfang der

  12. Proceedings of the 2002 Winter Simulation Conference E. Ycesan, C.-H. Chen, J. L. Snowdon, and J. M. Charnes, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    in the supply chain of pipe supports used in power plants. The models are used to study how produc- tion system of the design phase in the supply chain of pipe supports used in power plants. To- day's practices collected on power plant projects. Each of the tasks, respectively, takes about 2-to-2.5 man- hours (mh), 0

  13. The Math Colloquium Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Tim

    is a dynamic suite of tools designed by ATAC Corporation and used by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA examples of the in-depth analysis and support ATAC and PDARS has provided to the FAA and other aviation Corporation Math Careers: Aviation Analysis October 20, 2010, MH320 Abstract: The speaker will discuss her

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 12, Tome 37, DCcembre 1976, page C6-333 G. WORTMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    nuclear reactor design, the properties of hydrides (as neutron moderator or reflector materials) have been widely investigated [6]. For the fusion reactor, serioustechno- logical problems [7] are connected-H systems which are stillin discussion. The thermodynamicbehaviour of M-H systems,the theory of the elastic

  15. A Cell-Based High-Throughput Screen for Novel Chemical Inducers of Fetal Hemoglobin for Treatment of Hemoglobinopathies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth R.; Costa, Flá via C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y.; Chazelle, Allen M.; Zelenchuk, Lesya; Fonteles, Andrea H.; Dalal, Parmita; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Li, Biaoru; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    S (1997) Mechanism of action of hydroxyurea in the management of sickle cell anemia in adults. Semin Hematol 34(3 Suppl 3): 15–21. 5. Steinberg MH, Lu ZH, Barton FB, Terrin ML, Charache S, et al. (1997) Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: determinants...

  16. Discussion of the paper "Riemann manifold Langevin and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods" by M. Girolami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippone, Maurizio

    in a poor Effective Sample Size (ESS) for the length-scale parameters (Murray and Adams, 2010). The metric Table 1. ESS for Gibbs Metropolis-Hastings (Gibbs MH), Gibbs Simplified MMALA (Gibbs S-MMALA), Gibbs RM estimated from pilot runs of Gibbs Wht. We also report the number of calls (in thousands) to the functions

  17. NERI Technical Report No. 703, 2009 Projection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hjorth Mikkelsen Steen Gyldenkærne Erik Lyck Marlene Plejdrup Leif Hoffmann Marianne Thomsen Patrik Plejdrup, Leif Hoffmann, Marianne Thomsen, Patrik Fauser Department: Department of Policy Analysis: Nielsen, O-K., Winther, M., Mikkelsen, M.H., Gyldenkærne, S., Lyck, E., Plejdrup, M., Hoffmann, L

  18. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hjorth mikkelsen steen Gyldenkærne erik Lyck marlene Plejdrup Leif Hoffmann Marianne Thomsen Katja, Marlene Plejdrup, Leif Hoffmann, Marianne Thomsen, Katja Hjelgaard, Patrik Fauser Department: Department-K., Winther, M., Mikkelsen, M.H., Gyldenkærne, S., Lyck, E., Plejdrup, M., Hoffmann, L., Thomsen, M

  19. National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkelsen Erik Lyck, Malene Nielsen Leif Hoffmann Steen Gyldenkærne Marianne Thomsen #12;'DWD VKHHW Series, Erik Lyck, Malene Nielsen, Leif Hoffmann, Steen Gyldenkærne, Marianne Thomsen Department: Department., Mikkelsen, M.H., Lyck, E., Nielsen, M., Hoffmann, L., Gyldenkærne, S. & Thomsen, M. 2007: Projection

  20. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mette Hjorth Mikkelsen Leif Hoffmann Steen Gyldenkærne Patrik Fauser Malene Nielsen #12;'DWD VKHHW, Ole-Kenneth Nielsen, Morten Winther, Mette Hjorth Mikkelsen, Leif Hoffmann, Steen Gyldenkærne, Patrik financial support Please cite as: Illerup, J.B., Nielsen, O-K., Winther, M., Mikkelsen, M.H., Hoffmann, L

  1. Implications of near-term coal power plant retirement for SO2 and NOX, and life cycle GHG emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  2. Non-Condon theory of nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in V-shaped donorbridgeacceptor complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    -site donor D, and acceptor A , two-level sys- tem, the Mulliken­Hush MH relation reads HET m12 mda E12 . 2 m12 m12·u on the di- rection u mda / mda of the diabatic differential dipole mda is significant

  3. Three-dimensional batteries using a liquid cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malati, Peter Moneir

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are recycled. 33 Lead-acid batteries contain 60% to 80%because 96% of all lead-acid batteries are recycled. 34 Thislead-acid, nickel- cadmium (Ni-Cd), nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH), lithium ion, plastic lithium ion (PLiON), and lithium metal batteries.

  4. POUR L'OBTENTION DU GRADE DE DOCTEUR S SCIENCES accepte sur proposition du jury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .-L. Scartezzini, président du jury Prof. F. Golay, Prof. M.-H. De Sède-Marceau, directeurs de thèse Prof. N'adressent à Marie-Hélène de Sède-Marceau, François Golay et Henri Pornon qui ont tous les trois acceptés d

  5. ISEF 2007 -XIII International Symposium on Electromagnetic Fields in Mechatronics, Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    realized with a Ni-MH battery bank, a DC/DC converter, a DC motor, a speed reducer and a lead-screw device and afterwards an optimisation of the motor and speed reducer main dimensions and the battery voltage in order, and mainly the battery, DC motor and speed reducer weights, geometrical and physical relations have

  6. Student No. NAME CLASS Project Title Project Teacher DEPT Remarks 2012563535 Adiputra Calvin EComE Study of digital fingerprinting techniques Dr. T.I. Yuk EEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    Chun Hin EE High efficiency battery bank with GaN devices Dr. M.H. Pong EEE 2010545280 Lam Kai Chun Ho EE Parallel Computing of Load Flow Analysis on OpenCL Dr. C.K. Lee EEE 3035023661 Chen Yibo ECom

  7. Overview of the 2014 ALTA Shared Task: Identifying Expressions of Locations in Tweets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the US and UK in advising their nationals in Libya to leave immediately http://bbc.in/1rVmrDJ France, Germany, US, UK, Libya Dutch investigators not going to MH17 crash site in eastern Ukraine due to security

  8. @CRC Press 2015. This chapter appears as G. Honan, N. Gekakis, M. Hassanalieragh, A. Nadeau, G. Sharma and T. Soyata, "Energy Harvesting and Buffering for CyberPhysical Systems: A Review," Cyber Physical Systems -A Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    are batteries and supercapacitors, with the batteries being further classified into their own sub of environments. Keywords: Energy harvesting; Energy buffering; Supercapacitors; Cyber-physical Systems #12;@CRC batteries, such as Li-Ion, lead-acid, NiCd, and Ni-Mh, or supercapacitors. While supercapacitors

  9. Memory & Cognition 1991. 19. 95-112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutas, Marta

    - and closed-class words CYMA VAN PETTEN and MARTA KUTAS University of California, San Diego, La Jolla. Van Petten was supported by an NSF graduate fellowship. M. Kutas was supported by Research Career De- velopment Award MH 00322 from NIH. Correspondence should be ad- dressed to Cyma Van Petten, Department

  10. [9] M. Dietzfelbinger, A. Karlin, K. Mehlhorn, F. Meyer auf der Heide, H. Rohnert and R.E. Tarjan, Dynamic perfect hashing: upper and lower bounds, Proc. 29th IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    .A. Sober, Editor, The Chemical Rubber Co., 2nd Edition, 1970. [15] M.J. Katz, M H. Overmars and M. Sharir modeling can be solved efficiently using the data structures and properties presented in this paper­J. Giezeman, D. Halperin, and M.H. Overmars, Fast display of molecular models, in preparation. [13] L

  11. Energy Conversion DevicesEnergy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and disordered materials. Advances include: · Nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, negative and positive-precious metal electrocatalysts for H2/air fuel cells. ECD: Catalyst Provider Twenty years of development electrodes based on non-precious metal electrocatalysts for H2/air fuel cells. #12;Evaluation programs exist

  12. Analysis of Electrochemical and Thermal Behavior of Li-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on heat generation is collected during charge/discharge1-3 and/or by studying the self-heating heat generation. Simulations were used to estimate the thermal and electrical energy and the active applications, are expected to replace Ni-MH and lead-acid cells in electric and hybrid electric vehicles

  13. Optimization Neuroimaging'',

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

    Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C - PLS 1 = k 0 = k optimal k k = optimal k k £ £ 0 #12; Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C. Strother The Human Brain Project, P20 MH57180 ``Spatial

  14. arXiv:hep-ph/9704410v127Apr1997 University of California -Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    .E. Haberc and J. Kalinowskib,d a Davis Institute for High Energy Physics, University of California, Davis, CA, USA b Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland c University on mhSM which has been increasing as higher energy data becomes available. For example, the latest ALEPH

  15. Materials and Systems for Environmental Remediation and 1. Environmental Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Indranath

    Savage. Elsevier · Zhang S, Y Shao, J Liu, IA Aksay, and Y Lin. 2011. "Graphene-Polypyrrole Nanocomposite." ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 3(9):3633-3637. · Lin Y, and X Cui. 2005. "Novel Hybrid Materials/Polyaniline/Nickel Hexacyanoferrate Nanocomposites." Chemical Communications (17):2226-2228. doi:10.1039/b500417a · Cui X, MH

  16. LAPP-EXP-2005.01 8 avril 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    bosons in a range of masses of 90 GeV mH 150 GeV through the H decay channel. Because this Higgs bosons on the photodetector generate an electric signal registered by the read-out electronics. It is designed to detect Higgs

  17. LAPP-EXP 2001-05 Experimental summary talk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of a statistical fluctuation or the first sign of direct production of the Higgs boson. Four LEP experiments have combination results are given here). IF the observations are the first sign of direct production of the Higgs boson then we know its mass quite precisely mH = 115+1.3 -0.9 More data will come from Tevatron

  18. HIGGS BOSONS: THEORY AND SEARCHES Updated May 2010 by G. Bernardi (LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ 1­ HIGGS BOSONS: THEORY AND SEARCHES Updated May 2010 by G. Bernardi (LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3, U becomes the Higgs boson - a new fundamental scalar particle. The masses of all fermions are also interactions. If the Higgs boson mass mH is below 180 GeV, all fields remain weakly interacting up

  19. Space Sci Rev (2008) 136: 117184 DOI 10.1007/s11214-007-9170-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    · W.R. Cook · B. Kecman · M.E. Wiedenbeck · T. von Rosenvinge · M.H. Acuna · L.S. Reichenthal · S to provide multipoint solar wind and suprathermal electron, interplanetary magnetic field, and solar. Keywords STEREO · Coronal mass ejection · Solar energetic particles · Suprathermal electrons · Solar wind

  20. Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

  1. Non-Aqueous Solvation of n-Octanol and Ethanol: Spectroscopic and Computational Lori M. Levering, Carrigan J. Hayes, Karen M. Callahan, Christopher M. Hadad,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-Aqueous Solvation of n-Octanol and Ethanol: Spectroscopic and Computational Studies Lori M-H bonds in n-octanol and ethanol with the organic solvents carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), cyclohexane populations of each ethanol complex and are consistent with the experimental results. Additional spectra were

  2. Composite metal-hydrogen electrodes for metal-hydrogen batteries. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Weismann, H. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding those of commercially available metal hydride materials and fast hydrogen charging and discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films and multilayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 {mu}m thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  3. Process for production of a metal hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  4. Review: Avgust Pavel: Prekmurska Slovenska Slovnica. Vend Nyelvtan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Šek Mertü k, Polonca

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    #3;SUHG#3;QMHQLP#3; QDVWDQNRP#15;#3;åH#3;Y#3;þDVX#3;âWHIDQD#3;.]PLþD#15;#3; GD#3;EL#3;ODKNR#3;ELO#3;SUHNPXUVNL#3;NQMLåQL#3;MH]LN#3; QRUPLUDQ#3;åH#3;RE#3;VYRMHP#3;QDVWDQNX#3;#11;#20;#26;#26;#20;#12;#17;#3; 6ORYQLFD#3;MH#3;QDVWDOD#3;ªY#3;QHXJRGQHP#3;þ...DYORYH#3; VORYQLFH#29;#3; URNRSLV#3; VH#3; QDKDMD#3; Y#3; 3DYORYL#3; VSRPLQVNL#3; VREL#3; QD#3;.DWHGUL#3; ]D#3; VODYLVWL-­ NR#3;8QLYHU]LWHWQHJD#3; VUHGLãþD#3;6DYDULD#3; Y#3; 6RPERWHOX#15;#3; WLSNRSLV#3; SD#3; KUDQL#3;0X]HM#3; 6DYDULD#3;Y#3;6RPERWHOX#17...

  5. Studies of multichannel rotational predissociation of Ar–H2 van der Waals molecule by the complexcoordinate coupledchannel formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Datta, Krishna K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )] • [(6 - f3Ren)Cs,,~+€"f3R.,.l • 136400 134500 14590 13500 J. Chern. Phys., Vol. 76, No. 11, 1 June 1982 3.692 3.610 0.170 0.248 This article is copyrighted as indicated in the article. Reuse of AIP content is subject to the terms at: http... complex. A" A.L b" b.L M(Ar) M(H2)" M(H2h rs rs rio Cs C8 CIO aIn atomic units. bReference 12(c). 46.4 45.0 1.752 1. 804 0.0318 0.0903 0.0956 0.102 0.248 0.30 28.4 576.0 14600 J. Chern. Phys., Vol. 76, No. ", 1 June 1982...

  6. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZH production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZHmore »production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.« less

  8. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excessmore »above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.« less

  9. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excess above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.

  10. Immiscible displacement of viscositymatched fluids in twodimensional porous media Olav Inge Frette, Knut Jo'' rgen Ma lo'' y, and Jean Schmittbuhl*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    to the viscous effects. @S1063­651X~96!05012­X# PACS number~s!: 47.55.Mh, 05.40.1j, 47.55.Kf I. INTRODUCTION­phase flow in a porous medium is also of large practical importance in secondary oil recovery. In this paper a lower viscosity than the displaced fluid, the situation is highly unstable and ramified viscous fingers

  11. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 54515475, 2014 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/acp-14-5451-2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Methylglyoxal 4 GLYAC Glyoxylic acid 5 OXLAC Oxalic acid 6 PRV Pyruvic acid 7 GLYX_MH Glyoxal monohydrate 8 GLYX Oligomers from glyoxal 12 MGLOLI Oligomers from methylglyoxal 13 C4D C4 dimer 14 TA Tartaric acid 15 C3D C3 dimer 16 MA Malonic acid #12;Table S2. Non-organic chemistry used in the model. Reaction Number Aqueous

  12. EXTENDED RANGE FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    Energy (ACE) (96.1) 100-162 150 Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (100%) 108-172 160 PROBABILITIES-39 35 Major Hurricanes (MH) (2.3) 3-5 4 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (5.0) 6-12 10 Accumulated Cyclone-to-year variability of any of the global tropical cyclone basins. People are curious to know how active the upcoming

  13. The 2009 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantichur- ricanes began in 1995 (Goldenberg et al.2001).Asaresult,theAccumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index 2009 High-activity Era Averages 10 NS, 6.5H 3.3MH, ACE=131% Averages 8.5 NS, 5.shtml)calledfor9-14 named storms, 4-7 hurricanes, 1-3 major hurricanes, and anACE range of 65%-130% of the median

  14. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  15. Off-shell effects in Higgs processes at a linear collider and implications for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Liebler; Gudrid Moortgat-Pick; Georg Weiglein

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of off-shell contributions is discussed for $H\\to VV^{(*)}$ with $V\\in\\{Z,W\\}$ for large invariant masses $m_{VV}$ involving a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson with $m_H=125$GeV at a linear collider (LC). Both dominant production processes $e^+e^-\\to ZH\\to ZVV^{(*)}$ and $e^+e^-\\to\

  16. Off-shell effects in Higgs processes at a linear collider and implications for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebler, Stefan; Weiglein, Georg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of off-shell contributions is discussed for $H\\to VV^{(*)}$ with $V\\in\\{Z,W\\}$ for large invariant masses $m_{VV}$ involving a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson with $m_H=125$GeV at a linear collider (LC). Both dominant production processes $e^+e^-\\to ZH\\to ZVV^{(*)}$ and $e^+e^-\\to\

  17. PHYSICAL REVIE% D VOLUME 23, NUMBER 5 1 M ARC H 1981 Earth as a source of antineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Theoretical Physics, Roland Eo'tvo's University, Budapest, Hungary B.Fuentes Instituto de Fisica, Apartado Postal 20.02 MeV. The reaction cross section is given by 21r2A 3 g(e}= ' In2(e --eo)[(e --co)2-lj'~' for e& go+I, ftc where E =em, c2 is the energy of the antineutrino, M('H) -M('He) =m, eo is the mass difference

  18. VLSI Implementation of Low Power Reconfigurable MIMO Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dash, Rajballav

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Gwan S. Choi Committee Members, Peng Li Duncan M.H. Walker Head of Department, Costas N. Georghiades December 2009 Major Subject: Computer... Engineering iii ABSTRACT VLSI Implementation of Low Power Reconfigurable MIMO Detector. (December 2009) Rajballav Dash, B.Tech., National Institute of Technology Rourkela Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Gwan S. Choi...

  19. Recycling of Advanced Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The pace of development and fielding of electric vehicles is briefly described and the principal advanced battery chemistries expected to be used in the EV application are identified as Ni/MH in the near term and Li-ion/Li-polymer in the intermediate to long term. The status of recycling process development is reviewed for each of the two chemistries and future research needs are discussed.

  20. Use of DOE-2 to Evaluate Evaporative Cooling in Texas Correctional Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N.; Heneghan, T.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , W.K., "Fundamental Concepts Integrating Evaporative Techniques in HVAC Systems," ASHRAE TRANSACTIONS, V. 96, Pt. 1, 1990. 3. McDonald, G.W., M.H. Turietta and R.E. Foster, "Modeling Evaporative Cooling Systems with DOE- 2. ID," ASHRAE...USE OF DOE-2 TO EVALUATE EVAPORATIVE COOLING IN TEXAS CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES Namir Saman, Ph.D., P.E. Tarek Bou-Saada Tia Heneghan Visiting Assistant Professor Research Associate Energy Manager Energy Systems Laboratory Energy Systems...

  1. The Higgs boson: from the lattice to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the triviality and spontaneous symmetry breaking scenario where the Higgs boson without self-interaction coexists with spontaneous symmetry breaking. We argue that non perturbative lattice investigations support this scenario. Moreover, from lattice simulations we predict that the Higgs boson is rather heavy. We estimate the Higgs boson mass $m_H = 754 \\pm 20 {\\text{(stat)}} \\pm 20 {\\text{(syst)}} {\\text{GeV}}$ and the Higgs total width $\\Gamma(H) \\simeq 340 {\\text{GeV}}$.

