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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an approach to comparing computer run time of buildingthe purpose of comparing computer run time. Modelers shouldATIONAL L ABORATORY Comparing Computer Run Time of Building

Hong, Tianzhen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

Wang, Linghua [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: wanglhwang@gmail.com [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an approach to comparing computer run time of building simulation programs. The computing run time of a simulation program depends on several key factors, including the calculation algorithm and modeling capabilities of the program, the run period, the simulation time step, the complexity of the energy models, the run control settings, and the software and hardware configurations of the computer that is used to make the simulation runs. To demonstrate the approach, simulation runs are performed for several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy models. The computer run time of these energy models are then compared and analyzed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip; Selkowitz, Stephen; Wetter, Michael

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Estimation of run times in a freight rail transportation network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the accuracy of individual freight train run time predictions defined as the time between departure from an origin node to arrival at a destination node not including yard time. ...

Bonsra, Kunal (Kunal Baldev)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Run-time optimization of adaptive irregular applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compared to traditional compile-time optimization, run-time optimization could o?er signi?cant performance improvements when parallelizing and optimizing adaptive irregular applications, because it performs program analysis and adaptive optimizations during program execution. Run-time techniques can succeed where static techniques fail because they exploit the characteristics of input data, programs' dynamic behaviors, and the underneath execution environment. When optimizing adaptive irregular applications for parallel execution, a common observation is that the effectiveness of the optimizing transformations depends on programs' input data and their dynamic phases. This dissertation presents a set of run-time optimization techniques that match the characteristics of programs' dynamic memory access patterns and the appropriate optimization (parallelization) transformations. First, we present a general adaptive algorithm selection framework to automatically and adaptively select at run-time the best performing, functionally equivalent algorithm for each of its execution instances. The selection process is based on off-line automatically generated prediction models and characteristics (collected and analyzed dynamically) of the algorithm's input data, In this dissertation, we specialize this framework for automatic selection of reduction algorithms. In this research, we have identi?ed a small set of machine independent high-level characterization parameters and then we deployed an off-line, systematic experiment process to generate prediction models. These models, in turn, match the parameters to the best optimization transformations for a given machine. The technique has been evaluated thoroughly in terms of applications, platforms, and programs' dynamic behaviors. Speci?cally, for the reduction algorithm selection, the selected performance is within 2% of optimal performance and on average is 60% better than "Replicated Buffer," the default parallel reduction algorithm speci?ed by OpenMP standard. To reduce the overhead of speculative run-time parallelization, we have developed an adaptive run-time parallelization technique that dynamically chooses effcient shadow structures to record a program's dynamic memory access patterns for parallelization. This technique complements the original speculative run-time parallelization technique, the LRPD test, in parallelizing loops with sparse memory accesses. The techniques presented in this dissertation have been implemented in an optimizing research compiler and can be viewed as effective building blocks for comprehensive run-time optimization systems, e.g., feedback-directed optimization systems and dynamic compilation systems.

Yu, Hao

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Run-time validation of knowledge-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As knowledge bases become more complex it is increasingly unlikely that they will have been validated against all possible data and therefore an increasing risk of making errors. Run-time validation is checking whether the output of a knowledge base ... Keywords: anomalies, outliers, prudence, ripple-down rules, validation

Angela Finlayson, Paul Compton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hybrid Run-time Power Management Technique for Realtime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new run-time power management technique for real-time embedded systems which consist of a voltage scalable processor and power controllable peripheral devices. We have observed that there exist significant trade-offs in terms of energy consumption between the Dynamic Power Management (DPM) scheme and the Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) scheme over a wide range of system operating conditions. The proposed technique fully exploits workload-variation slack time by partitioning the task into several timeslots and shut down the unneeded peripheral device on timeslot-by-timeslot basis.

Minyoung Kim; Embedded System With

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Initial steps towards run-time support for norm-governed systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a knowledge representation framework with an associated run-time support infrastructure that is able to compute, for the benefit of the members of a norm-governed multi-agent system, the physically possible and permitted actions at each time, ... Keywords: GOLEM, event calculus, run-time service, social interaction

Visara Urovi; Stefano Bromuri; Kostas Stathis; Alexander Artikis

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Ravenscar-compliant hardware run-time (Ravenhart) kernel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time embedded systems are increasingly becoming the foundation of control systems in both the aerospace and automotive worlds. This class of systems has to meet three requirements: strict timing constraints on operational ...

Silbovitz, Anna, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FORODT: Fortran debug routine for the PDP-11 (RT-11). [For run-time debugging  

SciTech Connect

FORODT provides run-time debug features to PDP-11 Fortran programs running with the RT-11 operating system. Digital Equipment Corporation's ODT program has been extended to include Fortran breakpoints, decimal integer and floating point data input, and output options. 3 figures.

Tanner, D.N.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models September 8, 2008 - 9:45am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time for the U.S. Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore advanced climate change models at three of DOE's national laboratories as part of a three-year memorandum of understanding on collaborative climate research signed today by the two agencies. NOAA will work with climate change models as well as perform near real-time high-impact (non-production) weather prediction research using computing

13

PARLO: PArallel Run-Time Layout Optimization for Scientific Data Explorations with Heterogeneous Access Pattern  

SciTech Connect

Download Citation Email Print Request Permissions Save to Project The size and scope of cutting-edge scientific simulations are growing much faster than the I/O and storage capabilities of their run-time environments. The growing gap is exacerbated by exploratory, data-intensive analytics, such as querying simulation data with multivariate, spatio-temporal constraints, which induces heterogeneous access patterns that stress the performance of the underlying storage system. Previous work addresses data layout and indexing techniques to improve query performance for a single access pattern, which is not sufficient for complex analytics jobs. We present PARLO a parallel run-time layout optimization framework, to achieve multi-level data layout optimization for scientific applications at run-time before data is written to storage. The layout schemes optimize for heterogeneous access patterns with user-specified priorities. PARLO is integrated with ADIOS, a high-performance parallel I/O middleware for large-scale HPC applications, to achieve user-transparent, light-weight layout optimization for scientific datasets. It offers simple XML-based configuration for users to achieve flexible layout optimization without the need to modify or recompile application codes. Experiments show that PARLO improves performance by 2 to 26 times for queries with heterogeneous access patterns compared to state-of-the-art scientific database management systems. Compared to traditional post-processing approaches, its underlying run-time layout optimization achieves a 56% savings in processing time and a reduction in storage overhead of up to 50%. PARLO also exhibits a low run-time resource requirement, while also limiting the performance impact on running applications to a reasonable level.

Gong, Zhenhuan [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Boyuka, David [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Zou, X [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Liu, Gary [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ma, Xiaosong [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Samatova, Nagiza F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SLUDGE BATCH SUPPLEMENTAL SRAT RUNS EFFECTS OF YIELD STRESS AND CYCLE TIME INCREASE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has transitioned from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing. Phase III-Tank 40 Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet simulations have been completed to determine the initial processing conditions for the DWPF transition. The impact of higher yield stress (SB-25) and cycle time extension (SB6-26) on the physical and chemical effects of SB6 processing during the SRAT (Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank) cycle were evaluated. No significant impacts on the SRAT chemistry were noted during the higher yield stress run. In particular, no impact on mercury stripping was noted, indicating that settling of elemental mercury was not the primary factor in the low mercury recovery noted in the flowsheet testing. The SRAT product from this run retained the higher yield stress of the starting sludge. The run indicated that ultrasonication is an effective tool to increase the yield stress of simulants to targeted values and the chemistry of downstream processing is not impacted. Significant differences were noted in the cycle time extension test compared to the Phase III flowsheet baseline runs. Large decreases in the ammonia and hydrogen generation rates were noted along with reduced mercury stripping efficiency. The latter effect is similar to that of operating under a high acid stoichiometry. It is conceivable that, under the distinctly different conditions of high formic acid concentration (high acid run) or slow formic acid addition (extended run), that mercury could form amalgams with noble metals, possibly rendering both inert. Thus, the removal of free mercury and noble metals could decrease the rate of catalytic formic acid reactions which would decrease generation of ammonium and hydrogen. The potential underlying reasons for the behavior noted during this run would require additional testing.

Fernandez, A.

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

The average running time of an algorithm as a midpoint between fuzzy sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, Nieto and Torres introduced the notions of segment and midpoint between fuzzy sets with the aim of giving applications to medicine [J.J. Nieto, A. Torres, Midpoints for fuzzy sets and their application in medicine, Artif. Intell. Med. 27 (2003) ... Keywords: Asymmetric distance, Fuzzy set, Midpoint, Running time of computing, Weighted maximum distance

Pedro Tirado; Oscar Valero

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The benefits and costs of DyC's run-time optimizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DyC selectively dynamically compiles programs during their execution, utilizing the run-time-computed values of variables and data structures to apply optimizations that are based on partial evaluation. The dynamic optimizations are preplanned at static ... Keywords: dynamic compilation, specialization

Brian Grant; Markus Mock; Matthai Philipose; Craig Chambers; Susan J. Eggers

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Prototyping a fault-tolerant multiprocessor SoC with run-time fault recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern integrated circuits (ICs) are becoming increasingly complex. The complexity makes it difficult to design, manufacture and integrate these high performance ICs. The advent of multiprocessor Systems-on-chips (SoCs) makes it even more challenging ... Keywords: fault-tolerance, multiprocessor system, network-on-chip, retargetable simulation, run-time verification, system-on-chip

Xinping Zhu; Wei Qin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Run-time Modeling and Estimation of Operating System Power Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

software power evaluation, as well as power management (e.g. dynamic thermal control and equal energy of a commercial OS across a wide spectrum of applications to understand OS energy profiles and then proposes to track run- time OS energy profiles, the proposed routine level OS power model offers superior accuracy

John, Lizy Kurian

19

Run-Time Power-Down Strategies for Real-Time SDRAM Memory Controllers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. PDTRANS PUP Figure 1: Power-Down Transitions 3.3 Arbiters and Latency-Rate Servers Real-time SDRAM memory on the memory state and the power- down duration, for both the power-down strategies. We experimentally evaluate, the tTRANS parameter gives the transition in timing constraint before the memory can switch to a power

Epema, Dick H.J.

20

ParaGraph-RTS: A parallel reduction-based run-time system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are investigating the use of the functional programming paradigm on multiprocessor computers. We have developed a parallel graph reduction run-time system called ParaGraph-RTS (Parallel Graph Reduction) that provides both significant amounts of exploitable parallelism and the robustness to support development of large scientific codes. This system allows us to empirically investigate the functional programming paradigm within computationally intensive application domains. In this paper, we describe an implementation of ParaGraph-RTS on a shared-memory multiprocessor. The implementation strategy reflects insights gained through performance characterizations of the reduction process. Preliminary performance results and analyses are presented. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Yantis, B.; Rich, D.; Michelsen, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Enabling run-time memory data transfer optimizations at the system level with automated extraction of embedded software metadata information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information about the run-time behavior of software applications is crucial for enabling system level optimizations for embedded systems. This embedded Software Metadata information is especially important today, because several complex multi-threaded ...

Alexandros Bartzas; Miguel Peon-Quiros; Stylianos Mamagkakis; Francky Catthoor; Dimitrios Soudris; Jose M. Mendias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Communication library for run-time visualization of distributed, asynchronous data  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a method for collecting and visualizing data generated by a parallel computational simulation during run time. Data distributed across multiple processes is sent across parallel communication lines to a remote workstation, which sorts and queues the data for visualization. We have implemented our method in a set of tools called PORTAL (for Parallel aRchitecture data-TrAnsfer Library). The tools comprise generic routines for sending data from a parallel program (callable from either C or FORTRAN), a semi-parallel communication scheme currently built upon Unix Sockets, and a real-time connection to the scientific visualization program AVS. Our method is most valuable when used to examine large datasets that can be efficiently generated and do not need to be stored on disk. The PORTAL source libraries, detailed documentation, and a working example can be obtained by anonymous ftp from info.mcs.anl.gov from the file portal.tar.Z from the directory pub/portal.

Rowlan, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wightman, B.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Oshkosh, WI (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geyser-1: a MIPS R3000 CPU core with fine-grained run-time power gating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geyser-1 is a MIPS CPU which provides a fine-grained run-time power gating (PG) controlled by instructions. Unlike traditional PGs, it uses special standard cells in which the virtual ground (VGND) is separated from the real ground, and a certain number ...

D. Ikebuchi; N. Seki; Y. Kojima; M. Kamata; L. Zhao; H. Amano; T. Shirai; S. Koyama; T. Hashida; Y. Umahashi; H. Masuda; K. Usami; S. Takeda; H. Nakamura; M. Namiki; M. Kondo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Can critical real-time services of public infrastructures run over ethernet and MPLS networks?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the adoption of Ethernet-IP as the main technology for building end-to-end real-time networks, the requirement to deliver high availability, quality and secure services over Ethernet and MPLS has become strategic. Critical real-time traffic is generally ... Keywords: MPLS, critical systems, ethernet, real-time networks

Jaime Lloret; Francisco Javier Sanchez; Hugo Coll; Fernando Boronat

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Centralized Run-Time Resource Management in a Network-on-Chip Containing Reconfigurable Hardware Tiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science University British Columbia Vancouver, V6T Canada {swyang,mrg}@cs.ubc.ca Abstract. This paper is abstract. Hopefully, won't abstract time submit Introduction Fig. Synchronous Pipeline Stage Surfing Figure 1 shows typical synchronous pipeline stage. For proper operation, clock period must longer than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

A collaborative framework for evaluation of run-time changes in enterprise web services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing market demand and technology in today's world has made change management an inevitable one. To remain competitive, organizations must be able to respond to change in a timely and cost effective manner. Although there are many change management ... Keywords: dependency analysis, enterprise business scenario, similarity measure, web services change management

M. Thirumaran; P. Dhavachelvan; G. Naga Venkata Kiran

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CMS Runs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Runs Runs Web Based Monitoring Run Summary DQM Run Registry Commissioning & Run Coordination Online WorkBook Global Run Data Analysis FNAL ROC Process Summary [May-Dec 2007] Text output of Run Summary Global File List in dCache Directory Index DBS Discovery Aug 2008: ROOT Jul 2008: ROOT Jun 2008: ROOT May 2008: ROOT Mar 2008: ROOT Nov/Dec 2007: Streamer ROOT Sep 2007: Streamer ROOT Aug 2007: Streamer ROOT Jul 2007: Streamer ROOT Jun 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM May 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM PhEDEx Transfer State Cruzet4 Files Transferred Cruzet3 Files Transferred Cruzet2 Files Transferred GlobalCruzet1 Files Transferred GlobalMar08 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalNov07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalSep07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalAug07 Files Transferred to FNAL

28

Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a model of financial institutions that borrow shortterm and invest into long-term marketable assets. Because these financial intermediaries perform maturity transformation, they are subject to runs. We endogenize the profits of the intermediary and derive distinct liquidity and solvency conditions that determine whether a run can be prevented. We first characterize these conditions for an isolated intermediary and then generalize them to the case where the intermediary can sell assets to prevent runs. The sale of assets can eliminate runs if the intermediary is solvent but illiquid. However, because of cash-in-the-market pricing, this becomes less likely the more intermediaries are facing problems. In the limit, in case of a general market run, no intermediary can sell assets to forestall a run, and our original solvency and liquidity constraints are again relevant for the stability of financial institutions.

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Swiss Watch Running on Chilean Time: A Progress Report on Two New Automated CORALIE RV Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the current status of two new fully automated reduction and analysis pipelines, built for the Euler telescope and the CORALIE spectrograph. Both pipelines have been designed and built independently at the Universidad de Chile and Universidad Catolica by the two authors. Each pipeline has also been written on two different platforms, IDL and Python, and both can run fully automatically through full reduction and analysis of CORALIE datasets. The reduction goes through all standard steps from bias subtraction, flat-fielding, scattered light removal, optimal extraction and full wavelength calibration of the data using well exposed ThAr arc lamps. The reduced data are then cross-correlated with a binary template matched to the spectral type of each star and the cross-correlation functions are fit with a Gaussian to extract precision radial-velocities. For error analysis we are currently testing bootstrap, jackknifing and cross validation methods to properly determine uncertainties directly from the dat...

Jenkins, James S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DASCH ON KU Cyg: A {approx} 5 YEAR DUST ACCRETION EVENT IN {approx} 1900  

SciTech Connect

KU Cyg is an eclipsing binary consisting of an F-type star accreting through a large accretion disk from a K5III red giant. Here we present the discovery of a 5 year dip around 1900 found from its 100 year DASCH light curve. It showed a {approx}0.5 mag slow fading from 1899 to 1903 and brightened back around 1904 on a relatively shorter timescale. The light curve shape of the 1899-1904 fading-brightening event differs from the dust production and dispersion process observed in R Coronae Borealis stars, which usually has a faster fading and slower recovery, and for KU Cyg is probably related to the accretion disk surrounding the F star. The slow fading in KU Cyg is probably caused by increases in dust extinction in the disk, and the subsequent quick brightening may be due to the evaporation of dust transported inward through the disk. The extinction excess which caused the fading may arise from increased mass transfer rate in the system or from dust clump ejections from the K giant.

Tang Sumin; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu, E-mail: stang@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Power-aware scheduling and dynamic voltage setting for tasks running on a hard real-time system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- This paper addresses the problem of minimizing energy consumption of a computer system performing periodic hard real-time tasks with precedence constraints. In the proposed approach, dynamic power management and voltage scaling techniques are combined to reduce the energy consumption of the CPU and devices. The optimization problem is first formulated as an integer programming problem. Next, a three-phase solution framework, which integrates power management scheduling and task voltage assignment, is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms existing methods by an average of 18 % in terms of the system-wide energy savings. I.

Peng Rong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Evaluation of the 1994 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook in the Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged under programs conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The detection of tagged individuals at Lower Granite Dam provides a measure, of the temporal and spatial distribution of the wild populations. PIT Forecaster was developed to take advantage of this historical data to predict the proportion of a particular population which had arrived at the index site in real-time and to forecast elapsed time to some future percentile in a migration. This report evaluates the performance of the Least Squares (LS) method and the Synchronized historical pattern matching (SYNC) method used in the PIT Forecaster and two other possible methods of prediction reminiscent of methods recommended by the Fish Passage Center (FPC). Alternative No. 1 bases predictions on the historical proportion of PIT-Tags recovered in a specific year and Alternative No. 2 uses the historical cumulative distribution of smolt predicted of a previous season. Over the entire 1994 season, the LS method had the best prediction performance for both aggregate and individual streams. However, for the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 was clearly a better predictor. This performance deteriorated for the last half of the season, and the LS method improved prediction for aggregate streams and for the individual streams. The algorithms used by PIT Forecaster provide a better prediction as the season progresses. For the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 did very well for both index years selected. For the 1995 season, Alternative No. 1 will be combined with the LS method to create an improved predictor.

Townsend, Richard L.; Westhagen, P.; Yasuda, D.; Skalski, J.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE EPOCH OF DISK SETTLING: z {approx} 1 TO NOW  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence from a sample of 544 galaxies from the DEEP2 Survey for evolution of the internal kinematics of blue galaxies with stellar masses ranging 8.0 < log M {sub *}(M {sub Sun }) < 10.7 over 0.2 < z < 1.2. DEEP2 provides galaxy spectra and Hubble imaging from which we measure emission-line kinematics and galaxy inclinations, respectively. Our large sample allows us to overcome scatter intrinsic to galaxy properties in order to examine trends in kinematics. We find that at a fixed stellar mass, galaxies systematically decrease in disordered motions and increase in rotation velocity and potential well depth with time. Massive galaxies are the most well ordered at all times examined, with higher rotation velocities and less disordered motions than less massive galaxies. We quantify disordered motions with an integrated gas velocity dispersion corrected for beam smearing ({sigma} {sub g}). It is unlike the typical pressure-supported velocity dispersion measured for early type galaxies and galaxy bulges. Because both seeing and the width of our spectral slits comprise a significant fraction of the galaxy sizes, {sigma} {sub g} integrates over velocity gradients on large scales which can correspond to non-ordered gas kinematics. We compile measurements of galaxy kinematics from the literature over 1.2 < z < 3.8 and do not find any trends with redshift, likely for the most part, because these data sets are biased toward the most highly star-forming systems. In summary, over the last {approx}8 billion years since z = 1.2, blue galaxies evolve from disordered to ordered systems as they settle to become the rotation-dominated disk galaxies observed in the universe today, with the most massive galaxies being the most evolved at any time.

Kassin, Susan A.; Gardner, Jonathan P. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Devriendt, Julien [Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Dutton, Aaron A. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Metevier, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sonoma State University, 1801 East Cotati Avenue, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (United States); Noeske, Kai G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Primack, Joel R., E-mail: susan.kassin@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

THE CURIOUS CASE OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS: GROWING YOUNGER FROM z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 2?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies are thought to be progenitors of present-day L* galaxies. Clustering analyses have suggested that LAEs at z {approx} 3 might evolve into LAEs at z {approx} 2, but it is unclear whether the physical nature of these galaxies is compatible with this hypothesis. Several groups have investigated the properties of LAEs using spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, but direct comparison of their results is complicated by inconsistencies in the treatment of the data and in the assumptions made in modeling the stellar populations, which are degenerate with the effects of galaxy evolution. By using the same data analysis pipeline and SED fitting software on two stacked samples of LAEs at z = 3.1 and z = 2.1, and by eliminating several systematic uncertainties that might cause a discrepancy, we determine that the physical properties of these two samples of galaxies are dramatically different. LAEs at z = 3.1 are found to be old (age {approx}1 Gyr) and metal-poor (Z Z{sub Sun }). The difference in the observed stellar ages makes it very unlikely that z 3.1 LAEs evolve directly into z = 2.1 LAEs. Larger samples of galaxies, studies of individual objects, and spectroscopic measurements of metallicity at these redshifts are needed to confirm this picture, which is difficult to reconcile with the effects of 1 Gyr of cosmological evolution.

Acquaviva, Viviana; Vargas, Carlos; Gawiser, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Guaita, Lucia [Institutionen foer Astronomi, Stockholms Universitet, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation of the 2008 Predictions of Run-Timing and Survival of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Steelhead on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia Basin Research uses the COMPASS model on a daily basis during the outmigration of Snake River Chinook and steelhead smolts to predict downstream passage and survival. Fish arrival predictions and observations from program RealTime along with predicted and observed environmental conditions are used to make in-season predictions of arrival and survival to various dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. For 2008, calibrations of travel and survival parameters for two stocks of fish-Snake River yearling PIT-tagged wild chinook salmon (chin1pit) and Snake River PIT-tagged steelhead (lgrStlhd)-were used to model travel and survival of steelhead and chinook stocks from Lower Granite Dam (LWG) or McNary Dam (MCN) to Bonneville Dam (BON). This report summarizes the success of the COMPASS/RealTime process to model these migrations as they occur. We compared model results on timing and survival to data from two sources: stock specific counts at dams and end-of-season control survival estimates (Jim Faulkner, NOAA, pers. comm. Dec. 16, 2008). The difference between the predicted and observed day of median passage and the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between predicted and observed arrival cumulative distributions are measures of timing accuracy. MAD is essentially the average percentage error over the season. The difference between the predicted and observed survivals is a measure of survival accuracy. Model results and timing data were in good agreement from LWG to John Day Dam (JDA). Predictions of median passage days for the chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were 0 and 2 days (respectively) later than observed. MAD for chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks at JDA were 2.3% and 5.9% (respectively). Between JDA and BON modeling and timing data were not as well matched. At BON, median passage predictions were 6 and 10 days later than observed and MAD values were 7.8% and 16.0% respectively. Model results and survival data were in good agreement from LWG to MCN. COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.77 and 0.69 for chin1pit and lgrStlhd, while the data control's survivals were 0.79 and 0.68. The differences are 0.02 and 0.01 (respectively), nearly identical. However, from MCN to BON, COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.74 and 0.69 while the data controls survivals were 0.47 and 0.53 respectively. Differences of 0.27 and 0.16. In summary: Travel and survival of chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were well modeled in the upper reaches. Fish in the lower reaches down through BON suffered unmodeled mortality, and/or passed BON undetected. A drop in bypass fraction and unmodeled mortality during the run could produce such patterns by shifting the observed median passage day to appear artificially early.