  2. Best Practices for Running a Hyperfunctional Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegle, Greg J.

    Best Practices for Running a Hyperfunctional Psychology Laboratory Greg J. Siegle, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Presented work supported by MH082998 These slides available at http://www.pitt.edu/~gsiegle/SiegleLaboratoryBestPracticesColloquium.pdf #12;Why bother? · You and others can trust your data ­ It's easy to know when you step into a best-practices

  3. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125<m_H<155 GeV/c^2. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156<m_H<177 GeV/c^2, with an expected exclusion region of 148<m_H<180 GeV/c^2.

  4. The Role of Pension Funds in Housing Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Kenneth T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    caansapm .wH I m I mm ow mN©N HHO H?nos . >H «w v N a avUop?ab .mH w ma m NH we mmum A.aHv HHO camaqwpm .NH I I NHmN mm ¢HwN .00 HHO Hamnm .aH I NN I HN om ooom .00 a

  5. KaushikRajashekara TheUniversityofTexasatDallas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    of a EV Power-train 13 14 #12;15 Vehicle range per battery charge under various driving conditions Fuel/DOETargets Batteries ElectricMachines PowerElectronics Futurepowertrains Conclusions 2 #12;GeneralMotorsEV1 * Engine: 1.3 liter, 4 cylinder * Battery: 100.8V DC (NiMH battery), 5.75 Ah * Motor/Generator: 13 KW @1500

  6. Hybrid Vehicle Comparison Testing Using Ultracapacitor vs. Battery Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.; Lustbader, J.; Tataria, H.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With support from General Motors, NREL researchers converted and tested a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) with three energy storage configurations: a nickel metal-hydride battery and two ultracapacitor (Ucap) modules. They found that the HEV equipped with one Ucap module performed as well as or better than the HEV with a stock NiMH battery configuration. Thus, Ucaps could increase the market penetration and fuel savings of HEVs.

  7. Absorption and metabolism of carbaryl, malathion, DDT, aldrin and permethrin by larvae of Aedes Aegypti (Linnaeus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Alberto

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the least stable. The polarity of the insecticides was determined by two phase partitioning systems. Chloroform/water partitioning showed that all insecticides were recovered almost quantitatively in the chloroform. Partitioning with petroleum ether... Glucuronide Formation Glucoside Formation Ethereal Sulfate Con u ation. ~Mh 1 t. ~At 1 tt C steine Con u ation. Malathion. Carbaryl . Page Aldrin Permethrin MATERIALS AND METHODS RESULTS 15 Partitionin Ex eriments. 15 Com arative Rates...

  8. The circulating hemocytes of the white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus: origin, abundance, morphology, and function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Clark Timothy

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism contributing to the maintenance of hematological equilibrium. Research of this nature is needed for penaeid shrimp. The fall in hemocyte count could be due to retirement of hemocytes from circulation. Cells thus retired may adhere to tissues...THE CIRCULATING HENOCYTFS OF THE MH1TE SHRIMP& Penaeus seti. ferus: ORIGIN, ABUNDANCE, NORPHOLOGY, AND I'UNCTION A Thesis by Clark Timothy Fontaine Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in Partial fulfillment...

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near ps = 183 GeV The ALEPHV. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson on the mass of the Higgs boson: mH > 87:9 GeV=c2 at 95% con#12;dence level. The ALEPH Collaboration wish

  10. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb-1. The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly-charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, mH±± > 190 - 245 GeV/c2, depending on the decay mode and coupling.

  11. Dr. S. Cruz-Pol, INEL 4151-Electromagnetics I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

    ://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/electromag/java/generator/dc.html BlIF BuQF �= �= Encarta® Who was NikolaTesla? �Find out what inventions he made �His relation = magnetic field density, [Teslas] mH mF HB ED o o /104 36 10 /1085.8 7 9 12 - - - �= =�= = = µ µ #12;Dr

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, supplement au n09, Tome 48, septembre 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    preheated in a circulating air furnace a t 524-537Oc and extruded a t 385-524 C with the container ta AND PERFORMANCE OF A1-Li-Cu-X EXTRUSIONS M.H. .SKILLINGBERG and R.F. ASHTON Reynolds Metals Company, Metallurgy aircraft alloys. The mechanical properties of the extrusions,were a function of micros-e and test direction

  13. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  14. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

  15. Higgs Boson Mass and Electroweak-Gravity Hierarchy from Dynamical Gauge-Higgs Unification in the Warped Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani; Mitsuru Mabe

    2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by the Hosotani mechanism in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime is examined, relations among the W-boson mass (m_W), the Kaluza-Klein mass scale (M_{KK}), and the Higgs boson mass (m_H) being derived. It is shown that M_{KK}/m_W = (2 pi kR)^{1/2} (pi/theta_W) and m_H /m_W = 0.058 kR (pi/theta_W), where k^2, R, and theta_W are the curvature and size of the extra-dimensional space and the Wilson line phase determined dynamically. For typical values kR = 12 and theta_W = (0.2 to 0.4) pi, one finds that M_{KK} = (1.7 to 3.5) TeV, k = (1.3 to 2.6) x 10^{19} GeV, and m_H = (140 to 280) GeV.

  16. Dark Matter Halos in Galaxies and Globular Cluster Populations. II: Metallicity and Morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William; Hudson, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing body of data reveals a one-to-one linear correlation between galaxy halo mass and the total mass in its globular cluster (GC) population, M_{GCS} ~ M_h^{1.03 \\pm 0.03}, valid over 5 orders of magnitude. We explore the nature of this correlation for galaxies of different morphological types, and for the subpopulations of metal-poor (blue) and metal-rich (red) GCs. For the subpopulations of different metallicity we find M_{GCS}(blue) ~ M_h^{0.96 \\pm 0.03} and M_{GCS}(red) ~ M_h^{1.21 \\pm 0.03} with similar scatter. The numerical values of these exponents can be derived from the detailed behavior of the red and blue GC fractions with galaxy mass and provide a self-consistent set of relations. In addition, all morphological types (E, S0, S/Irr) follow the same relation, but with a second-order trend for spiral galaxies to have a slightly higher fraction of metal-rich GCs for a given mass. These results suggest that the amount of gas available for GC formation at high redshift was in nearly direct pr...

  17. Synthesis of single-phase Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} Z-type ferrite by polymerizable complex method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikuchi, Takeyuki, E-mail: kikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan); Nakamura, Tatsuya [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan); Yamasaki, Tohru [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Syosya, Himeji-shi 671-2280 (Japan); Nakanishi, Makoto; Fujii, Tatsuo; Takada, Jun [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasunori [Research Institute for Production Development, 15 Morimoto-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-0805 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Production Development, 15 Morimoto-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 606-0805 (Japan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Single-phase Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Z was obtained in a very narrow temperature range. {yields} Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Z ferrite prepared by polymerizable complex method showed typical M-H curve of soft ferrite. -- Abstract: Synthesis of single-phase Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} Z-type (Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Z) ferrite was realized by adopting the polymerizable complex method. Crystal structure of samples has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Single-phase Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Z ferrite was obtained by heating at 1473 K for 5 h in air. Magnetic properties were discussed by measurements of M-H curves with vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Z ferrite prepared by polymerizable complex method showed typical M-H curve of soft ferrite, with a saturation magnetization of 21.5{mu}{sub B}/formula unit (50.5 emu/g) and a coercive force of 0.014 T at room temperature.

  18. Growth and response of whitebrush to 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid as conditioned by available soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCully, Wayne Gunter

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A&MCOL EGF &?*/MG*? MH CLeO?a&d*L OM - of?OLDp- b orLpM&M/L?GMtDEr?Oer EreF E* rMGFeOeMG?F aD EmEepEap? *Mep fMe*Od&? E Fnyy19585nKN aW C8WN1 AT fSrhuuW ? ? * *hscn551i 5K 5l1 A98ih851 *SlKKu Kv 5l1 Eb9nShu5h...98u 8Ni f1Sl8NnS8u rKuu1b1 Kv O1,8y nN B895n8u vhuvnuuc1N5 Kv 5l1 91.hn91c1N5y vK9 5l1 i1b911 Kv FMrOM& MH /LepM*M/LD f8W P>xg fE?M& *da??rOJ /pEGO /LD*eMpMAD A&MCOL EGF &?*/MG*? MH CLeO?a&d*L OM - of?OLDpow orLpM&M/L?GMteEr?Oer EMeF E* r...

  19. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman Jr, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A. [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE)] [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE); Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V [University of the Western Cape, South Africa] [University of the Western Cape, South Africa; Pollet, Dr. B.G. [University of the Western Cape, South Africa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  20. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  1. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  2. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

  3. MSSM Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC: Benchmark Scenarios after the Discovery of a Higgs-like Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Stål, O.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Weiglein, G.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 125.5 GeV has been discovered at the LHC. Within the current experimental uncertainties, this new state is compatible with both the predictions for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson and with the Higgs sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We propose new low-energy MSSM benchmark scenarios that, over a wide parameter range, are compatible with the mass and production rates of the observed signal. These scenarios also exhibit interesting phenomenology for the MSSM Higgs sector. We propose a slightly updated version of the well-known mh-max scenario, and a modified scenario (mh-mod), where the light CP-even Higgs boson can be interpreted as the LHC signal in large parts of the MA-tan \\beta\\ plane. Furthermore, we define a light stop scenario that leads to a suppression of the lightest CP-even Higgs gluon fusion rate, and a light stau scenario with an enhanced decay rate of h to \\gamma\\gamma\\ at large tan \\beta. We also suggest a \\tau-phobic Higgs scenario in which the lightest Higgs can have suppressed couplings to down-type fermions. We propose to supplement the specified value of the \\mu\\ parameter in some of these scenarios with additional values of both signs. This has a significant impact on the interpretation of searches for the non SM-like MSSM Higgs bosons. We also discuss the sensitivity of the searches to heavy Higgs decays into light charginos and neutralinos, and to decays of the form H to hh. Finally, in addition to all the other scenarios where the lightest CP-even Higgs is interpreted as the LHC signal, we propose a low-MH scenario, where instead the heavy CP-even Higgs boson corresponds to the new state around 125.5 GeV.

  4. Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

  5. Utilizing body temperature to evaluate ovulation in mature mares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, Marissa Coral

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -19. Butterfield, R.R. and R.G. Matthews. 1970. Mare is a four-letter word. Vet. Rec. 87: 787. Cohen, M.R., R. Frank, M.H. Dresner, and J.J. Gold. 1956. The use of a new long- acting progestational steriod (17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate.... Body temperature increasing effect of female sex steriods. Gynaecologia 136: 129. 25 Ginther, O.J. 1979. Reproductive Biology of the Mare. Equiservices, Cross Plains, Wisconsin. pp. 173. Ginther, O.J., H.L. Whitmore, and E.L. Squires. 1972...

  6. The mathematics of Moby-Dick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Mary Lou

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vh M th Mtt' 1' ~M*h -D k. (D c*kh* 19839 Mary Lou Taylor, B. A. , Rice University Chairman of Advisory Committee9 Dr. Dennis A. Berthold Great writers rarely limit their intellectual freedom to narrow paths of knowledge. Biographers report Herman... and man's place in the natural world . Melville 's ck, p*' 1 lych-D'k, lprll*1' thkh* between Melville and key figures in the history of mathe- matics such as Rene Descartes (father of modern mathe- matics), Isaac Newton, Pierre Simon Laplace (pioneer...

  7. A study of the juvenile fish fauna associated with the cooling water of a steam electric generating station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullough, Martha Mary

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    martinica ~ht d1t ~M11 mh 1 Intake Canal ~Elo s saurus. ~Mht M t 1 tt M Anchoa mitchilli. Gobiesox strumosus. Fundulus grandis. Gambusia affinis. Membras martinica ~Menidi ~blli~a ~th 1 1 1 Caranx ~hi os ~La odon rhomboides. ~dt *1 ~dt 1 1... soma boa ci . Discharge Canal ~t' t 1 ~Elo s saurus hi. p Brevoortia Eatronus. Anchoa h~e actus. Anchoa mitchilli Gobiesox strumosus ~C' d . ~Zt Lucania Earva. Gambusia affinis Membras martinica. Menidia berr llina ~dh 1 1 ~La odon...

  8. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

  9. Mechanism of Thickness Dependence of Critical Current Density in HTS YBaCuO7-x Film and Its Elimination Using Nano-Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . CHAPTER 2 Fig. 2.1: Plume generated by a focused pulsed UV laser beam on a YBCO target. Fig. 2.2: I-V curves measured on a YBCO film at 77K and various fields. Fig. 2.3: M-H hysteretic loops measured on a YBCO film at 10, 50, 77 and 86K. Fig. 2... to acknowledge those who have provided guidance and assistance toward this dissertation project over the years, which include Dr. Rongtao Lu and Ms. Rose Lyn Emergo for their assistance in building the cryogenic system equipped with 8-Tesla NbTi superconducting...

  10. Qualifying Vehicles for Low Emitting, Fuel Efficient Vehicle Discount (50 points or better)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Tim

    MH batteries) +1 ZEV 2.9 3.3 52 2001 01_TS HONDA INSIGHT 1.0L 3, manual ULEV I 61 68 53 2001 01_TS HONDA INSIGHT 1.0L 3, manual LEV I 61 68 52 2001 02_SUB HONDA CIVIC GX 1.7L 4, auto [CNG] SULEV II 31 34 53 2002 01_TS HONDA INSIGHT 1.0L 3, auto CVT SULEV II 57 56 57 2002 01_TS HONDA INSIGHT 1.0L 3, manual ULEV I

  11. Some Kansas Lawyer-Poets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Brian; Hoeflich, Michael H.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Kansas Lawyer-Poets Brian Moline" & MH. Hoeflich·· At first glance the idea of a Kansas lawyer-poet might seem odd. We tend to think oflawyers as hard-boiled men and women ofthe world, not as sensitive poetic types. Similarly, when we think... of Kansas we think first of farmers and ranchers, not of lawyers. The idea of Kansas lawyer-poets, therefore, may well seem to be strange and the breed quite limited, but nothing could be further from the truth. Throughout American history, lawyers have...

  12. String Phenomenology in the Era of LHC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxin, James A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    limits on the Flavor Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) process b ! s [19, 20], the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, g??2 [21], the process B0s ! ?+?? [22], and the limit on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass [23]. These, combined with the WMAP... bound to be Br(B0s ! ?+??) < 5:8?10?8 [22]. 5. The LEP limit on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass, mh ? 114 GeV [23]. A scan of the full parameter space is performed for both the strict moduli scenario and the dilaton scenario. The gaugino mass m1...

  13. Method Of Charging Maintenance-Free Nickel Metal Hydride Storage Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlureau, Thierry (Bordeaux, FR); Liska, Jean-Louis (Bordeaux, FR)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of charging an industrial maintenance-free Ni-MH storage cell, the method comprising in combination a first stage at a constant current I.sub.1 lying in the range I.sub.c /10 to I.sub.c /2, and a second stage at a constant current I.sub.2 lying in the range I.sub.c /50 to I.sub.c /10, the changeover from the first stage to the second stage taking place when the time derivative of the temperature reaches a threshold value which varies as a function of the temperature at the time of the changeover.

  14. Thermalization of heavy quarks in the quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the kinetic equilibration of c quarks as compared to using perturbative interactions. We also comment on consequences for D-meson observables in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.71.034907 PACS number(s): 12.38.Mh, 24.85.+p, 25... of individual c quarks in the QGP will reflect themselves in transverse- momentum (pT -) spectra of open charm hadrons (D mesons) [4?7], most notably their elliptic flow, v2(pT ), in semicentral collisions [8,9]. Preliminary experimental results from...

  15. Ecology and control of thrips and spider mites injurious to cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the thriys Fxxs&Q)nie))a fossa {15nds) SNI ptatllllllllellll ttlttCl Steep M C ttM Th Bttl'1MM ceM~MM . . . . . . . ~. . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 geesons) ~cs of Tstrmgpds6s dssertorun Banks on se66erel lsl?etetlt beet lllllots ?EOIISNS K Bal'1 ath Nld Bcb... tteaa Coentiesf TeNs \\ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ * \\ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ llollb Pl?lto NN MCCCM1 4th dssc4 f Tstlollfl INC d 4 etcsIIR BRAN Rl AMa 6 BatlMM CCMtp RNCS ~ ~ ~ ~ bt RISN PIINts IRS MMchal sl?hd?lco cf 'totloltlblts dMoel4Mh BOSN I Atl? 8 Batlae...

  16. LIBRARIES IN TRANSFORMATION: Exploring Topics of Changing Practices and New Technologies - Proceedings of the 43th Meeting of the Geoscience Information Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshops and reports over the past few years addressing the challenges and opportunities related to the current digital data revolution, including the need for ade- quate stewardship of data: National Science Foundation Blue-Ribbon Advisory Panel....E., Droegemeier, K.K., Feldman, S.I., Garcia -Molina, H., Klein, M.L., Messerschmitt, D.G., Messina, P., Ostriker, J.P., and Wright, M.H., 2003, Revolutionizing science and engineering through cyberinfrastructure; Report of the National Science Foundation Blue-Ribbon...

  17. Lightest Higgs Boson and Relic Neutralino in the MSSM with CP Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae Sik Lee; Stefano Scopel

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the lower bound to the lightest Higgs boson H_1 in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, and the phenomenology of the lightest relic neutralino in the same scenario. In particular, adopting the CPX benchmark scenario, we find that the combination of experimental constraints coming from LEP, Thallium Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) measurements, quorkonium decays, and B_s -> mu mu decay favours a region of the parameter space where the mass of H_1 is in the range 7 GeV M_{H_1}/2 which is allowed by cosmology is excluded by antiproton fluxes.

  18. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145<mH<206 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  19. Decoupling of Higgs boson from the inflationary stage of Universe evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev; S. A. Timofeev

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraint on the mass of Higgs field in the Standard Model at the minimal interaction with the gravity is derived in the form of lower bound $m_H> 150$ GeV by the strict requirement of decoupling the Higgs boson from the inflation of early Universe: the inflation produced by the Higgs scalar could crucially destroy visible properties of large scale structure of Universe, while the large mass makes the Higgs particle not able to produce the inflation and shifts its cosmological role into the region of quantum gravity.

  20. Preparation of dinitrogen, hydrido, and carbonyl complexes of molybdenum and tungsten from higher halides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, A.P.; Makhaev, V.D.; Semenenko, K.N.