Beer, W. Nicholas; Iltis, Susannah; Anderson, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs Running jobs For Edison Phase 1 users You can run jobs in the same way as you did on the phase 1 system, but keep in mind that the number of cores per node is 24 instead of...

39

User_RunReports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Standard Reports Running Standard Reports © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Running Standard Reports Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of running standard reports in SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. Run Standard Report From the Home page, click the Reports easy link. In the Report Name table, locate the report you want to generate. Click the expand icon ( ) to expand the report group. Click the title link. For this example, select the User Curriculum Status Group by Item Details report. Note: Click Help ( ) for additional information on reports. 1 1 2 2 3 3 Run Standard Report 13 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid

40

Running Jobs with the UGE Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Jobs Running Jobs Submitting Jobs How to submit your job to the UGE. Read More » Running with Java Solutions to some of the common problems users have with running on Genepool when the JVM is part of their workflow. Read More » Batch Script Examples Sample batch scripts for Genepool/Phoebe highlighting queue selection, setting the run time and requesting large amounts of memory. Read More » Interactive Jobs How to run your workflow on the interactive nodes. Read More » Job Arrays Job arrays are a way to efficiently submit large numbers of jobs. Read More » Parallel Batch Scripts This page has examples of how to run parallel jobs on Genepool. Read More » Best Practices - and Practices to Avoid Things users should do to run jobs efficiently using UGE. Read More »

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Running Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Job Launch Overview Parallel applications can not run on the login nodes. They must be launched onto the compute nodes via the aprun command. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Franklin by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Submitting Batch Jobs Basic batch scripts, torque keywords. Sample scripts for advanced work flows: running multiple jobs, MPMD jobs, job dependencies. Read More » Queues and Policies Queue configuration and limits, policies and tips for getting your job through the queue faster. Read More » Monitoring Jobs Once a job is submitted it can be monitored, held, deleted and in some

42

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Quick Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option is available on Edison. Read More » Overview A brief overview of how to run jobs on Edison. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Edison by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Batch Jobs Batch script options. Read More » Example Batch Scripts Sample batch scripts for MPI, OpenMP, hybrid applications and various workflows. Read More » Job Launch Command: aprun Aprun is the job launcher for Cray XC30. There are many options that are

43

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option...

44

MEASUREMENT OF 21 cm BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS AT z {approx} 0.8 IN CROSS-CORRELATION  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling {approx}41 deg. sq. and 190 hr of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains {Omega}{sub HI} b{sub HI} r = [0.43 {+-} 0.07(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, where {Omega}{sub HI} is the neutral hydrogen (H I) fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b{sub HI} is the H I bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z {approx} 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E. R.; Calin, L.-M.; Pen, U.-L.; Shaw, J. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Banavar, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bandura, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Blake, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Chang, T.-C.; Liao, Y.-W. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, X.; Li, Y.-C. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Voytek, T. C. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Running jobs on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running jobs Running jobs Running jobs Overview and Basic Description Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI job, type in this at the shell prompt: % mpirun -np numprocs executable_name where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data analysis, NERSC will attempt to provide equitable access to Euclid's resources through the enforcement of certain usage guidelines. The most crucial resources are the processor cores (48) and memory (512 GB). Processor Core Usage Policy No single interactive job should use more than 12 processor cores. A single

46

Fermilab DART run control  

SciTech Connect

DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the, control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of our experiences in developing it. We also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system.

Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EXPLORING THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY RELATION AT z {approx} 3-5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide a premier tool for studying high-redshift star-forming galaxies thanks to their extreme brightness and association with massive stars. Here we use GRBs to study the galaxy stellar mass-metallicity (M{sub *}-Z) relation at z {approx} 3-5, where conventional direct metallicity measurements are extremely challenging. We use the interstellar medium metallicities of long GRB hosts derived from afterglow absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with host galaxy stellar masses determined from deep Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m observations of 20 GRB hosts. We detect about 1/4 of the hosts with M{sub AB}(I) {approx} -21.5 to -22.5 mag and place a limit of M{sub AB}(I) {approx}> -19 mag on the remaining hosts from a stacking analysis. Using these observations, we present the first rest-frame optical luminosity distribution of long GRB hosts at z {approx}> 3 and find that it is similar to the distribution of long GRB hosts at z {approx} 1. In comparison to Lyman-break galaxies at the same redshift, GRB hosts are generally fainter, but the sample is too small to rule out an overall similar luminosity function. On the other hand, the GRB hosts appear to be more luminous than the population of Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 3-4. Using a conservative range of mass-to-light ratios for simple stellar populations (with ages of 70 Myr to {approx}2 Gyr), we infer the host stellar masses and present mass-metallicity measurements at z {approx} 3-5 ((z) {approx} 3.5). We find that the detected GRB hosts, with M{sub *} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, display a wide range of metallicities, but that the mean metallicity at this mass scale, Z {approx} 0.3 Z{sub sun}, is lower than measurements at z {approx}< 3. Combined with stacking of the non-detected hosts with M{sub *} {approx}< 3 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} and Z {approx}< 0.1 Z{sub sun}, we find tentative evidence for the existence of an M{sub *}-Z relation at z {approx} 3.5 and continued evolution of this relation to systematically lower metallicities from z {approx} 2.

Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

OPTIMIZATION OF RUNNING STRATEGIES BASED ON ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine his speed in order to run a given distance in the shortest time. ... based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of ..... associated cost converges to the one associated with ? . The conclusion follows.

49

Running Jobs.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting and Running Jobs on Submitting and Running Jobs on the Cray XT5 Richard Gerber NERSC User Services RAGerber@lbl.gov Joint Cray XT5 Workshop UC-Berkeley February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Outline * XT5 Overview * Creating and Submitting a Batch Job * How a Job Is Launched * Monitoring Your Job * Queues and Policies Hopper in blue; Jaguar in Orange; Kraken in Green February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Cray XT5 Overview Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node etc.... No local disk Login Node Login Node Login Node etc.... home Login Node Login Node $SCRATCH[1|2] /tmp/work/$USER /lustre/scratch/$USER

50

THE BRIGHTEST OF REIONIZING GALAXIES SURVEY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE BRIGHT END OF THE z {approx} 8 LUMINOSITY FUNCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery of 33 Lyman-break galaxy candidates at z {approx} 8 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging as part of the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) pure-parallel survey. The ongoing BoRG survey currently has the largest area (274 arcmin{sup 2}) with Y {sub 098} (or Y {sub 105}), J {sub 125}, and H {sub 160} band coverage needed to search for z {approx} 8 galaxies, about three times the current CANDELS area, and slightly larger than what will be the final CANDELS wide component with Y {sub 105} data (required to select z {approx} 8 sources). Our sample of 33 relatively bright Y {sub 098}-dropout galaxies have J {sub 125}-band magnitudes between 25.5 and 27.4 mag. This is the largest sample of bright (J {sub 125} {approx}data set with the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field data set, we constrain the rest-frame ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at z {approx} 8 over the widest dynamic range currently available. The combined data sets are well fitted by a Schechter function, i.e., {phi} (L) = {phi}{sub *} (L/L{sub *}){sup {alpha}} e{sup -(}L{sup /L{sub *})}, without evidence for an excess of sources at the bright end. At 68% confidence, for h = 0.7 we derive {phi}{sub *} = (4.3{sup +3.5} {sub -2.1}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, M {sub *} = -20.26{sup +0.29} {sub -0.34}, and a very steep faint-end slope {alpha} = -1.98{sup +0.23} {sub -0.22}. While the best-fit parameters still have a strong degeneracy, especially between {phi}{sub *} and M {sub *}, our improved coverage at the bright end has reduced the uncertainty of the faint-end power-law slope at z {approx} 8 compared to the best previous determination at {+-}0.4. With a future expansion of the BoRG survey, combined with planned ultradeep WFC3/IR observations, it will be possible to further reduce this uncertainty and clearly demonstrate the steepening of the faint-end slope compared to measurements at lower redshift, thereby confirming the key role played by small galaxies in the reionization of the universe.

Bradley, L. D.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Treu, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Bouwens, R. J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Shull, J. M. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Holwerda, B. W. [European Space Agency (ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, NL-2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total HVAC electricity and gas usage. Compared with the baseheat supply and usage as well as electricity and gas. Within

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 and Support for California Energy Commission Staff Use ofCEC Project Manager California Energy Commission 1516 NinthBerkeley, CA 94720 California Energy Commission EnergyPlus

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

envelope, daylighting, and HVAC systems. Sensitivity ofand windows, daylighting and controls, HVAC system types andand daylighting, service water heating, HVAC systems, and

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Polarization Issues in Run 2008  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC proton beam polarization has a strong dependence on intensity in Run 2008, whereas the dependence is almost absent in Run 2006. Meanwhile, the RHIC beam transverse emittance also has a dependence on intensity in Run 2008, but little in Run 2006. Using the emittance measurement at the AGS IPM and the BtA multiwires, the source of this difference between 2006 and 2008 runs is traced to the Booster. It is found that at least the degree of the vertical scraping in the Booster is different in 2006 and 2008. The effect of this scraping for the RHIC beam emittance and polarization is studied.

Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

59

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning Maintenance AP SPEAR Down Injector Startup University Holidays Spear Down SPEAR Startup MA Sep Oct 2011 2012 MA Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

60

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oil shale project run summary: small retort run S-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Retort run S-14 was a combustion run in the small retort conducted on Nov. 15-16, 1977. The charge of Anvil Points shale operated under a 50% steam - 50% air mixture. Results indicate that the broad particle size range in the packed bed increases nonuniformities in gas flow and bed retorting characteristics. Oil yield was 87%, hydrogen production amounted to 0.25 wt % of the raw shale. (DLC)

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Tripp, L.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hitting the ground running  

SciTech Connect

Very few of us get to start clean: getting a new organization, new space, and hiring new people for a new information management program. In over 20 years in some aspect of this profession, the author has never faced that particular challenge. By far the majority of information management opportunities involve taking over from someone else. Sometimes, a predecessor has gone on to better things on his/her initiative; that is not always the case. Sometimes the group is one you were a part of yesterday. If the function functions, time moves on and changes may be needed to accommodate new technology, additional and/or changed tasks, and alterations in corporate missions. If the function does not, it is a good bet that you were hired or promoted as an agent of change. Each of these situations poses challenges. This presentation is about that first few months and first year in a new assignment. In other words, you have the job, now what?

KEENEN,MARTHA JANE; NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Running Interactive Jobs on Dirac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requests 8 cores on one node using the interactive queue (and you will run on either Tesla or Fermi nodes): % qsub -I -V -q diracint -l nodes1:ppn8 If you want to request...

64

THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3: A TEST FOR STELLAR FEEDBACK, GALACTIC OUTFLOWS, AND COLD STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

We present new results on the kinematics, thermal and ionization state, and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of massive galaxies at redshift {approx}3, using the Eris suite of cosmological hydrodynamic ''zoom-in'' simulations. The reference run adopts a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback that produces large-scale galactic outflows, a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. The effect of the local UV radiation field is added in post-processing. The CGM (defined as all gas at R > 0.2 R{sub vir} = 10 kpc, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius) contains multiple phases having a wide range of physical conditions, with more than half of its heavy elements locked in a warm-hot component at T > 10{sup 5} K. Synthetic spectra, generated by drawing sightlines through the CGM, produce interstellar absorption-line strengths of Ly{alpha}, C II, C IV, Si II, and Si IV as a function of the galactocentric impact parameter (scaled to the virial radius) that are in broad agreement with those observed at high redshift by Steidel et al. The covering factor of absorbing material declines less rapidly with impact parameter for Ly{alpha} and C IV compared to C II, Si IV, and Si II, with Ly{alpha} remaining strong (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 300 mA) to {approx}> 5 R{sub vir} = 250 kpc. Only about one third of all the gas within R{sub vir} is outflowing. The fraction of sightlines within one virial radius that intercept optically thick, N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2} material is 27%, in agreement with recent observations by Rudie et al. Such optically thick absorption is shown to trace inflowing ''cold'' streams that penetrate deep inside the virial radius. The streams, enriched to metallicities above 0.01 solar by previous episodes of star formation in the main host and in nearby dwarfs, are the origin of strong (N{sub C{sub II}}>10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) C II absorption with a covering factor of 22% within R{sub vir} and 10% within 2 R{sub vir}. Galactic outflows do not cause any substantial suppression of the cold accretion mode. The central galaxy is surrounded by a large O VI halo, with a typical column density N{sub O{sub VI}} {approx}> 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and a near unity covering factor maintained all the way out to 150 kpc. This matches the trends recently observed in star-forming galaxies at low redshift by Tumlinson et al. Our zoom-in simulations of this single system appear then to reproduce quantitatively the complex baryonic processes that determine the exchange of matter, energy, and metals between galaxies and their surroundings.

Shen Sijing; Madau, Piero; Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Guedes, Javiera [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-9057 Zurich (Switzerland); Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

A CANDELS WFC3 GRISM STUDY OF EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: A MIX OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND LOW-METALLICITY STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) slitless grism spectroscopy of 28 emission-line galaxies at z {approx} 2, in the GOODS-S region of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. The high sensitivity of these grism observations, with >1{sigma} detections of emission lines to f > 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, means that the galaxies in the sample are typically {approx}7 times less massive (median M{sub *} = 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) than previously studied z {approx} 2 emission-line galaxies. Despite their lower mass, the galaxies have [O III]/H{beta} ratios which are very similar to previously studied z {approx} 2 galaxies and much higher than the typical emission-line ratios of local galaxies. The WFC3 grism allows for unique studies of spatial gradients in emission lines, and we stack the two-dimensional spectra of the galaxies for this purpose. In the stacked data the [O III] emission line is more spatially concentrated than the H{beta} emission line with 98.1% confidence. We additionally stack the X-ray data (all sources are individually undetected), and find that the average L{sub [OIII]}/L{sub 0.5-10keV} ratio is intermediate between typical z {approx} 0 obscured active galaxies and star-forming galaxies. Together the compactness of the stacked [O III] spatial profile and the stacked X-ray data suggest that at least some of these low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies harbor weak active galactic nuclei.

Trump, Jonathan R.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Yesuf, Hassen [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Scarlata, Claudia [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Laird, Elise S.; Rangel, Cyprian [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Yan Renbin [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Atek, Hakim [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Donley, Jennifer L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dunlop, James S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); and others

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Running Interactive Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are typically pre- and post-processing jobs, data management programs, or some other type of "tool". Note that it is not possible to run any MPI application on Carver login nodes. The second type of interactive job runs on one or more Carver compute nodes. Because the only way to gain access to the compute nodes is through the batch system, these types of jobs may more accurately be called "interactive batch" jobs. The remainder of this section focuses on these types of jobs. Usage Basic usage: carver% qsub -I The above command creates an interactive shell on a compute node, in the user's home directory. As a batch job, it has default values for batch

67

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually runs the program in parallel on the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

68

Tevatron Run II Physics Projections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Document for the P5 Committee (version 8, September 30, 2005) Electroweak Precision Measurements and Standard Model Higgs Searches W Mass Measurement: 20 - 30 MeV Projections versus Integrated Luminosity (made by CDF): eps, gif, gif (log) Extrapolated from Run Ib measurement Uncertainties assumed to scale with luminosity: Statiscal uncertainties Systematic uncertainties such as Energy and momentum scale, Hadron Recoil against W Uncertainties assumed not to scale with luminosity: W production and decay: PDFs, d(sigma_W)/d(Pt), higher order QCD/QED effects Assumed to be beween 20 MeV (dashed lines) and 30 MeV (solid lines) Top Mass Measurement: ~1.5 GeV Assumptions Channel: only lepton+jets channle considered. Uncertainties that scale with luminosity - 1 / sqrt(lum)

69

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Edison batch system is up and running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batch system is up and running Edison batch system is up and running July 25, 2013 (0 Comments) Edison batch system is up and running. Cray benchmark team and NERSC staff have...

71

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT 1993EDL RUN 2 UTILITY-RATEs GAS-RATE RESOURCE, NATURAL-ES-E SUMMARY OF UTILITY-RATE: ELI_CTRGCHRONIC GLAZING ININP RUN 3 1993EDL RUN UTILITY-RATE: ELk'C-COST RESOURCE:

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

THE EARLY EARLY TYPE: DISCOVERY OF A PASSIVE GALAXY AT z{sub spec} {approx} 3  

SciTech Connect

We present the discovery of a massive, quiescent galaxy at z = 2.99. We have obtained an Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 spectrum of this object and measured its redshift from the detection of a deep 4000 A break consistent with an old population and a high metallicity. By stellar population modeling of both its grism spectrum and broadband photometry, we derive an age of {approx}0.7 Gyr, implying a formation redshift of z > 4, and a mass >10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Although this passive galaxy is the most distant confirmed so far, we find that it is slightly less compact than other z > 2 early types of similar mass, being overall more analogous to those z {approx} 1.6 field early-type galaxies. The discovery of this object shows that early-type galaxies are detectable to at least z = 3 and suggests that the diversity of structural properties found in z = 1.4-2 ellipticals to earlier epochs could have its origin in a variety of formation histories among their progenitors.

Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Daddi, E.; Bethermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Onodera, M.; Carollo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Renzini, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dickinson, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facebook Find us "in the news" Home News & Publications News Center News Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully Green Flash Project Runs First...

74

Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

75

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually launches the program on to the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

76

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

77

Oil shale project: large retort run summary, run L-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the retort run L-3, a high yield (83 to 84% of FA) was achieved using a broad particle size distribution (-30.5 cm, + 0.001 cm) with 15 to 20% of the shale larger than 15 cm. The nonuniform flow in the retort was closely predicted by the changing shape of the steam front. Steam front measurements after the run indicated that the flow distribution through the bed was little affected by the retorting and combustion processes. The technique of ignition by hot-gas-preheating worked satisfactorily; no oxygen was observed in the exit gas during the entire retort operation. The temperature of the retort front was controlled by the air flux; no runaway temperatures were encountered when making the step grade change from 18 to 36 gal/ton. The hydrogen concentration in the exit gas reached approximately 18% in the rich (36 gal/ton) shale at the bottom of the bed; this is the highest concentration seen in any of the retorting experiments. A factor-of-three change in the CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio was observed as the combustion front moved from the 18 gal/ton to 36 gal/ton shale; also, about a factor-of-two change occurred in the rate of production of CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/ and CO.

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Carley, J.F.; Tripp, L.J.; Rothman, A.J.; Campbell, J.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Unpaired band crossings in the A{approx}160 mass region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Levels schemes for a number of low lying normally deformed bands in {sup 161,162}Er have been extended to significantly higher spins than hitherto using the EUROBALL Ge detector array sited at the Legnaro National Laboratory. In the case of one band in {sup 161}Er states have tentatively been observed to a spin in excess of 60({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Evidence is found for a band crossing at high spin in the yrast even parity, positive signature (+, +1/2) band in {sup 161}Er. This can be explained in terms of a system in which the static pairing is quenched either involving a rearrangement of two neutrons into steeply aligning i{sub 13/2} orbitals or possibly an interchange of state of one proton and one neutron. A similar type of band crossing is tentatively identified in the lowest (-,-1/2) band of {sup 161}Er. Since a crossing involving the interchange of neutrons is blocked, this must involve protons. This, if confirmed, provides the first direct evidence for the quenching of static proton pairing at high spin in this mass region. Recent calculations [1] predict that such a crossing involving purely protons will occur in this band at I{approx}60({Dirac_h}/2{pi})

Lisle, J. C.; Bagshaw, A. P.; Dagnall, P. J.; Smith, A. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [CLRC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bentley, M. A. [School of Sciences, University of Stafford, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 2DE (United Kingdom); Cullen, D. M.; King, S. L.; Shepherd, S. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Hagemann, G. B.; Tormanen, S. [Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Napoli, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Riley, M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States)

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one

80

Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -V -q interactive -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the umber of cores per node. On Hopper, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one more if

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 16 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/16 plus one

82

Caloric expenditure and substrate utilization in underwater treadmill running versus land-based treadmill running.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study is to compare the caloric expenditure and oxidative sources of underwater treadmill running and land-based treadmill running at maximal and (more)

Schaal, Courtney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scheduled Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-hr) Hours of Top- up Scheduled Top-up Injector Availability MTBF Run 97-7 741.9 698.2 94.1% 17 2.6 0.58 52.9 N/A N/A 41.1 Run 98-1 703.1 640.6 91.1% 21 3.0 0.79 48.7 N/A N/A 30.5 Run 98-2 714.5 656.4 91.9% 27 2.2 0.99 50.3 N/A N/A 24.3 Run 98-3 1154.2 1091.1 94.5% 28 2.3 0.62 85.1 N/A N/A 39.0 Run 98-4 1152.2 1076.9 93.5% 31 2.4 0.69 84.2 N/A N/A 34.7 Run 98-5 1093.6 987.4 90.3% 49 2.2 1.19 79.3 N/A N/A 20.2 Run 99-1 976.6 923.6 94.6% 35 1.5 0.91 75.3 N/A N/A 26.4 Run 99-2 831.2 794.9 95.6% 19 1.9 0.57 65.1 N/A N/A 41.8 Run 99-3 832.0 805.6 96.8% 31 0.9 0.92 58.5 N/A N/A 26.0 Run 99-4 1320.0 1256.2 95.2% 42 1.5 0.80 102.5 N/A N/A 29.9 Run 99-5 1024.0 970.8 94.8% 44 1.2 1.09 82.0 N/A N/A 22.1 Run 00-1 1511.0

84

SEE HOW WE RUN...At WIPP, We Really Mean Business  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will ensure accuracy and reliability of information, as well as reduced cycle time for information retrieval. W Why is it important to run WIPP like a business? Continually...

85

SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities SNS SNS Operating Status FY 2012 Run Schedule SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 (Oct. 2011-Sep. 2012) Printable version Excel version SNS Run Schedule...

86

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Running against hunger Running against hunger Posted By Office of Public Affairs Pantex Security Police Officers Byron Logan and Randy Stokes completed their annual Run Against Hunger last week. The two officers ran and biked

87

THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS. IV. THE TWO POPULATIONS WITH [Fe/H] {approx}< -3.0  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the carbon-normal and carbon-rich populations of Galactic halo stars having [Fe/H] {approx}< -3.0, utilizing chemical abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise model-atmosphere analyses. The C-rich population represents {approx}28% of stars below [Fe/H] = -3.1, with the present C-rich sample comprising 16 CEMP-no stars, and two others with [Fe/H] {approx} -5.5 and uncertain classification. The population is O-rich ([O/Fe] {approx}> +1.5); the light elements Na, Mg, and Al are enhanced relative to Fe in half the sample; and for Z > 20 (Ca) there is little evidence for enhancements relative to solar values. These results are best explained in terms of the admixing and processing of material from H-burning and He-burning regions as achieved by nucleosynthesis in zero-heavy-element models in the literature of 'mixing and fallback' supernovae (SNe); of rotating, massive, and intermediate-mass stars; and of Type II SNe with relativistic jets. The available (limited) radial velocities offer little support for the C-rich stars with [Fe/H] < -3.1 being binary. More data are required before one could conclude that binarity is key to an understanding of this population. We suggest that the C-rich and C-normal populations result from two different gas cooling channels in the very early universe of material that formed the progenitors of the two populations. The first was cooling by fine-structure line transitions of C II and O I (to form the C-rich population); the second, while not well defined (perhaps dust-induced cooling?), led to the C-normal group. In this scenario, the C-rich population contains the oldest stars currently observed.

Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Bessell, M. S.; Asplund, M., E-mail: yong@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: bessell@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); and others

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Transparent run-time defense against stack smashing attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exploitation of buffer overflow vulnerabilities in process stacks constitutes a significant portion of security attacks. We present two new methods to detect and handle such attacks. In contrast to previous work, the new methods work with any existing ...

Arash Baratloo; Navjot Singh; Timothy Tsai

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005, Montreal, Canada. DOE-2 web site, gundog.lbl.govmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutefor several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy

Hong, Tianzhen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and regional climate change induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of aerosols and greenhouse gases; quantify sources and sinks of energy-related greenhouse gases;...