    1988-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The yields, physicochemical properties, and analyses of phosphine complexes of molybdenum and tungsten are shown. The reduction of molydenum pentachloride or tungsten hexachloride with metallic magnesium in THF in the presence of a tertiary organic phosphines in an atmosphere of nitrogen, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide provided a convenient method for the preparation of dinitrogen M(N/sub 2/)/sub 2/L/sub 4/, hydride MH/sub 4/L/sub 4/, or carbonyl M(CO)/sub 6/minus/x/L/sub x/ complexes respectively of molybdenum or tungsten (M = Mo, W; L - tertiary organic phosphine).

  1. Elastic contribution to interaction of vortices in uniaxial superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, Vladimir [Ames Laboratory, DOE; Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The stress caused by vortices in tetragonal superconductors contributes to the intervortex interaction which depends on vortex orientation within the crystal, on elastic moduli, and is attractive within certain angular regions even in fields along the c crystal axis. For sufficiently strong stress dependence of the critical temperature, this contribution may result in distortions of the hexagonal vortex lattice for H||c. In small fields it leads to formation of a square vortex lattice with a fixed H independent spacing. This should be seen in the magnetization M(H) as a discontinuous jump of magnetization at the transition from the Meissner to mixed states.

  2. Long term culture of genome-stable bipotent progenitor cells from adult human liver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Niewenhuis, Edward; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R. G.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    hepatocyte differentiation-promoting compounds (Table S1). Removal of the growth stimuli R-spo and FSK directly resulted in the up-regulation of Albumin and CYP3A4 gene expression (Figure S5C). To this medium, we then added the Notch inhibitor DAPT (Huch... B performed the genetic stability studies, supervised the next-gen sequencing and set up the filtering pipeline. FB adjusted and applied pipeline. JdL performed the CNV analysis. MH, MvW, RH, SF, SJB, HK performed functional in vitro experiments...

  3. Observing the synoptic structure of two moisture bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaeffer, James Royal

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ()'N 115'W 25'N 112 'l1 20 N 109 otf 1000 mh 105 N Fig. 1. SATEM cross section of temperature distributton for 0000 GMT 21 January 1979. SATEM OOGMT 23 JAN 79 -00'C 200 b -50 oc -40 C -30 'C 400 mb . 20 oc -10 'C 600 mb 0'C +10'C... is similar, although the area of significant variability around 15 N/145 W has shrunk considerably. The corresponding analysis at 700 mb (Fig. 15) continues this trend of lesser variability all along the burst axes. There is a 2 ~ e B e g 2 ~ "2 EQ 1...

  4. Activities of livestock and deer on experimental pastures of the Kerr Wildlife Management Area near Hunt, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grelen, Harold Eugene

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 42 Qso swk fs?a ?atoriag ofter ~ctfsll. Pho4o- graph takes ?ith eamaa tssy sag flash. Srigh4 eyoi ia piet?re is ?atoh cgcioh refieoM light fr?a the flMh s ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Q ACZPITXNS lF LSSSSCK LND QUINN CN NZyRRDWLL RLNSSNS O' TNR KNNN... oattle twreDed tve an4 a half to three adios a day~ motored tm or throe times a day and took salt ono to three times during tho day. Time spent im tho various daily activities by these cattle ~ as fcllovsa 10 hours, 25 minutes 2 hours' 28 minutes 3...

  5. Doping Experiments on Low-Dimensional Oxides and a Search for Unusual Magnetic Properties of MgAlB14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julienne Marie Hill

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Doping experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} and SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were performed with the intent of synthesizing new metallic low-=dimensional cuprate oxide compounds. Magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) measurements on a polycrystalline La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} sample chemically oxidized at room temperature in aqueous NaClO showed superconductivity with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 42.6 K and a Meissner fraction of 26%. They were unable to electrochemically oxidize La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in a nonaqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and methanol. Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} was found to decompose upon exposure to air and water. Electron paramagnetic resonance, isothermal magnetization M(H), and {chi}(T) measurements on the primary decomposition product, Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6}, were consistent with a nearly isolated, spin S = 1/2, local moment model for the Cu{sup +2} spins. From a fit of {chi}(T) by the Curie-Weiss law and of the M(H) isotherms by a modified Brillouin function, the weakly antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between adjacent Cu{sup +2} spins in Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6} was found to be J/k{sub B} = 1.06(4) K. Doping studies on SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were inconclusive. {chi}(T) measurements on an undoped polycrystalline sample of SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, a sample treated with distilled water, and a sample treated with aqueous NaClO showed no qualitative differences between the samples. In addition, {chi}(T) and M(H, T) studies of the ultra-hard material MgAlB{sub 14} were carried out in search of superconductivity or ferromagnetism in this compound. {chi}(T) measurements on a powder sample revealed temperature-independent diamagnetism from 1.8 K up to room temperature with a Curie-Weiss impurity concentration equivalent to {approx} 1 mol% of spin-1/2 ions. In contrast, M(H, T) data on hot pressed samples showed evidence of ferromagnetic transitions above {approx} 330 K. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis of the hot pressed samples indicated that the observed ferromagnetism was likely due to Fe impurities.

  6. Ecology and control of thrips and spider mites injurious to cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the thriys Fxxs&Q)nie))a fossa {15nds) SNI ptatllllllllellll ttlttCl Steep M C ttM Th Bttl'1MM ceM~MM . . . . . . . ~. . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 geesons) ~cs of Tstrmgpds6s dssertorun Banks on se66erel lsl?etetlt beet lllllots ?EOIISNS K Bal'1 ath Nld Bcb... tteaa Coentiesf TeNs \\ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ * \\ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ llollb Pl?lto NN MCCCM1 4th dssc4 f Tstlollfl INC d 4 etcsIIR BRAN Rl AMa 6 BatlMM CCMtp RNCS ~ ~ ~ ~ bt RISN PIINts IRS MMchal sl?hd?lco cf 'totloltlblts dMoel4Mh BOSN I Atl? 8 Batlae...

  7. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl [Ames Laboratory; Schmidt, Frederick [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Frerichs, A.E. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Ament, Katherine A. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  8. Herwig++ 2.0 beta release note.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieseke, Stefan; Grellscheid, D; Ribon, Alberto; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H; Stephens, Phil; Webber, Bryan R

    @particle.uni-karlsruhe.de D. Grellscheid IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University E-mail: david.grellscheid@durham.ac.uk A. Ribon PH Department, CERN E-mail: Alberto.Ribon@cern.ch P. Richardson IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University E-mail: Peter... .Richardson@durham.ac.uk.ac.uk M.H. Seymour PH Department, CERN E-mail: M.Seymour@rl.ac.uk P. Stephens Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow E-mail: stephens@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk B.R. Webber Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge E-mail: webber@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk Abstract A new...

  9. Dark photons and resonant monophoton signatures in Higgs boson decays at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emidio Gabrielli; Matti Heikinheimo; Barbara Mele; Martti Raidal

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by dark-photon $\\bar{\\gamma}$ scenarios extensively considered in the literature, we explore experimentally allowed models where the Higgs boson coupling to photon and dark photon $H\\gamma\\bar{\\gamma}$ can be enhanced. Correspondingly, large rates for the $H\\to \\gamma\\bar \\gamma$ decay become plausible, giving rise to one monochromatic photon with $E^{\\gamma}\\simeq m_H/2$ (i.e., more than twice the photon energy in the rare standard-model decay $H\\to \\gamma Z\\to\\gamma\\bar\

  10. String Phenomenology in the Era of LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxin, James A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    limits on the Flavor Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) process b ! s [19, 20], the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, g??2 [21], the process B0s ! ?+?? [22], and the limit on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass [23]. These, combined with the WMAP... bound to be Br(B0s ! ?+??) < 5:8?10?8 [22]. 5. The LEP limit on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass, mh ? 114 GeV [23]. A scan of the full parameter space is performed for both the strict moduli scenario and the dilaton scenario. The gaugino mass m1...

  11. Synthesis of some †-lactams via enolate-imine reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElveen, Margaret Lynn

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenylacetate (34), menthyl mandelate (g), ethyl acetate (Q6), ethyl lactate (37), and ethyl propionate (38). The imines used in this study were benzilidene-tert-butylamine (g), benzilidenemethylamine (2g), benzilideneethylamine (24), benzi1idene- aniline (Q... phenylacetate (g), menthyl mandelate (g) which was a mixture of diastereomers (see Experimental section), ethyl acetate (36), ethyl lactate (37), and ethyl propionate (38). CeHa- ? NH ? CHsCOsEt 30 Ce Ha MH-C-OR +3 R=CHzCHs CeHeCH= N-CHzCOeEt 0 R'-3...

  12. Published: October 21, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 5493 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ef201329x |Energy Fuels 2011, 25, 54935502

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    As suggested by the intergovernmental panel on climate control (IPCC), a 50�85% reduction in total CO2 emission (CLC) process allows intrinsic separation of pure CO2 from a hydrocarbon fuel combustion process CnH2m f ð2n þ m�MexOy�1 þ nCO2 þ mH2O ð1� 2MexOy�1 þ O2 f 2MexOy ð2� Here MexOy and MexOy�1

  13. Metallicities of M Dwarf Planet Hosts from Spectral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob L. Bean; G. Fritz Benedict; Michael Endl

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first spectroscopic metallicities of three M dwarfs with known or candidate planetary mass companions. We have analyzed high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of these stars which we obtained at McDonald Observatory. Our analysis technique is based on spectral synthesis of atomic and molecular features using recently revised cool-star model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis code. The technique has been shown to yield results consistent with the analyses of solar-type stars and allows measurements of M dwarf [M/H] values to 0.12 dex precision. From our analysis, we find [M/H] = -0.12, -0.32, and -0.33 for GJ 876, GJ 436, and GJ 581 respectively. These three M dwarf planet hosts have sub-solar metallicities, a surprising departure from the trend observed in FGK-type stars. This study is the first part of our ongoing work to determine the metallicities of the M dwarfs included in the McDonald Observatory planet search program.

  14. Search for the dark photon and the dark Higgs boson at Belle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dark photon, $A^\\prime$, and the dark Higgs boson, $h^\\prime$, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. Assuming prompt decays of both dark particles, we search for their production in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, $e^+e^- \\rightarrow A^\\prime h'$, with $h^\\prime \\rightarrow A^\\prime A^\\prime$. We investigate ten exclusive final-states with $A^\\prime \\rightarrow e^+e^-$, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, or $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, in the mass ranges $0.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $0.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. We also investigate three inclusive final-states, $2(e^+e^-)X$, $2(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, and $(e^+e^-)(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, where $X$ denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges $1.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $2.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. Using the entire $977\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ data set collected by Belle, we observe no significant signal. We obtain ind...

  15. Search for WH associated production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L?5.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? Collider. Events containing a W?l? candidate (with l corresponding to e or ?) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product ofmore »the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.« less

  16. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the abundance of haloes in the $\\sim(3 \\ \\text{Gpc}/h)^3$ volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jack-Knife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$ and $c_3$) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their overall poor performance when including the low mass range ($M_h \\lesssim 3 \\ 10^{12} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$) in the analysis, which indicates noisy friends-of-friends halo detection given the MICE resolution ($m_p \\simeq 3 \\ 10^{10} \\ M_{\\odot}$/h). Together with fits from the literature we find an overall variance in the amplitudes of around $10%$ in the low mass and up to $50%$ in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range ($M_h > 10^{14} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$). These variations propagate into a $10%$ change in $b_1$ predictions and a $50%$ change in $c_2$ or $c_3$. Despite the...

  17. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore »are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  18. The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs II. Halo Occupation Distribution Modeling of the Cross Correlation Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison L; Aceves, Hector

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of AGNs in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS Broad-line AGNs with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16M_h, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M_h more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper lim...

  19. Study of Higgs boson production and its b-bbar decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria; Jean-Philippe Lansberg

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (mH = 115-140 GeV/c^2) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (pPb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b-bbar decay. Using equivalent Weizsaecker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling gamma-gamma --> H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> p H Pb) and semielastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> Pb H X) processes at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds (gamma-gamma --> b-bbar and misidentified gamma-gamma-->q-qbar events), we find that a Higgs boson with mH = 120 GeV/c^2 could be observed in the b-bbar channel with a 3sigma-significance integrating 300 pb^-1 with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10^31 cm^-2s^-1. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t-tbar cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

  20. Doping Experiments on Low-Dimensional Oxides and a Search for Unusual Magnetic Properties of MgAlB sub 1 sub 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hil, Julienne Marie

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doping experiments on La sub 2 CuO sub 4 , Sr sub 2 CuO sub 3 and SrCu sub 2 (BO sub 3) sub 2 were performed with the intent of synthesizing new metallic low-=dimensional cuprate oxide compounds. Magnetic susceptibility chi(T) measurements on a polycrystalline La sub 2 CuO sub 4 sample chemically oxidized at room temperature in aqueous NaClO showed superconductivity with a superconducting transition temperature T sub c of 42.6 K and a Meissner fraction of 26%. They were unable to electrochemically oxidize La sub 2 CuO sub 4 in a nonaqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and methanol. Sr sub 2 CuO sub 3 was found to decompose upon exposure to air and water. Electron paramagnetic resonance, isothermal magnetization M(H), and chi(T) measurements on the primary decomposition product, Sr sub 2 Cu(OH) sub 6 , were consistent with a nearly isolated, spin S = 1/2, local moment model for the Cu sup + sup 2 spins. From a fit of chi(T) by the Curie-Weiss law and of the M(H) isotherms by a modified Bri...

  1. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  2. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

  3. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb?¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on ?(pp??WH)×B(H?bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  4. Search for WH associated production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; Cruz-Burelo, E. De La; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Cruz, I. Heredia-De La; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N. K.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L?5.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? Collider. Events containing a W?l? candidate (with l corresponding to e or ?) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

  5. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  6. Effective temperature scale and bolometric corrections from 2MASS photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Masana; C. Jordi; I. Ribas

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method to determine effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters and bolometric corrections for population I and II FGK type stars based on V and 2MASS IR photometry. Accurate calibration is accomplished by using a sample of solar analogues, whose average temperature is assumed to be equal to the solar effective temperature of 5777 K. By taking into account all possible sources of error we estimate associated uncertainties better than 1% in effective temperature and in the range 1.0-2.5% in angular semi-diameter for unreddened stars. Comparison of our new temperatures with other determinations extracted from the literature indicates, in general, remarkably good agreement. These results suggest that the effective temperaure scale of FGK stars is currently established with an accuracy better than 0.5%-1%. The application of the method to a sample of 10999 dwarfs in the Hipparcos catalogue allows us to define temperature and bolometric correction (K band) calibrations as a function of (V-K), [m/H] and log g. Bolometric corrections in the V and K bands as a function of effective temperature, [m/H] and log g are also given. We provide effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters, radii and bolometric corrections in the V and K bands for the 10999 FGK stars in our sample with the corresponding uncertainties.

  7. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in CP-conserving and CP-violating MSSM scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; De, A; Roeck, A D; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the final results from the OPAL collaboration on searches for neutral Higgs bosons predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). CP-conserving and for the first time at LEP CP-violating scenarios are studied. New scenarios are also included, which aim to set the stage for Higgs searches at future colliders. The results are based on the data collected with the OPAL detector at e+e- centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The data are consistent with the prediction of the Standard Model with no Higgs boson produced. Model-independent limits are derived for the cross-section of a number of events topologies motivated by prediction of the MSSM. Limits on Higgs boson masses and other MSSM parameters are obtained for a number of representative MSSM benchmark scenarios. For example, in the CP-conserving scenario mh-max where the MSSM parameters are adjusted to predict the largest range of values for mh at each tan beta, and for a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV, the domain 0.784.5 ...

  8. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Laerty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schar-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  9. A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the MSSM and models with two scalar field doublets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; List, B; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is described for the neutral Higgs bosons h^0 and A^0 predicted by models with two scalar field doublets and, in particular, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The search in the Z^0 h^0 and h^0 A^0 production channels is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 25 pb^{-1} from e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. The observation of a number of candidates consistent with Standard Model background expectations is used in combination with earlier results from data collected at the Z^0 resonance to set limits on m_h and m_A in general models with two scalar field doublets and in the MSSM. For example, in the MSSM, for tan(beta) > 1, minimal and maximal scalar top quark mixing and soft SUSY-breaking masses of 1 TeV, the 95% confidence level limits m_h > 59.0 GeV and m_A > 59.5 GeV are obtained. For the first time, the MSSM parameter space is explored in a detailed scan.

  10. Advanced nickel-metal hydride cell development. Final report, September 1993--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Hong S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inert gas atomization using metal hydride alloys for a Ni/MH{sub x}cell was studied. Atomization of the alloys was demonstrated on a small production scale up to batch size of several kg. Relative performance of the atomized and nonatomized alloys was investigated for the electrode material in a Ni/MH{sub x} cell. The study included effects of charge-discharge rates, temperature, and particle size on cell voltage (polarization) and specific capacity. Results show that the specific capacity of the present atomized alloys was apprecialy smaller than that of the nonatomized powder, especially for initial cycles. Full activation of the atomized alloys oftentook several hundreds of cycles. However, no appreciable difference in discharge rate capability was observed with R10 and R12 alloys. Chemical compositions were indistinguishable, although the oxygen contents of the atomized alloys were always higher. Effects of Ni and Cu coating on alloy performance were studied after electroless coating; the coatings noticeably improved the electrode rate capability for all the alloys. The electrode polarization was esecially improved, but not the cycle life. Further studies are needed.

  11. A CO-rich merger shaping a powerful and hyper-luminous infrared radio galaxy at z=2: the Dragonfly Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emonts, B H C; Stroe, A; Pentericci, L; Villar-Martin, M; Norris, R P; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; van Moorsel, G A; Lehnert, M D; Carilli, C L; Rottgering, H J A; Seymour, N; Sadler, E M; Ekers, R D; Drouart, G; Feain, I; Colina, L; Stevens, J; Holt, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the low-redshift Universe, the most powerful radio sources are often associated with gas-rich galaxy mergers or interactions. We here present evidence for an advanced, gas-rich (`wet') merger associated with a powerful radio galaxy at a redshift of z~2. This radio galaxy, MRC 0152-209, is the most infrared-luminous high-redshift radio galaxy known in the southern hemisphere. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we obtained high-resolution CO(1-0) data of cold molecular gas, which we complement with HST/WFPC2 imaging and WHT long-slit spectroscopy. We find that, while roughly M(H2) ~ 2 x 10$^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$ of molecular gas coincides with the central host galaxy, another M(H2) ~ 3 x 10$^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$ is spread across a total extent of ~60 kpc. Most of this widespread CO(1-0) appears to follow prominent tidal features visible in the rest-frame near-UV HST/WFPC2 imaging. Ly$\\alpha$ emission shows an excess over HeII, but a deficiency over L(IR), which is likely the result of photo-ionisation by ...