91

RECONSTRUCTING THE {gamma}-RAY PHOTON OPTICAL DEPTH OF THE UNIVERSE TO z {approx} 4 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH GALAXY SURVEY DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reconstruct the {gamma}-ray opacity of the universe out to z {approx}gamma}{gamma} optical depth out to several TeV. Here, we use the same database as Helgason et al. where the extragalactic background light was reconstructed from LFs out to 4.5 {mu}m and was shown to recover observed galaxy counts to high accuracy. We extend our earlier library of LFs to 25 {mu}m such that it covers the energy range of pair production with {gamma}-rays (1) in the entire Fermi/LAT energy range, and (2) at higher TeV energies probed by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. In the absence of significant contributions to the cosmic diffuse background from unknown populations, such as the putative Population III era sources, the universe appears to be largely transparent to {gamma}-rays at all Fermi/LAT energies out to z {approx} 2 whereas it becomes opaque to TeV photons already at z {approx}gamma-ray burst and blazar data shows that there is room for significant emissions originating in the first stars era.

Helgason, Kari [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kashlinsky, Alexander, E-mail: kari@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Run05 Proton Beam Polarization Measurements by pC-Polarimeter (ver. 1.1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polarization of the proton beams [1, 2] at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)[3] RHIC ring. The H-Jet polarimeter is located at the collision point allowing measurements of absolute normalization is provided by the hydrogen polarimeter, which measures over 1 {approx} 2 another measurement rather than measuring the absolute polarization. both beams. Two identical pC-polarimeters are equipped in the yellow and blue rings, where carbon ribbon target, providing fast feedback to beam operations and experiments. The days to obtain {approx} 5% statistical uncertainty (in Run05). Thus, the operation of the carbon is measured using both an atomic beam source hydrogen gas jet (H-Jet)[4, 5] and proton-carbon polarimeters was focused on better control of relative stability between one measurement to statistical accuracy within 20 to 30 seconds using an ultra-thin (typically 6 {approx} 8 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) the rings are separated. The pC-polarimeter measures relative polarization to a few percent.

Nakagawa,I.; Alekseev, I.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bravar, A.; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K.O.; Gill, R.; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.N.; Wise, T.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Running Jobs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Cobalt Job Control How to Queue a Job Running Jobs FAQs Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Running Jobs Contents Job Submission Submitting a Script Job Sub-block Script Jobs Multiple Consecutive Runs within a Script Job Settings Environment Variables Script Environment Program and Argument Length Limit Job Dependencies Thread Stack Size Verbose Setting for Runjob How do I get each line of the output labeled with the MPI rank that it came from? Mapping of MPI Tasks to Cores

94

Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

Klann, Jeffrey G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Mohamed M. Anber; John F. Donoghue

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Anber, Mohamed M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8  

SciTech Connect

During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental Run Schedule Experimental Run Schedule SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be closed for the winter holidays, December 21, 2013 through January 5, 2014. SSRL generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. SSRL operates at 500mA and employs a frequent fill schedule to maintain the SPEAR3 current approximately constant. Automatic injections will be conducted every 5 minutes. Automatic injections will only occur at the designated 5 minute intervals (i.e., on the hour and every 5 minutes thereafter). If the injector is not functional at the designated fill time, then the fill will be skipped. The current will be replenished at the next scheduled fill time after the injector is repaired and normal injection intervals will resume. The operator will give

99

The online system of the PHENIX experiment in the RHIC run 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHENIX [1] is one of two large experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At the time of this conference, the Run 5 of RHIC is in progress and has been very successful so far. Compared to the previous run, ...

Martin L. Purschke

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Compare 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010 with Run 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the very successful commissioning of the vertical stochastic cooling in 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010, the IBS (intra-beam scattering) is no longer the dominant factor in terms of the integrated luminosity. A new luminosity model is needed, where the beam intensity lifetime is more important and the burn-off needs to be accounted for. Toward this goal, a brief review of the Run 2010, compared with Run 2007, is presented.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EVOLUTION OF QUIESCENT AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 1.5 AS A FUNCTION OF THEIR VELOCITY DISPERSIONS  

SciTech Connect

We measure stellar masses and structural parameters for 5500 quiescent and 20,000 star-forming galaxies at 0.3 < z {<=} 1.5 in the Newfirm Medium Band Survey COSMOS and UKIDSS UDS fields. We combine these measurements to infer velocity dispersions and determine how the number density of galaxies at fixed inferred dispersion, or the velocity dispersion function (VDF), evolves with time for each population. We show that the number of galaxies with high velocity dispersions appears to be surprisingly stable with time, regardless of their star formation history. Furthermore, the overall VDF for star-forming galaxies is constant with redshift, extending down to the lowest velocity dispersions probed by this study. The only galaxy population showing strong evolution are quiescent galaxies with low inferred dispersions, whose number density increases by a factor of {approx}4 since z = 1.5. This buildup leads to an evolution in the quiescent fraction of galaxies such that the threshold dispersion above which quiescent galaxies dominate the counts moves to lower velocity dispersion with time. We show that our results are qualitatively consistent with a simple model in which star-forming galaxies quench and are added to the quiescent population. In order to compensate for the migration into the quiescent population, the velocity dispersions of star-forming galaxies must increase, with a rate that increases with dispersion.

Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Franx, Marijn [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

SunRun Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunRun Inc SunRun Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name SunRun Inc Address 717 Market Street Place San Francisco, California Zip 94103 Sector Solar Product Solar installer Website http://www.sunrunhome.com/ Coordinates 37.7871306°, -122.4041075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7871306,"lon":-122.4041075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort: MPICH2 ERROR [Rank 7436] [job id 14638087] [Sat Jan 12 04:56:54 2013] [c11-2c1s3n1] [nid04487] - MPIU_nem_gni_get_hugepages(): Unable to mmap 4194304 bytes for file /var/lib/hugetlbfs/global/pagesize-2097152/hugepagefile.MPICH.0.5841.kvs_14638087, err Cannot allocate memory This is caused by available huge page memory being not sufficient on one or more of the allocated compute nodes. The above error happens more often with jobs using the "-ss" option for the aprun command. It is confirmed

104

ARE PULSING SOLITARY WAVES RUNNING INSIDE THE SUN?  

SciTech Connect

A precise sequence of frequencies-detected four independent ways-is interpreted as a system of solitary waves below the Sun's convective envelope. Six future observational or theoretical tests of this idea are suggested. Wave properties (rotation rates, radial energy distribution, nuclear excitation strength) follow from conventional dynamics of global oscillation modes after assuming a localized nuclear term strong enough to perturb and hold mode longitudes into alignments that form 'families'. To facilitate future tests, more details are derived for a system of two dozen solitary waves 2 {<=} l {<=} 25. Wave excitation by {sup 3}He and {sup 14}C burning is complex. It spikes by factors M{sub 1} {<=} 10{sup 3} when many waves overlap in longitude but its long-time average is M{sub 2} {<=} 10. Including mixing can raise overall excitation to {approx}50 times that in a standard solar model. These spikes cause tiny phase shifts that tend to pull wave rotation rates toward their ideal values {proportional_to}[l(l + 1)]{sup -1}. A system like this would generate some extra nuclear energy in two spots at low latitude on opposite sides of the Sun. Each covers about 20 Degree-Sign of longitude. Above a certain wave amplitude, the system starts giving distinctly more nuclear excitation to some waves (e.g., l = 9, 14, and 20) than to neighboring l values. The prominence of l = 20 has already been reported. This transition begins at temperature amplitudes {Delta}T/T = 0.03 in the solar core for a typical family of modes, which corresponds to {delta}T/T {approx} 0.001 for one of its many component oscillation modes.

Wolff, Charles L., E-mail: charles.l.wolff@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1  

SciTech Connect

We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cresci, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Quirrenbach, Andreas [ZAH, Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pasquali, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Department of Astronomy, 351 Tate Laboratory of Physics, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

STELLAR POPULATIONS OF ULTRAVIOLET-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use stellar population synthesis modeling to analyze the host-galaxy properties of a sample of 33 UV-selected, narrow-lined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 2-3. In order to quantify the contribution of AGN emission to host galaxy broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we use the subsample of 11 AGNs with photometric coverage spanning from rest-frame UV through near-IR wavelengths. Modeling the SEDs of these objects with a linear combination of stellar population and AGN templates, we infer the effect of the AGN on derived stellar population parameters. We also estimate the typical bias in derived stellar populations for AGNs lacking rest-frame near-IR wavelength coverage, and develop a method for inferring the true host-galaxy properties. We compare AGN host-galaxy properties to those of a sample of UV-selected, star-forming non-AGNs in the same redshift range, including a subsample carefully matched in stellar mass. Although the AGNs have higher masses and star-formation rates than the full non-active sample, their stellar population properties are consistent with those of the mass-selected sample, suggesting that the presence of an AGN is not connected with the cessation of star formation activity in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2-3. We suggest that a correlation between M {sub BH} and galaxy stellar mass is already in place at this epoch. Assuming a roughly constant Eddington ratio for AGNs at all stellar masses, we are unable to detect the AGNs in low-mass galaxies because they are simply too faint.

Hainline, Kevin N.; Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Steidel, Charles C. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. ... The AT1 scale is run in real time using data from an ensemble of cesium standards and hydrogen masers. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs  

SciTech Connect

In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The D0 run II trigger system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

B PHYSICS AT THE TEVATRON RUN II.  

SciTech Connect

We present the B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab and their future prospect. This includes various B mass and lifetime measurements, B mixing, the confirmation of the discovery of the X particle, rare decays, CP violation, and spectroscopy.

YIP,K.

2004-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

How to Run DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run DomainParser Run DomainParser The structure for partition needs to be prepared in the PDB format. In most cases, running DomainParser using defaults should give satisfactory partitions. However, several options offered in DomainParser can provide a partition that a user desires or correct some overcut/undercut partitions. Here, we use a PDB file 1atna.pdb as an example to show how to use the DomainParser program. Run DomainParser using defaults: domainparser 1atna.pdb The output shows the partition for each domain in terms of ranges of residue numbers: 4 domains have been found for 1atna: Domain 1 : 34-96. Domain 2 : 181-272. Domain 3 : 148-180; 273-336. Domain 4 : 0-33; 97-147; 337-372. The program also generates a new file 1atna_dom.pdb, with the "temperature factor" column (column 61-66 of an "ATOM" entry) showing domain numbers. A

112

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog Blog Archive Run, Dishwasher...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run, Dishwasher, Run Saturday, September 24, 2011 By Alexis Powers The typical college student does about two loads of laundry a week. However, the student decathletes must go...

114

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 -...

115

THE BRIGHT END OF THE ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 8: NEW CONSTRAINTS FROM CANDELS DATA IN GOODS-SOUTH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present new z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates from a search over {approx}95 arcmin{sup 2} of WFC3/IR data, tripling the previous search area for bright z {approx} 8 galaxies. Our analysis uses newly acquired WFC3/IR imaging data from the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury program over the GOODS-South field. These new data are combined with existing deep optical Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging to search for relatively bright (M {sub UV} search area, we identify 16 candidate z {approx} 8 galaxies, spanning a magnitude range H {sub 160,AB} = 25.7-27.9 mag. The new data show that the UV LF is a factor {approx}1.7 lower at M {sub UV} < -19.5 mag than determined from the HUDF09 and Early Release Science (ERS) data alone. Combining this new sample with the previous candidates from the HUDF09 and ERS data allows us to perform the most accurate measurement of the z {approx} 8 UV LF yet. Schechter function fits to the combined data result in a best-fit characteristic magnitude of M {sub *}(z = 8) = -20.04 {+-} 0.46 mag. The faint-end slope is very steep, though quite uncertain, with {alpha} = -2.06 {+-} 0.32. A combination of wide-area data with additional ultra-deep imaging will be required to significantly reduce the uncertainties on these parameters in the future.

Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Franx, M.; Labbe, I. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Trenti, M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Carollo, C. M., E-mail: poesch@ucolick.org [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Design and first tests of the CDF Run 2 farms  

SciTech Connect

The high energy physics experiment CDF, located in the anti-proton-proton collider at Fermilab, will write data in Run 2 at a rate of 20 MByte/s, twenty times the rate of Run 1. The offline production system must be able to handle this rate. Components of that system include a large PC farm, I/O systems to read/write data to and from mass storage, and a system to split the reconstructed data into physics streams which are required for analysis. All of the components must work together seamlessly to ensure the necessary throughput. A description will be given of the overall hardware and software design for the system. A small prototype farm has been used for about one year to study performance, to test software designs and for the first Mock Data Challenge. Results from the tests and experience from the first Mock Data Challenge will be discussed. The hardware for the first production farm is in place and will be used for the second Mock Data Challenge. Finally, the possible scaling of the system to handle larger rates foreseen later in Run 2 will be described.

Jaroslav Antos et al.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES THROUGH INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF CO AND SPITZER MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect

We explore the relationship between gas, dust, and star formation in a sample of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at high-redshift compared to a similar sample of local galaxies. We present new CO observations and/or Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy for six 70 {mu}m selected galaxies at z {approx} 1 in order to quantify the properties of the molecular gas reservoir, the contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the mid-IR luminosity, and the star formation efficiency (SFE = L{sub IR}/L{sup '}{sub CO}). The mid-IR spectra show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and our spectral decomposition suggests that the AGN makes a minimal contribution (<25%) to the mid-IR luminosity. The 70 {mu}m selected ULIRGs, which we find to be spectroscopic close pairs, are observed to have high SFE, similar to local ULIRGs and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies, consistent with enhanced IR luminosity due to an ongoing major merger. Combined with existing observations of local and high-redshift ULIRGs, we further compare the PAH, IR, and CO luminosities. We show that the ratio L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} decreases with increasing IR luminosity for both local and high-redshift galaxies, but the trend for high-redshift galaxies is shifted to higher IR luminosities; the average L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} ratio at a given L{sub IR} is {approx}3 times higher at high-redshift. When we normalize by the molecular gas, we find this trend to be uniform for galaxies at all redshifts and that the molecular gas is correlated with the PAH dust emission. The similar trends seen in the [C II] to molecular gas ratios in other studies suggests that PAH emission, like [C II], continues to be a good tracer of photodissociation regions even at high-redshift. Together the CO, PAH, and far-IR fine structure lines should be useful for constraining the interstellar medium conditions in high-redshift galaxies.

Pope, Alexandra; Kirkpatrick, Allison [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Wagg, Jeff [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Frayer, David [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Armus, Lee; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Desai, Vandana [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dickinson, Mark E., E-mail: pope@astro.umass.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Physics Case for Extended Tevatron Running  

SciTech Connect

Run II of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is currently scheduled to end late in 2011. Given the current performance of the collider and of the CDF and D0 detectors, it is estimated that the current data set could be approximately doubled with a run extended into 2014. A few examples are presented of the physics potential of these additional statistics. These are discussed in the context of the expected reach of the LHC 7 TeV data and the existing Tevatron data. In particular, an extraordinary opportunity is described which could probe the existence of a standard model Higgs boson with mass in the currently preferred region between 115 GeV and 150 GeV.

Wood, Darien R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 2: Run 248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 248 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on 8 February 1985 and continued through 5 May 1985. A total of 170 tons of Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was fed in 1,904 hours of operation. The primary run objectives included the demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal with the low-contact time (LCT) reactor in place at the thermal liquefaction unit (TLU) in both the Double Integrated T...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

First LQCD Physics Runs with MILC and P4RHMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial series of physics LQCD runs were submitted to the BG/L science bank with the milc and p4rhmc. Both runs were for lattice dimensions of 32{sup 2} x 8. The p4 calculation was performed with v2.0 QMP{_}MPI.X (semioptomized p4 code using qmp over mpi) and milc v7.2, also using RHMC, but not specifically optimized for BlueGene. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics, with the light quark masses 2-3 times their physics values and the strange quark mass set by m{sub ud} = 0.1m{sub s}. Job submissions was performed using the standard milc and p4 scripts provided on the ubgl cluster. Initial thermalized lattices for each code were also provided in this way. The only modifications for running on BG/L were to the directory names and the mT parameter which determines job durations (24 hrs on BG/L vs. 4 hrs on ubgl). The milc scripts were set to resubmit themselves 10 times, and the p4 scripts were submitted serially using the ''psub -d'' job dependency option. The runp4rhmc.tcsh could not be used to resubmit due to the 30m time limit imposed on interactive jobs. Most jobs were submitted to the smallest, 512 node partitions, but both codes could also run on the 1024 node partitions with a gain of only 30-50%. The majority of jobs ran without error. Stalled jobs were often indicative of a communication gap within a partition that LC was able to fix quickly. On some occasion a zero-length lattice file was deleted to allow jobs to restart successfully. Approximately 1000 trajectories were calculated for each beta value, see Table . The analysis was performed with the standard analysis scripts for each code, make{_}summary.pl for milc and analysis.tcsh for p4rhmc. All lattices, log files, and job submission scripts have been archived to permanent storage for subsequent analysis.

Soltz, R; Gupta, R

2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

A FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for obtaining a flux-limited sample of Ly{alpha} emitters from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data. We show that the multiple GALEX grism images can be converted into a three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one wavelength axis) data cube. The wavelength slices may then be treated as narrowband images and searched for emission-line galaxies. For the GALEX NUV grism data, the method provides a Ly{alpha} flux-limited sample over the redshift range z = 0.67-1.16. We test the method on the Chandra Deep Field South field, where we find 28 Ly{alpha} emitters with faint continuum magnitudes (NUV > 22) that are not present in the GALEX pipeline sample. We measure the completeness by adding artificial emitters and measuring the fraction recovered. We find that we have an 80% completeness above a Ly{alpha} flux of 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We use the UV spectra and the available X-ray data and optical spectra to estimate the fraction of active galactic nuclei in the selection. We report the first detection of a giant Ly{alpha} blob at z < 1, though we find that these objects are much less common at z = 1 than at z = 3. Finally, we compute limits on the z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} luminosity function and confirm that there is a dramatic evolution in the luminosity function over the redshift range z = 0-1.

Barger, A. J.; Wold, I. G. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cowie, L. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

THE EXTENDED HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SUPERNOVA SURVEY: THE RATE OF CORE COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE TO z {approx} 1  

SciTech Connect

We use a sample of 45 core collapse supernovae detected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope to derive the core collapse supernova rate in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 1.3. In redshift bins centered on (z) = 0.39, (z) = 0.73, and (z) = 1.11, we find rates of 3.00{sup +1.28}{sub -0.94} {sup +1.04}{sub -0.57}, 7.39{sup +1.86}{sub -1.52} {sup +3.20}{sub -1.60}, and 9.57{sup +3.76}{sub -2.80} {sup +4.96}{sub -2.80}, respectively, given in units of yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} 10{sup -4} h {sup 3}{sub 70}. The rates have been corrected for host galaxy extinction, including supernovae missed in highly dust-enshrouded environments in infrared bright galaxies. The first errors are statistical while the second ones are the estimated systematic errors. We perform a detailed discussion of possible sources of systematic errors and note that these start to dominate over statistical errors at z > 0.5, emphasizing the need to better control the systematic effects. For example, a better understanding of the amount of dust extinction in the host galaxies and knowledge of the supernova luminosity function, in particular the fraction of faint M {approx}> -15 supernovae, is needed to better constrain the rates. When comparing our results with the core collapse supernova rate based on the star formation rate, we find a good agreement, consistent with the supernova rate following the star formation rate, as expected.

Dahlen, Tomas; Riess, Adam G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Mobasher, Bahram, E-mail: dahlen@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Citrus County Extension Office From I-75, take Exit # 329 (old # 66), SR 44 and go West on SR 44 toward Inverness/Crystal River (approx. 17 miles). Follow SR 44  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on SR 44 toward Inverness/Crystal River (approx. 17 miles). Follow SR 44 through Inverness to traffic

Watson, Craig A.

126

The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon detector, part of the first LHCb trigger level (L0), has been built to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25 ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a Pr resolution of 20%. The detector has been built using Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier technology. The chambers are arranged in five stations, interspersed with iron filter placed along the beam pipe. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers and the measured performances are presented. The strategies foreseen for the detector calibration, the results of the space and time alignment efforts and few first running scenarios are discussed.

Furcas, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

128

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

129

Cloud Coverage in the Joint OSSE Nature Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is fundamentally dependent on the simulation of the global observing system used in the experiment. In many applications, a free-running numerical model simulation, called a nature run, is ...

Will McCarty; Ronald M. Errico; Ronald Gelaro

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

TianRun UILK LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name TianRun UILK LLC Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based joint venture formed by TianRun USA, Horizon Wind, and Dakota Wind to develop the UILK wind...

131

PHENIX Beam Use Proposal for RHIC Runs 5-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- larized proton collisions. Building on the successes of Runs 1-4, the requested running conditions of an Aerogel Cerenkov Counter (ACC). This detector, con- sisting of 160 elements of hydrophobic aerogel

Homes, Christopher C.

132

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

133

Entropy signature of the running cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renormalization group (RG) improved cosmologies based upon a RG trajectory of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) with realistic parameter values are investigated using a system of cosmological evolution equations which allows for an unrestricted energy exchange between the vacuum and the matter sector. It is demonstrated that the scale dependence of the gravitational parameters, the cosmological constant in particular, leads to an entropy production in the matter system. The picture emerges that the Universe started out from a state of vanishing entropy, and that the radiation entropy observed today is essentially due to the coarse graining (RG flow) in the quantum gravity sector which is related to the expansion of the Universe. Furthermore, the RG improved field equations are shown to possess solutions with an epoch of power law inflation immediately after the initial singularity. The inflation is driven by the cosmological constant and ends automatically once the RG running has reduced the vacuum energy to the...

Bonanno, Alfio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

LHC Computing: The First Run and Beyond  

SciTech Connect

Even in between the last two generations of high energy physics detectors there has been a tremendous amount of progress in the area of computing. The distributed computing systems used in the LHC are composed of large-scale facilities on 5 continents, executing over a million processing requests a day, and moving peta-bytes of data a month. In this presentation I will discuss the operational experience of the LHC experiments and the challenges faced in the first run. I will discuss how the techniques have evolved and I will cover future projects to improve the distributed computing infrastructure and services. I will close by speaking of some potential new technologies being explored.

Fisk, Ian [Michigan State Univeristy

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

ATLAS Trigger Performance and Initial Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient trigger will be crucial to charged Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a rejection factor of about 10^7 against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select signal events. Commissioning of the ATLAS trigger is progressing well, and much has already been done using cosmic rays and by replaying simulated physics events through the system. Detailed plans have been developed for commissioning with single LHC beams and the first collisions. The evolution of the ATLAS trigger towards stable running will be discussed in view of the searches for the charged Higgs boson. In particular, the determination of the trigger efficiency will be discussed, both in the case of the inclusive lepton triggers and the combined triggers needed for charged Higgs boson searches.

Winklmeier, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID: GOOGLE1 Overall Responsiveness 1.000 Overall ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Production-run software failure diagnosis via hardware performance counters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential and concurrency bugs are widespread in deployed software. They cause severe failures and huge financial loss during production runs. Tools that diagnose production-run failures with low overhead are needed. The state-of-the-art diagnosis techniques ... Keywords: concurrency bugs, failure diagnosis, performance counters, production run

Joy Arulraj; Po-Chun Chang; Guoliang Jin; Shan Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Designs of control charts with supplementary runs rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article studies the designs of the control charts with the supplementary runs rules (zone rules). It also investigates, compares and ranks 15 resultant control charts based on steady-state Average Run Length (ARL) that is evaluated by computer simulation. ... Keywords: Computer simulation, Control charts, Optimization design, Quality control, Runs rules

Sheng Zhang; Zhang Wu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

How Long For the Long-Run Equilibrium in a Cointegration System?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In economics the period of "long-run" often signifies the length of time within which transient fluctuations disappear, and a system eventually comes back to an equilibrium state (or path), if any. Among some interesting cases of long run analysis, the concept of cointegration is a relatively new concept of the long run equilibrium. This paper discusses how to determine the length of the long-run period for a cointegration relation. In an application to a consumption-income relation we found that the length of the long-run period for the relation is about ten quarters. Keywords: Long run equilibrium, cointegration. 1 Department of Economics, State University of New York - Albany, Albany, NY 12222. (518) 442-4926, jykim@cnsunix.albany.edu 1 1 Introduction The concept of cointegration defined by Engle and Granger (1987) has become useful for analyzing linear dynamic systems in economics. The existence of a cointegration relation among a set of variables implies that there exists a...