  12. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  13. Evidence for temporal evolution in the M33 disc as traced by its star clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, Michael A; Gallart, Carme; Sarajedini, Ata; Aparicio, Antonio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present precision radial velocities and stellar population parameters for 77 star clusters in the Local Group galaxy M33. Our GTC and WHT observations sample both young, massive clusters and known/candidate globular clusters, spanning ages ~ 10^6 - 10^10 yr, and metallicities, [M/H] ~-1.7 to solar. The cluster system exhibits an age-metallicity relation; the youngest clusters are the most metal-rich. When compared to HI data, clusters with [M/H] ~ -1.0 and younger than ~ 4 Gyr are clearly identified as a disc population. The clusters show evidence for strong time evolution in the disc radial metallicity gradient (d[M/H]dt / dR = 0.03 dex/kpc/Gyr). The oldest clusters have stronger, more negative gradients than the youngest clusters in M33. The clusters also show a clear age-velocity dispersion relation. The line of sight velocity dispersions of the clusters increases with age similar to Milky Way open clusters and stars. The general shape of the relation is reproduced by disc heating simulations, and the s...

  14. Top-Quark Initiated Processes at High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Han; Joshua Sayre; Susanne Westhoff

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In hadronic collisions at high energies, the top-quark may be treated as a parton inside a hadron. Top-quark initiated processes become increasingly important since the top-quark luminosity can reach a few percent of the bottom-quark luminosity. In the production of a heavy particle $H$ with mass $m_H > m_t$, treating the top-quark as a parton allows us to resum large logarithms $\\log(m_{H}^{2}/m_{t}^{2}$) arising from collinear splitting in the initial state. We quantify the effect of collinear resummation at the 14-TeV LHC and a future 100-TeV hadron collider, focusing on the top-quark open-flavor process $gg\\to t\\bar t H$ in comparison with $t\\bar t \\to H$ and $tg\\rightarrow tH$ at the leading order (LO) in QCD. We employ top-quark parton distribution functions with appropriate collinear subtraction and power counting. We find that (1) Collinear resummation enhances the inclusive production of a heavy particle with $m_H\\approx$ 5 TeV (0.5 TeV) by more than a factor of two compared to the open-flavor process at a 100-TeV (14-TeV) collider; (2) Top-quark mass effects are important for scales $m_H$ near the top-quark threshold, where the cross section is largest. We advocate a modification of the ACOT factorization scheme, dubbed m-ACOT, to consistently treat heavy-quark masses in hadronic collisions; (3) The scale uncertainty of the total cross section in m-ACOT is of about 20 percent at the LO. While a higher-order calculation is indispensable for a precise prediction, the LO cross section is well described by the process $t\\bar t\\to H$ using an effective factorization scale significantly lower than $m_H$. We illustrate our results by the example of a heavy spin-0 particle. Our main results also apply to the production of particles with spin-1 and 2.

  15. Winding Transitions at Finite Energy and Temperature: An O(3) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman Habib; Emil Mottola; Peter Tinyakov

    1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Winding number transitions in the two dimensional softly broken O(3) nonlinear sigma model are studied at finite energy and temperature. New periodic instanton solutions which dominate the semiclassical transition amplitudes are found analytically at low energies, and numerically for all energies up to the sphaleron scale. The Euclidean period beta of these finite energy instantons increases with energy, contrary to the behavior found in the abelian Higgs model or simple one dimensional systems. This results in a sharp crossover from instanton dominated tunneling to sphaleron dominated thermal activation at a certain critical temperature. Since this behavior is traceable to the soft breaking of conformal invariance by the mass term in the sigma model, semiclassical winding number transition amplitudes in the electroweak theory in 3+1 dimensions should exhibit a similar sharp crossover. We argue that this is indeed the case in the standard model for M_H < 4 M_W.

  16. Introduction to energy storage with market analysis and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Robert [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Pillot, Christophe [AVICENNE Energy, LITWIN Building, 10 rue Jean-Jaurès, La Défense 11, Puteaux Cedex (France)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    At first, the rechargeable battery market in 2012 will be described by technology - lead acid, NiCd, NiMH, lithium ion - and application - portable electronics, power tools, e-bikes, automotive, energy storage. This will be followed by details of the lithium ion battery market value chain from the raw material to the final application. The lithium ion battery market of 2012 will be analyzed and split by applications, form factors and suppliers. There is also a focus on the cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator market included. This report will also give a forecast for the main trends and the market in 2020, 2025. To conclude, a forecast for the rechargeable battery market by application for 2025 will be presented. Since energy storage plays an important role for the growing Electric Vehicle (EV) market, this EV issue is closely considered throughout this analysis.

  17. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Nakamura, Kenji (Toyota, JP); Au, Ming (Martinez, GA); Zidan, Ragaiy (Alken, SC)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  18. CMS High mass WW and ZZ Higgs search with the complete LHC Run1 statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelliccioni, Mario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the decay of a heavy Higgs boson in the H$\\to$ZZ and H$\\to$WW channels is reported, analyzing several final states of the H$\\to$ZZ and H$\\to$WW decays. The search used proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and up to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV recorded with the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. A Higgs boson with Standard Model-like coupling and decays in the mass range of 145 $< m_H <$ 1000 GeV is excluded at 95\\% confidence level, based on the limit on the product of cross section and branching fraction. An interpretation of the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model is reported.

  19. Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass in Decays into Four Leptons with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röhrig, Rainer

    This master thesis presents a measurement of the mass of the observed Higgs boson candidate in the decay channel $H \\rightarrow ZZ^* \\rightarrow \\ell^+\\ell^-\\ell^{'+}\\ell^{'-}$, with $\\ell,\\ell' = e$ or $\\mu$. The result is based on the full 2011 and 2012 proton-proton collision dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $4.5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and $20.3~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$, respectively. The mass is measured to be $m_H = 124.58 ^{+0.53}_{-0.47}{\\rm{~(stat)~}}\\pm0.06{\\rm{~(syst)~}} ~\\mathrm{GeV}$ using an analytical parametrization of the expected mass distribution on an event-by-event basis.

  20. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    be calculated by S1(y) = X 1?iMH ratio r...

  1. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electroweak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $\\sin^2\\theta=1/4$ for the Weinberg angle, and the ratio $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  2. Superconnections and the Higgs Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the mathematical framework of Quillen, one interprets the Higgs field as part of the superconnection on a superbundle. We propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian bundle with structure group U(n). Spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a consequence of a non-vanishing scalar curvature. The U(1) Higgs model reformulates the Ginzburg-Landau theory, while the U(2) model relates to the electro-weak theory with the relation $g^2=3g4^2$ for the gauge coupling constants, the formula $ m_W^2 : m_Z^2 : m_H^2 = 3 : 4 : 12 $ for the masses (squared) of the W, Z, and Higgs boson (at tree level).

  3. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March-May 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Techniques developed in the first three areas were used in additional research on Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky. Some of the findings are: percent variations (pseudovitrinite-vitrinite/vitrinite X100) indicate greater dispersions in Vicker's microhardness values, MH(v), of vitrinite and pseudovitrinite from eastern Kentucky coals than those of western Kentucky coals; reflectance data confirm a previously suspected rank increase from eastern Knott and Magoffin Counties to eastern Pike County; microhardness investigation of Upper Elkhorn 2 coal in eastern Kentucky indicates that pseudovitrinite is consistently harder than vitrinite; and of the western coals studied, Dunbar and Lead Creek, there appears to be some correlations between vitrinite, ash, sulfur, and thickness. 6 tables.

  4. LHC Higgs boson mass combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adye, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is $m_{H} = 125.09\\pm0.21\\,\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm0.11\\,\\mathrm{(syst.)}~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  5. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for B-8 -> Be-7+p from a study of Li-8 -> Li-7+n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Azhari, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tang, X.; Timofeyuk, N.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclei, and charge symmetry implies that the spectroscopic amplitudes for the proton single particle orbitals entering the 8B wave 0556-2813/2003/67~6!/062801~5!/$20.00 67 062801- B\\7Be?p from a study of 8Li\\7Li?n ,1 Y.-W. Lui,1 A. M. Mukhamedzhanov.../Oxford University Press, New York, 1983!. @29# L. Trache, A. Azhari, H.L. Clark, C.A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, R.E. Tribble, and F. Carstoiu, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024612 ~2000!. @30# M. Rhoades-Brown, M.H. Macfarlane, and S.C. Pieper, Phys. Rev. C...

  6. Measurement of the Cross Section for Production of Prompt Diphoton in $p\\overline{p}$ Collisions at$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yanwen

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the measurement of prompt diphoton production rate in protonantiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the upgraded Collider Detector at FermiLab (CDF II). This process deserves some attention for the following reasons. The $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ decay mode is an important channel for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson searches in the low mass region (MH gamma\\gamma$ signature. Some examples are supersymmetry with a light gravitino, radiative decays to a higgsino-LSP and models with large symmetry groups. The QCD production of prompt photon pairs with large invariant mass is the irreducible background to these searches. The rate is huge and requires to be quantitively evaluated prior to any of the possible discoveries. In a hadronic collider environment such as LHC, prompt photon signals are contaminated by the production of neutr...

  7. Total Ni-Cd battery recycling by INMETCO U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanewald, R.H.; McComas, D.M.; Onuska, J.C. Jr. [Inmetco, Ellwood City, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The processing and recycling of various batteries has been occurring at INMETCO (a wholly owned subsidiary of Inco Ltd.) since the early 1980`s. Due to changing environmental regulations, INMETCO`s spent nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery recycling has steadily grown since 1990. INMETCO`s new Cadmium Recovery Operation will be discussed along with its unique ability to recycle/reuse 100% of the battery components on site. Start up results, along with actual cadmium analysis, as well as actual air and water environmental impact will be highlighted. INMETCO has been, and continues to be, the major recycler of stainless steel by-products, both hazardous and non-hazardous, back into a stainless steel remelt alloy which is accepted in North America, Europe, and Japan.

  8. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Junk; Aurelio Juste

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DO. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV$Higgs boson with a mass in the range 115 GeV$Higgs boson mass of $m_H=125$ GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times branching the ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.

  9. High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Penning

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

  10. The LHC Higgs Boson Discovery: Implications for Finite Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinemeyer; M. Mondragon; G. Zoupanos

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are N = 1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which can be made finite to all-loop orders, based on the principle of reduction of couplings, and therefore are provided with a large predictive power. We confront the predictions of an SU(5) FUT with the top and bottom quark masses and other low-energy experimental constraints, resulting in a relatively heavy SUSY spectrum, naturally consistent with the non-observation of those particles at the LHC. The light Higgs boson mass is automatically predicted in the range compatible with the Higgs discovery at the LHC. Requiring a light Higgs-boson mass in the precise range of M_h = 125.6 +- 2.1 GeV favors the lower part of the allowed spectrum, resulting in clear predictions for the discovery potential at current and future pp, as well as future e+e- colliders.

  11. Asymptotic safety of gravity and the Higgs boson mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Shaposhnikov; Christof Wetterich

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are indications that gravity is asymptotically safe. The Standard Model (SM) plus gravity could be valid up to arbitrarily high energies. Supposing that this is indeed the case and assuming that there are no intermediate energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales we address the question of whether the mass of the Higgs boson $m_H$ can be predicted. For a positive gravity induced anomalous dimension $A_\\lambda>0$ the running of the quartic scalar self interaction $\\lambda$ at scales beyond the Planck mass is determined by a fixed point at zero. This results in $m_H=m_{\\rm min}=126$ GeV, with only a few GeV uncertainty. This prediction is independent of the details of the short distance running and holds for a wide class of extensions of the SM as well. For $A_\\lambda 0$ is favored by explicit computations existing in the literature.

  12. Effects of In{sub 3+} substitution on structural properties, cation distribution and Mössbauer spectra of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Ravi, E-mail: ranade65@gmail.com [Centre for Material Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology Hamirpur (H.P.)-177005 (India); Pandit, Rabia; Sharma, K. K.; Kaur, Pawanpreet [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Hamirpur (H.P.)-177005 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of non-destructive, high resolution technique namely Mössbauer spectroscopy is discussed in detail for the investigation of structural and magnetic properties of Fe based indium substituted cobalt ferrites. The polycrystalline samples of CoFe{sub 2?x}In{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.2, 0.6) were prepared by double sintering solid state reaction method. To ensure a single phase formation of the as prepared samples the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the powdered samples was Rietveld refined using Fd3m space group. An excellent agreement is obtained between the integrated intensity ratios of 57 Fe spectra at A- and B-sites and those calculated on the basis of cation distribution the cation distribution obtained data analysis. The results of Mössbauer spectra and cation distribution are also correlated well with magnetization versus applied field (M-H) study.

  13. Synthesis of organometallic complexes containing Group 13 elements and transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New organometallic complexes containing Group 13 elements and transition metals were synthesized characterized by X-ray diffraction methods. (C[sub 5]H[sub 5])[sub 2]W[l brace]In(CH[sub 3])[sub 2][r brace][sub 2], (C[sub 5]H[sub 5])[sub 2]Mo[l brace]In(CH[sub 3])[sub 2][r brace][sub 2], and (C[sub 5]H[sub 5])[sub 2]W(I)[l brace]In(CH[sub 3])[sub 2][r brace] were synthesized by alkane elimination reactions between trimethylindium and metal hydride complexes (C[sub 5]H[sub 5])[sub 2]MH[sub 2] (M = W, Mo). [K]-[In[l brace]Fe[sub 2] (CO[sub 8])[r brace][sub 2

  14. Study of x CNFO + (1-x) PLZT magnetoelectric composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dipti [Electroceramics Research Lab, G.V.M Girls College, Sonepat-131001, India and School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Singh, Sangeeta [Department of Physics, G.V.M Girls College, Sonepat-131001 (India); Juneja, J. K. [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonepat-131001 (India); Pant, R. P. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi -110012 (India); Raina, K. K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Prakash, Chandra, E-mail: cprakash2014@gmail.com [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, we are reporting the studies on structural, dielectric, ferroelectric and magnetic properties of Lanthanum (La) substituted Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Cobalt Nickel ferrite (CNFO) composites with compositional formula x(Co{sub 0.80}Ni{sub 0.20}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})+(1?x)(Pb{sub 1.01625}La{sub 0.0025}Zr{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3}) (x = 0.00,0.10). The materials were synthesized by solid state reaction route. XRD analysis confirms the presence of both ferrite and ferroelectric phases. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature. Ferroelectric P-E and Magnetic M-H hysteresis loops were measured at room temperature.

  15. A comparative study of conventionally sintered and microwave sintered nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rani, Rekha [Electroceramics Research Lab, GVM Girls College, Sonepat-131001, India and School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Juneja, J. K. [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonepat-131001 (India); Raina, K. K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Kotnala, R. K. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi -110012 (India); Prakash, Chandra, E-mail: cprakash2014@gmail.com [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Timarpur, Delhi - 110054 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For the present work, nickel zinc ferrite having compositional formula Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by conventional solid state method and sintered in conventional and microwave furnaces. Pellets were sintered with very short soaking time of 10 min at 1150 °C in microwave furnace whereas 4 hrs of soaking time was selected for conventional sintering at 1200 °C. Phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis technique. Scanning electron micrographs were taken for microstructural study. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of temperature. To study magnetic behavior, M-H hysteresis loops were recorded for both samples. It is observed that microwave sintered sample could obtain comparable properties to the conventionally sintered one in lesser soaking time at lower sintering temperature.

  16. Combined search for the Higgs boson with the D0 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a combination of searches for standard model Higgs boson production in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. The different production and decay channels have been analyzed separately, with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ and for Higgs boson masses $90\\leq M_H \\leq 200$ GeV. We combine these final states to achieve optimal sensitivity to the production of the Higgs boson. We also interpret the combination in terms of models with a fourth generation of fermions, and models with suppressed Higgs boson couplings to fermions. The result excludes a standard model Higgs boson at 95% C.L. in the ranges $90 Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV.

  17. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K., E-mail: nishim11@nuclear.es.kit.ac.jp; Sanpei, A., E-mail: sanpei@kit.ac.jp; Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  18. Review: Miran Štuhec: Žive besede in prodorne misli. Antologija slovenske esejistike prve polovice 20. stoletja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zgoznik, Vita

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ;SROLWLNH#17;#3;2E#3;WHK#3;QD]RUVNLK#3;SR-­ JOHGLK#3; VR#3; L]EUDQL#3; HVHMLVWL#3;RGVWLUDOL#3; WXGL#3; YSUDãDQMH#3; XPHWQRVWL#3; LQ#3; þORYHãNLK#3; YUH-­ GQRW#17;#3;9#3;DQWRORJLML#3;MH#3;SUHSR]QDYQR#15;#3;GD#3;VL#3; HVHMLVWL#3;]DVWDYOMDMR#3;YSUDãDQMD#3;R#3...— 105 — 2FHQH#15;#3;]DSLVNL#15;#3;SRURþLOD#3;±#3;5HYLHZV#15;#3;1RWHV#15;#3;5HSRUWV 0,5$1#3;â78+(#3;ä,9(#3;%(6('(#3; ,1#3;352'251(#3;0,6/,#17;#3;$QWRORJLMD#3; VORYHQVNH#3;HVHMLVWLNH#3;SUYH#3;SRORYLFH#3; #21;#19;#17;#3;VWROHWMD#17;#3...

  19. Review: Besedotvorni tematski blok na petnajstem mednarodnem slvisti?nem kongresu v Minsku (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorši?, Ines; Breznik, Irena Stramlji?

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    — #20;#19;#28; — 2FHQH#15;#3;]DSLVNL#15;#3;SRURþLOD#3;±#3;5HYLHZV#15;#3;1RWHV#15;#3;5HSRUWV Y#3; HNVSUHVLRQLVWLþQR#3; VWLOQR#3; SDUDGLJPR#3; #11;#20;#28;#20;#23;±#20;#28;#21;#22;#12;#3;RSUDYLOD#3;L]MHPQR#3;]DKWHYQR#3; LQ#3; REVHåQR#3;GHOR#17;#3...;8VSHOR#3; ML#3; MH#3; ]DSROQLWL#3; YU]HO#3;PHG#3;HNVSUHVLRQLVWLþQR#3;SRH]LMR#3; LQ#3; GUDPDWLNR#15;#3; GR#3; VHGDM#3; EROM#3; UD]LVNDQLPD#3; SRGURþMHPD#17;#3; âWXGLMH#3; V#3; SRGURþMD#3;PHWD-­ IRULNH#3;]JRGQMH#3;HNVSUHVLRQLVWLþQH#3;NUDWNH#3; SUR]H#3;XYUãþ...

  20. Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 parsecs: The Northern Sample I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. O. Gray; C. J. Corbally; R. F. Garrison; M. T. McFadden; P. E. Robinson

    2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have embarked on a project, under the aegis of the Nearby Stars (NStars)/ Space Interferometry Mission Preparatory Science Program to obtain spectra, spectral types, and, where feasible, basic physical parameters for the 3600 dwarf and giant stars earlier than M0 within 40 parsecs of the sun. In this paper we report on the results of this project for the first 664 stars in the northern hemisphere. These results include precise, homogeneous spectral types, basic physical parameters (including the effective temperature, surface gravity and the overall metallicity, [M/H]) and measures of the chromospheric activity of our program stars. Observed and derived data presented in this paper are also available on the project's website at http://stellar.phys.appstate.edu/ .