How Long; Long-run Equilibrium; Jae-young Kim; Jae-young Kim

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE SLOW DEATH (OR REBIRTH?) OF EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN z {approx} 0.1 GREEN VALLEY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim and Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call ''extended star-forming early-type galaxies'' (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that Almost-Equal-To 13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies with low-level ongoing star formation.

Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Salim, Samir [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47404 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jjfang@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

PDSF FAQ - Why don't my jobs run?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

don't my don't my jobs run? Why don't my jobs run? If your jobs are just sitting in the "qw" state and not starting you cannot ask SGE directly why they aren't running (that service is turned off for scalability) so you have to do some detective work. Things to consider include: - Is the cluster full? Maybe you just need to be patient, especially if your project doesn't have any shares. In that case your jobs won't run until the cluster isn't full. In any event your jobs can't run until some other jobs finish and sometimes there are a lot of relatively long jobs running. - Check your job's resource requirements. It might be that you are incorrectly specifying some resource or requesting something that is not available. For example you might be specifying "-l eliza18io=1" and

144

CONSTRAINTS ON THE ASSEMBLY AND DYNAMICS OF GALAXIES. I. DETAILED REST-FRAME OPTICAL MORPHOLOGIES ON KILOPARSEC SCALE OF z {approx} 2 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present deep and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope NIC2 F160W imaging at 1.6 {mu}m of six z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies with existing near-infrared integral field spectroscopy from SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope. The unique combination of rest-frame optical imaging and nebular emission-line maps provides simultaneous insight into morphologies and dynamical properties. The overall rest-frame optical emission of the galaxies is characterized by shallow profiles in general (Sersic index n < 1), with median effective radii of R{sub e} {approx} 5 kpc. The morphologies are significantly clumpy and irregular, which we quantify through a non-parametric morphological approach, estimating the Gini (G), multiplicity ({Psi}), and M{sub 20} coefficients. The estimated strength of the rest-frame optical emission lines in the F160W bandpass indicates that the observed structure is not dominated by the morphology of line-emitting gas, and must reflect the underlying stellar mass distribution of the galaxies. The sizes and structural parameters in the rest-frame optical continuum and H{alpha} emission reveal no significant differences, suggesting similar global distributions of the ongoing star formation and more evolved stellar population. While no strong correlations are observed between stellar population parameters and morphology within the NIC2/SINFONI sample itself, a consideration of the sample in the context of a broader range of z {approx} 2 galaxy types (K-selected quiescent, active galactic nucleus, and star forming; 24 {mu}m selected dusty, infrared-luminous) indicates that these galaxies probe the high specific star formation rate and low stellar mass surface density part of the massive z {approx} 2 galaxy population, with correspondingly large effective radii, low Sersic indices, low G, and high {Psi} and M{sub 20}. The combined NIC2 and SINFONI data set yields insights of unprecedented detail into the nature of mass accretion at high redshift.

Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Davies, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Shapley, A. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Erb, D. K.; Bouche, N. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Steidel, C. C. [California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cresci, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Analysis of Performance Accelerator Running ETMSP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates new approaches to parallel computer processing capable of accelerating certain classes of power system problems. The results show that a speedup of 30 times over conventional workstation computers is possible.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26/02 26/02 Run Shutdown Weekends Maintenance / AP Injector Startup University Holidays PPS Certification Injector / SPEAR Startup SLAC Closed Edited - Robleto, Scott 10 11 12 AP 13 14 12 AP MA/AP 13 14 15 8 9 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I T 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 4 25 26 29 30 28 30 5 6 5 6 8 9 22 16 17 15 16 N 23 24 25 5 17 18 19 Startup 23 24 23 22 21 1 2 3 MA/AP 10 4 5 AP 6 7 8 9 20 22 18 24 24 17 22 23 20 21 14 15 11 16 10 12 9 13 7 8 S T A 1 2 3 15 4 5 5 6 8 6 4 5 R T 8 1 7 6 7 U P 2 3 10 9 10 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 31 25 26 27 28 29 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 21 15 16 13 14 10 27 28 26 22 23 24 25 8 9 10 21 20 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 22 23 15 16 21 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 15 16 29 30 31 29 31 28 20 28 21 22 23 24 25 17 26 27 18 19 20 24

147

FY2003 Run Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/16/02 7/16/02 Run Maint/AP PPS Certification SLAC Closed Shutdown Startup Weekends University Holidays AP AP 15 8 9 10 11 12 14 12 AP MA/AP 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I 7 8 9 T S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I Edited by J. Robleto, B. Scott 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 N 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 29 30 31 10 5 6 5 6 7 8 9 22 23 MA/AP AP A E 5 17 18 19 10 11 12 9 MA/AP 18 Startup 24 23 22 21 16 17 15 1 2 3 15 10 4 5 AP 5 6 16 13 20 21 20 22 23 24 24 16 17 13 14 5 6 7 8 4 5 1 2 3 6 4 5 1 2 3 8 9 7 6 7 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 S T A R T U P 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 22 23 13 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 15 16 13 14 10 25 17 18 19 20 22 21 29 22 23 24 25 27 28 26 21 19 20 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 22 23 15 16 21 25 17 18 19 20 24 4 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 15 16 29 30 31 26 27 28

148

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations July 16, 2013 Printer-friendly version Shortly after Mira, the ALCF's new 10-petaflops supercomputer, entered...

149

Predicting Baseball Home Run Records Using Exponential Frequency Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new model, which uses the frequency of individuals' annual home run totals, is employed to predict future home run totals and records in Major League Baseball. Complete home run frequency data from 1903--2005 is analyzed, resulting in annual exponential distributions whose changes can be a used as a measure of progression in the sport and serve as a basis against which record-setting performances can be compared. We show that there is an 80% chance that Barry Bonds' current 73 home run record will be broken in the next 10 years, despite the longevity of previous records held by baseball legends Babe Ruth and Roger Marris.

Kelley, D J; Phillips, J A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Big Run, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigRun,Pennsylvania&oldid227772" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

151

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

152

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 35.0 55.0 75.0 95.0 115.0 135.0 155.0 175.0 195.0 215.0 235.0 255.0 275.0 295.0 315.0 Hours Run Number APS Run History Operational Statistics Average Fill Duration Without a...

153

FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Queueing Running Jobs HTC Mode MPMD and MPIEXEC FAQs Queueing and Running Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems Contents Is there a limit on stack size? What are typical boot times for a job My job had empty stdout, and the stderr looks like it died immediately after it started. What happened? Where can I find the details of a job submission? Back to top Is there a limit on stack size? There is no strict limit on the stack size. The stack and heap grow towards each other until a collision occurs. If your job terminates with an error

154

RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN  

SciTech Connect

Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2012 August 14, 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Coun- ties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. "We excavated and disposed of over five million pounds of contaminated soil from three specific sites along the stream, erected miles of fence and placed over 2,000 signs in order to make Lower Three Runs safe and to reduce our site's footprint by another 10 percent," said Chris

158

Improved power source for doubling the exchange time interval of LLC.  

SciTech Connect

This LDRD project attempts to use novel electrochemical techniques to understand the reaction mechanism that limits the discharge reaction of lithium CF{sub x} chemistry. If this advanced component development and exploratory investigations efforts are successful we will have a High Energy Density Li Primary Battery Technology with the capability to double the run time in the same volume, or provide the same energy in a much smaller volume. These achievements would be a substantial improvement over commercial Li/Thionyl chloride battery technology. The Li(CF{sub x}){sub n} chemistry has the highest theoretical energy (and capacity) and hence very attractive for long life battery applications. However, the practical open circuit voltage (OCV) is only 3.2 V which is {approx}1.3 V lower than the thermodynamic cell voltage (for an in depth explanation of the voltage depression refer to 'Introduction'). The presence of intermediate has been invoked to explain the lower OCV of the cell. Due to the reduction in cell voltage the cell out put is reduced by {approx}40%. To account for the initial voltage loss a mechanism has been proposed which involves the formation of a ternary compound (like C(LiF){sub x}). But neither its presence nor its nature has been confirmed. Our work will seek to develop understanding of the voltage depression with a goal to produce a primary battery with improved properties that will have significant impact in furthering advancements.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Improved power source for doubling the exchange time interval of LLC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This LDRD project attempts to use novel electrochemical techniques to understand the reaction mechanism that limits the discharge reaction of lithium CF{sub x} chemistry. If this advanced component development and exploratory investigations efforts are successful we will have a High Energy Density Li Primary Battery Technology with the capability to double the run time in the same volume, or provide the same energy in a much smaller volume. These achievements would be a substantial improvement over commercial Li/Thionyl chloride battery technology. The Li(CF{sub x}){sub n} chemistry has the highest theoretical energy (and capacity) and hence very attractive for long life battery applications. However, the practical open circuit voltage (OCV) is only 3.2 V which is {approx}1.3 V lower than the thermodynamic cell voltage (for an in depth explanation of the voltage depression refer to 'Introduction'). The presence of intermediate has been invoked to explain the lower OCV of the cell. Due to the reduction in cell voltage the cell out put is reduced by {approx}40%. To account for the initial voltage loss a mechanism has been proposed which involves the formation of a ternary compound (like C(LiF){sub x}). But neither its presence nor its nature has been confirmed. Our work will seek to develop understanding of the voltage depression with a goal to produce a primary battery with improved properties that will have significant impact in furthering advancements.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Commissioning Run of the CRESST-II Dark Matter Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CRESST cryogenic direct dark matter search at Gran Sasso, searching for WIMPs via nuclear recoil, has been upgraded to CRESST-II by several changes and improvements.We present the results of a commissioning run carried out in 2007. The basic element of CRESST-II is a detector module consisting of a large (~ 300 g) CaWO_4 crystal and a very sensitive smaller (~ 2 g) light detector to detect the scintillation light from the CaWO_4.Information from light-quenching factor studies allows the definition of a region of the energy-light yield plane which corresponds to tungsten recoils. A neutron test is reported which supports the principle of using the light yield to identify the recoiling nucleus. Data obtained with two detector modules for a total exposure of 48 kg-days are presented. Judging by the rate of events in the "all nuclear recoils" acceptance region the apparatus shows a factor ~ten improvement with respect to previous results, which we attribute principally to the presence of the neutron shield. In the "tungsten recoils" acceptance region three events are found, corresponding to a rate of 0.063 per kg-day. Standard assumptions on the dark matter flux, coherent or spin independent interactions,then yield a limit for WIMP-nucleon scattering of 4.8 \\times 10^{-7}pb, at M{WIMP} ~50 GeV.

G. Angloher; M. Bauer; I. Bavykina; A. Bento; A. Brown; C. Bucci; C. Ciemniak; C. Coppi; G. Deuter; F. von Feilitzsch; D. Hauff; S. Henry; P. Huff; J. Imber; S. Ingleby; C. Isaila; J. Jochum; M. Kiefer; M. Kimmerle; H. Kraus; J. -C. Lanfranchi; R. F. Lang; B. Majorovits; M. Malek; R. McGowan; V. B. Mikhailik; E. Pantic; F. Petricca; S. Pfister; W. Potzel; F. Proebst; W. Rau; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; K. Schaeffner; J. Schmaler; S. Scholl; W. Seidel; L. Stodolsky; A. J. B. Tolhurst; I. Usherov; W. Westphal

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

Furcas, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II  

SciTech Connect

The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

Lammel, S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Awarded 2.6 NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models September 11, 2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time for the U.S. Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore advanced climate change models at three of DOE's national laboratories as part of a three-year memorandum of understanding on collaborative climate research signed today by the two agencies. NOAA will work with climate change models as well as perform near real-time high-impact (non-production) weather prediction research using computing time on DOE Office of Science resources including two of the world's top

165

The progenitors of present-day massive red galaxies up to z {\\approx} 0.7 - finding passive galaxies using SDSS-I/II and SDSS-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive study of 250,000 galaxies targeted by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) up to z {\\approx} 0.7 with the specific goal of identifying and characterising a population of galaxies that has followed passive evolution (no mergers) as closely as possible. We compute a likelihood that each BOSS galaxy is a progenitor of the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) sample, targeted by SDSS-I/II up z {\\approx} 0.5, by using the fossil record of LRGs and their inferred star-formation histories, metallicity histories and dust content. We determine merger rates, luminosity growth rates and the evolution of the large-scale clustering between the two surveys, and we investigate the effect of using different stellar population synthesis models in our conclusions. We demonstrate that our sample is slowly evolving (of the order of 2 {\\pm} 1.5% Gyr-1 by merging) by computing the change in weighted luminosity-per-galaxy between the two samples, and that this result is robust to our choice of stell...

Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A; Maraston, Claudia; Skibba, Ramin A; Zehavi, Idit; Ross, Ashley J; Conroy, Charlie; Guo, Hong; Manera, Marc; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national ... Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions Posted By Office of Public Affairs

167

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

168

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Facility Brent Run Generating Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Genesee County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0777289°, -83.6773928° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0777289,"lon":-83.6773928,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

170

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 11:41am Addthis Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Economic Impact Editor's Note: This article is cross-posted from the Office of Fossil Energy. Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the Energy Department's long-running minority educational research program. The awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions program - are $200,000 each

171

DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) long running minority educational research program. The DOE awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMIs) program - are $200,000 each for projects that will address high-performance materials for long-term fossil energy applications, such as advanced ultrasupercritical

172

Running fermi with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout, performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running FERMI with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout,a lattice with one-stage compressor, it was thought at thetime that the two bunch compressors configuration was still

Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Holographic fermions with running chemical potential and dipole coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the properties of the holographic fermions in extremal $R$-charged black hole background with a running chemical potential, as well as the dipole coupling between fermions and the gauge field in the bulk. We find that although the running chemical potential effect the location of the Fermi surface, it does not change the type of fermions. We also study the onset of the Fermi gap and the gap effected by running chemical potential and the dipole coupling. The spectral function in the limit $\\omega\\rightarrow0$ and the existence of the Fermi liquid are also investigated. The running chemical potential and the dipole coupling altogether can make a non-Fermi liquid become the Landau-Fermi type.

Li Qing Fang; Xian-Hui Ge; Xiao-Mei Kuang

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANLHEPWF Note 184 June 3, 1999 Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run Wei Gai for AWA group Purpose: To verify efficient Wakefield energy coupling from stage I to...

175

First operational experience with the CMS Run Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Run Control System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) controls the sub-detector and central data acquisition systems and the high-level trigger farm of the experiment. ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

176

TianRun USA Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name TianRun USA Inc. Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based investment arm of Goldwind Science & Technology, Beijing Tianrun invested USD 3m to set up the...

177

Using Dynamic Tracing Sampling to Measure Long Running Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed cache simulation can be useful to both system developers and application writers to understand an application's performance. However, measuring long running programs can be extremely slow. In this paper we present a technique to use dynamic ...

Jeffrey Odom; Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth; Luiz DeRose; Kattamuri Ekanadham; Simone Sbaraglia

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Silicon detector upgrades for the Tevatron Run 2  

SciTech Connect

The current silicon devices being used by the D0 and CDF collaborations for the Tevatron Run 2a, which is expected to end in 2005 after accumulating about 2 fb{sup -1} of data, will need to be replaced due to radiation damage for the following data collection period designated as Run 2b. We will discuss these silicon replacement plans, the more uniform design of the detectors between D0 and CDF, and the current status of their fabrication.

M. Kruse

2002-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Pomeron fan diagrams with an infrared cutoff and running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By direct numerical calculations the influence of a physically relevant infrared cutoff and running coupling on the gluon density and structure function of a large nucleus is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the infrared cutoff changes the solutions very little. Running of the coupling produces a bigger change, considerably lowering both the saturation momentum and values of the structure functions.

M. A. Braun

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mill Run Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mill Run Wind Power Project Facility Mill Run Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Atlantic Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Exelon Location Mill Run PA Coordinates 39.921026°, -79.388666° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.921026,"lon":-79.388666,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Running Dry at the Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Securing sufficient supplies of fresh water for societal, industrial, and agricultural uses while protecting the natural environment is becoming increasingly difficult in many parts of the United States. Climate variability and change may exacerbate the situation through hotter weather and disrupted precipitation patterns that promote regional droughts. Achieving long- term water sustainability will require balancing competing needs effectively, managing water resources more holistically, and developing innovative approaches to water use and conserva- tion. Utility companies-which use substantial amounts of water for plant cooling and other needs-are doing their part by pursuing water-conserving

183

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities May 28, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts?

184

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Luminosity issues in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run  

SciTech Connect

Several luminosity issues are reviewed. Questions remain, which are stated for further investigation. Some suggestions are made for possible luminosity improvement. There are several factors affecting the luminosity in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run: (1) The highest bunch intensity at RHIC early store (1.5 hour after accramp in this note) in 2009 is 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. In 2008 run, it was 1.42 x 10{sup 11} protons, which gives rise to 30% higher luminosity if other conditions are the same. Yellow ramp efficiency is identified as one of the main problem. Meanwhile, the beam-beam induced loss in about 1 hour into collision accounts actually no less than the ramp. (2) The typical transverse emittance at early store is 13 {pi}{micro}m for bunch intensity of 10{sup 11} protons, but it is 17 {pi}{micro} for 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. The increase of the emittance implies a 30% difference in luminosity if other conditions are the same. The emittance growth with electron cloud below instability threshold may be partially responsible. Meanwhile, the Booster scraping may also be relevant. (3) The luminosity lifetime in 2009 run is significantly lower than that in 2005, 2006, and 2008 runs. At the beam-beam parameter of 0.01, the typical average luminosity lifetime in early store is 10 hours in 2009, and it is 15 hours in previous runs. Given 8 hours of store time, this implies more than 20% of the difference in integrated luminosity. The 0.7 m betastar adopted in 2009 might be relevant, but the evidence is not fully convincing. On the other hand, the continuing RF voltage ramp in store may be of concern. (4) In the last month of the run, the polarization at RHIC early store is declined from 60% to 55%, a 30% reduction in p{sup 4} factor. It is noted that the Booster scraping is reduced in order to increase bunch intensity at RHIC, and the source polarization is also declined at the same time. Questions regarding these issues are discussed, and some suggestions are made.

Zhang,S.Y.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The LSC Glitch Group : Monitoring Noise Transients during the fifth LIGO Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) glitch group is part of the LIGO detector characterization effort. It consists of data analysts and detector experts who, during and after science runs, collaborate for a better understanding of noise transients in the detectors. Goals of the glitch group during the fifth LIGO science run (S5) included (1) offline assessment of the detector data quality, with focus on noise transients, (2) veto recommendations for astrophysical analysis and (3) feedback to the commissioning team on anomalies seen in gravitational wave and auxiliary data channels. Other activities included the study of auto-correlation of triggers from burst searches, stationarity of the detector noise and veto studies. The group identified causes for several noise transients that triggered false alarms in the gravitational wave searches; the times of such transients were identified and vetoed from the data generating the LSC astrophysical results.

L. Blackburn; L. Cadonati; S. Caride; S. Caudill; S. Chatterji; N. Christensen; J. Dalrymple; S. Desai; A. Di Credico; G. Ely; J. Garofoli; L. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; R. Gouaty; C. Gray; A. Gretarsson; D. Hoak; T. Isogai; E. Katsavounidis; J. Kissel; S. Klimenko; R. A. Mercer; S. Mohapatra; S. Mukherjee; F. Raab; K. Riles; P. Saulson; R. Schofield; P. Shawhan; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; R. Stone; C. Vorvick; M. Zanolin; N. Zotov; J. Zweizig

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk ·This event will be held in recognition of Alex who is living already love him so much!" ­Alex Keefover Fus-ion: The process or result of joining two or more things

Mohaghegh, Shahab

188

Floodplain modeling for Paddy's Run at the DOE Fernald Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restoration work for an intermittent stream, Paddy's Run, in the boundaries of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, managed by Fluor Fernald, involved floodplain expansion and the installation of grade control structures. Floodplain ... Keywords: Fernald, HEC-RAS, RiverCAD, floodplain, surface water

Marek H. Zaluski; Mark A. Ewanic; Steve D. Dunstan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE-1: sample run book. [Four different bldgs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of DOE-1 energy analysis runs are presented for four different buildings: a simple structure; a 31-story office building; a modified 31-story office building with a solar-heating system; and a small medical-office building. The intention is to progress from minimal to complex uses of the program. The simple structure introduces the new user to DOE-1. The large office building demonstrates runs on a variety of systems and plant options. The modified office building is a more complex treatment that illustrates the use of DOE-1 to determine energy code compliance. The medical building demonstrates a number of available options, such as simulation of shading surfaces and use of heat recovery. The following is given for each run: a simplified drawing of the building, detailed specifications, DOE-1 input, and selected output reports. The building specifications were compiled to allow the reader to relate the input to the actual physical characteristics of the architecture, distribution system, and central plant for each building. The input shown is that echoed by the program, complete with line numbers supplied by the Building Design Language processor. All of the runs were made on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC 7600 computer using Version 1.4 of the DOE-1 (formerly Cal-ERDA) program.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Quantifying disturbance rejection of SLIP-like running systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speed and maneuverability at which legged animals can travel across rough and cluttered landscapes has provided inspiration for the development of legged robots with similar capabilities. Researchers have developed a number of robots that can run ... Keywords: Legged robot, biologically-inspired robot, disturbance rejection, stability

Bruce Miller; John Schmitt; Jonathan E Clark

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Performance monitoring strategies for effective running of commercial refrigeration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems often represent the largest electricity consumers in the supermarkets. Therefore there is a clear need for running these systems effectively. Performance monitoring uses different techniques to determine the actual system state. ... Keywords: COP, FDD, energy monitoring, performance measure, refrigeration

Martin Hrn?r; Petr Stluka

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The long-run evolution of energy prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Phoenix: an epidemic approach to time reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harsh deployment environments and uncertain run-time conditions create numerous challenges for postmortem time reconstruction methods. For example, motes often reboot and thus lose their clock state, considering that the majority of mote platforms lack ...

Jayant Gupchup; Douglas Carlson; R?zvan Mus?loiu-E.; Alex Szalay; Andreas Terzis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2077859°, -117.1092049° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2077859,"lon":-117.1092049,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

Dry Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1042277°, -84.330494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1042277,"lon":-84.330494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

SUMMARY OF HRE-2 RUN 13 (INITIAL POWER OPERATION)  

SciTech Connect

The first power operation of the HRE-2, referred to as Run 13, occurred in February 1958. In five days of power operation, the maximum sustained power was 1.5 Mw and the total power generated was 4B Mw-hr. During the first part of the power operation, the fuel solution contained very little internal recombination catalyst. This part of the run was characterized by high concentrations of radiolytic gas and significant loss of reactivity at very low powers. After an addition of copper and acid, reactivity losses were observed only nt higher powers. Power operation was terminated after samples showed high nickel concentrations in the fuel solution, indicating a very high stainless steel corrosion rate. Subsequent subcritical operation ended because of power wiring insulation failures. (auth)

Engel, J.R.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Hernandez-Fragoso, J.; Richardson, D.M.

1958-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Study of the Influence of Air Supply Temperature on Air Distribution in the Run-through Large Space Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduces the concept and features of run-through large space. By using CFD technology, the paper simulates a velocity field and temperature field in the important air conditioned zone of China's science and technology museum (new museum) under winter operating conditions. At the same time, the indoor air flow regulations are summarized according to the simulation results. On the above basis, a new solution for airflow control of the connection in a run-through large space is put forward. The conclusion of this paper will offer guidance and reference for the air conditioning design of homogeneous architecture.

Tian, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, M.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

THE ANALYSIS OF DEPOLARIZATION FACTORS IN THE LAST RHIC RUN.  

SciTech Connect

Polarized proton beams were accelerated successfully at RHIC up to 100 Gev with the use of Siberian Snakes. Although the snakes were designed to preserve polarization, the successful acceleration and storage of polarized beams was dependent also on beam characteristics, like closed orbit, betatron tunes and even betatron coupling. The high-order spin resonances were observed and evaluated. The paper summarizes depolarizing effects observed during the run.