  1. Novel electrolyte chemistries for Mg-Ni rechargeable batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Diaz, Brenda (Savannah River National Laboratory); Kane, Marie; Au, Ming (Savannah River National Laboratory)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and battery electric vehicles (BEV) serve as means to reduce the nation's dependence on oil. Current electric vehicles use relatively heavy nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries. Li-ion rechargeable batteries have been developed extensively as the replacement; however, the high cost and safety concerns are still issues to be resolved before large-scale production. In this study, we propose a new highly conductive solid polymer electrolyte for Mg-Ni high electrochemical capacity batteries. The traditional corrosive alkaline aqueous electrolyte (KOH) is replaced with a dry polymer with conductivity on the order of 10{sup -2} S/cm, as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Several potential novel polymer and polymer composite candidates are presented with the best-performing electrolyte results for full cell testing and cycling.

  2. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Higgs Boson Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Junk; Aurelio Juste

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the techniques and results of the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the two Tevatron collaborations, CDF and DO. The Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model was sought in the mass range 90 GeV$Higgs boson with a mass in the range 115 GeV$Higgs boson mass of $m_H=125$ GeV, studies of Higgs boson properties were performed, including measurements of the product of the cross section times branching the ratio in various production and decay modes, constraints on Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, and tests of spin and parity. We also summarize the results of searches for supersymmetric Higgs bosons, and Higgs bosons in other extensions of the Standard Model.

  3. Instrumental Variable Analysis with a Nonlinear Exposure–Outcome Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Stephen; Davies, Neil M.; Thompson, Simon G.

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    triglyceridesa 3.445 (0.141) 4.034 (0.158) ?0.148 (0.018) BMi is centered prior to analysis, and adjustment is made for age, sex, and center. BMi indicates body mass index; BP, blood pressure; crP, c-reactive protein; Hba1c, glycated hemoglobin; Se, standard... motivation for this finding in the eappendix (http://links.lww.com/eDe/a818). Previous 22 26 30 34 12 5 13 5 Sy st ol ic bl oo d pr es su re (m mH g) 22 26 30 34 ? 0. 2 0. 2 0. 6 lo g C? re ac tiv e pr ot ei n (m g/L ) 22 26 30 34 26 0 30 0 Ur ic a ci...

  4. The level of serum protein-bound iodine, its repeatability and relationship to rate of gain in immature beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, George G.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $dok*'h*df' fw0 Kxkufwokf' tl''x$x lm Wxyfs ow ;fdhof' m*'mo'',xwh lm hux dx\\*odx,xwh mld hux 0x$dxx lm SOtWOA Oa NrLcOMONre n*$*shi >?R? Kf3ld M*H3xkhs nDLKnc DCWALWLOD WrE cE.Ec Oa MEACK NAOWELDGTOCDS LOSLDEi LWM AENEnWnTLcLWe nDS AEcnWLODMrLN WO AnWE Oa... pnLD LD LKKnWCAE TEEa tnWWcE n Sossxdhfholw Tg pEOApE p: pAEED n;;dlJx0 fs hl shg'x fw0 klwhxwh HgP ?tufod,fw lm tl,,ohhxxV ?rxf0 lm Sx;fdh,xwhV n*$*shi >?R? ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Sincere appreciation is expressed to the following: Dr* H, 0 o Kunke...

  5. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ channel (l=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeVmH<206 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  6. Characterization of the Nuclear Barge Sturgis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honerlah, H. B.; Hearty, B. P.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of the Army is authorized to build and operate nuclear reactors for defense purposes under Paragraph 91b of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (1). As part of the Army Reactor Program, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for nuclear reactor engineering and design, reactor construction, and decommissioning design and implementation (2). The Corps is currently focused on ensuring the safety and security of the Army's three deactivated power reactors and planning for their final decommissioning. To support decommissioning cost projections, the Corps is gathering information on the residual radiological and chemical hazards associated with each reactor, starting with the MH-1A reactor on the Sturgis Barge (3). Because the Sturgis Barge is moored in the James River Reserve Fleet, there were unique challenges that had to be overcome during the characterization survey and others that will become a concern when final decommissioning is to be per formed.

  7. Surface structure and electrochemical characteristics of Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys sintered with Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuji, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Osamu; Matsuda, Hiromu; Toyoguchi, Yoshinori

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys can absorb a large amount of hydrogen and be applied to active materials of the negative electrode in Ni-MH batteries. However, because of the insolubility of Ni into these alloys, the electrochemical characteristics like discharge capacity and cycle life were poor. In order to increase the discharge capacity of hydrogen absorbing alloy electrodes, Ti-V-Cr bcc-type alloy powders were sintered with Ni in order to form Ni contained surface layer on the alloy surface. As sintering temperature rose up, the surface composition changed from TiNi to Ti{sub 2}Ni. TiNi surface layer showed better electrochemical characteristics. For the Ni adding method, Ni electroless plating was preferred because of good adhesion. As a result of optimized conditions, a discharge capacity of 570 mAh/g and an improvement of cycle life were achieved.

  8. Critical Fields, Thermally Activated Transport, and Critical Current Density of Beta-FeSe Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovic, C.; Lei, H.; Hu, R.

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present critical fields, thermally activated flux flow (TAFF), and critical current density of tetragonal phase {beta}-FeSe single crystals. The upper critical fields H{sub c2}(T) for H {parallel} (101) and H {perpendicular} (101) are nearly isotropic and are likely governed by the Pauli limiting process. The large Ginzburg-Landau parameter {Kappa} {approx} 72.3(2) indicates that {beta}-FeSe is a type-II superconductor with a smaller penetration depth than in Fe(Te, Se). The resistivity below T{sub c} follows Arrhenius TAFF behavior. For both field directions below 30 kOe, single-vortex pinning is dominant, whereas collective creep becomes important above 30 kOe. The critical current density J{sub c} from M-H loops for H {parallel} (101) is about five times larger than for H {perpendicular} (101), yet much smaller than in other iron-based superconductors.

  9. Continuation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip G. Jessop

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B262 In the first 8 months of this grant, the PI and his team have developed new hydrogenation catalysts for CO2 fixation, screened a series of ligands for their ability to dissolve in CO2, and invented a new and environmentally benign system for recovering and recycling homogeneous catalysts using CO2 and liquid polymers. The team has also begun work on two projects: (a) the evaluation of the effect of secondary interactions between ligands and CO2 on the insertion of CO2 into M-H bonds, and (b) the design and testing of promoters or catalysts for the insertion of CO2 into C-H bonds. Ongoing research is primarily focusing on these last two projects.

  10. Study on the structures and magnetic properties of Ni, Co-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} electrodeposited nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Jinxia; Huang Xinming; Xie Guozhi; Fang Yonghao; Liu Dazhi

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the direct electrodeposition of nickel and cobalt nanowire arrays within the nanopores of ordered porous alumina films prepared by a two-step anodization. SEM and TEM images reveal that the pore arrays are regularly arranged throughout the alumina film. X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis show that the nickel and cobalt nanowires are single crystalline with highly preferential orientation. The aspect ratio of nanowires is over 300. M-H hysteresis loops determined by VSM indicate that the nanowire arrays obtained possess obvious magnetic anisotropy. Because of proper square ratio and coercivity the nanowire arrays of nickel seem to be more suitable candidates for perpendicular magnetic recording medium than those of cobalt.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic effects on pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, H.R. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Park, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The location at which pellets are injected into a plasma can have a significant effect on what fraction of the pellet mass remains in the plasma for refueling purposes. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations presented here, confirm the results of pellet injection experiments: toroidal curvature makes it favorable to inject pellets from the inboard side or from the top or bottom, rather than from the outboard side. Sufficiently large pellets injected at the inboard edge can reach the plasma center, and in the process drive magnetic reconnection to produce negative central shear. Injection at the top (or bottom) of the tokamak causes relatively little displacement of the pellet. A scaling law is obtained for pellet displacement which agrees well with the simulations. The MHD simulations were carried out with a new unstructured mesh finite element version of the MH3D full MHD code. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Searches for a high mass Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pagan Griso

    2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Higgs boson searches are commonly considered one of the main objectives of particle physics nowadays. The latest results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations are presented here when searching for Higgs boson decaying into a W-boson pair, currently the most sensitive channel for masses greater than 130 GeV. The presented results are based on an integrated luminosity that ranges from 3.0 to 4.2 fb^-1. No significant excess over expected background is observed and the 95% CL limits are set for a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson for different mass hypotheses ranging from 100 GeV to 200 GeV. The combination of CDF and D0 results is also presented, which exclude for the first time a SM Higgs boson in the 160 < mH < 170 GeV mass range.

  13. Effective scalar field theory for the electroweak phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Patkós, András

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate an effective model for the finite temperature restoration phase transition of the electroweak theory. It is obtained by dimensional reduction of the 3+1 dimensional full theory and by subsequent integration over all static gauge degrees of freedom. The resulting theory corresponds to a 3-dimensional O(4) ferromagnet containing cubic and quartic terms of the field in its potential function. Possible nonperturbative effects of a magnetic screening mass are parametrically included in the potential. We analyse the theory using mean field and numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. At the value of the physical Higgs mass m_H=37~{\\rm GeV}, considered in the present investigation, we find a discontinuous symmetry restoring phase transition. We determine the critical temperature, order parameter jump, interface tension and latent heat characteristics of the transition. The Monte Carlo results indicate a somewhat weaker first order phase transition as compared to the mean field treatment, demonst...

  14. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  15. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  16. Assessing Stability of the Knee In Vitro Using Envelope Normalized Kinematics and Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucinaro, Kaity

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    %,&"(3!(+!*$%!+(77(8"39!*$%&"&:!!!!!!!!!!!!;&&%&&"39!3!?"*,(!@&"39!A35%7(4%!B(,).7"C%6!-"3%).*"2&!.36!D,"32"4.7!'()4(3%3*!;3.7/&"&!!!!!!!!!!!!!EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!F,G!H(,"3!I.7%*&J/!!!!!!!!F.*%!;44,(5%6:!B(5%)=%,!KLM!NOKN!!!!! ! """! !"#$%&'()*+,)%-.!>*!8(176!3(*!$.5%!=%%3!4...&(3!.36!T($3&(3!'()4.3/M!+(,!+136"39!*$"&!,%&%.,2$G!!• #(!*$%!)%)=%,&!(+!*$%!AP4%,")%3*.7!T("3*!U"()%2$.3"2&!V%&%.,2$!H.=(,.*(,/:!;6.)!'/,M!I.,J!-()(&.M!<.)"!<$.7$(1=M!H.1,%3!0%,,"&M!-,"&*.!<.32$%C!.36!H"36.!F%33/G!#$%/!$.5%!$%74%6!)%!*(!*$"3J!=%/(36!)/!(83...

  17. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 5.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be $\\mu = 1.17 \\pm 0.27$ at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, $m_{H}$ = 125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at this value of $m_{H}$. They are found to be $\\mu_{\\mathrm{ggF}} = 1.32 \\pm 0.38$, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{VBF}} = 0.8 \\pm 0.7$, $\\mu_{{WH}} = 1.0 \\pm 1.6 $, $\\mu_{{ZH}} = 0.1 ^{+3.7}_{-0.1} $, $\\mu_{{t\\bar{t}H}} = 1.6 ^{+2.7}_{-1.8} $, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson or a top-quark pair, respectively. Compared with the previously published ATLAS analysis, the results reported here also benefit from a new energy calibration procedure for photons and the subsequent reduction of the systematic uncertainty on the diphoton mass resolution. No significant deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model are found.

  18. Vacuum effects of ultra-low mass particle account for Recent Acceleration of Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Parker; Alpan Raval

    1999-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent work, we showed that non-perturbative vacuum effects of a very low mass particle could induce, at a redshift of order 1, a transition from a matter-dominated to an accelerating universe. In that work, we used the simplification of a sudden transition out of the matter-dominated stage and were able to fit the Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) data points with a spatially-open universe. In the present work, we find a more accurate, smooth {\\it spatially-flat} analytic solution to the quantum-corrected Einstein equations. This solution gives a good fit to the SNe-Ia data with a particle mass parameter $m_h$ in the range $6.40 \\times 10^{-33}$ eV to $7.25 \\times 10^{-33}$ eV. It follows that the ratio of total matter density (including dark matter) to critical density, $\\O_0$, is in the range 0.58 to 0.15, and the age $t_0$ of the universe is in the range $8.10 h^{-1}$ Gyr to $12.2 h^{-1}$ Gyr, where $h$ is the present value of the Hubble constant, measured as a fraction of the value 100 km/(s Mpc). This spatially-flat model agrees with estimates of the position of the first acoustic peak in the small angular scale fluctuations of the cosmic background radiation, and with light-element abundances of standard big-bang nucleosynthesis. Our model has only a single free parameter, $m_h$, and does not require that we live at a special time in the evolution of the universe.

  19. DETECTION OF DIFFUSE NEUTRAL INTRAGROUP MEDIUM IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Yun, Min Su [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes, E-mail: sanch@astro.umass.ed, E-mail: myun@astro.umass.ed, E-mail: lourdes@iaa.e [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 21 cm neutral hydrogen (H I) observations of a complete distance-limited sample of 22 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with at least four true members. We detected an average H I mass of 8 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} (median = 6 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), which is significantly larger than previous single-dish measurements. Consequently, the H I deficiencies for these HCGs have been reduced, although not completely eliminated. Spectral comparison of the GBT data with complementary Very Large Array data shows significant H I excess in the GBT spectra. The observed excess is primarily due to the high surface brightness (HSB) sensitivity of the GBT detecting diffuse, low column density H I in these groups. The excess gas forms a faint diffused neutral medium which is an intermediate stage in the evolution of HSB H I tidal debris in the intragroup medium (IGM) before it is fully ionized. The excess gas mass fraction, (M(H I){sub GBT} - M(H I){sub VLA})/M(H I){sub GBT}, for our complete sample varies from 5% to 81% with an average of 36% (median = 30%). The excess gas mass fraction is highest in slightly H I deficient groups where the tidal debris has had enough time to evolve. We also find the excess gas content increases with the evolutionary phase of the group described in Verdes-Montenegro et al. Theoretical calculations indicate that an H I cloud of radius >= 200 pc would survive in an IGM of 2 x 10{sup 6} K for more than the typical dynamical lifetime of a group. However, smaller clouds get evaporated and assimilated into the hot IGM in a much shorter timescale.

  20. The Enemy Below - The Global Diffusion of Submarines and Related Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, K G

    2002-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the Cold War seemed to create a more peaceful international environment. September 11 reminded us of the dangers of complacency. Indeed, even before September 11 US forces had intervened in a number of wars and crises, including Panama, the Persian Gulf War, Somalia, Rwanda, Bosnia, Kosovo, several Taiwan Straits crises, the North Korea nuclear weapons crisis, and most recently Afghanistan. US ability to intervene in remote areas of the world is often dependent on the Navy's ability to project power ashore. As a result, US ability to influence events in crisis situations, especially between or among nuclear powers, may become more difficult along with our ability to conduct littoral warfare. Although the numbers of potentially hostile submarines have declined with the end of the Cold War, US anti-submarine warfare capabilities have also declined. Moreover, foreign submarines and related technologies are likely to diffuse globally. New technologies like Air Independent Propulsion (AIP), improved weapons and sensors will make conventional submarines more dangerous, and the spread of nuclear submarines even to a few more countries raise political, military, environmental, and safety concerns. Submarines are one of the key weapon systems used alone or in combination with other weapon systems such as coastal defense missiles, aircraft, and other sea-based missile platforms to deny US ability to project power ashore, Thus, other countries who wish to deny the US the ability to interfere with their regional or even global ambitions may emphasize the acquisition and/or development of submarines. As the world become more multipolar over the longer term, as the Chinese believe it will, countries such as Russia, China. etc., may be able to acquire the submarine capabilities to challenge us not just regionally, but in blue waters. To the extent that our alliance relationships require US naval access or superiority to sustain them, then our erstwhile friendly allies such as Japan, South Korea, ASEAN states, Taiwan, etc., may seek their own arrangements with other powers for their protection or seek WMD capabilities to offset the former reliance on the US. In addition to a loss of unchallenged regional access, the US may have to devote greater resources for protecting its homeland, and perhaps its sea-based deterrent, from hostile submarine forces.

  1. Mid-infrared followup of cold brown dwarfs: diversity in age, mass and metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leggett, Sandy K [GEMINI OBSERVATORY; Burningham, Ben [HERTFORDSHITE UNIV; Marley, Mark S [NASA AMES; Waren, S J [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Jones, H R A [HERTFORDSHIRE U; Pinfield, D J [HERTFORDSHIRE U; Smart, R L [ASTRONOMICAL OBS

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Spitzer IRAC [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry of nine very late-type T dwarfs. Combining this with previously published photometry, we investigate trends with type and color that are useful for both the planning and interpretation of infrared surveys designed to discover the coldest T or Y dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with effective temperature (T{sub eff}) below 700 K emit more than half their flux at wavelengths longer than 3 {micro}m, and the ratio of the mid-infrared flux to the near-infrared flux becomes very sensitive to T{sub eff} at these low temperatures. We confirm that the color H (1.6 {micro}m) - [4.5] is a good indicator of T{sub eff} with a relatively weak dependence on metallicity and gravity. Conversely, the colors H - K (2.2 {micro}m) and [4.5] - [5.8] are sensitive to metallicity and gravity. Thus near- and mid-infrared photometry provide useful indicators of the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs, and if temperature and gravity are known, then mass and age can be reliably determined from evolutionary models. There are twelve dwarfs currently known with H - [4.5] > 3.0, and {approx} 500 < T{sub eff} K {approx}< 800, which we examine in detail. The ages of the dwarfs in the sample range from very young (0.1 - 1.0 Gyr) to relatively old (3 - 12 Gyr). The mass range is possibly as low as 5 Jupiter masses to up to 70 Jupiter masses, i.e. near the hydrogen burning limit. The metallicities also span a large range, from [m/H]= -0.3 to [m/H]= +0.2. The small number of T8 - T9 dwarfs found in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey to date appear to be predominantly young low-mass dwarfs. Accurate mid-infrared photometry of cold brown dwarfs is essentially impossible from the ground, and extensions to the mid-infrared space missions warm-Spitzer and WISE are desirable in order to obtain the vital mid-infrared data for cold brown dwarfs, and to discover more of these rare objects.