PTITSYN,V.LUCCIO,A.U.RANJBAR,V.H.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

Snowmass Benchmark Points and Three-Loop Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the full three-loop beta-functions for the MSSM generalised to include additional matter multiplets in 5, 10 representations of SU(5). We analyse in detail the effect of three-loop running on the sparticle spectrum for the MSSM Snowmass Benchmark Points. We also consider the effect on these spectra of additional matter multiplets (the semi-perturbative unification scenario).

I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; A. F. Kord

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Succinct suffix arrays based on run-length encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A succinet full-text self-index is a data structure built on a text T = t1t2...tn, which takes little space (ideally close to that of the compressed text), permits efficient search for the ... Keywords: burrows-wheeler transform, compressed full-text self-indexes, empirical k-th order entropy, indexed string matching, run-length compression, suffix arrays, text retrieval

Veli Mkinen; Gonzalo Navarro

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Federal Reserve Bank of New York Staff Reports Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings and is being distributed to economists and other interested readers solely to stimulate discussion and elicit comments. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and are not necessarily reflective of views at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors. Repo Runs

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Search for gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's third science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the three LIGO interferometric detectors during their third science run. The search targets subsecond bursts in the frequency range 100-1100 Hz for which no waveform model is assumed, and has a sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude of hrss ~ 10^{-20} / sqrt(Hz). No gravitational wave signals were detected in the 8 days of analyzed data.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Estimation of the Long-run Average Relationship in Nonstationary Panel Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Econo metrics, New York, Wiley Makela, T. (2002): "Long runhas been explored by Makela (2002) He followed the

Sun, Yixiao

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Corps of Engineers, electrical power demand forecasts, and other criteria. The substantial electrical load to be met by all generating projects in the region, the Snake projects could be operated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.1: Flow and Spill Forecasts

Washington at Seattle, University of

206

The Long-Run Efficiency of Real-Time Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for any set of installed baseload, mid-merit, and peakerNote that from any given baseload, mid-merit, and peakerout to be the total of the baseload and mid-merit capacity.

Borenstein, Severin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Time lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The reactor was shut down on April 3, 2011 and restarted to low power on February 8, 2012. During the post-outage period, which runs until ...

209

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Calibration of the LIGO Gravitational Wave Detectors in the Fifth Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of three detectors built to detect local perturbations in the space-time metric from astrophysical sources. These detectors, two in Hanford, WA and one in Livingston, LA, are power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometers. In their fifth science run (S5), between November 2005 and October 2007, these detectors accumulated one year of triple coincident data while operating at their designed sensitivity. In this paper, we describe the calibration of the instruments in the S5 data set, including measurement techniques and uncertainty estimation.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M; Abernathy; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; Y. Aso; S. Aston; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; B. Behnke; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; M. Boyle; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; M. Brinkmann; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. Capano; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; C. Cepeda; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; C. A. Costa; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; K. Danzmann; K. Das; B. Daudert; G. Davies; A. Davis; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; P. Devanka; S. Dhurandhar; I. Di Palma; M. Daz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. Dueck; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; L. S. Finn; M. Flanigan; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. A. Garofoli; I. Gholami; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; C. Graef; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; P. Hall; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh--Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; D. Kozak; T. Krause; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; J. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; C. Mak; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; E. Maros; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. J. A. McKechan; G. Meadors; M. Mehmet; T. Meier; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menndez; R. A. Mercer; L. Merill; S. Meshkov; C. Messenger; M. S. Meyer; H. Miao; J. Miller; Y. Mino; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; B. Moe; S. D. Mohanty; S. R. P. Mohapatra; D. Moraru; G. Moreno; T. Morioka; K. Mors; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; A. Mullavey; H. Mller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. G. Murray; T. Nash; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; D. Nolting; E. Ochsner; J. O'Dell; G. H. Ogin; R. G. Oldenburg; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; C. Osthelder; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; A. Page; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; M. Pareja; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; L. Pekowsky; S. Penn; C. Peralta; A. Perreca; M. Pickenpack; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; V. Predoi; L. R. Price; M. Prijatelj; M. Principe; R. Prix; L. Prokhorov; O. Puncken; V. Quetschke; F. J. Raab; T. Radke; H. Radkins; P. Raffai; M. Rakhmanov; B. Rankins; V. Raymond; C. M. Reed; T. Reed; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies of the tight scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies have suggested that in the past BHs constituted a larger fraction of their host galaxies' mass. However, these arguments are limited by selection effects and difficulties in determining robust host galaxy masses at high redshifts. Here we report the first results of a new, complementary diagnostic route: we directly determine a dynamical host galaxy mass for the z = 1.3 luminous quasar J090543.56+043347.3 through high spatial resolution (0.''47, 4 kpc FWHM) observations of the host galaxy gas kinematics over 30 x 40 kpc using the European Southern Observatory/Very Large Telescope/SINFONI with laser guide star adaptive optics. Combining our result of M{sub dyn} = 2.05{sup +1.68}{sub -0.74} x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (within a radius 5.25 {+-} 1.05 kpc) with M{sub BH,MgII} = 9.02 {+-} 1.43 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, M{sub BH,H{alpha}} = 2.83{sup +1.93}{sub -1.13} x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, we find that the ratio of BH mass to host galaxy dynamical mass for J090543.56+043347.3 matches the present-day relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}, well within the IR scatter, and deviating at most by a factor of two from the mean. J090543.56+043347.3 displays clear signs of an ongoing tidal interaction and of spatially extended star formation at a rate of 50-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, above the cosmic average for a galaxy of this mass and redshift. We argue that its subsequent evolution may move J090543.56+043347.3 even closer to the z = 0 relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}. Our results support the picture in which any substantive evolution in these relations must occur prior to z {approx} 1.3. Having demonstrated the power of this modeling approach, we are currently analyzing similar data on seven further objects to better constrain such evolution.

Inskip, K. J.; Jahnke, K.; Rix, H.-W.; Van de Ven, G., E-mail: inskip@mpia.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

THE COSMOLOGICAL BULK FLOW: CONSISTENCY WITH {Lambda}CDM AND z {approx} 0 CONSTRAINTS ON {sigma}{sub 8} AND {gamma}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive estimates for the cosmological bulk flow from the SFI++ Tully-Fisher (TF) catalog. For a sphere of radius 40 h{sup -1} Mpc centered on the Milky Way, we derive a bulk flow of 333 {+-} 38 km s{sup -1} toward Galactic (l, b) = (276 deg., 14 deg.) within a 3{sup 0} 1{sigma} error. Within a radius of 100h{sup -1} Mpc we get 257 {+-} 44 km s{sup -1} toward (l, b) = (279 deg., 10 deg.) within a 6 deg. error. These directions are at 40 deg. to the Supergalactic plane, close to the apex of the motion of the Local Group of galaxies after the Virgocentric infall correction. Our findings are consistent with the {Lambda}CDM model with the latest Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) best-fit cosmological parameters, but the bulk flow allows independent constraints. For the WMAP-inferred Hubble parameter h = 0.71 and baryonic mean density parameter {Omega}{sub b} = 0.0449, the constraint from the bulk flow on the matter density, {Omega}{sub m}, the normalization of the density fluctuations, {sigma}{sub 8}, and the growth index, {gamma}, can be expressed as {sigma}{sub 8}{Omega}{sup {gamma}-0.55}{sub m}({Omega}{sub m}/0.266){sup 0.28} = 0.86 {+-} 0.11 (for {Omega}{sub m} {approx} 0.266). Fixing {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.8 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.266 as favored by WMAP, we get {gamma} = 0.495 {+-} 0.096. The constraint derived here rules out popular Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models at more than the 99% confidence level. Our results are based on the All Space Constrained Estimate (ACSE) model which reconstructs the bulk flow from an all space three-dimensional peculiar velocity field constrained to match the TF measurements. At large distances, ASCE generates a robust bulk flow from the SFI++ survey that is insensitive to the assumed prior. For comparison, a standard straightforward maximum likelihood estimate leads to very similar results.

Nusser, Adi [Physics Department and the Asher Space Science Institute-Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Davis, Marc, E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.il, E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Time Running Out: A Portrait of California Families Reaching the CalWORKs Time Limit in 2004, Detailed Research Findings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reported being sick or disabled, one-third knew that suchnot report being sick or disabled understood this to be theold age, disability, caring for a disabled family member, or

London, Rebecca A.; Mauldon, Jane G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automated compile-time and run-time techniques to increase usable memory in MMU-less embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Random access memory (RAM) is tightly-constrained in many embedded systems. This is especially true for the least expensive, lowest-power embedded systems, such as sensor network nodes and portable consumer electronics. The most widely-used sensor network ... Keywords: data compression, embedded system, wireless sensor network

Lan S. Bai; Lei Yang; Robert P. Dick

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

New Time Widget Puts Accurate Clocks on Web Pages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Time Widget Puts Accurate Clocks on Web Pages. ... Web widgets are small application programs designed to be run inside Web pages. ...

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

The State of Supersymmetry after Run I of the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these lectures I survey the state of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model in light of data from the first run of the LHC. After assessing pre-LHC expectations based on principles of naturalness and parsimony, I review the landscape of direct and indirect search limits at the LHC, including the implications of the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Finally, I survey several broad classes of supersymmetric models that are consistent with current data and enumerate the most promising search strategies and model-building directions for the future.

Nathaniel Craig

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Long-Run Evolution of Energy Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price evolution, and how it should be modeled? Can models of reversion to stochastically fluctuating trend lines help us forecast prices over horizons of 20 years or more? And what do the answers to these questions tell us about investment decisions that are dependent on prices and their stochastic evolution?

Robert S. Pindyck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Full core reactor analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160 k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics. (authors)

Jarrell, J. J.; Godfrey, A. T.; Evans, T. M.; Davidson, G. G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Search for gravitational-wave bursts in LIGO data from the fourth science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fourth science run of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational-wave detectors, carried out in early 2005, collected data with significantly lower noise than previous science runs. We report on a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts with arbitrary waveform in the 64-1600 Hz frequency range appearing in all three LIGO interferometers. Signal consistency tests, data quality cuts, and auxiliary-channel vetoes are applied to reduce the rate of spurious triggers. No gravitational-wave signals are detected in 15.5 days of live observation time; we set a frequentist upper limit of 0.15 per day (at 90% confidence level) on the rate of bursts with large enough amplitudes to be detected reliably. The amplitude sensitivity of the search, characterized using Monte Carlo simulations, is several times better than that of previous searches. We also provide rough estimates of the distances at which representative supernova and binary black hole merger signals could be detected with 50% efficiency by this analysis.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 4}Si{sub 2}C{sub 5}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6)  

SciTech Connect

We have prepared a new layered oxycarbide, [Al{sub 5.25(5)}Si{sub 0.75(5)}][O{sub 1.60(7)}C{sub 3.40(7)}], by isothermal heating of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}) at 2273 K near the carbon-carbon monoxide buffer. The crystal structure was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3m (centrosymmetric), Z=3, and hexagonal cell dimensions a=0.32464(2) nm, c=4.00527(14) nm and V=0.36556(3) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The reliability indices were R{sub wp}=4.45% (S=1.30), R{sub p}=3.48%, R{sub B}=2.27% and R{sub F}=1.25%. The crystal is composed of three types of domains with nearly the same fraction, one of which has the crystal structure of space group R3-bar m. The crystal structure of the remaining two domains, which are related by pseudo-symmetry inversion, is noncentrosymmetric with space group R3m. - Graphical Abstract: A new aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6). The crystal is composed of three types of domains (I, II and III), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al,Si){sub 4}(O,C){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al,Si)(O,C){sub 2}] single layers.

Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Sugiura, Keita [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Real Time Pricing and the Real Live Firm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response to electricity real-time prices: short run and longwith respect to real time prices has not been extensivelywere linked to real-time prices, most customers indicated

Moezzi, Mithra; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, Osman; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Hopper, Nicole

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Survey of Utility Experience with Real Time Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Electricity Real-Time Prices: Short Run and Longat the prevailing real time price. Because only marginalService Rate RTP: Real Time Price Rate Experimental Day

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 (will not work with VISTA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 for a terminal window to appear. The wait may be 30 to 70 seconds on some machines. 6. Use the terminal window, and shut down the X server. 12. Remove CD from drive. #12;[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January

Meagher, Mary

225

Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing conveyed perforating (TCP), underbalanced perforating, high shot density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems are some of the developments that have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development, described in this paper, is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements during a perforating run and has the capability of selectively firing a number of guns at different depths or times. These measurements include pressure, flow rate, temperature, GR, CCL, and cable tension. The simultaneous downhole measurements, in addition to providing better control of the perforating process, can in a single trip provide a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions.

Tariq, S.M.; Ayestaran, L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DOE-2 sample run book: Version 2.1E  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-2 Sample Run Book shows inputs and outputs for a variety of building and system types. The samples start with a simple structure and continue to a high-rise office building, a medical building, three small office buildings, a bar/lounge, a single-family residence, a small office building with daylighting, a single family residence with an attached sunspace, a ``parameterized`` building using input macros, and a metric input/output example. All of the samples use Chicago TRY weather. The main purpose of the Sample Run Book is instructional. It shows the relationship of LOADS-SYSTEMS-PLANT-ECONOMICS inputs, displays various input styles, and illustrates many of the basic and advanced features of the program. Many of the sample runs are preceded by a sketch of the building showing its general appearance and the zoning used in the input. In some cases we also show a 3-D rendering of the building as produced by the program DrawBDL. Descriptive material has been added as comments in the input itself. We find that a number of users have loaded these samples onto their editing systems and use them as ``templates`` for creating new inputs. Another way of using them would be to store various portions as files that can be read into the input using the {number_sign}{number_sign} include command, which is part of the Input Macro feature introduced in version DOE-2.lD. Note that the energy rate structures here are the same as in the DOE-2.lD samples, but have been rewritten using the new DOE-2.lE commands and keywords for ECONOMICS. The samples contained in this report are the same as those found on the DOE-2 release files. However, the output numbers that appear here may differ slightly from those obtained from the release files. The output on the release files can be used as a check set to compare results on your computer.

Winkelmann, F.C.; Birdsall, B.E.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hirsch, J.J.; Gates, S. [Hirsch (James J.) and Associates, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Distributional and Environmental Effects of Time-Varying Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Run E?ects of Real-Time Electricity Pricing, CSEM WP-133 (Severin. Time-Varying Retail Electricity Prices: Theoryand Practice, Electricity Restructuring: Choices and

Holland, Stephen P.; MANSUR, ERIN T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Certification of Instrumentation Techniques for Resources Management of Real-Time Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dynamic real-time systems have to meet timing requirements in unpredictable environments, where available resources might vary, running tasks might change, and task workloads might differ. (more)

Tan, Zhenyu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Santa Fe Metro Fleet Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... June 8, 2010 Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas " CNG buses are reliable, have cleaner-burning engines, offer increased oil life, and have lower fuel costs than diesel.

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania School Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... Feb. 16, 2013 Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas F ind out how schools in Pennsylvania transport students in compressed

231

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models September 11, 2008...

232

Using the Bran Luminosity Detectors for Beam Emittance Monitoring During LHC Physics Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MONITORING DURING LHC PHYSICS RUNS* A. Ratti", H.S. Matis,IP5 during each of the Physics Runs. This provides a toolthe luminous regions from the physics experiments. Operator

Ratti, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fun with sub-linear time algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provided that one is willing to use randomness and to tolerate an approximate answer, many computational problems admit ultrafast algorithms that run in less than linear time in the length of the input. In many interesting cases, even algorithms that ...

Luca Trevisan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

DiStravolo, M.A. [comp.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's Batch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF Batch System Introduction Quick Overview Setup Basic Idea Including a Tarball Using runManySections.py to Create Command File Running Compiled Root Macros Debugging Jobs Locally CERN (LSF) versus FNAL (Condor) Differences Introduction runManySections.py is designed to make it easy to run many different sections (or jobs) at once on the CMSLPC CAF or CERN's batch system. It is designed to complement CRAB as runManySections.py is designed to be used with non-cmsRun executables. The general idea is that you pass in a list of commands you would like run and you get the output of these commands back. It is currently configured to run for the Condor system at CMSLPC CAF and CERN's LSF batch system. It is very easy to configure to run on other

236

China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd Hua Run | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hua Run Hua Run Jump to: navigation, search Name China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) Place Shantou, Guangdong Province, China Zip 515041 Sector Wind energy Product A company engages in developing wind power project. References China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) is a company located in Shantou, Guangdong Province, China . References ↑ "China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=China_Resources_Wind_Power_Development_Co_Ltd_Hua_Run&oldid=343528

237

Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time independent and a time dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor operated valves (MOVs), motor driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine driven pumps (FDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78%) from environmental factors (standby time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63%) than standby time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby time stresses (approx. 78%). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk informed and performance based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

Lofgren, E.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Fairfax Station, VA (United States); Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

[Global warming and the running average sunspot number  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported in your pages that the Bush administration`s views and actions regarding how or whether to react to possible global warming due to greenhouse gases have been influenced by the so-called Marshall report. This unrefereed report, released by the George C. Marshall Institute, had as its principal conclusion the finding that the 0.5{degree} C global warming of the last century was mostly due to solar variability and, thus, the greenhouse warming of the 21st century can be expected to be a relatively small l{degree} C or so. The authors support this finding by comparing the 33-year running average sunspot number with the trend in annual average global temperature and noting the parallel between the two, especially during the 1940s--1960s when the temperature trend was downward. Subsequent letters to Science debated the merits of this and other conclusions contained in the report. I now present additional technical evidence which shows that, quite aside from the question of whether the data presented in the report support its conclusions, the actual figure on which the above conclusion is based is in error.

Fernau, M.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing  

SciTech Connect

SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; /Fermilab; St. Denis, R.; /Glasgow U.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measurement of the t tbar cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation measures the t{bar t} production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p{bar p} collider with center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 {+-} 0.1 fb{sup -1}. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t{bar t} events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t{bar t} production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.14 {+-} 0.25 (stat){sub -0.86}{sup +0.61}(sys) pb.

Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric; /Tufts U.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tan{beta} vs. M{sub A}, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; /Valencia U., IFIC

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

focused some of their time on ways to predict, mitigate, and control failure rates in wind turbines, thereby improving efficiency in wind-energy generation. Another student...

244

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-hr)...

245

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-...

246

Running backwards the Mermin device: Causality in EPR correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time reversal of Mermins reasoning is exemplified in the case of spin?0 photon pairs issuing from cascade transitions

O. Costa De Beauregard

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data is disclosed. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer. 3 figs.

Berlin, G.J.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, Gary J. (Beech Island, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, G.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

LCLS-scheduling-run_V_Ver9c.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tue Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day Com Com Com Com Com L421 Coffee Night L477 Robinson Gruebel (L304, run 4) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thur Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day L498 Yachandra L487 Sokoloswski-Tinten IH Bozek L447 Harmand Night IH Lemke L396 Scherz L396 Scherz L409 Boeglin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Day L399/433 Fromme/Neutze L467 Madsen Night Com Com Com L467 Mad L399/433 Fromme Com Com 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri

251

The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

Farrer, R.; Longshore, A. [comps.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 1: Run 247  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 247 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was to obtain performance data for the TSL system and the individual process units with particular emphasis on hydrotreating catalyst performance. Secondary objectives were to demonstrate operability for the system and the respective ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2/04 2/04 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup SLAC Closed Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays 17 MA/AP 18 MA 5 1 1 1 AP 3 4 7 4 9 5 6 8 10 20 10 11 12 11 AP 9 1 4 1 2 8 12 20 24 21 22 21 26 5 5 2 3 6 7 16 MA O 9 12 I 15 10 S 8 9 13 11 11 12 13 6 2 MA MA/AP AP 3 2 4 2 1 1 AP 3 T 17 17 18 16 16 4 3 13 14 12 8 14 15 U 20 10 21 13 MA 15 12 11 9 MA 4 5 5 3 MA 6 1 9 MA 16 13 3 4 1 13 M 5 12 11 M S C 8 11 M M 14 14 15 A E B M 31 M 29 28 MA 18 19 17 4 10 11 7 18 22 17 19 21 20 23 26 25 A 25 24 30 20 24 25 P 29 28 U 31 29 30 MA/AP 29 2003 2004 5 17 4 9 10 11 8 12 13 14 H D 15 16 14 O 13 N 7 User Conf. W 7 7 3 3 9 10 6 4 2 2 6 27 T 2003 2004 1 2 3 24 S 26 R 22 23 T AP 30 29 29 30 31 AP A M E 20 T 30 22 23 24 30 24 MA 25 N N 19 25 17 MA B 20 17 19 18 O W/ I S 27 C 7 8 6 14 15 16 7 10 9 8 10 6 6 7 5 17 15 MA 9 12 11 14 24 26 23 21 26 23 22 I N 2 3 5 2 3 4 8 1 S T 7 6 A L L 7 7 8 9 10 T 6 A I 11 12 I I 10 O 9 11 12 13 10 14 15 16 17 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 30 28 29 O N 22 23 28 20 13 14 15 16 18 19 25 26 O 22 18 27 24 27 22 23 24 30 29 28 21 12 13 22 31 25 23 21 29 30 13 14 27 19 26 24 25 15 16 27 28 29 28 27 26 29 N 28 I 31

254

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-E 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agreed to work with the United Nations to curb production and encourage ... 35 Run-E 2 XIE19990605.0194 Besides supplying crude oil to Cuba, the ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources is essen-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptable engines Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources; natural gas; hydrogen; synthetic fuels; biofuels including biogas, biodiesels, and alcohols--even syngas

Endres. William J.

256

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run MICHAEL YE,? JOHN ZYREN,?? AND JOANNE SHORE?? Abstract To better understand petroleum ...

257

Feasibility Test Run of C-12(e,e'K{sup +}) Reaction at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high quality and high duty factor (100%) electron beam at Jefferson Lab offers an opportunity to broaden their view of hypernuclear physics by studying the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction with high resolution. The present data represent a feasibility study of such a reaction on a carbon target. The test run was carried out during experiments E91-16 (Electroproduction of Kaons and Light Hypernuclei) and E93-18 (Kaon Electroproduction on p(e,e{prime}K{sup +})Y). These two experiments used liquid deuterium and hydrogen targets, respectively. There exist data on an aluminum target for the background calibration of the liquid targets which are suitable also for a feasibility study of electroproduction of hypernuclei. These data are still under analysis. The goal of this test run is to evaluate issues concerned with the electroproduction of hypernuclei. These issues include: (1) the quasi-free production rate, which had not been measured previously, (2) random coincidence background, (3) keon identification over a possibly large hadronic background, and (4) possible evaluation of the production rate of the bound hypernuclear structures. This test run will supply significant knowledge for running high quality hypernuclear experiments at Jefferson Lab. The spectroscopy of hypernuclei has been studied mainly in two ways: the strangeness-exchange reaction (K{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}), and associated strangeness production ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}). The (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction has the advantage of exciting both natural- and unnatural-parity states and the possibility of obtaining good energy resolution. The cross section for the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is about a hundred times smaller than for the corresponding hadronic production reactions but it is compensated for by the availability of high intensity and high duty factor electron beams. In order to optimize the production rate, the kinematic setting requires both the scattered electron and kaon to be detected at very forward angles. The test run was not optimized for hypernuclear production, but it serves as an important technical evaluation for future hypernuclear programs at Jefferson Lab. The first high-resolution spectroscopy experiment on p-shell lambda hypernuclei is tentatively scheduled to run in 1999 in Hall C at Jefferson Lab.