  2. MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF COLD BROWN DWARFS: DIVERSITY IN AGE, MASS, AND METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Burningham, Ben; Jones, H. R. A.; Lucas, P. W.; Pinfield, D. J. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Saumon, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS F663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Marley, M. S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Mail Stop 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Warren, S. J. [Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Smart, R. L. [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: sleggett@gemini.ed [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry of 12 very late-type T dwarfs: nine have [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] photometry and three have [3.6] and [4.5] photometry only. Combining this with previously published photometry, we investigate trends with type and color that are useful for both the planning and interpretation of infrared surveys designed to discover the coldest T or Y dwarfs. The online appendix provides a collation of MKO-system YJHKL'M' and IRAC photometry for a sample of M, L, and T dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with effective temperature (T{sub eff}) below 700 K emit more than half their flux at wavelengths longer than 3 {mu}m, and the ratio of the mid-infrared flux to the near-infrared flux becomes very sensitive to T{sub eff} at these low temperatures. We confirm that the color H (1.6 {mu}m) - [4.5] is a good indicator of T{sub eff} with a relatively weak dependence on metallicity and gravity. Conversely, the colors H - K (2.2 {mu}m) and [4.5] - [5.8] are sensitive to metallicity and gravity. Thus, near- and mid-infrared photometry provide useful indicators of the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs, and if temperature and gravity are known, then mass and age can be reliably determined from evolutionary models. There are 12 dwarfs currently known with H- [4.5] >3.0, and 500 K {approx}< T{sub eff} {approx}<800 K, which we examine in detail. The ages of the dwarfs in the sample range from very young (0.1-1.0 Gyr) to relatively old (3-12 Gyr). The mass range is possibly as low as 5 Jupiter masses to up to 70 Jupiter masses, i.e., near the hydrogen burning limit. The metallicities also span a large range, from [m/H] = -0.3 to [m/H] = +0.3. The small number of T8-T9 dwarfs found in the UK Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey to date appear to be predominantly young low-mass dwarfs. Accurate mid-infrared photometry of cold brown dwarfs is essentially impossible from the ground, and extensions to the mid-infrared space missions, warm-Spitzer and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, are desirable in order to obtain the vital mid-infrared data for cold brown dwarfs, and to discover more of these rare objects.

  3. Correlation between structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties of manganese substituted cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramana, C. V., E-mail: rvchintalapalle@utep.edu; Kolekar, Y. D.; Kamala Bharathi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Sinha, B. [Functional Nanopowder Material Division, Korea Institute of Material Science, Changwon 642-831, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Ghosh, K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Manganese (Mn) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFMO) were synthesized and their structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties were evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements coupled with Rietveld refinement indicate that the CFMO materials crystallize in the inverse cubic spinel phase. Temperature (T?=?300?K and 10?K) dependent magnetization (M(H)) measurements indicate the long range ferromagnetic ordering in CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x?=?0.00–0.15) ferrites. The cubic anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}(T)) and saturation magnetization (M{sub s}(T)) were derived by using the “law of approach” to saturation that describes the field dependence of M(H) for magnetic fields much higher than the coercive field (H{sub c}). Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), obtained from the model, decreases with increasing temperature. For CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, M{sub s} decreases from 3.63??{sub B} per formula unit (f.u.) to 3.47??{sub B}/f.u. with increasing temperature from 10 to 300?K. CFMO (0.00–0.15) exhibit the similar trend while the magnitude of M{sub s} is dependent on Mn-concentration. M{sub s}-T functional relationship obeys the Bloch's law. The lattice parameter and magnetic moment calculated for CFMO reveals that Mn ions occupying the Fe and Co position at the octahedral site in the inverse cubic spinel phase. The structure and magnetism in CFMO are further corroborated by bond length and bond angle calculations. The dielectric constant dispersion of CFMO in the frequency range of 20?Hz–1?MHz fits to the modified Debye's function with more than one ion contributing to the relaxation. The relaxation time and spread factor derived from modeling the experimental data are ?10{sup ?4}?s and ?0.35(±0.05), respectively.

  4. Ferroelectric and dielectric properties of ferrite-ferroelectric ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elena Ciomaga, Cristina; Maria Neagu, Alexandra; Valentin Pop, Mihai; Mitoseriu, Liliana [Faculty of Physics, 'Al. I. Cuza' University of Iasi 700506, Iasi (Romania); Airimioaei, Mirela [Faculty of Chemistry, 'Al. I. Cuza' University of Iasi 700506, Iasi, Romania and Dept. Chemistry and Process Engineering, University of Genoa, P-le Kennedy no. 1, I-16129, Genoa (Italy); Tascu, Sorin [RAMTECH Faculty of Physics, 'Al. I. Cuza' University of Iasi 700506 (Romania); Schileo, Giorgio [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Ferroic Oxides, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Galassi, Carmen [CNR-ISTEC, Via Granarolo no. 64, I-48018 Faenza (Italy)

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate composites of ferrite and ferroelectric phases with xNiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NF) and (1 - x)Pb{sub 0.988}(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}){sub 0.976}Nb{sub 0.024}O{sub 3} (where x = 2, 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, and 100 wt. %) were prepared in situ by sol-gel method. The presence of a diphase composition was confirmed by X-ray diffraction while the microstructure of the composites was studied by scanning electron microscopy revealing a good mixing of the two phases and a good densification of the bulk ceramics. The dielectric permittivity shows usual dielectric dispersion behavior with increasing frequency due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. AC conductivity measurements made in frequency range 1 Hz-1 MHz suggest that the conduction process is due to mixed polaron hopping. The effect of NF phase concentration on the P-E and M-H hysteresis behavior and dielectric properties of the composites was investigated. At low NF concentration a sharp ferro-paraelectric transition peak can be observed at around 360 Degree-Sign C while for higher NF concentrations a trend to a diffuse phase transition occurs. All the composite samples exhibit typical ferromagnetic hysteresis loops, indicating the presence of ordered magnetic structure.

  5. Is the Standard Model saved asymptotically by conformal symmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorsky, A; Morozov, A; Tomaras, T N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the top-quark and Higgs masses and the Higgs VEV satisfy with great accuracy the relations 4m_H^2=2m_T^2=v^2, which are very special and reminiscent of analogous ones at Argyres - Douglas points with enhanced conformal symmetry. Furthermore, the RG evolution of the corresponding Higgs self-interaction and Yukawa couplings \\lambda(0)=1/8 and y(0)=1 leads to the free-field stable point \\lambda(M_Pl)= \\dot \\lambda(M_Pl)=0 in the pure scalar sector at the Planck scale, also suggesting enhanced conformal symmetry. Thus, it is conceivable that the Standard Model is the low-energy limit of a distinct special theory with (super?) conformal symmetry at the Planck scale. In the context of such a "scenario" one may further speculate that the Higgs particle is the Goldstone boson of (partly) spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. This would simultaneously resolve the hierarchy and Landau pole problems in the scalar sector and would provide a nearly flat potential with two almost degenerate minima...

  6. Development of an analytic core flow approximation for a square duct in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The core flow approximation for liquid metal (LM), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) duct flow is a method that ignores the contributions of viscous forces in the fluid. For a fully developed, steady state flow situation, this approximation leaves the magnetic forces to be balanced only by the pressure gradient and results in a greatly simplified momentum equation. The velocity field predicted by the core flow equations is obtained much more easily than that described by the full solution, which usually requires a numerical approach. For this reason it is desirable to use the core flow method for flow situations in which viscosity has little effect. Developed here is an analytic core flow solution for a square duct in an obliquely incident magnetic field which omits any special treatment of boundary layers. This solution is compared to the full solution method developed in the code MH2D and a parametric comparison is performed. This general analytic approach can be expanded to consider rectangular ducts or walls of different thickness and electrical conductivity. The latter, however, will greatly complicate the equations presented here.

  7. A study of the relationship between recreational user-day visits and the physical and economic characteristics of Texas water impoundment areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ronnie D

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @ 3Q6MR@gt3i' og x'4tox'. GIBtkonQX n88 Fact. L3. M. ee peon, ala@. ae the 3. boa. 'ah& QtR68pcikon oi. . O'VXQBt3~onQ. GGUREt j. sn 3n CUQ Bonttzo~n p&i~t y P9 gQgo 2~ ~o ZGQXX3. tgtQ Qo~~pn'iLK1'fi'" on o? Q5@ Glntn Qn8 9n ot%2& to @3BLS k...'-. 5~4:why x", ~~X ~ng A'equi %~4y X%ve. 4e- W4'~ . 4~545 ~. Z, y~ ~ M4e ''V . :4i' "~~X j' e" 4'ekeX4g ' ~ih'Ci'MATE@ ~ x'eels M the ~ee ms4+eye3, 4@eu mcus aZ 8@~etee, Beammoxa@ Paz't, i3, Mh~, mad 6eXmeeCea Texas CICy~ The peap1e eZ %has ez...

  8. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  9. Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson ($V$ = $W$ or $Z$) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain $VH$ production followed by $H$ decaying to invisible particles for the Higgs mass range $115<m_H<300$~GeV. The 95% confidence-level observed upper limit on $\\sigma_{VH} \\times \\text{BR}(H\\rightarrow \\text{inv.})$ varies from 1.6 pb at 115 GeV to 0.13 pb at 300 GeV. Assuming Standard Model production and including the $gg\\rightarrow H$ contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78% at 95% confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons dec...

  10. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (�¢����38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (�¢����17.0%), and diel rate of travel (�¢����18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muirhead, Philip S. [Current address: Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hamren, Katherine [Current address: Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 122 Sciences Drive, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Rojas-Ayala, Barbara [Current address: Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Covey, Kevin R., E-mail: philm@astro.caltech.edu [Hubble Fellow. (United States)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  12. The Coldest Brown Dwarf (Or Free Floating Planet)?: The Y Dwarf WISE 1828+2650

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beichman, Charles A; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Barman, Travis S; Marsh, Kenneth A; Cushing, Michael C; Wright, E L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have monitored the position of the cool Y dwarf WISEPA J182831.08+265037.8 using a combination of ground- and space-based telescopes and have determined its distance to be 11.2$_{-1.0}^{+1.3}$ pc. Its absolute H magnitude, M$_H=22.21^{+0.25}_{-0.22}$ mag, suggests a mass in the range 0.5-20 M$_{Jup}$ for ages of 0.1-10 Gyr with an effective temperature in the range 250-400 K. The broad range in mass is due primarily to the unknown age of the object. Since the high tangential velocity of the object, 51$\\pm5$ km s$^{-1}$, is characteristic of an old disk population, a plausible age range of 2-4 Gyr leads to a mass range of 3-6 M$_{Jup}$ based on fits to the (highly uncertain) COND evolutionary models. The range in temperature is due to the fact that no single model adequately represents the 1-5 $\\mu$m spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source, failing by factors of up to 5 at either the short or long wavelength portions of the spectral energy distribution. The appearance of this very cold object may b...

  13. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  14. Spectroscopic analysis of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma and fast growth rate of diamond single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derkaoui, N.; Rond, C., E-mail: rond@lspm.cnrs.fr; Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux (LSPM), UPR3407 CNRS, Université Paris 13, 99 Avenue Jean Baptiste Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the best ways to increase the diamond growth rate is to couple high microwave power to the plasma. Indeed, increasing the power density leads to increase gas temperature the atomic hydrogen density in the plasma bulk, and to produce more hydrogen and methyl at the diamond surface. Experimental and numerical approaches were used to study the microwave plasma under high power densities conditions. Gas temperature was measured by optical emission spectroscopy and H-atom density using actinometry. CH{sub 3}-radical density was obtained using a 1D model that describes temperatures and plasma composition from the substrate to the top of the reactor. The results show that gas temperature in the plasma bulk, atomic hydrogen, and methyl densities at the diamond surface highly increase with the power density. As a consequence, measurements have shown that diamond growth rate also increases. At very high power density, we measured a growth rate of 40??m/h with an H-atom density of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup ?3} which corresponds to a H{sub 2} dissociation rate higher than 50%. Finally, we have shown that the growth rate can be framed between a lower and an upper limit as a function depending only on the maximum of H-atom density measured or calculated in the plasma bulk. The results also demonstrated that increasing fresh CH{sub 4} by an appropriate injection into the boundary layer is a potential way to increase the diamond growth rates.

  15. Property measurement of Higgs boson in the gamma gamma final state with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanping , Huang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With $pp$ collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 25 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, an improved measurement of the mass of the Higgs boson is derived from a combined fit to the decay channels $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\rightarrow ZZ^{*}\\rightarrow 4l$ with improved energy-scale calibrations for photons, electrons and muons as well as other analysis improvements. It is $m_{H}=125.36\\pm0.37{\\rm (stat)}\\pm0.18{\\rm (syst)}$ GeV. Furthermore, measurement of fiducial and differential cross sections are presented in the $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel using only the 8 TeV data sample with a luminosity of $20.3{\\rm fb}^{-1}$. The observed spectra are statistically limited but broadly in line with the theoretical expectations.

  16. Tevatron Measurements on Standard Model Higgs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Sforza; on behalf of the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the study of the SM Higgs properties obtained from the combined analysis of the up-to 10 fb$^{-1}$ dataset collected by the CDF and D0 experiments during the $p\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV of Tevatron Run II. The observed local significance for the SM Higgs boson signal is of 3.0$\\sigma$ at $m_H=125$ GeV/c$^2$. After a brief review of analysis channels contributing the most, where the Higgs boson decays to a pair of $W$ bosons or to a pair of $b$-quarks jets, the signal production cross section and its couplings to fermions and vector bosons are analyzed. Other presented results are the recent study of the spin and parity of the SM Higgs performed by the D0 collaboration, leading to 3$\\sigma$ level expected exclusion of the JP$=0^{-}$ and JP$=2^{+}$ hypothesis, and the investigation of exotics final states with invisible decay products of the Higgs, excluded by the CDF collaboration for masses below 120 GeV.

  17. Standard Model Higgs Boson Combination at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Ming Yao for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results from combinations of searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson ($H$) by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 8.2 (CDF) and 8.6 (D0) fb$^{-1}$. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been added, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. No excess is observed above background expectation, and set 95% C.L. upper limits (median expected) on Higgs boson production at factors of 1.17 (1.16), 1.71 (1.16), and 0.48(0.57) times the SM predictions for Higgs bosons of mass $m_H$=115, 140, and 165 GeV/c$^2$, respectively. We exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 156--177 GeV/c$^2$ at the 95% C.L, with an expected exclusion region 148--180 GeV/c$^2$. The absence of a Higgs boson signal also constrains some new physics such as $4^{th}$ generation models and other exotic models.

  18. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

  19. Higgs Boson Mass predicted by the Four Color Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashay Dharwadker; Vladimir Khachatryan

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the mathematical proof of the four color theorem yields a perfect interpretation of the Standard Model of particle physics. The steps of the proof enable us to construct the t-Riemann surface and particle frame which forms the gauge. We specify well-defined rules to match the Standard Model in a one-to-one correspondence with the topological and algebraic structure of the particle frame. This correspondence is exact - it only allows the particles and force fields to have the observable properties of the Standard Model, giving us a Grand Unified Theory. In this paper, we concentrate on explicitly specifying the quarks, gauge vector bosons, the Standard Model scalar Higgs $H^{0}$ boson and the weak force field. Using all the specifications of our mathematical model, we show how to calculate the values of the Weinberg and Cabibbo angles on the particle frame. Finally, we present our prediction of the Higgs $H^{0}$ boson mass $M_{H^{0}} = 125.992 \\simeq 126 GeV$, as a direct consequence of the proof of the four color theorem.

  20. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  1. SDSS J0025-10 at z=0.30: a (U)LIRG to optical QSO transition candidate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar-Martin, M; Rodriguez, M; Torres, M Perez; Drouart, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have characterized the amount, spatial distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the merging, double nucleus type 2 quasar SDSS J0025-10 at z=0.30 using the CO(1-0) transition, based on data obtained with ATCA. This is one of the scarce examples of quasar host galaxies where the CO emission has been resolved spatially at any redshift. We infer a molecular gas mass M(H2) = (6 +/- 1) x 1e9 Msun, which is distributed in two main reservoirs separated by ~9 kpc. ~60% of the gas is in the central region, associated with the QSO nucleus and/or the intermediate region between the two nuclei. The other 40% is associated with the northern tidal tail and is therefore unsettled. With its high infrared luminosity L(IR) = (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 1e12 Lsun, SDSS J0025-10 is an analogue of local luminous LIRGs and ULIRGs. On the other hand, the clear evidence for an ongoing major merger of two gas rich progenitors, the high L(IR) dominated by a starburst, the massive reservoir of molecular gas with a large fraction stil...

  2. The formation of globular clusters through minihalo-minihalo mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trenti, Michele; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scenario for the formation of Globular Clusters (GCs) based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high-redshift (z>6). The model naturally fulfills several key observational constraints on GCs that have emerged in the last decade. Specifically, absolute and relative ages, widespread presence of multiple stellar populations, spatial distribution around host galaxies, and correlations between galactocentric radius and metallicity. In our framework, the oldest globular clusters form the first generation stars as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass M_h~1e8 Msun) and undergoes a major merger within the cooling timescale (~150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring new supply of pristine gas at the halo center, diluting AGB ejecta, and triggering additional bursts of star formation which form multiple generation of stars in the majority of the clusters. The DM halo around the GC is then s...

  3. Softened Gravity and the Extension of the Standard Model up to Infinite Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian F. Giudice; Gino Isidori; Alberto Salvio; Alessandro Strumia

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to solve naturalness by having the weak scale as the only breaking of classical scale invariance have to deal with two severe difficulties: gravity and the absence of Landau poles. We show that solutions to the first problem require premature modifications of gravity at scales no larger than $10^{11}$ GeV, while the second problem calls for many new particles at the weak scale. To build models that fulfil these properties, we classify 4-dimensional Quantum Field Theories that satisfy Total Asymptotic Freedom (TAF): the theory holds up to infinite energy, where all coupling constants flow to zero. We develop a technique to identify such theories and determine their low-energy predictions. Since the Standard Model turns out to be asymptotically free only under the unphysical conditions $g_1 = 0$, $M_t = 186$ GeV, $M_\\tau = 0$, $M_h = 163$ GeV, we explore some of its weak-scale extensions that satisfy the requirements for TAF.

  4. The Abundance Distribution in the Extrasolar-Planet Host Star HD19994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verne V. Smith; Katia Cunha; Daniela Lazzaro

    2001-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundances of 22 elements have been determined from a high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectrum of HD19994, a star recently announced as harboring an extrasolar planet. A detailed spectroscopic analysis of this stars finds it to have a mass of 1.2+/-0.1Msun. HD19994 is found to be slightly enriched in "metals" relative to the Sun 9[Fe/H]=+0.09+/-0.05 and an average of all metals of [m/H]=+0.13), as are most stars known with extrasolar planets. In a search for possible signatures of accretion of metal-rich gas onto the parent stars (using HD19994 and published abundances for other stars), it is found that a small subset of stars with planets exhibit a trend of increasing [X/H] with increasing condensation temperature for a given element X. This trend may point to the accretion of chemically fractionated solid material into the outer (thin) convection zones of these solar-type stars. It is also found that this small group of stars exhibiting an accretion signature all have large planets orbiting much closer than is found, in general, for stars with planets not showing this peculiar abundance trend, suggesting a physical link between accretion and orbital separation. In addition, the stars showing evidence of fractionated accretion are, on average, of larger mass (1.2Msun) than stars not showing measurable evidence of accretion (1.0Msun).

  5. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waynert, J. A. (Joseph A.); Boenig, H. (Heinrich E.); Mielke, C. H. (Charles H.); Willis, J. O. (Jeffrey O.); Burley, B. L. (Burt L.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  6. Search for a Two-Higgs-Boson Doublet Using a Simplified Model in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for new particles in an extension to the standard model that includes a heavy Higgs boson (H?), a lighter charged Higgs boson (H±), and an even lighter Higgs boson h?, with decays leading to a W-boson pair and a bottom-antibottom quark pair in the final state. We use events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum, and at least four jets in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb?¹ collected by the CDF II detector in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. We find the data to be consistent with standard model predictions and reportmore »the results in terms of a simplified Higgs-cascade-decay model, setting 95% confidence level upper limits on the product of cross section and branching fraction from 1.3 pb to 15 fb as a function of H? and H± masses for m?h=126 GeV/c²« less

  7. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of the anionic group 6B transition-metal hydrides. Convenient, in-situ-deuterium transfer reagents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaus, P.L.; Kao, S.C.; Darensbourg, M.Y.; Arndt, L.W.

    1984-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The facile exchange of hydrogen for detuerium in the anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides HM(CO)/sub 4/L/sup -/(M = Cr, W; L = CO P(OMe)/sub 3/) has been studied in THF/sub 4/ (tetrahydrofuran) with CH/sub 3/OD, D/sub 2/O, and CH/sub 3/CO/sub 2/D. This has provided a synthesis of the deuterides, DM(CO)/sub 4/L/sup -/, as well as a convenient in situ source of deuteride reducing reagents for organic halides. A number of such reductions are described, using /sup 2/H NMR to demonstrate both selectivity and stereospecificity for certain systems. The carbonyl region of the infrared spectra of the hydrides is not affected by deuteration of the hydrides, suggesting that the M-H or M-D vibrational modes are not coupled significantly to CO vibrations in these hydrides. The mechanism of the H/D exchange and of a related H/sub 2/ elimination reaction is discussed.

  8. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  9. Limits on a Composite Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sekhar Chivukula; Nick Evans; Christian Hoelbling

    2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision electroweak data are generally believed to constrain the Higgs boson mass to lie below approximately 190 GeV at 95% confidence level. The standard Higgs model is, however, trivial and can only be an effective field theory valid below some high energy scale characteristic of the underlying non-trivial physics. Corrections to the custodial isospin violating parameter T arising from interactions at this higher energy scale dramatically enlarge the allowed range of Higgs mass. We perform a fit to precision electroweak data and determine the region in the (m_H, Delta T) plane that is consistent with experimental results. Overlaying the estimated size of corrections to T arising from the underlying dynamics, we find that a Higgs mass up to 500 GeV is allowed. We review two composite Higgs models which can realize the possibility of a phenomenologically acceptable heavy Higgs boson. We comment on the potential of improvements in the measurements of m_t and M_W to improve constraints on composite Higgs models.

  10. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158<m_H<173 GeV/c^2.

  11. Testing Low-Energy, High-Power Energy Storage Alternatives in a Full-Hybrid Vehicle (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosgrove, J.; Gonger, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automakers have been mass producing hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for well over a decade, and the technology has proven to be very effective at reducing per-vehicle gasoline use. However, the battery cost in HEVs contribute to higher incremental cost of HEVs (a few thousand dollars) than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. Significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can improve the vehicle-level cost vs. benefit relationship for HEVs. Such an improvement could lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate gasoline savings. After significant analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage program suggested a new set of requirements for ESS for power-assist HEVs for cost reduction without impacting performance and fuel economy significantly. With support from DOE, NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This poster will describe development of the LEESS HEV test platform, and LEESS laboratory as well as in-vehicle evaluation results. The first LEESS technology tested was lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) - i.e., asymmetric electrochemical energy storage devices possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon). We will discuss the performance and fuel saving results with LIC with comparison with original NiMH battery.

  12. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  13. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  14. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cedeno-Mattei, Y.; Roman, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, 00681-9019 (Puerto Rico); Perales-Perez, O. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, 00681-9044 (Puerto Rico); Tomar, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, 00681-9016 (Puerto Rico); Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1595 (United States)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626 Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 2{sup 3} factorial design.

  15. Astrometry and Photometry for Two Dwarf Carbon Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; C. C. Dahn; R. L. Walker; C. B. Luginbuhl; A. B. Monet; H. H. Guetter; R. C. Stone; F. J. Vrba; D. G. Monet; J. R. Pier

    1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary trigonometric parallaxes and BVI photometry are presented for two dwarf carbon stars, LP765-18 (= LHS1075) and LP328-57 (= CLS96). The data are combined with the literature values for a third dwarf carbon star, G77-61 (= LHS1555). All three stars have very similar luminosities (9.6m/H]<-1.0. The kinematics indicate that they are members of the Galactic spheroid population. The subluminosity of all three stars is due to an as-yet-unknown combination of (undoubtedly low) metallicity, possibly enhanced helium abundance, and unusual line-blanketing in the bandpasses considered. The properties of the stars are compared with models for the production of dwarf carbon stars.

  16. Vacuum Stability and Higgs Diphoton Decay Rate in the Zee-Babu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chao; Jian-Hui Zhang; Yongchao Zhang

    2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent Higgs data from ATLAS and CMS are compatible with a Standard Model (SM) signal at $2\\sigma$ level, both experiments see indications for an excess in the diphoton decay channel, which points to new physics beyond the SM. Given such a low Higgs mass $m_H \\sim 125 {\\rm GeV}$, another sign indicating the existence of new physics beyond the SM is the vacuum stability problem, i.e., the SM Higgs quartic coupling may run to negative values at a scale below the Planck scale. In this paper, we study the vacuum stability and enhanced Higgs diphoton decay rate in the Zee-Babu model, which was used to generate tiny Majorana neutrino masses at two-loop level. We find that it is rather difficult to find overlapping regions allowed by the vacuum stability and diphoton enhancement constraints. As a consequence, it is almost inevitable to introduce new ingredients into the model, in order to resolve these two issues simultaneously.

  17. The Higgs mass range from Standard Model false vacuum Inflation in scalar-tensor gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Masina; Alessio Notari

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Standard Model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around $10^{15}-10^{17}$ GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacuum can give rise to viable inflation if the potential barrier is very shallow, allowing for tunneling and relaxation into the electroweak scale true vacuum. The amplitude of cosmological density perturbations from inflation is directly linked to the value of the Higgs potential at the false minimum. Requiring the top quark mass, the amplitude and spectral index of density perturbations to be compatible with observations, selects a narrow range of values for the Higgs mass, $m_H=126.0\\pm 3.5$ GeV, where the error is mostly due to the theoretical uncertainty of the 2-loop RGE. This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  18. Search for a Two-Higgs-Boson Doublet Using a Simplified Model in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnstone, A.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for new particles in an extension to the standard model that includes a heavy Higgs boson (H?), a lighter charged Higgs boson (H±), and an even lighter Higgs boson h?, with decays leading to a W-boson pair and a bottom-antibottom quark pair in the final state. We use events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum, and at least four jets in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb?¹ collected by the CDF II detector in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. We find the data to be consistent with standard model predictions and report the results in terms of a simplified Higgs-cascade-decay model, setting 95% confidence level upper limits on the product of cross section and branching fraction from 1.3 pb to 15 fb as a function of H? and H± masses for m?h=126 GeV/c²

  19. http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/stark Webquines, The Collatz Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Ian

    Iy2bkwAyULxfaPclFmQQllYvBh9qlz zX9B0GIBv1pC4bQAbzpXduFoANZEAG5tzAnVR4UMr7FlaAUT78BkwB5w7mTwaz72CaC8BNIMGR7ADon0HcAAiAfwPuP4OXPz1f/n48vcMevJzoA30HD6cPMIhLB2QwIy2bkwAyULxfaPclFmQQllYvBh9qlz zX9B0GIBv1pC4bQAbzpXduFoANZEAG5tzAnVR4UMr7FlaAUT78BkwB5w7mTwaz72CaC8AGXqkWATDM/QgXx+zBFaUc poMz+hmvqI7gHFRL33yiMhTnqQ4qCzUE1DJVQC0

  20. Is the Standard Model saved asymptotically by conformal symmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gorsky; A. Mironov; A. Morozov; T. N. Tomaras

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the top-quark and Higgs masses and the Higgs VEV satisfy with great accuracy the relations 4m_H^2=2m_T^2=v^2, which are very special and reminiscent of analogous ones at Argyres - Douglas points with enhanced conformal symmetry. Furthermore, the RG evolution of the corresponding Higgs self-interaction and Yukawa couplings \\lambda(0)=1/8 and y(0)=1 leads to the free-field stable point \\lambda(M_Pl)= \\dot \\lambda(M_Pl)=0 in the pure scalar sector at the Planck scale, also suggesting enhanced conformal symmetry. Thus, it is conceivable that the Standard Model is the low-energy limit of a distinct special theory with (super?) conformal symmetry at the Planck scale. In the context of such a "scenario" one may further speculate that the Higgs particle is the Goldstone boson of (partly) spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. This would simultaneously resolve the hierarchy and Landau pole problems in the scalar sector and would provide a nearly flat potential with two almost degenerate minima at the electroweak and Planck scales.

  1. Measurements of the Higgs Boson in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jacob

    The generation of vector boson mass via the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model has been confirmed by the 2012 discovery of a candidate Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow{WW}$, $H\\rightarrow{ZZ}$, and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channels. In contrast, the Yukawa couplings hypothesized to provide the mass of fermions in the Standard Model have yet to be observed. The $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel currently provides the best opportunity for observing these couplings. This thesis describes two separate but related searches for Higgs boson decays in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel using proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The first analysis is a general search for all Higgs boson production mechanisms leading to a $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay using 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collision data. A deviation from the background-only hypothesis is observed with a significance of $4.5\\sigma$ for a hypothetical Higgs boson mass of ${m_{H} ...

  2. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the decay channel $H$ to $Z Z$ to 4 leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a Higgs boson in the four-lepton decay channel H to ZZ, with each Z boson decaying to an electron or muon pair, is reported. The search covers Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 < mH < 600 GeV. The analysis uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS detector in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV from the LHC. Seventy-two events are observed with four-lepton invariant mass m[4 leptons] > 100 GeV (with thirteen below 160 GeV), while 67.1 +/- 6.0 (9.5 +/-1.3) events are expected from background. The four-lepton mass distribution is consistent with the expectation of standard model background production of ZZ pairs. Upper limits at 95% confidence level exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the ranges 134-158 GeV, 180-305 GeV, and 340 -465 GeV. Small excesses of events are observed around masses of 119, 126, and 320 GeV, making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal.

  3. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et. al,

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  4. Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jennings, Elise; Jennings, David

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between ? – ? • ?(x,t)/aH and ?. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean (???), together with the fluctuations of ? around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from ~10% at kmore »relation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, M ? 5 x 10¹²Mh?¹, compared to the dark matter at z – 0 and 1. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean (???) away from the linear theory prediction –fLT?, where fLT is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, k, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for k LT from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between ? and ? is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of fLT extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.« less

  5. Softened Gravity and the Extension of the Standard Model up to Infinite Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian F. Giudice; Gino Isidori; Alberto Salvio; Alessandro Strumia

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to solve naturalness by having the weak scale as the only breaking of classical scale invariance have to deal with two severe difficulties: gravity and the absence of Landau poles. We show that solutions to the first problem require premature modifications of gravity at scales no larger than $10^{11}$ GeV, while the second problem calls for many new particles at the weak scale. To build models that fulfil these properties, we classify 4-dimensional Quantum Field Theories that satisfy Total Asymptotic Freedom (TAF): the theory holds up to infinite energy, where all coupling constants flow to zero. We develop a technique to identify such theories and determine their low-energy predictions. Since the Standard Model turns out to be asymptotically free only under the unphysical conditions $g_1 = 0$, $M_t = 186$ GeV, $M_\\tau = 0$, $M_h = 163$ GeV, we explore some of its weak-scale extensions that satisfy the requirements for TAF.

  6. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

  7. Growth diagram of N-face GaN (0001{sup ¯}) grown at high rate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okumura, Hironori, E-mail: okumura@engineering.ucsb.edu; McSkimming, Brian M.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Huault, Thomas; Chaix, Catherine [RIBER S.A., 3a Rue Casimir Perier, BP 70083, 95873 Bezons Cedex (France)] [RIBER S.A., 3a Rue Casimir Perier, BP 70083, 95873 Bezons Cedex (France)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    N-face GaN was grown on free-standing GaN (0001{sup ¯}) substrates at a growth rate of 1.5??m/h using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Difference in growth rate between (0001{sup ¯}) and (0001) oriented GaN depends on nitrogen plasma power, and the (0001{sup ¯}) oriented GaN had only 70% of the growth rate of the (0001) oriented GaN at 300?W. Unintentional impurity concentrations of silicon, carbon, and oxygen were 2?×?10{sup 15}, 2?×?10{sup 16}, and 7?×?10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?3}, respectively. A growth diagram was constructed that shows the dependence of the growth modes on the difference in the Ga and active nitrogen flux, ?{sub Ga}????{sub N*}, and the growth temperature. At high ?{sub Ga}????{sub N*} (?{sub Ga}????{sub N*}), two-dimensional (step-flow and layer-by-layer) growth modes were realized. High growth temperature (780?°C) expanded the growth window of the two-dimensional growth modes, achieving a surface with rms roughness of 0.48?nm without Ga droplets.

  8. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada); Ek, J. van [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, California 94588 (United States); Mercer, J. I. [Department of Computer Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  9. Abundances, Stellar Parameters, and Spectra From the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzman, Jon A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Andrews, Brett; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bovy, Jo; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Perez, Ana E Garcia; Hernandez, D Anibal Garcia; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Ivans, Inese; Majewski, Steven R; Martell, Sarah; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nidever, David L; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Pinsonneault, Marc; Robin, Annie C; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Sobeck, Jennifer; Smith, Verne V; Troup, Nicholas; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey operated from 2011-2014 using the APOGEE spectrograph, which collects high-resolution (R~22,500), near-IR (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra with a multiplexing (300 fiber-fed objects) capability. We describe the survey data products that are publicly available, which include catalogs with radial velocity, stellar parameters, and 15 elemental abundances for over 150,000 stars, as well as the more than 500,000 spectra from which these quantities are derived. Calibration relations for the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [M/H], [alpha/M]) and abundances (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni) are presented and discussed. The internal scatter of the abundances within clusters indicates that abundance precision is generally between 0.05 and 0.09 dex across a broad temperature range; within more limited ranges and at high S/N, it is smaller for some elemental abundances. We assess the accuracy of the abundances using comparison of mean cluster metallicities with literature values...

  10. GUT-inspired supersymmetric model for h ? ? ? and the muon g - 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a grand unified theories inspired supersymmetric model with nonuniversal gaugino masses that can explain the observed muon g-2 anomaly while simultaneously accommodating an enhancement or suppression in the h??? decay channel. In order to accommodate these observations and mh?125 to 126 GeV, the model requires a spectrum consisting of relatively light sleptons whereas the colored sparticles are heavy. The predicted stau mass range corresponding to R???1.1 is 100 GeV?m?˜?200 GeV. The constraint on the slepton masses, particularly on the smuons, arising from considerations of muon g-2 is somewhat milder. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range. The colored sparticles turn out to be considerably heavier with mg˜?4.5 TeV and mt˜??3.5 TeV, which makes it challenging for these to be observed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  11. Inhomogeneous chemical evolution of the Galactic disk: evidence for sequential stellar enrichment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob van den Hoek; Teije de Jong

    1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origin of the abundance variations observed among similarly aged F and G dwarfs in the local Galactic disk. We present arguments in support of combined infall of metal-deficient gas and sequential enrichment by successive stellar generations in the local Galactic disk ISM. We show that galactic chemical evolution models which take into account these processes simultaneously are consistent with both the observed abundance variations among similarly aged dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood and the abundances observed in the local disk ISM. For reasonable choices of parameters, these models can reproduce variations in [M/H] for individual elements M = C, O, Fe, Mg, Al, and Si as well as the scatter observed in abundance-abundance relations like [O/Fe]. For the same models, the contribution of sequential stellar enrichment to the magnitude of the observed abundance variations can be as large as 50%. We discuss the impact of sequential stellar enrichment and episodic infall of metal-deficient gas on the inhomogeneous chemical evolution of the Galactic disk.

  12. Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

  13. Magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars to black holes in full general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuk Tung Liu; Stuart L. Shapiro; Branson C. Stephens

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform axisymmetric simulations of the magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars in full general relativity. Our simulations are applicable to the collapse of supermassive stars (M > 10^3M_sun) and to very massive Pop III stars. We model our initial configurations by n=3 polytropes. The ratio of magnetic to rotational kinetic energy in these configurations is chosen to be small (1% and 10%). We find that such magnetic fields do not affect the initial collapse significantly. The core collapses to a black hole, after which black hole excision is employed to continue the evolution long enough for the hole to reach a quasi-stationary state. We find that the black hole mass is M_h = 0.95M and its spin parameter is J_h/M_h^2 = 0.7, with the remaining matter forming a torus around the black hole. We freeze the spacetime metric ("Cowling approximation") and continue to follow the evolution of the torus after the black hole has relaxed to quasi-stationary equilibrium. In the absence of magnetic fields, the torus settles down following ejection of a small amount of matter due to shock heating. When magnetic fields are present, the field lines gradually collimate along the hole's rotation axis. MHD shocks and the MRI generate MHD turbulence in the torus and stochastic accretion onto the central black hole. When the magnetic field is strong, a wind is generated in the torus, and the torus undergoes radial oscillations that drive episodic accretion onto the hole. These oscillations produce long-wavelength gravitational waves potentially detectable by LISA. The final state of the magnetorotational collapse always consists of a central black hole surrounded by a collimated magnetic field and a hot, thick accretion torus. This system is a viable candidate for the central engine of a long-soft gamma-ray burst.