Wendy Hinton

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Streamlined determination of processive run length and mechanochemical coupling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RecBCD helicase determined from single turnover chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies. J. Mol. Biol, for both basic research and technological applications. Here, we present a streamlined analytical method of kinetic time courses of NTP hydrolysis that have not been addressed in previous analyses, and also

Derényi, Imre

260

When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue June 8, 2011 - 5:25pm Addthis Wendy Wolfson...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Asymmetric trajectory generation and impedance control for running of biped robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online asymmetric trajectory generation method for biped robots is proposed to maintain dynamical postural stability and increase energy autonomy, based on the running stability criterion defined in phases. In a support phase, an asymmetric trajectories ... Keywords: Angular momentum, Asymmetric trajectory, Biped robot, Impedance control, Running stability

Ohung Kwon; Jong Hyeon Park

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

PoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- gency situation handling were defined, e.g. remote shifter replacement with a local (Fnal) one in casePoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment and the Remote Operation Facilities T the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with enphasis on the remote monitoring shift

263

Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DZero Experiment Run 1 (1992-1996) Event Display Gallery from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This web page provides access to images captured during D0 experiments Run I. In addition, the user can see live event displays from the current Run II for both the CDF and the DZero experiments at http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/live_events/index.html. Another interesting offering from the D0 groups at Fermilab is the large collection of "Plain English Summaries" of their published reports and papers. These Summaries are excellent for layman's understanding of the high energy physics research done at Fermilab and can serve as introductions to the published papers themselves. The Summaries are at http://www-d0.fnal.gov/public/pubs/d0_physics_summaries.html for Run I and http://www-d0.fnal.gov/Run2Physics/WWW/results/summary.htm for Run II.

266

Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, I. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Advanced Photovoltaics Development Center, Advanced Energy Research Center, Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., 108 Ohmori, Anpachi-cho, Anpachi-gun, Gifu 503-0195 (Japan)

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Runtime Monitoring of Timing Constraints in Distributed Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Embedded real-time systems often operate under strict timing and dependability constraints. To ensure responsiveness, these systems must be able to provide the expected services in a timely manner even in the presence of faults. In this paper, we describe a run-time environment for monitoring of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems. In particular, we focus on the problem of detecting violations of timing assertions in an environment in which the real-time tasks run on multiple processors, and timing constraints can be either inter-processor or intra-processor constraints. Constraint violations are detected at the earliest possible time by deriving and checking intermediate constraints from the user-specified constraints. If the violations must be detected as early as possible, then the problem of minimizing the number of messages to be exchanged between the processors becomes intractable. We characterize a sub-class of timing constraints that occur commonly in distribu...

Farnam Jahanian; Ragunathan Rajkumar; Sitaram C. V. Raju

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for Beam Time Apply for Beam Time NEXT PROPOSAL DEADLINE: March 7, 2014 @ 11:59 PM (Chicago time) Submit Proposal » SEE ALSO: Calendar: deadlines, run & review dates Help Page: frequently asked questions, tips for success, common errors, blank forms, instructions Review Criteria Sectors Directory: check CAT websites for info about managed beam time The Run 2014-2 proposal submission deadline is 11:59 p.m. (Chicago time) March 7, 2014. The system will open to accept proposals beginning December 20, 2013. NEW USERS: to avoid delays and to make the most of your time on site, read Become a User. You must register as a user and receive a badge number before submitting a proposal. About the Beam Time Request Process All beam time at the APS must be requested each cycle through the web-based

269

Search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first year of the fifth LIGO science run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results obtained from an all-sky search for gravitational-wave (GW) bursts in the 64-2000 Hz frequency range in data collected by the LIGO detectors during the first year (November 2005--November 2006) of their fifth science run. The total analyzed live time was 268.6 days. Multiple hierarchical data analysis methods were invoked in this search. The overall sensitivity expressed in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude h{sub rss} for gravitational-wave bursts with various morphologies was in the range of 6x10{sup -22} Hz{sup -1/2} to a fewx10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. No GW signals were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 3.75 events per year on the rate of strong GW bursts was placed at the 90% confidence level. As in our previous searches, we also combined this rate limit with the detection efficiency for selected waveform morphologies to obtain event rate versus strength exclusion curves. In sensitivity, these exclusion curves are the most stringent to date.

Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Barton, M. A.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Influence of the Magnetic Field on Running Penumbral Waves in the Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained using both ground- and space-based instrumentation, to investigate the role magnetic field inclination angles play in the propagation characteristics of running penumbral waves in the solar chromosphere. Analysis of a near-circular sunspot, close to the center of the solar disk, reveals a smooth rise in oscillatory period as a function of distance from the umbral barycenter. However, in one directional quadrant, corresponding to the north direction, a pronounced kink in the period-distance diagram is found. Utilizing a combination of the inversion of magnetic Stokes vectors and force-free field extrapolations, we attribute this behaviour to the cut-off frequency imposed by the magnetic field geometry in this location. A rapid, localised inclination of the magnetic field lines in the north direction results in a faster increase in the dominant periodicity due to an accelerated reduction in the cut-off frequency. For the first time we reveal how th...

Jess, D B; Van Doorsselaere, T; Keys, P H; Mackay, D H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 3: Run 250  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 250 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode of operation. In CC-ITSL the products from the thermal (first stage) reactor are sent directly ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

OVERVIEW OF BEAM STUDIES AT RHIC DURING THE YEAR 2000 RUN.  

SciTech Connect

During the Year 2000 run, RHIC has been commissioned and brought into operation reaching 10% of the design luminosity. A program for beam studies and machine development has been setup before the run with the goal of improving machine performance. The plan was implemented during the run in a series of beam studies, focusing initially on interaction region correction, intrabeam scattering, 3-dimensional beam reconstruction and luminosity optimization. An overview of the results is given with pointers to individual contributions where data are presented in more detail. The program for dedicated machine development at RHIC during the Year 2001 is reviewed and discussed.

PILAT,F.; BAI,M.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recent beauty results from CDF and the Run-II upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the most recent results from the Collider Detector Facility (CDF) from 110 pb{sup -1} of data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron from 1992 to 1995. Improved measurements of B meson spectroscopy, lifetimes, and searches for new particle states are presented. Evidence for the effectiveness of same side tagging techniques in the context of mixing measurements is shown with applicability for CP violation studies in Run-II explained. The planned upgrades of importance to {ital b} physics for Run-II are briefly detailed with an emphasis on the expected physics reach in Run-II by CDF.

Huffman, B.T. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States); CDF Collaboration

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Can we predict long-run economic growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For those concerned with the long-term value of their accounts, it can be a challenge to plan in the present for inflation-adjusted economic growth over coming decades. Here, I argue that there exists an economic constant that carries through time, and that this can help us to anticipate the more distant future: global economic wealth has a fixed link to civilization's overall rate of energy consumption from all sources; the ratio of these two quantities has not changed over the past 40 years that statistics are available. Power production and wealth rise equally quickly because civilization, like any other system in the universe, must consume and dissipate its energy reserves in order to sustain its current size. One perspective might be that financial wealth must ultimately collapse as we deplete our energy reserves. However, we can also expect that highly aggregated quantities like global wealth have inertia, and that growth rates must persist. Exceptionally rapid innovation in the two decades following 19...

Garrett, Timothy J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc^3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range 5 10^-22 Hz^-1/2 to 1 10^-20 Hz^-1/2. The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

279

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

280

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? September 16, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Shannon told you about biodiesel, a renewable fuel that can power a vehicle using less fuel and producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. DOE has an Alternative Fuel Station Locator that can help drivers find the nearest fueling station to fill up their vehicles. Would you consider driving a vehicle that can run on biodiesel? Why or why not? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

282

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl oommf12a4pre-20100719bis/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl --- oommf12a4pre ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

The impact of "Never Run Out" policy assured supply chain with dual reorder point expediting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing a big supply chain for one of the largest quick service restaurant companies, especially when the company has a policy called "Never Run Out," is very challenging. A traditional way of managing inventory requires ...

Lee, Gil Su

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

Moyer, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-B 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 9 Run-B 2 XIE19971228.0012 The United States has pressured Kazakhstan to shelve a plan for pipeline through Iran in favor of a US backed ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative on Maryland Power Sectors Costs and CO2 Emissions Speaker(s): Yihsu Chen Date: June 14, 2007 - 12:00pm...

287

Selection of tau leptons with the CDF Run 2 trigger system  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented triggers for hadronically decaying tau leptons within a framework of the CDF Run 2 trigger system. We describe the triggers, along with their physics motivations, and report on their initial performance.

A. Anastassov; S. Baroiant; M. Chertok

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of a Fast-Running Urban Dispersion Modeling System Using Joint Urban 2003 Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban dispersion modeling system was evaluated using the Joint Urban 2003 field data. The system consists of a fast-running urban airflow model (RUSTIC, for Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants) that is coupled with a ...

Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

IR Radiation from Trees to a Ski Run: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately calculating the surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is crucial when determining snow surface temperature and other snow-related variables, knowledge of which is important for ski racing. Downwelling longwave radiation can ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year Year Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A- hr) Hours of Top-up Scheduled Top-up Injector Availability MTBF 1998 4465.9 4163.2 93.22% 124 2.4 0.71 321.2 0.0 N/A 33.6 1999 5053.4 4767.7 94.35% 176 1.6 0.89 380.7 0.0 N/A 27.1 2000 5047.2 4723.8 93.59% 160 2.0 0.81 390.2 0.0 N/A 29.5 2001 5000.3 4788.7 95.77% 188 1.1 0.94 409.8 1032.0 96.1% 25.5 2002 4999.0 4855.4 97.13% 147 1.0 0.73 469.1 3680.0 94.9% 33.0 2003 4912.0 4772.5 97.16% 107 1.3 0.54 467.6 3592.0 97.6% 44.6 2004 5225.0 5112.5 97.85% 89 1.3 0.42 509.9 3865.6 97.9% 57.4 2005 5001.5 4931.0 98.59% 49 1.4 0.24 433.7 3976.5 98.5% 100.6 2006 5000.0 4875.5 97.51% 57 2.2 0.28 488.9 3928.0 97.3% 85.5 2007 4832.0 4750.8 98.32% 49 1.7 0.25 476.2 3816.0 98.4% 97.0 2008 4588.1 4478.8

291

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Beuf, Guillaume

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Guillaume Beuf

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Time dependence of liquid-helium fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluorescence following an ionizing radiation event in liquid helium is observed and studied in the temperature range from 250 mK to 1.8 K. The fluorescence exhibits significant structure including a short ({approx}10 ns) strong initial pulse followed by single photons whose emission rate decays exponentially with a 1.6-{mu}s time constant. At an even longer time scale, the emission rate varies as '1/time' (inversely proportional to the time after the initial pulse). The intensity of the '1/time' component from {beta} particles is significantly weaker than those from {alpha} particles or neutron capture on {sup 3}He. It is also found that for {alpha} particles, the intensity of this component depends on the temperature of the superfluid helium. Proposed models describing the observed fluorescence are discussed.

McKinsey, D.N.; Brome, C.R.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Korobkina, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin-Wannsee (Germany); Huffman, P.R.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The evolution of the width of X-ray flares with time in Gamma-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

We present one of the most intriguing results obtained with an updated catalog of 113 early time (i.e. t{sub pk} < or approx. 1000 s) and 36 late time (i.e. t{sub pk} > or approx. 1000 s) X-ray flares detected by Swift in the afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB): the evolution of the width of the flares with time. This result, together with other properties investigated on early and late time flares and bright flares, provides a clear observational property that every model aiming at explaining the GRB emission has to face.

Bernardini, Maria Grazia [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); ICRANet, P.le della Repubblica 10, I-65100 Pescara (Italy); Chincarini, Guido; Margutti, Raffaella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Physics Dept., P.zza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Residential response to price changes in natural gas service: A short-run analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential consumer demand for natural gas services is determined by numerous components including natural gas and competing fuel prices, weather patterns, appliance ownership characteristics, income, and energy conservation measure implementation. This study utilizes household-level data on a set of the determinants of residential natural gas demand, combined with corresponding consumption observations, to analyze the price response over the [open quotes]short-run[close quotes] period, in which primary natural gas-consuming appliances are fixed. Two model specifications are employed in this study to model the natural gas demand function and derive short-run price elasticity estimates. These are the Error Components (EC) and Fixed Effects (FE) models. These specifications result in elastic short-run responses estimates ranging between [minus]2.164 and [minus]7.015. These values contrast with the inelastic short-run estimated responses presented in previous empirical work, and the likelihood of actually observing such large short-run responses is expected to be small. The large estimates developed in the current study are evidently due to the use of household-specific data that incorporates disaggregated factors that influence monthly fluctuations in demand. This level of detail is subsumed within the aggregated data employed in prior studies. The price elasticity estimates developed in this study are directly applicable to short-run fuel demand analyses. The estimates are also applicable to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy conservation programs.

Wilson, P.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sensitivity to Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescences Achieved during LIGO's Fifth and Virgo's First Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. We present noise spectral density curves for each of the four detectors that operated during these science runs which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors for CBC searches. These spectra are intended for release to the public as a summary of detector performance for CBC searches during these science runs.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; S. Aoudia; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; K. G. Arun; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Astone; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; S. Bigotta; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; C. Boccara; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; C. Corda; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; J. -P. Coulon; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; A. Dari; K. Das; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; M. Davier; G. Davies; A. Davis; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; P. Devanka; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. Dueck; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; L. Gammaitoni; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; I. Gholami; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; P. Hall; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh--Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; C. Kim; H. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; T. Krause; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; J. Li; T. G. F. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; J. M. Mackowski; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; E. Majorana; C. Mak; N. Man; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; E. Maros; J. Marque; F. Martelli

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gain Time Reclaiming in High Performance Real-Time Java Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The run-time characteristics of Java, such as high frequency of method invocation, dynamic dispatching and dynamic loading, make Java more difficult than other object-oriented programming languages, such as C++, for conducting Worst-Case Execution Time (WCET) analysis. To offer a more flexible way to develop object-oriented real-time applications in the realtime Java environment without loss of predicability and performance, we propose a novel gain time reclaiming framework integrated with WCET analysis. This paper demonstrates how to improve the utilisation and performance of the whole system by reclaiming gain time at run-time. Our approach shows that integrating WCET with gain time reclaiming can not only provide a more flexible environment, but it also does not necessarily result in unsafe or unpredictable timing behaviour.

Erik Yu-Shing Hu; Andy Wellings; Guillem Bernat

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Testing of the TriP Chip Running at 132 nsec Using a Modified AFE Board  

SciTech Connect

In this note we describe the first set of tests done with a sample of TriP chips that were mounted on a modified AFE board. The modifications consisted of different firmware and the replacement of one power supply switch. The board used was a standard AFEIc board (red type) on which new MCMs (MCMIIs) were mounted. The new MCMs were designed to support the TriP and emulate the SVX for readout when mounted on an AFEIc board. The TriP and the MCMs are described in Ref. [1]. Two versions of the MCMII were designed and built: one (MCMIIb) supports two TriP chips wirebonded directly to the MCM substrate. The other, (MCMIIc) supports one TriP which can be either wirebonded directly or packaged into a standard TQFP surface mount package. Due to space constraints, this MCM can support only 1 TriP. We tested 6 TriP chips on 3 different MCMIIb (MCMIIb-1, MCMIIb-2 and MCMIIb-3) and 2 other TriPs were tested on MCMIIc, one of them with an unpackaged TriP (MCMIIc-1) and the other with a packaged TriP (MCMIIc-2). A set of 10 programable internal registers control the TriP operation, the description of these registers can be found in [1]. Table 1 shows the values used for the tests described in this note. In Ref. [1] there is a description of the signals that are needed to operate the TriP chip. We implemented in a Field Programable Gate Array (FPGA), also part of the MCM, a set of shift registers that allow us to download via the 1553 interface to the AFE board, any desired timing for the signals that the FPGA has to send to the TriP chip. These registers are run with a 121.21 MHz clock (which is 16x the crossing clock and phase locked to it), which means that each bit corresponds to a time interval of 8.25 nsec. Finer control of timing is possible, but this changing the programing of the FPGA and recompiling. The bits downloaded to these shift registers inside the TriP are listed in Table 2.

Juan Estrada et al.

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

302

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts using data from LIGO Science Run 5 and Virgo Science Run 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with 137 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. The data used in this analysis were collected from 2005 November 4 to 2007 October 1, and most of the GRB triggers were from the Swift satellite. The search uses a coherent network analysis method that takes into account the different locations and orientations of the interferometers at the three LIGO-Virgo sites. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave burst signals associated with this sample of GRBs. Using simulated short-duration (<1 s) waveforms, we set upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves associated with each GRB. We also place lower bounds on the distance to each GRB under the assumption of a fixed energy emission in gravitational waves, with typical limits of D ~ 15 Mpc (E_GW^iso / 0.01 M_o c^2)^1/2 for emission at frequencies around 150 Hz, where the LIGO-Virgo detector network has best sensitivity. We present astrophysical interpretations and implications of these results, and prospects for corresponding searches during future LIGO-Virgo runs.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; F. Acernese; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; M. Alshourbagy; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; S. Aoudia; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; K. G. Arun; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; C. Barker; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Beker; M. Benacquista; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; S. Bigotta; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; C. Boccara; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; C. Van Den Broeck; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; G. Brunet; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; A. Bullington; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; F. Carbognani; L. Cardenas; S. Caride; G. Castaldi; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; T. Cokelaer; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. C. Corbitt; C. Corda; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; J. -P. Coulon; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; A. Dari; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. Dueck; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Faltas; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; A. Franzen; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; V. Galdi; L. Gammaitoni; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goezetler; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; V. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; G. Guidi; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. D. Hammond; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; D. Hoyland; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; T. Isogai; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Sancho de la Jordana; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. La Penna; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; H. Lei; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; C. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; T. B. Littenberg; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Longo; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; J. -M. Mackowski; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; E. Majorana; N. Man; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; J. Marque; F. Martelli; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; A. Masserot; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; D. J. A. McKechan; K. McKenzie; M. Mehmet; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menndez

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running March 16, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. “WIPP is America’s only and the world’s best,” Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. "WIPP is America's only and the world's best," Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. CARLSBAD, N.M. - If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office

306

PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces November 14, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured) serves as a control and doesn’t get changed during any of the experiments. | Photo courtesy of PNNL. At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in

307

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction regions substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the Year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction region substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. Coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge, due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. This suggests the intriguing possibility that the alga might exploit nonlinear mechanics---as opposed to sophisticated biochemical circuitry as used by bacteria---to control its behavior.

Rachel R. Bennett; Ramin Golestanian

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

GridRun: A lightweight packaging and execution environment forcompact, multi-architecture binaries  

SciTech Connect

GridRun offers a very simple set of tools for creating and executing multi-platform binary executables. These ''fat-binaries'' archive native machine code into compact packages that are typically a fraction the size of the original binary images they store, enabling efficient staging of executables for heterogeneous parallel jobs. GridRun interoperates with existing distributed job launchers/managers like Condor and the Globus GRAM to greatly simplify the logic required launching native binary applications in distributed heterogeneous environments.

Shalf, John; Goodale, Tom

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High-pressure hydrogen apparatus for PCT studies up to approx. 700 MPa and 200/sup 0/C: preliminary results on LaCo/sub 5/H/sub 9/ /sub 0/ at 21/sup 0/C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An apparatus has been developed to react samples with hydrogen at pressures of up to 689.5 MPa (6805 atm) and temperatures of up to 200/sup 0/C. It is being used to determine whether RT/sub 5/ and RT/sub 3/ compounds (where R is a lanthanide element and T is a 3-d transition element, usually cobalt or nickel) ''fill up'' with hydrogen when subjected to high hydrogen pressures. Preliminary experiments with LaCo/sub 5/ in this apparatus showed a new (third) plateau at 126.7 MPa (1250 atm) in the PCT diagram; only two plateaus have previously been reported. There is an abrupt upturn at an H/LaCo/sub 5/ ratio of approximately 8.23. A second run showed an upturn at 8.76. The maximum loading is nine atoms of hydrogen.

Lakner, J.F.; Steward, S.A.; Uribe, F.

1976-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Entropic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

None

314

Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II  

SciTech Connect

Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy Policy, 735 S. State St. #5224, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Miller: Economic Analysis Group, U.S. Department of intervention, the market is likely to produce efficient outcomes.1 We examine the empirical relationship

Edwards, Paul N.

316

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING The Use of Different Technologies During a Medical Interview: Effects on Perceived Quality of Care Julia M. DeBlasio, Britt Caldwell of Technology GVU Technical Report # GIT-GVU-07-13 October, 2007 #12;Medical Technology 2 Abstract This two

317

Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

318

Segmentation of historical machine-printed documents using Adaptive Run Length Smoothing and skeleton segmentation paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the valuable historical collections. In order to achieve accu- rate recognition results, a robust and efficientSegmentation of historical machine-printed documents using Adaptive Run Length Smoothing Stamatopoulos b , Nikos Papamarkos a a Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University

Gatos, Basilios

319

Statistical emulation of climate model projections based on precomputed GCM runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new approach for emulating the output of a fully coupled climate model under arbitrary forcing scenarios that is based on a small set of precomputed runs from the model. We express temperature and precipitation as simple functions of ...

Stefano Castruccio; David J. McInerney; Michael L. Stein; Feifei Liu; Robert L. Jacob; Elisabeth J. Moyer

320

Modeling the Downwelling Longwave Radiation over a Groomed Ski Run under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is important to ski racing. Variables such as snow-surface temperature and liquid water content depend upon the surface radiation budget and are crucial to preparing fast skis. This case study ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Authority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF COMMUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The magnitude of the disaster overwhelmed institutions normally responsible for providing relief--forums, bulletin boards, blogs, and personal websites--to coordinate a massive grassroots response to the disasterAuthority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF

Kiesler, Sara

322

A library to run evolutionary algorithms in the cloud using mapreduce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss ongoing development of an evolutionary algorithm library to run on the cloud. We relate how we have used the Hadoop open-source MapReduce distributed data processing framework to implement a single "island" with a potentially very large population. ... Keywords: Hadoop, cloud computing, evolutionary algorithms, mapreduce

Pedro Fazenda; James McDermott; Una-May O'Reilly

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A new coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture in pressurized pipelines has been developed. The pipe material and fracture propagation have been modeled using the finite-element method with a ductile fracture criterion. The ... Keywords: CFD, FEM, Fluid-structure, Fracture, Leak, Pipeline

H. O. Nordhagen; S. Kragset; T. Berstad; A. Morin; C. Drum; S. T. Munkejord

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

1D Solution NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1D Solution NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP) Jerry Hu, x7914 NMR yourself; Take everything ferromagnetic or vulnerable to magnetic field, such as mechanic watches them somewhere away from magnets; Table of Contents 1D Solution NMR Procedure

Akhmedov, Azer

325

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endrczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. K. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These ...

Briggs, M S; Hurley, K C; Jenke, P A; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X -L; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10{sup -2} M {sub Sun} c {sup 2} at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short-hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc, respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agatsuma, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 3128W (run 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-East Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from an open K-East canister (3128W) during the first fuel selection campaign conducted in 1995, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. Although it was judged to be breached during in-basin (i.e., K-Basin) examinations, visual inspection of this fuel element in the hot cell indicated that it was likely intact. Some scratches on the coating covering the cladding were identified before the furnace test. The drying test was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System located in G-Cell within the PTL. This test system is composed of three basic systems: the in-cell furnace equipment, the system gas loop, and the analytical instrument package. Element 3128W was subjected to the drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step. Results of the Pressure Rise and Gas Evolution Tests suggest that most of the free water in the system was released during the extended CVD cycle (68 hr versus 8 hr for the first run). An additional {approximately}0.34 g of water was released during the subsequent HVD phase, characterized by multiple water release peaks, with a principle peak at {approximately}180 C. This additional water is attributed to decomposition of a uranium hydrate (UO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O/UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) coating that was observed to be covering the surface of the fuel element to a thickness of {approximately}1.6 mg/cm{sup 2}. A limited quantity of hydrogen ({approximately}9 mg) was also released during HVD, mainly at temperatures above 300 C, likely from hydride decomposition.

Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Marshman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flament, T.A. [Numatec Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analyses and applications of pressure, flow rate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run. [Measurement while perforating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing-conveyed perforating, underbalanced perforating, high-shot-density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development described in this paper is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements (including pressure, flow rate, temperature, gamma ray, casing-collar locator (CCL), and cable tension) during a perforating run and can selectively fire a number of guns at different depths or times. In addition to providing better control of the perforating process, the simultaneous downhole measurements can provide in a single trip a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions. Thus, the completion can be evaluated in real time and any needed remedial reperforating can be performed while the gun is still in the hole. Other applications include limited-entry perforating, monitoring of bottomhole pressure (BHP) during minifracture jobs, better depth control with a gamma ray detector, fluid-level monitoring, and underbalance control. The applications of these measurements, with field data obtained with the Measurement While Perforating (MWP{sup SM}) tool, are the subject of this paper. Examples show the capabilities and the versatility of the MWP tool.