  14. METALLICITY AND TEMPERATURE INDICATORS IN M DWARF K-BAND SPECTRA: TESTING NEW AND UPDATED CALIBRATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS OF 133 SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Ayala, Barbara [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Covey, Kevin R.; Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 122 Sciences Drive, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muirhead, Philip S., E-mail: babs@amnh.org [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present K-band spectra for 133 nearby (d < 33 ps) M dwarfs, including 18 M dwarfs with reliable metallicity estimates (as inferred from an FGK type companion), 11 M dwarf planet hosts, more than 2/3 of the M dwarfs in the northern 8 pc sample, and several M dwarfs from the LSPM catalog. From these spectra, we measure equivalent widths of the Ca and Na lines, and a spectral index quantifying the absorption due to H{sub 2}O opacity (the H{sub 2}O-K2 index). Using empirical spectral type standards and synthetic models, we calibrate the H{sub 2}O-K2 index as an indicator of an M dwarf's spectral type and effective temperature. We also present a revised relationship that estimates the [Fe/H] and [M/H] metallicities of M dwarfs from their Na I, Ca I, and H{sub 2}O-K2 measurements. Comparisons to model atmosphere provide a qualitative validation of our approach, but also reveal an overall offset between the atomic line strengths predicted by models as compared to actual observations. Our metallicity estimates also reproduce expected correlations with Galactic space motions and H{alpha} emission line strengths, and return statistically identical metallicities for M dwarfs within a common multiple system. Finally, we find systematic residuals between our H{sub 2}O-based spectral types and those derived from optical spectral features with previously known sensitivity to stellar metallicity, such as TiO, and identify the CaH1 index as a promising optical index for diagnosing the metallicities of near-solar M dwarfs.

  15. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  16. Higgs boson mass and new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedor Bezrukov; Mikhail Yu. Kalmykov; Bernd A. Kniehl; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the lower Higgs boson mass bounds which come from the absolute stability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum and from the Higgs inflation, as well as the prediction of the Higgs boson mass coming from asymptotic safety of the SM. We account for the 3-loop renormalization group evolution of the couplings of the Standard Model and for a part of two-loop corrections that involve the QCD coupling alpha_s to initial conditions for their running. This is one step above the current state of the art procedure ("one-loop matching--two-loop running"). This results in reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs boson mass bounds and predictions, associated with the Standard Model physics, to 1-2 GeV. We find that with the account of existing experimental uncertainties in the mass of the top quark and alpha_s (taken at 2sigma level) the bound reads M_H>=M_min (equality corresponds to the asymptotic safety prediction), where M_min=129+-6 GeV. We argue that the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in this range would be in agreement with the hypothesis of the absence of new energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, whereas the coincidence of M_H with M_min would suggest that the electroweak scale is determined by Planck physics. In order to clarify the relation between the Fermi and Planck scale a construction of an electron-positron or muon collider with a center of mass energy ~200+200 GeV (Higgs and t-quark factory) would be needed.

  17. THE APOKASC CATALOG: AN ASTEROSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC JOINT SURVEY OF TARGETS IN THE KEPLER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Elsworth, Yvonne; Chaplin, William J. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hekker, Saskia; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mészáros, Sz. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); García, Rafael A.; Beck, Paul [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS—Université Denis Diderot-IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Mathur, Savita [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); García Pérez, Ana [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, 32 Fowlkes Road, TX 79734-3005 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias (IAC), C/Va Lactea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); An, Deokkeun [Department of Science Education, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Beers, Timothy C., E-mail: pinsonneault.1@osu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46656 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of the order of 80 K in T {sub eff}, 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with T {sub eff} and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0 and 200 K cooler than that expected from the infrared flux method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in T {sub eff} and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.

  18. High Metallicity, Photoionised Gas in Intergalactic Large-Scale Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastien Aracil; Todd M. Tripp; David V. Bowen; Jason X. Proschaska; Hsiao-Wen Chen; Brenda L. Frye

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high-resolution UV spectra of absorption-line systems toward the low-z QSO HS0624+6907 (z=0.3700). Coupled with spectroscopic galaxy redshifts, we find that many of these absorbers are integalactic gas clouds distributed within large-scale structures. The gas is cool (T0.9). STIS data reveal a cluster of 13 HI Lyman alpha lines within a 1000 km/s interval at z=0.0635. We find 10 galaxies at this redshift with impact parameters ranging from 135 h^-1 kpc to 1.37 h^-1 Mpc. We attribute the HI Lya absorptions to intragroup medium gas, possibly from a large-scale filament viewed along its long axis. Remarkably, the metallicity is near-solar, [M/H] = -0.05 +/- 0.4 (2 sigma uncertainty), yet the nearest galaxy which might pollute the IGM is at least 135 h_70^-1 kpc away. Tidal stripping from nearby galaxies appears to be the most likely origin of this highly enriched, cool gas. More than six Abell galaxy clusters are found within 4 degree of the sight line suggesting that the QSO line of sight passes near a node in the cosmic web. At z~0.077, we find absorption systems as well as galaxies at the redshift of the nearby clusters Abell 564 and Abell 559. We conclude that the sight line pierces a filament of gas and galaxies feeding into these clusters. The absorber at z_abs = 0.07573 associated with Abell 564/559 also has a high metallicity with [C/H] > -0.6, but again the closest galaxy is relatively far from the sight line (293 h^-1 kpc).

  19. Can bars be destroyed by a central mass concentration? I. Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Athanassoula; J. C. Lambert; W. Dehnen

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a central mass concentration (CMC) on the secular evolution of a barred disc galaxy. Unlike previous studies, we use fully self-consistent 3D $N$-body simulations with live haloes, which are known to be important for bar evolution. The CMC is introduced gradually, to avoid transients. In all cases where the mass of the CMC is of the order of, or more than, a few per cent of the mass of the disc, the strength of the bar decreases noticeably. The amount of this decrease depends strongly on the bar type. For the same CMC, bars with exponential surface-density profile, which formed in a disk-dominated galaxy (MD-type bars), can be totally destroyed, while strong bars with a flat surface-density profile, whose evolution is largely due to the halo (MH-type bars), witness only a decrease of their strength. This decrease occurs simultaneously from both the innermost and outermost parts of the bar. The CMC has a stronger effect on the Fourier components of higher azimuthal wave number $m$, leading to fatter and/or less rectangular bars. Furthermore, the CMC changes the side-on outline from peanut-shaped to boxy or, for massive CMCs, to elliptical. Similarly, side-on initially boxy outlines can be destroyed. The CMC also influences the velocity dispersion profiles. Most of the decrease of the bar strength occurs while the mass of the CMC increases and it is accompanied by an increase of the pattern speed. In all our simulations, the mass of the CMC necessary in order to destroy the bar is at least several per cent of the mass of the disc. This argues that observed super-massive black holes are not likely to destroy pre-existing bars.

  20. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  1. Towards tailoring the magnetocaloric response in FeRh-based ternary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Radhika, E-mail: barua.r@husky.neu.edu; Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Lewis, L. H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate that the magnetocaloric response of FeRh-based compounds may be tailored for potential magnetic refrigeration applications by chemical modification of the FeRh lattice. Alloys of composition Fe(Rh{sub 1?x}A{sub x}) or (Fe{sub 1?x}B{sub x})Rh (A?=?Cu, Pd; B?=?Ni; 0?M(H) curves measured in the vicinity of the magnetostructural temperature (T{sub t}). It is found that the FeRh working temperature range (?T{sub FWHM}) may be chemically tuned over a wide temperature range, 100?K???T???400?K. While elemental substitution consistently decreases the magnetic entropy change (?S{sub mag}) of the FeRh-based ternary alloys from that of the parent FeRh compound (?S{sub mag},{sub FeRh}???17?J/kg?K; ?S{sub mag,FeRh-ternary?=}?7–14?J/kg?K at H{sub app}?=?2?T), the net refrigeration capacity (RC), defined as the amount of heat that can be transferred during one magnetic refrigeration cycle, of the modified systems is significantly higher (RC{sub FeRh}???150?J/kg; RC{sub FeRh-ternary?=}?170–210?J/kg at H{sub app}?=?2?T). These results are attributed to stoichiometry-induced changes in the FeRh electronic band structure and beneficial broadening of the magnetostructural transition due to local chemical disorder.

  2. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Cindy Zhang, Xiao Y; Dickman, Christopher TD; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa C; Millen, Kathleen J; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Ramos, Oscar HP; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda SC; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma DC; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam WZ; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter J; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    f8nK 2f8nH 2f8nF 2f8nB 2f8nD 1p3iG 1p3aC 1p3aF 1p3aD 1p3oB 1p3bG 1p3pG 1p3fD 1p34B 1p3oF 1p3iD 1p3gD 1p3oD 1p3bH 1p3iC 1p3lH 1p34C 1p3bD 1p3kB 1p3pF 1p3mH 1p3lB 1p34H 1p3mC 1p3gG 1p3mD 1p34D 1p3kD 1p3oG 1p3lF 1p3bC 1p3kH 1p3pH 1p3iH 1p3pB 1p3gH 1p3kC... 02N 2o61A 2o61B 2as5N 2as5M 1gjiA 1gjiB 1nfkA 1nfkB 1s9kC 1owrP 1owrQ 1owrM 1owrN 1svcP 1le5A 1leiB 1le5E 1le9E 1le5B 1le9F 1le5F 1le9B 1le9A 1leiA DNA_pol_lambd_f 3c5fB 3c5gB 3c5fA 3c5gA 1huoB 1huoA 1huzA 1huzB 2i9gA 1tv9A 1tvaA 2fmsA 2fmpA 2fmqA 1...

  3. A very cool brown dwarf in UKIDSS DR1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Warren; D. J. Mortlock; S. K. Leggett; D. J. Pinfield; D. Homeier; S. Dye; R. F. Jameson; N. Lodieu; P. W. Lucas; A. J. Adamson; F. Allard; D. Barrado y Navascues; M. Casali; K. Chiu; N. C. Hambly; P. C. Hewett; P. Hirst; M. J. Irwin; A. Lawrence; M. C. Liu; E. L. Martin; R. L. Smart; L. Valdivielso; B. P. Venemans

    2007-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) We report the discovery of a very cool brown dwarf, ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 (ULAS J0034-00), identified in UKIDSS DR1. We provide optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared photometry of the source, and two near-infrared spectra. Comparing the spectral energy distribution of ULAS J0034-00 to that of the T8 brown dwarf 2MASS J0415-09, the latest-type and coolest well-studied brown dwarf to date, with Teff~750 K, we find evidence that ULAS J0034-00 is significantly cooler. First, the measured values of the near-infrared absorption spectral indices imply a later classification, of T8.5. Second, the H-[4.49] colour provides an empirical estimate of the temperature of 540m/H])<-0.25 (+/-2sig). Combining these estimates, and considering systematics, it is likely the temperature lies in the range 600

  4. Interstellar Gas in the NGC 4410 Galaxy Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new radio continuum, 21 cm HI, and 2.6 mm CO data for the peculiar radio galaxy NGC 4410A and its companion NGC 4410B, and compare with available optical and X-ray maps. Our radio continuum maps show an asymmetric double-lobedstructure, with a high surface brightness lobe extending 3.6 arcmin (~100 kpc) to the southeast and a 6.2 arcmin (~180 kpc) low surface brightness feature in the northwest. Molecular gas is abundant in NGC 4410A, with M(H2) ~ 4 X 10^9 M(sun) (using the standard Galactic conversion factor), but is undetected in NGC 4410B. HI is less abundant, with M(HI) ~ 10^9 M(sun) for the pair. Our HI map shows a 3 X 10^8 M(sun) HI tail extending 1.7 arcmin (50 kpc) to the southeast of the pair, coincident with a faint optical tail and partially overlapping with the southeastern radio lobe. The HI tail is anti-coincident with a 2' (56 kpc) long X-ray structure aligned with a stellar bridge that connects the pair to a third galaxy. If this X-ray emission is associated with the group, there is 3 - 8 X 10^8 M(sun) of hot gas in this feature: either intracluster gas or shocked gas associated with the bridge. Our detection of abundant interstellar gas in this pair suggests that the distortions in this lobe map have been caused by the interstellar medium in this system. The interaction of the two galaxies and the subsequent motion of the interstellar medium in the system relative to the jet may have produced sufficient ram pressure to bend the radio jet. An alternative hypothesis is that the jet was distorted by ram pressure due to an intracluster medium, although the small radial velocity of NGC 4410A relative to the group and the lack of diffuse X-ray emission in the group makes this less likely unless the group is not virialized or is in the process of merging with another group.

  5. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally (Xiaolei) Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the “Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile” (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditions—it is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  6. Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, T. S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly K.; Boswell, Ray

    2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumberger’s Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison group’s consensus value for the initial perme- ability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGHþHYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the pre- dicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3–3.9 ?C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

  7. Critical behavior of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition in Fe{sub 90?x}Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 10} alloy ribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh, Tran Dang, E-mail: thanhxraylab@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Materials Science, VAST, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Huy Dan, Nguyen [Institute of Materials Science, VAST, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Phan, The-Long; Yu, Seong-Cho, E-mail: scyu@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kumarakuru, Haridas; Olivier, Ezra J.; Neethling, Johannes H. [Centre for HRTEM, Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a detailed study on the critical behavior of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic (FM-PM) phase transition in Fe{sub 90?x}Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 10} (x?=?0 and 5) alloy ribbons. Basing on field dependences of magnetization (M-H), M{sup 2} versus H/M plots prove the alloys exhibiting a second-order magnetic phase transition. To investigate the nature of the FM-PM phase transition at T{sub C}?=?245 and 306?K for x?=?0 and 5, respectively, we performed a critical-exponent study. The values of critical components ?, ?, and ? determined by using the modified Arrott plots, Kouvel-Fisher (KF), and critical isotherm analyses agree with each other. For x?=?0, the critical parameters ??=?0.365?±?0.013 and ??=?1.615 ± 0.033 are obtained by modified Arrott plots while ??=?0.368?±?0.008 and ??=?1.612?±?0.016 are obtained by the KF method. These values are close to those expected for the 3D-Heisenberg model, revealing short-range FM interactions in Fe{sub 90}Zr{sub 10}. Meanwhile, for x?=?5, the values of the critical parameters ??=?0.423?±?0.008 and ??=?1.325?±?0.036 are obtained by modified Arrott plots, and ??=?0.425?±?0.006 and ??=?1.323?±?0.012 are obtained by the KF method. The falling of the ? value in between the values of the mean-field theory (??=?0.5) and the 3D-Heisenberg model (??=?0.365) indicates an existence of FM short-range order and magnetic inhomogeneity in Fe{sub 85}Ni{sub 5}Zr{sub 10}. With a partial replacement of Ni for Fe in Fe{sub 90?x}Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 10}, the value of the critical exponent ? trends to shift towards that of the mean-field theory. Such the result proves the presence of Ni favors establishing FM long-range order. The nature of this phenomenon is carefully discussed.

  8. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  9. PHEV-EV Charger Technology Assessment with an Emphasis on V2G Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisacikoglu, Mithat C [ORNL; Bedir, Abdulkadir [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More battery powered electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will be introduced to the market in 2011 and beyond. Since these vehicles have large batteries that need to be charged from an external power source or directly from the grid, their batteries, charging circuits, charging stations/infrastructures, and grid interconnection issues are garnering more attention. This report summarizes information regarding the batteries used in PHEVs, different types of chargers, charging standards and circuits, and compares different topologies. Furthermore, it includes a list of vehicles that are going to be in the market soon with information on their charging and energy storage equipment. A summary of different standards governing charging circuits and charging stations concludes the report. There are several battery types that are available for PHEVs; however, the most popular ones have nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) chemistries. The former one is being used in current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), but the latter will be used in most of the PHEVs and EVs due to higher energy densities and higher efficiencies. The chargers can be classified based on the circuit topologies (dedicated or integrated), location of the charger (either on or off the vehicle), connection (conductive, inductive/wireless, and mechanical), electrical waveform (direct current (dc) or alternating current (ac)), and the direction of power flow (unidirectional or bidirectional). The first PHEVs typically will have dedicated, on-board, unidirectional chargers that will have conductive connections to the charging stations or wall outlets and will be charged using either dc or ac. In the near future, bidirectional chargers might also be used in these vehicles once the benefits of practical vehicle to grid applications are realized. The terms charger and charging station cause terminology confusion. To prevent misunderstandings, a more descriptive term of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) is used instead of charging station. The charger is the power conversion equipment that connects the battery to the grid or another power source, while EVSE refers to external equipment between the grid or other power source and the vehicle. EVSE might include conductors, connectors, attachment plugs, microprocessors, energy measurement devices, transformers, etc. Presently, there are more than 40 companies that are producing EVSEs. There are several standards and codes regarding conductive and inductive chargers and EVSEs from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the Underwriter Laboratories (UL), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the National Electric Code (NEC). The two main standards from SAE describe the requirements for conductive and inductive coupled chargers and the charging levels. For inductive coupled charging, three levels are specified: Level 1 (120 V and 12 A, single-phase), Level 2 (208 V-240 V and 32 A, single-phase), and Level 3 (208-600 V and 400 A, three-phase) . The standard for the conductive-coupled charger also has similar charging ratings for Levels 1 and 2, but it allows higher current ratings for Level 2 charging up to 80 A. Level 3 charging for this standard is still under development and considers dc charging instead of three-phase ac. More details in these areas and related references can be found in this Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report on PHEV-EV charger technology assessment.

  10. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  11. Conformational Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel Catalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, James A.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Helm, Monte L.; Lense, Sheri; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Appel, Aaron M.; Raugei, Simone; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The [Ni(PR2NR’2)2]2+ catalysts, (where PR2NR´2 is 1,5-R´-3,7-R-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane), are some of the fastest reported for hydrogen production and oxidation, however, chair/boat isomerization and the presence of a fifth solvent ligand have the potential to slow catalysis by incorrectly positioning the pendant amines or blocking the addition of hydrogen. Here, we report the structural dynamics of a series of [Ni(PR2NR’2)2]n+ complexes, characterized by NMR spectroscopy and theoretical modeling. A fast exchange process was observed for the [Ni(CH3CN)(PR2NR’2)2]2+ complexes which depends on the ligand. This exchange process was identified to occur through a three step mechanism including dissociation of the acetonitrile, boat/chair isomerization of each of the four rings identified by the phosphine ligands (including nitrogen inversion), and reassociation of acetonitrile on the opposite side of the complex. The rate of the chair/boat inversion can be influenced by varying the substituent on the nitrogen atom, but the rate of the overall exchange process is at least an order of magnitude faster than the catalytic rate in acetonitrile demonstrating that the structural dynamics of the [Ni(PR2NR´2)2]2+ complexes does not hinder catalysis. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under FWP56073. Research by J.A.F., M.O., M-H. H., M.L.H, D.L.D. A.M.A., S. R. and R.M.B. was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. W.J.S. and S.L. were funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. T.L. was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (INCITE 2008-2011 award supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725).

  12. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too