Tariq, S.M. (Schlumberger Perforating and Testing Center (US)); Ayestaran, L.C. (Schlumberger Well Services (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Application of a Hough search for continuous gravitational waves on data from the 5th LIGO science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range $\\mathrm{50-1000 Hz}$ with the first derivative of frequency in the range $-8.9 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s to zero in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run. Our results employ a Hough transform technique, introducing a $\\chi^2$ test and analysis of coincidences between the signal levels in years 1 and 2 of observations that offers a significant improvement in the product of strain sensitivity with compute cycles per data sample compared to previously published searches. Since our search yields no surviving candidates, we present results taking the form of frequency dependent, 95$%$ confidence upper limits on the strain amplitude $h_0$. The most stringent upper limit from year 1 is $1.0\\times 10^{-24}$ in the $\\mathrm{158.00-158.25 Hz}$ band. In year 2, the most stringent upper limit is $\\mathrm{8.9\\times10^{-25}}$ in the $\\mathrm{146.50-146.75 Hz}$ band. This improved detection pipeline, which is computationally efficient by at least two orders of magnitude better than our flagship Einstein$@$Home search, will be important for "quick-look" searches in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector era.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; A. Dietz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

TIMING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

REPROCESSING OF ARE FUEL, VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT RUNS E-3 THROUGH E-6  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing of the ARE fuel was resumed after extensive leak testing in the pilot plant. This was considered necessary to assure no recurrence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ leaks as experienced in Run E-2. In the four additional runs required to complete the program, about 641 kg of fluoride salt containing 40.64 kg of fully enriched uranium was reprocessed. Recovery as UF/sub 6/ product represented 97.97% of the feed, with 0.01% measured losses. An additional 2.14% was reclaimed from NaF beds. The product was of sufficient purity to meet specifications for material designated for reduction to uranium metal. Decontamination from fission products was essentially complete. Calculations based on the entire ARE program indicated 96.38% product recovery, with 0.06% measured losses. An additional 2.50% was reclaimed from NaF beds and equipment washes. (auth)

Whitmarsh, C.L.

1959-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Extending the CRESST-II commissioning run limits to lower masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the recent interest in light WIMPs of mass ~O(10 GeV), an extension of the elastic, spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section limits resulting from the CRESST-II commissioning run (2007) are presented. Previously, these data were used to set cross-section limits from 1000 GeV down to ~17 GeV, using tungsten recoils, in 47.9 kg-days of exposure of calcium tungstate. Here, the overlap of the oxygen and calcium bands with the acceptance region of the commissioning run data set is reconstructed using previously published quenching factors. The resulting elastic WIMP cross section limits, accounting for the additional exposure of oxygen and calcium, are presented down to 5 GeV.

Andrew Brown; Sam Henry; Hans Kraus; Christopher McCabe

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

JAVA & Parallelism/Real-time systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windowing Toolkit (AWT) in a memory-efficient way. JAVA Application Environment (JAE) Support enables the same applets and applications to run on other servers or platforms running the JAVA Virtual Machine. CHAPTER 2 Embedded and Real-Time JAVA According to the designers at Sun Microsystems, is JAVA also suitable for Embedded or Real-Time systems. Before proceeding further it is worth trying to define the phrase `real-time system' more precisely. 2.1 Definition of a real-time system There are many interpretations of the exact nature of a real-time system; however, they all have in common the notion of response time, the time taken for the system to generate output from some associated input. The Oxford Dictionary of Computing [48] gives the following definition of a real-time system. A real-time system is... Any system in which the time at which output is produced is significant. This is usually because the input corresponds to some movement in the physical world, and the output ha...

D. F. Nooren

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

338

Improved interval estimation of long run response from a dynamic linear model: A highest density region approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new method of interval estimation for the long run response (or elasticity) parameter from a general linear dynamic model. We employ the bias-corrected bootstrap, in which small sample biases associated with the parameter estimators ... Keywords: ARDL model, Bias-correction, Bootstrapping, Highest density region, Long run elasticity

Jae H. Kim; Iain Fraser; Rob J. Hyndman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dynamic software updates for real-time systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seamlessly updating software in running systems has recently gained momentum. Dynamically updating the software of real-time embedded systems, however, still poses numerous challenges: such systems must meet hard deadlines, cope with limited resources, ... Keywords: dynamic software update, embedded, real-time

Michael Wahler; Stefan Richter; Manuel Oriol

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Design and implementation of time management service for IEEE 1516 HLA/RTI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of time management service of Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI), it is necessary to consider an efficient design approach and an algorithm of Greatest Available Logical Time (GALT) computation. However, many time management services ... Keywords: GALT calculation algorithm, HLA, IEEE 1516, RTI, modular design, time management

Jeong Hee Hong; Jae Hyun Kim; Tag Gon Kim

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Digestion time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

342

Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by timing of the electromagnetic wave propagating along the anode wire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using an anode wire and surrounding electrodes in drift chambers as a transmission line for second coordinate readout has been studied. The method is based on propagation of the electromagnetic wave along the anode wire is determined by measurement, in an optimized electronic readout system, of the time difference between the arrivals of the signal to the ends of the wire. The resolution obtained on long wires (approx. 2 meters) is about 2 cm FWHM for minimum ionizing particles at a gas gain of approx. = 10/sup 5/.

Boie, R.A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.M.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Uncertainty quantification given discontinuous climate model response and a limited number of model runs.  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty quantification in complex climate models is challenged by the sparsity of available climate model predictions due to the high computational cost of model runs. Another feature that prevents classical uncertainty analysis from being readily applicable is bifurcative behavior in climate model response with respect to certain input parameters. A typical example is the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The predicted maximum overturning stream function exhibits discontinuity across a curve in the space of two uncertain parameters, namely climate sensitivity and CO2 forcing. We outline a methodology for uncertainty quantification given discontinuous model response and a limited number of model runs. Our approach is two-fold. First we detect the discontinuity with Bayesian inference, thus obtaining a probabilistic representation of the discontinuity curve shape and location for arbitrarily distributed input parameter values. Then, we construct spectral representations of uncertainty, using Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions on either side of the discontinuity curve, leading to an averaged-PC representation of the forward model that allows efficient uncertainty quantification. The approach is enabled by a Rosenblatt transformation that maps each side of the discontinuity to regular domains where desirable orthogonality properties for the spectral bases hold. We obtain PC modes by either orthogonal projection or Bayesian inference, and argue for a hybrid approach that targets a balance between the accuracy provided by the orthogonal projection and the flexibility provided by the Bayesian inference - where the latter allows obtaining reasonable expansions without extra forward model runs. The model output, and its associated uncertainty at specific design points, are then computed by taking an ensemble average over PC expansions corresponding to possible realizations of the discontinuity curve. The methodology is tested on synthetic examples of discontinuous model data with adjustable sharpness and structure.

Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and implementation of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control plans was mandated by the 1972 Federal Pollution Control Act Amendments, Public Law 92-500. The purpose of this particular report is to present the results of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages in the watershed; (c) the costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion controls, and (d) on-farm economics of soil conservation practices. Erosion controls considered include the traditional voluntary programs combined with economic incentives as well as possible regulatory programs. The focus of the study is on erosion and sedimentation because sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants. Practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This is a study of both conservation and environmental economics, two areas that tend to be closely related. For this project, the concern was over potential pollution (an off-site problem), but because of long-run farm income consequences, this concern cannot be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for the specific soil mapping units in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The results of this study are applicable to the majority of the soils in the High Plains Land Resource Area. Only sheet and rill erosion are considered in the study. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. The second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences of implementation, both to agricultural producers as a group, and to society.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Analysis of Pipe Supports with a Trunnion Welded to the Main Piping Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One configuration of pipe support that is gaining popularity, particularly on main steam and hot reheat high-energy piping, is the trunnion. In a trunnion support system, load is transferred from the main pipe to a hanger system through trunnions welded to the main pipe run. Welded trunnions are used in a variety of support configurations, and, in several cases, the support frame around the trunnion would have to be dismantled to permit inspection of the pipe-to-trunnion weld. In other ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

Distribution Management System Planning Guide: How to Run a Distribution Automation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this distribution automation (DA) guide is to provide a comprehensive volume from which a DA project manager or project team member faced with making choices about a DA deployment can learn about the key issues, key decision points, and pros and cons of each choice that in the end will lead to a successful outcome. Success, in the case of a DA deployment, is not merely about doing a good job in selecting a vendor, managing a successful proof of concept, running a strong pilot, or even ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Prototype geothermal power plant summary of operation for automatic-run test phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prototype Power Plant was built to demonstrate and learn the operation of a binary power cycle, and then serve as a test bed for pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from a moderate temperature geothermal fluid resource. The operation to date of the prototype plant is summarized with primary emphasis on the automatic-run phase, during which the plant was operated over a five-month period with minimal operator surveillance.

Mines, G.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of Fast-Time Simulation Techniques to Model Safety Issues in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA nm PIREP RAM RFS RTI SJSU SOM UCB Aviation PerformanceHLA interface standards and RTI software. Demonstration ofits Run-Time Interface (RTI) appears to be a very efficient

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Time-Energy Measure for Quantum Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum mechanics sets limits on how fast quantum processes can run given some system energy through time-energy uncertainty relations, and they imply that time and energy are tradeoff against each other. Thus, we propose to measure the time-energy as a single unit for quantum channels. We consider a time-energy measure for quantum channels and compute lower and upper bounds of it using the channel Kraus operators. For a special class of channels (which includes the depolarizing channel), we can obtain the exact value of the time-energy measure. One consequence of our result is that erasing quantum information requires $\\sqrt{(n+1)/n}$ times more time-energy resource than erasing classical information, where $n$ is the system dimension.

Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Time Domain Stability Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST researchers need the best tools for identifying the type and cause of undesirable clock noise. ... For an N-point data run, N-2 for Tho1 vs. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

LCLS-schedul_run-II_10_05_6-detail.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User-Assisted Commissioning Run II Detailed Schedule, May 6-September 13, 2010 User-Assisted Commissioning Run II Detailed Schedule, May 6-September 13, 2010 Thurs Fri Sat Sun Mon Tues Wed BL Prop# Spokesperson/ PI Planned Activity/Experiment Title POC AD Program Deputy Week 1 6-May 7-May 8-May 9-May 10-May 11-May 12-May Day SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com MD MD SXR L805 Bill Schlotter SXR Commissioning Schlotter H-D. Nuhn Night Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper MD ROD AMO L011 Jochen Küpper Diffractive Imaging of Oriented Molecules in the Gas Phase Bostedt (H. Loos on Monday) Week 2 13-May 14-May 15-May 16-May 17-May 18-May 19-May Day SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com MD MD SXR L805 Bill Schlotter SXR Commissioning Schlotter A. Brachman Night Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper MD ROD AMO L128 Jochen Küpper Fragmentation Holography: Diffractive imaging of ultrafast dissociation dynamics of aligned and

353

WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1,344 kg.days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8E-8 pb near 50 GeV/c^2 WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9E-8 pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0E-3 pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. Bewick; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; L. DeViveiros; B. Edwards; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; W. G. Jones; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Studies and proposed changes to the RHIC p-Carbon polarimeters for the upcoming RUN-11  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The RHIC polarized proton complex utilizes polarimeters in each of the Blue and Yellow beams that measure the beam polarization through the p-Carbon elastic scattering process in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference kinematic region. This along with a Polarized Hydrogen Jet Target that utilizes the proton-proton elastic scattering process to first measure the analyzing power of the reaction and using the reverse process to measure the beam polarization. The latter is used to calibrate the p-Carbon polarimeters at the desired beam energy. In Run 9 RHIC ran with beams at center-of-mass energies of 200 and 500 GeV respectively. The higher beam intensities as well as the fact that the 250 GeV beam size is much smaller than that at 100 GeV resulted in significantly higher rates seen by the polarimeters and led to observed instability. In this paper, we will discuss the problems encountered and the tests that were carried out using the AGS as a proxy in an attempt to solve the problems and the path forward we took towards the upcoming polarized proton Run11.

Makdisi, Y.; Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Morozov, B.; Svirida, D.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Comparison of Climates Simulated by a General Circulation Model when Run in the Annual Cycle and Perpetual Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the climate simulated by the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) General Circulation Model when run its usual annual cyclemode, in which the solar declination angle varies annually, and the climate which is simulated when ...

F. W. Zwiers; G. J. Boer

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Time Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Cosmology from . . . Time Brightness ... . . . 50-100 Fields Lunar Calendar Scheduled Follow-Up Imaging at Hubble, Cerro Tololo, WIYN, Isaac Newton Scheduled Follow-Up Spectroscopy at Keck Almost 1000 Galaxies per Field RESULT: ~24 Type Ia supernovae discovered while still brightening, at new moon Berkeley Lab Keck WIYN Cerro Tololo Isaac Newton Hubble Strategy We developed a strategy to guarantee a group of supernova discoveries on a certain date. Just after a new moon, we observe some 50 to 100 high-galactic lattitute fields-each containing almost a thousand high-redshift galaxies-in two nights on the Cerro Tololo 4-meter telescope with Tyson & Bernstein's wide-field camera. We return three weeks later to observe the same

358

A Novel Gain Time Reclaiming Framework Integrating WCET Analysis for Object-Oriented Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel gain time reclaiming framework integrating WCET analysis for objectoriented real-time systems in order to provide greater flexibility and without loss of the predictability and e#- ciency of the whole system. In this paper we present an approach which demonstrates how to improve the utilisation and overall performance of the whole system by reclaiming gain time at run-time. Our approach shows that integrating WCET with gain time reclaiming not only can provide a more flexible environment to develop object-oriented real-time applications, but it also does not necessarily result in unsafe or unpredictable timing analysis.

Erik Yu-shing Hu; Andy Wellings; Guillem Bernat

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Determination of the spin-flip time in ferromagnetic SrRuO3 from time-resolved Kerr measurements  

SciTech Connect

We report time-resolved Kerr effect measurements of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic SrRuO{sub 3}. We observe that the demagnetization time slows substantially at temperatures within 15K of the Curie temperature, which is {approx} 150K. We analyze the data with a phenomenological model that relates the demagnetization time to the spin flip time. In agreement with our observations the model yields a demagnetization time that is inversely proportional to T-T{sub c}. We also make a direct comparison of the spin flip rate and the Gilbert damping coefficient showing that their ratio very close to k{sub B}T{sub c}, indicating a common origin for these phenomena.

Kantner, C.L.S.; Langner, M.C.; Siemons, W.; Blok, J.L.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, J.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

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361

Have we run out of oil yet? Oil Peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 (2006) 515-531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective $ David L. Greene à , Janet L. Hopson, Jia Li Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Research Center, University of Tennessee, 2360 Cherahala Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA Available online 27 December 2005 Abstract This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or

362

RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050 October 2003 David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Janet L. Hopson Research Assistant Jia Li Senior Research Technician DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

363

The ATLAS Muon Trigger - Experience and Performance in the first 3 years of LHC pp runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 trigger followed by an event filter for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. The ATLAS experiment has taken data with high efficiency continuously over entire running periods form 2010 to 2012, for which sophisticated triggers to guard the highest physics output while reducing effectively the event rate were mandatory. The ATLAS Muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analysis involving mu...

Ventura, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Potential impact of consumer choice on cogenerator's short-run price and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

Conditions were derived under which optimal price-output combinations can be determined for a profit-maximizing cogenerator faced with a demand constraint for useful energy. Four cases were considered. In two cases, all energy produced was sold to the end-use market and, in the other two, some electricity was sold to the grid. The effects of price regulation on energy output were also covered. In the short-run, in all four cases, whether or not the necessary conditions for Pareto optimality are satisfied is problematic. If the cogenerator monopolizes alternative supplies of energy, price regulation will not necessarily reduce energy expenditures. The short-term effects of constrained energy demand can only be determined with a knowledge of the cost and demand functions of thermal energy and electricity.

Poyer, D.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Drying damaged K West fuel elements (Summary of whole element furnace runs 1 through 8)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

N Reactor fuel elements stored in the Hanford K Basins were subjected to high temperatures and vacuum conditions to remove water. Results of the first series of whole element furnace tests i.e., Runs 1 through 8 were collected in this summary report. The report focuses on the six tests with breached fuel from the K West Basin which ranged from a simple fracture at the approximate mid-point to severe damage with cladding breaches at the top and bottom ends with axial breaches and fuel loss. Results of the tests are summarized and compared for moisture released during cold vacuum drying, moisture remaining after drying, effects of drying on the fuel element condition, and hydrogen and fission product release.

LAWRENCE, L.A.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is dependent on the production of oil and gas, and every day the demand increases. Technologies have to keep up with the demand of this resource to keep the world running. Since hydrocarbons are finite and will eventually run out, the increasing demand of oil and gas is the impetus to search for oil in more difficult and challenging areas. One challenging area is offshore in ultradeep water, with water depths greater than 5000 ft. This is the new arena for drilling technology. Unfortunately with greater challenges there are greater risks of losing control and blowing out a well. A dynamic kill simulator was developed in late 2004 to model initial conditions of a blowout in ultradeep water and to calculate the minimum kill rate required to kill a blowing well using the dynamic kill method. The simulator was simple and efficient, but had limitations; only vertical wells could be simulated. To keep up with technology, modifications were made to the simulator to model directional wells. COMASim (Cherokee, Offshore Technology Research Center, Minerals Management Service, Texas A&M Simulator) is the name of the dynamic kill simulator. The new version, COMASim1.0, has the ability to model almost any type of wellbore geometry when provided the measured and vertical depths of the well. Eighteen models with varying wellbore geometry were simulated to examine the effects of wellbore geometry on the minimum kill rate requirement. The main observation was that lower kill rate requirement was needed in wells with larger measured depth. COMASim 1.0 cannot determine whether the inputs provided by the user are practical; COMASim 1.0 can only determine if the inputs are incorrect, inconsistent or cannot be computed. If unreasonable drilling scenarios are input, unreasonable outputs will result. COMASim1.0 adds greater functionality to the previous version while maintaining the original framework and simplicity of calculations and usage.

Meier, Hector Ulysses

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Measurement of the Rate of type-Ia Supernovae at Redshift $z\\approx$ 0.1 from the First Season of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the rate of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the first of three seasons of data from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. For this measurement, we include 17 SNe Ia at redshift $z\\le0.12$. Assuming a flat cosmology with $\\Omega_m = 0.3=1-\\Omega_\\Lambda$, we find a volumetric SN Ia rate of $[2.93^{+0.17}_{-0.04}({\\rm systematic})^{+0.90}_{-0.71}({\\rm statistical})] \\times 10^{-5} {\\rm SNe} {\\rm Mpc}^{-3} h_{70}^3 {\\rm year}^{-1}$, at a volume-weighted mean redshift of 0.09. This result is consistent with previous measurements of the SN Ia rate in a similar redshift range. The systematic errors are well controlled, resulting in the most precise measurement of the SN Ia rate in this redshift range. We use a maximum likelihood method to fit SN rate models to the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data in combination with other rate measurements, thereby constraining models for the redshift-evolution of the SN Ia rate. Fitting the combined data to a simple power-law evolution of the volumetric SN Ia rate, $r_V \\propto (1+z)^{\\beta}$, we obtain a value of $\\beta = 1.5 \\pm 0.6$, i.e. the SN Ia rate is determined to be an increasing function of redshift at the $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ level. Fitting the results to a model in which the volumetric SN rate, $r_V=A\\rho(t)+B\\dot \\rho(t)$, where $\\rho(t)$ is the stellar mass density and $\\dot \\rho(t)$ is the star formation rate, we find $A = (2.8 \\pm 1.2) \\times 10^{-14} \\mathrm{SNe} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}^{-1} \\mathrm{year}^{-1}$, $B = (9.3^{+3.4}_{-3.1})\\times 10^{-4} \\mathrm{SNe} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}^{-1}$.

Benjamin Dilday; R. Kessler; J. A. Frieman; J. Holtzman; J. Marriner; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; R. Romani; M. Sako; B. Bassett; A. Becker; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; M. Doi; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; S. Jha; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. L. Marshall; D. McGinnis; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; C. Choi; A. Crotts; J. Dembicky; M. Harvanek; M. Im; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesi?ski; D. C. Long; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; A. Nitta; K. Pan; G. Saurage; S. A. Snedden; S. Watters; J. C. Wheeler; D. York

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan  

SciTech Connect

Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Investigating asymptotic properties of vector nonlinear time series models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses and simulations of vector nonlinear time series typically run into weeks or even months because the methods used are computationally intensive. Statisticians have been known to base empirical results on a relatively small number of simulation ... Keywords: Dynamic loop scheduling, Vector FCAR models

Ioana Banicescu; Ricolindo L. CariO; Jane L. Harvill; John Patrick Lestrade

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Compile-time dynamic voltage scaling settings: opportunities and limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With power-related concerns becoming dominant aspects of hardware and software design, significant research effort has been devoted towards system power minimization. Among run-time power-management techniques, dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) has emerged ... Keywords: analytical model, compiler, dynamic voltage scaling, low power, mixed-integer linear programming

Fen Xie; Margaret Martonosi; Sharad Malik

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Resource Reclaiming in Hard Real-Time Systems with Static and Dynamic Workloads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses resource reclaiming in the context of non-preemptive priority list scheduling for hard real-time systems. Such scheduling is inherently susceptible to multiprocessor timing anomalies. We present low overhead run-time stabilization methods for a general tasking model that allows phantom tasks as a mechanism to model processor external events. A family of scheduling algorithms is de?ned, that guarantees run-time stabilization for systems consisting of tasks with hard and soft deadlines. The later, i.e. soft tasks, may arrive dynamically. Stabilization is addressed in the context of dynamic and static task to processor allocation. Previous stabilization methods, focused on apriori stabilization for static workloads with dynamic task to processor allocation, thus cannot support this general scheduling model. By taking advantage of run-time information, the stabilization algorithms use the scan-window approach to prevent instability from occurring. Mechanisms are introduced that explicitly control the run-time behavior of tasks with hard deadlines. As a consequence, processor resources become available that can be used to improve processor utilization and response time of soft tasks. The resulting scan algorithms are intended for real world applications where low run-time overhead and a realistic task model are needed. 1

A. W. Krings; M. H. Azadmanesh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Measurement of the Rate of type-Ia Supernovae at Redshift $z\\approx$ 0.1 from the First Season of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the rate of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the first of three seasons of data from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. For this measurement, we include 17 SNe Ia at redshift $z\\le0.12$. Assuming a flat cosmology with $\\Omega_m = 0.3=1-\\Omega_\\Lambda$, we find a volumetric SN Ia rate of $[2.93^{+0.17}_{-0.04}({\\rm systematic})^{+0.90}_{-0.71}({\\rm statistical})] \\times 10^{-5} {\\rm SNe} {\\rm Mpc}^{-3} h_{70}^3 {\\rm year}^{-1}$, at a volume-weighted mean redshift of 0.09. This result is consistent with previous measurements of the SN Ia rate in a similar redshift range. The systematic errors are well controlled, resulting in the most precise measurement of the SN Ia rate in this redshift range. We use a maximum likelihood method to fit SN rate models to the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data in combination with other rate measurements, thereby constraining models for the redshift-evolution of the SN Ia rate. Fitting the combined data to a simple power-law evolution of the volumetric SN Ia rat...

Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, J A; Holtzman, J; Marriner, J; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Romani, R; Sako, M; Bassett, B; Becker, A; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Jha, S; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Zheng, N Yasuda C; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Choi, C; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Harvanek, M; Im, M; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Krzesi?ski, J; Long, D C; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Nitta, A; Pan, K; Saurage, G; Snedden, S A; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; York, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimation of Lag Time Between Onset of and Death from an Occult Hongshik Ahn1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of Lag Time Between Onset of and Death from an Occult Tumor Hongshik Ahn1 , Hojin Moon2 72205 Running title: Estimation of Lag Time from an Occult Tumor * Corresponding author: Hongshik Ahn the lag time between onset of and death from an occult tumor is proposed for data without cause

Ahn, Hongshik

374

Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)  

SciTech Connect

This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

Bharat L. Bhatt

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Performance of the ATLAS High Level Trigger in the 2011 and 2012 run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector operated during the last 3 years in the LHC beam line, collecting more than 27 fb^-1 of proton-proton events. This allowed researchers to detect a new boson, compatible in many of its properties with the long sought Higgs Boson. One of the main ATLAS components is its complex calorimeter system. This sub-detector is able to detect many of the fundamental processes involved in the physics search. For instance, photon, electron, taus and jets candidates detection as well as missing transverse energy measurement are per- formed using calorimetric information. The calorimeter also plays a central role in the ATLAS trigger system, helping to reduce the large amount of input events (order of 20-30 millions of events per second) to a manageable rate (few hundreds of events per second) recorded for more detailed physics analysis. The trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one implemented in electronic boards and the other two with programs running on a dedicated computing cluster inte...

Bernius, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Performances of the ATLAS High Level Trigger in the 2011 and 2012 run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector operated during the last 3 years in the LHC beam line, collecting more than 27 fb?1 of proton-proton events. This allowed researchers to detect a new boson, compatible in many of its properties with the long sought Higgs Boson. One of the main ATLAS components is its complex calorimeter system. This sub-detector is able to detect many of the fundamental processes involved in the physics search. For instance, photon, electron, taus and jets candidates detection as well as missing transverse energy measurement are per- formed using calorimetric information. The calorimeter also plays a central role in the ATLAS trigger system, helping to reduce the large amount of input events (order of 20-30 millions of events per second) to a manageable rate (few hundreds of events per second) recorded for more detailed physics analysis. The trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one implemented in electronic boards and the other two with programs running on a dedicated computing cluster int...

Bernius, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Results of hydrotreating the kerosene fraction of HTI`S first proof of concept run  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Sandia`s hydrotreating study is to determine the relationships between hydrotreating conditions and product characteristics for coal liquids produced using current technologies. The coal-derived liquid used in the current work is the kerosene fraction of the product from Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc.`s first proof-of-concept run for it`s Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction Technology. Sandia`s hydrotreating experiments were performed in a continuous operation, microflow reactor system using aged HDN-60 catalyst. A factorial experimental design with three variables (temperature, pressure, liquid hourly space velocity) was used in this work. Nitrogen and sulfur contents of the feed and hydrotreated products were determined using an Antek 7000 Sulfur and Nitrogen Analyzer. Multiple samples were collected at each set of reaction conditions to ensure that each condition was lined out. Hydrotreating at each set of reaction conditions was repeated so that results could be normalized for catalyst deactivation. The normalized results were statistically analyzed. Increases in temperature and pressure had the greatest effects on nitrogen removal. The highest severity condition (388{degrees}C, 1500 psig H{sub 2}, 1.5g/h/g(cat)) gave a measured nitrogen value of <5 ppm.

Stohl, F.V.; Lott, S.E.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A study on D0 Run2b stave structural performance  

SciTech Connect

Two different structural solutions have been proposed and studied for the D0 Run2b stave. The way the stave structural stiffness is achieved in both designs is essentially the same: the structural material is displaced as far as possible from the neutral axis in order to increase the bending moment of the stave. The agreement of the measured data with what has been theoretically predicted is excellent. The C channel stave with dog-bones glued on top of the sensor (stave No.2) has outperformed the other mockups with a predicted sag of 51{micro}m for a distributed load of 2.28 N/m [0.013 lbf/in] and a consequent natural frequency of 89.2Hz. The other three C channel staves with the dog-bones not glued on the sensor have a bending stiffness that is -19.0%, -10.8%, +4.0% of that of stave No.2, being 11.0%, 7.8%, 15.1% lighter respectively. An optimized stave structural proposal with 130.5% of the design stiffness within the mass budget is presented at the end of this paper.

Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A study on D0 Run2b stave structural performance  

SciTech Connect

Two different structural solutions have been proposed and studied for the D0 Run2b stave (Figure 1 and Figure 3). The way the stave structural stiffness is achieved in both designs is essentially the same: the structural material is displaced as far as possible from the neutral axis in order to increase the bending moment of the stave. The agreement of the measured data with what has been theoretically predicted is excellent. The C channel stave with dog-bones glued on top of the sensor (stave No.2) has outperformed the other mockups with a predicted sag of 51 {micro}m for a distributed load of 2.28 N/m [0.013 lbf/in] and a consequent natural frequency of 89.2Hz. The other three C channel staves with the dog-bones not glued on the sensor have a bending stiffness that is -19.0%, -10.8%, +4.0% of that of stave No.2, being 11.0%, 7.8%, 15.1% lighter respectively. An optimized stave structural proposal with 130.5% of the design stiffness within the mass budget is presented at the end of this paper.

Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

LHCb: LHCb High Level Trigger design issues for post Long Stop 1 running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb High Level Trigger uses two stages of software running on an Event Filter Farm (EFF) to select events for offline reconstruction and analysis. The first stage (Hlt1) processes approximately 1 MHz of events accepted by a hardware trigger. In 2012, the second stage (Hlt2) wrote 5 kHz to permanent storage for later processing. Following the LHC's Long Stop 1 (anticipated for 2015), the machine energy will increase from 8 TeV in the center-of-mass to 13 TeV and the cross sections for beauty and charm are expected to grow proportionately. We plan to increase the Hlt2 output to 12 kHz, some for immediate offline processing, some for later offline processing, and some ready for immediate analysis. By increasing the absolute computing power of the EFF, and buffering data for processing between machine fills, we should be able to significantly increase the efficiency for signal while improving signal-to-background ratios. In this poster we will present several strategies under consideration and some of th...

Albrecht, J; Raven, G; Sokoloff, M D; Williams, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

386

Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II  

SciTech Connect

This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Value of Real-Time Vegetation Fraction to Forecasts of Severe Convection in High-Resolution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-real-time values of vegetation fraction are incorporated into a 2-km nested version of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW) model and compared to forecasts from a control run that uses climatological values of ...

Kenneth A. James; David J. Stensrud; Nusrat Yussouf

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Time Schedule Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-version were conducted to examine the e ects of the evaporation-wind feedback EWF, Emanuel 1987, Neelin et al advection from a previous run, 4 both the EWF and extratropical disturbances turned o . The corresponding spectra are shown in Fig. 9. The lack of EWF signi cantly reduces the amplitude of variances in spectral

Washington at Seattle, University of

390

Time & Freq Sp Publication A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 500 word reports, called the Daily Market Marketgram, on ... Boulder and the use of atomic oscillators at ... are usually portable, and can run off batteries. ...

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Velocity and Timing of Multiple Spherically Converging Shock Waves in Liquid Deuterium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuel entropy and required drive energy for an inertial confinement fusion implosion are set by a sequence of shocks that must be precisely timed to achieve ignition. This Letter reports measurements of multiple spherical shock waves in liquid deuterium that facilitate timing inertial confinement fusion shocks to the required precision. These experiments produced the highest shock velocity observed in liquid deuterium (U{sub s}=135 km/s at {approx}2500 GPa) and also the first observation of convergence effects on the shock velocity. Simulations model the shock-timing results well when a nonlocal transport model is used in the coronal plasma.

Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Seka, W.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Barrios, M. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment  

SciTech Connect

The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

Clement, Benoit; /Strasbourg, IReS

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An analysis of the costs of running a station car fleet  

SciTech Connect

Station cars are electric vehicles available at transit stations which may be used for transportation between the transit station and home, work, and/or for errands. This transportation service would be provided by the local transit agency. This report discusses an economic model of the costs of running a station car fleet. While some of these costs are highly uncertain, this analysis is a first look at the required user fees for full cost recovery. The model considers the capital costs of the vehicles and the required infrastructure; the annual fixed vehicle costs for insurance, registration, etc.; the mileage-based costs; and the annual non-vehicle costs for administration, infrastructure maintenance, etc. The model also includes various factors such as the fleet size, the annual mileage, the number of transit stations that would have facilities for station cars, and the number of users. The model specifically examines the cost of using of electric vehicles; however, for comparison, the cost of using a fleet of gasoline-powered vehicles also is calculated. This report examines the sensitivity of the model to the various factors. A principal conclusion from the analysis is that the largest cost contributor is the initial vehicle purchase price. For a given initial purchase price, the factor driving the user fee required for full cost recovery is the number of different daily users of a vehicle. The model also compares the annual cost of transportation using station cars and mass transit to the annual cost of solo commuting. If a station car is used by more than one person a day, and this use replaces the ownership of a conventional vehicle, the annual cost of transportation may be similar. However, for the base case assumptions, the station car user fee required for full cost recovery is higher than the cost of solo commuting.

Zurn, R.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1990 (Run 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100-Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuels in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first of those tests (Run 1), which was conducted on an N-Reactor inner fuel element (1990) that had been stored underwater in the K-West Basin (see Section 2.0). This fuel element was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The testing was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 3.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in Section 4.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 5.0. These results are further discussed in Section 6.0.

Marschman, S.C.; Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Liquid-Phase Methanol (LPMeOHTM) Process Development Unit (PDU)--40-Day Run at LaPorte, Texas (1984)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustained catalyst life is a key to improved methanol synthesis from coal gasification products. A demonstration of scaled-up PDU operation--first using a large-particle catalyst and then a liquid-entrained slurry in a single run--produced a significant amount of crude methanol.

1986-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Hungry Lion A hungry lion runs inside a circus arena which is a circle of radius 10 meters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hungry Lion A hungry lion runs inside a circus arena which is a circle of radius 10 meters is never more than 10 meters away from the lion, the initial and final positions of the center are at most 20 meters apart. By a form of the triangle inequality, the total length of arcs is at least 30, 000

Sadeh, Norman M.

397

Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGOs fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 ...

Zucker, Michael E.

398

On the Validity of Reynolds Assumptions for Running-Mean Filters in the Absence of a Spectral Gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A running-mean operator is used to average predefined signals in order to calculate subgrid-scale (SGS) contributions. The role of the Leonard and cross terms (l and C, respectively) in the definition of the SGS is studied as a function of the ...

S. Galmarini; P. Thunis

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

1D Solid-state NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1D Solid-state NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP) Jerry Hu, x NMR yourself. Be aware of High Radio-Frequency Power in Solid-state NMR. Take everything ferromagnetic of Contents 1D Solid-state NMR Procedure ................................................................... 1

Akhmedov, Azer

400

Wind Run Changes: The Dominant Factor Affecting Pan Evaporation Trends in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Class A pan evaporation rates at many Australian observing stations have reportedly decreased between 1970 and 2002. That pan evaporation rates have decreased at the same time that temperatures have increased has become known as the pan ...

D. P. Rayner

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data from ancillary systems was collected manually and recorded on log sheets.

Berglin, B.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Using simulated partial dynamic run-time reconfiguration to share embedded FPGA compute and power resources across a swarm of unpiloted airborne vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how the limited electrical power and FPGA compute resources available in a swarm of small UAVs can be shared by moving FPGA tasks from one UAV to another. A software and hardware infrastructure that supports the mobility of embedded FPGA applications ...

David Kearney; Mark Jasiunas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Go-Global Version 2.2 Installation instructions Note: The first time you run Go-Global from your MS Windows, you must be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windows, you must be logged in as system administrator or have the computer permissions of the system" window will open, in the "Server Address:" pane type: "host.technion.ac.il" host is: stud" window will be open, Click "Yes" An "Authentication" window opens, type in your "Password" #12;Click "OK

Adler, Joan

404

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion

Gourber, J P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2

Brand, K

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Time-to-Produce, Inventory, and Asset Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a production-based general equilibrium model, I study the impact of time-to-build and time-to-produce technology constraints and inventory on asset prices and macroeconomic quantity dynamics. A time-to-build constraint captures the delay in transforming new investment into productive capital; a time-to-produce constraint captures the delay in transforming productive capital into final products. Empirically, I find that the U.S. economy in aggregate exhibits approximately a three-quarter time-to-build and a four-quarter time-to-produce constraint. These delays in the production process introduce short-run risks in the economy where inventory accumulation facilitates consumption smoothing over time. Using this structure for time-to-build and time-to-produce constraints, I numerically calibrate a production-based general equilibrium model where the representative investor has recursive preferences over consumption and inventory. The model delivers first and second moments of macroeconomic quantities and asset prices consistent with the data. A small elasticity of intertemporal substitution is necessary to positively price the short-run risks induced by the production constraints. Inventories help fit the volatilities of asset returns, while the time-to-produce feature ensures nontrivial inventory holdings. In addition, the model is able to match empirical lead-lag patterns between asset prices and macroeconomic quantities as well as observed equity return predictability.

Chen, Zhanhui

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Modeling shared cache and bus in multi-cores for timing analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timing analysis of concurrent programs running on multi-core platforms is currently an important problem. The key to solving this problem is to accurately model the timing effects of shared resources in multi-cores, namely shared cache and bus. In this ... Keywords: WCET, multi-core, shared bus, shared cache

Sudipta Chattopadhyay; Abhik Roychoudhury; Tulika Mitra

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Studying a self-sustainable system by making a mind time machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present our pilot study on a special machine that self-sustains its rich dynamics in an open environment. We made a machine called "MTM" (Mind Time Machine) that runs all day long, receiving massive visual data from the environment, processing by ... Keywords: massive data, mind time, plasticity, sustainability

Takashi Ikegami

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

DESIGN REAL-TIME JAVA REMOTE METHOD INVOCATION: A SERVER-CENTRIC APPROACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for incoming calls to the exported remote object. The others are worker threads for handling each accepted-time worker threads for handling incoming calls to exported remote objects. We have modified the run() methodDESIGN REAL-TIME JAVA REMOTE METHOD INVOCATION: A SERVER-CENTRIC APPROACH Sangig Rho Samsung

Choi, Byung K.

410

Dynamical System Analysis of Cosmologies with Running Cosmological Constant from Quantum Einstein Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a mechanism that induces a time-dependent vacuum energy on cosmological scales. It is based on the instability induced renormalization triggered by the low energy quantum fluctuations in a Universe with a positive cosmological constant. We employ the dynamical systems approach to study the qualitative behavior of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies where the cosmological constant is dynamically evolving according with this nonperturbative scaling at low energies. It will be shown that it is possible to realize a "two regimes" dark energy phases, where an unstable early phase of power-law evolution of the scale factor is followed by an accelerated expansion era at late times.

Bonanno, Alfio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

OMAE2009-79052 CFD SIMULATION OF WAVE RUN-UP ON A SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of CFD tools for industrial offshore applications is a common practice nowadays. So is the need for validation of such tools against experimental results. This paper presents one of the CFD tools, ComFLOW, which solves Navier-Stokes equations and employs an improved Volume of Fluid (iVOF) method to find temporary location of fluids free surface. The code is used to simulate flow around a semi-submersible offshore platform due to an incoming regular wave. In particular, wave run-up on the semis columns and under-deck fluid impact phenomena are investigated on high-accuracy computational grids with number of cells being in range of 10 millions. Results of numerical simulations are compared with experimental data and focus is on local fluid flow details in immediate vicinity of the platform. Wave run-up on the platforms columns

Bogdan Iwanowski; Marc Lefranc; Rik Wemmenhove

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Microsecond delays on non-real time operating systems  

SciTech Connect

We have developed microsecond timing and profiling software that runs on standard Windows and Linux based operating systems. This software is orders of magnitudes better than most of the standard native functions in wide use. Our software libraries calibrate RDTSC in microseconds or seconds to provide two different types of delays: a ''Guaranteed Minimum'' and a precision ''Long Delay'', which releases to the kernel. Both return profiling information of the actual delay.

Angstadt, R.; Estrada, J.; Diehl, H.T.; Flaugher, B.; Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Minimum weight perfect matching in O(1) parallel time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a 2-D square array of qubits of infinite extent. We provide a formal proof that the infinite size minimum weight perfect matching problem associated with running a particular class of topological quantum error correction codes on this array can be exactly solved with a corresponding infinite 2-D square array of classical computing devices in constant average time per round of error detection provided physical error rates are below fixed nonzero values, and other physically reasonable assumptions.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Adaptive real-time methodology for optimizing energy-efficient computing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is an effective way to reduce energy and power consumption in microprocessor units. Current implementations of DVFS suffer from inaccurate modeling of power requirements and usage, and from inaccurate characterization of the relationships between the applicable variables. A system and method is proposed that adjusts CPU frequency and voltage based on run-time calculations of the workload processing time, as well as a calculation of performance sensitivity with respect to CPU frequency. The system and method are processor independent, and can be applied to either an entire system as a unit, or individually to each process running on a system.

Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Feng, Wu-Chun

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Adaptive real-time methodology for optimizing energy-efficient computing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is an effective way to reduce energy and power consumption in microprocessor units. Current implementations of DVFS suffer from inaccurate modeling of power requirements and usage, and from inaccurate characterization of the relationships between the applicable variables. A system and method is proposed that adjusts CPU frequency and voltage based on run-time calculations of the workload processing time, as well as a calculation of performance sensitivity with respect to CPU frequency. The system and method are processor independent, and can be applied to either an entire system as a unit, or individually to each process running on a system.

Hsu, Chung-Hsing (Los Alamos, NM); Feng, Wu-Chun (Blacksburg, VA)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Time and Frequency Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Time and Frequency Portal. Time and Frequency Portal. Programs and Projects. CODATA values of the fundamental constants ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Time Series and Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time Series and Forecasting. Leigh, Stefan and Perlman, S. (1991). "An Index for Comovement of Time Sequences With ...

419

Final measurement of $B^0_s$ mixing phase in the full CDF Run II data set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the final CDF measurement of the $B^0_s$ mixing phase, mean lifetime, and decay-width difference through the fit of the time evolution of flavor-tagged $B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ decays. The measurement is based on the full data set of 1.96 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collisions collected between February 2002 and September 2011 by the CDF experiment. The results are consistent with the standard model and other experimental determinations and are amongst the most precise to date.

Sabato Leo

2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are: (1) to determine the fate of the plastics feedstocks, relative to coal-only operation; (2) to determine the conversion of the feedstocks; (3) to determine the product streams to which the feedstocks are converted (bottoms vs. distillate); (4) to determine interactions of feedstocks; (5) to determine how use of plastics feedstocks affect product quality; and (6) to determine to what degree property differences reflect feedstock differences vs. other (process) condition changes, such as unit operations, space velocity, and catalyst age.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "running time approx" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

DECORRELATION TIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC FIELDS AND FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.''3), high-cadence ({approx_equal} 2 minute) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the narrowband filter imager of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite over 2006 December 12 and 13. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms' susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval {Delta}t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter {sigma} used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, {tau}. For {Delta}t > {tau}, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and {Delta}t.

Welsch, B. T. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T. [Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Muglach, K. [Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Search for the Higgs Boson in the ZH->vvbb Channel at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect

This analysis focuses on a low mass Higgs boson search with 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data. The focus is on Higgs events in which it is produced in association with a W or Z boson. Such events are expected to leave a distinct signature of large missing transverse energy for either a Z {yields} {nu}{nu} decay or a leptonic W decay in which the lepton goes undetected, as well as jets with taggable secondary vertices from the H {yields} b{bar B} decay. Utilizing a new track based technique for removing QCD multi-jet processes as well as a neural network discriminant, an expected limit of 8.3 times the Standard Model prediction at the 95% CL for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2} is calculated, with an observed limit of 8.0*SM.

Parks, Brandon Scott; /Ohio State U.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

MINOS+: a Proposal to FNAL to run MINOS with the medium energy NuMI beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a proposal to continue to expose the two MINOS detectors to the NuMI muon neutrino beam for three years starting in 2013. The medium energy setting of the NuMI beam projected for NO{nu}A will deliver about 18 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target during the first three years of operation. This will allow the MINOS Far Detector to collect more than 10,000 charged current muon neutrino events in the 4-10 GeV energy range and provide a stringent test for non-standard neutrino interactions, sterile neutrinos, extra dimensions, neutrino time-of-flight, and perhaps more. In addition there will be more than 3,000 neutral current events which will be particularly useful in extending the sterile neutrino search range.

Tzanankos, G.; /Athens U.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; /Brookhaven; Escobar, C.O.; Gomes, R.A.; Gouffon, P.; /Campinas State U. /Goias U. /Sao Paulo U.; Blake, A.; Thomson, M.; /Cambridge U.; Patterson, R.B.; /Caltech; Adamson, P.; Childress, S.; /Fermilab /IIT, Chicago /Los Alamos /Minnesota U. /Minnesota U., Duluth /Bhubaneswar, NISER /Iowa State U.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

RunMC - an object-oriented analysis framework for Monte Carlo simulation of high-energy particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RunMC is an object-oriented framework aimed to generate and to analyse high-energy collisions of elementary particles using Monte Carlo simulations. This package, being based on C++ adopted by CERN as the main programming language for the LHC experiments, provides a common interface to different Monte Carlo models using modern physics libraries. Physics calculations (projects) can easily be loaded and saved as external modules. This simplifies the development of complicated calculations for high energy physics in large collaborations.This desktop program is open-source licensed and is available on the LINUX and Windows/Cygwin platforms.

S. Chekanov

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W {yields} e{nu} decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. With a sample of 499,830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

Osta, Jyotsna; /Notre Dame U.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dynamic Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks with Energy Efficiency in Weakly Hard Real-Time System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption is a critical design issue in real-time systems, especially in battery- operated systems. Maintaining high performance, while extending the battery life between charges is an interesting challenge for system designers. Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) allows a processor to dynamically change speed and voltage at run time, thereby saving energy by spreading run cycles into idle time. Knowing when to use full power and when not, requires the cooperation of the operating system scheduler. Usually, higher processor voltage and frequency leads to higher system throughput while energy reduction can be obtained using lower voltage and frequency. Instead of lowering processor voltage and frequency as much as possible, energy efficient real-time scheduling adjusts voltage and frequency according to some optimization criteria, such as low energy consumption or high throughput, while it meets the timing constraints of the real-time tasks. As the quantity and functional complexity of battery powered porta...

Baskaran, Santhi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Resource Reclaiming in Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most real-time scheduling algorithms schedule tasks with respect to their worst case computation times. Resource reclaiming refers to the problem of utilizing the resources left unused by a task when it executes less than its worst case computation time, or when a task is deleted from the current schedule. Resource reclaiming is a very important issue in dynamic real-time multiprocessor environments. In this paper, we present dynamic resource reclaiming algorithms that are effective, avoids any run time anomalies, and have bounded overhead cost that is independent of the number of tasks in the schedule. Each Task is assumed to have a worst case computation time, a deadline, and a set of resource requirements. The algorithms utilize the information given in a multiprocessor task schedule and perform on-line local optimization. The effectiveness of the algorithms is demonstrated through simulation studies. The algorithms have also been implemented in the Spring Kernel [15].

Chia Shen; Krithi Ramamritham; John A. Stankovic

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Microbial nitrogen transformation potential in surface run-off leachate from a tropical landfill  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial nitrogen transformations can alleviate toxic ammonium discharge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic ammonium oxidation was rate-limiting in Indonesian landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic nitrogen ammonification was most dominant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anaerobic nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation potential were also high. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A two-stage aerobic-anaerobic nitrogen removal system needs to be implemented. - Abstract: Ammonium is one of the major toxic compounds and a critical long-term pollutant in landfill leachate. Leachate from the Jatibarang landfill in Semarang, Indonesia, contains ammonium in concentrations ranging from 376 to 929 mg N L{sup -1}. The objective of this study was to determine seasonal variation in the potential for organic nitrogen ammonification, aerobic nitrification, anaerobic nitrate reduction and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) at this landfilling site. Seasonal samples from leachate collection treatment ponds were used as an inoculum to feed synthetic media to determine potential rates of nitrogen transformations. Aerobic ammonium oxidation potential (<0.06 mg N L{sup -1} h{sup -1}) was more than a hundred times lower than the anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes and organic nitrogen ammonification, which were of the same order of magnitude. Anaerobic nitrate oxidation did not proceed beyond nitrite; isolates grown with nitrate as electron acceptor did not degrade nitrite further. Effects of season were only observed for aerobic nitrification and anammox, and were relatively minor: rates were up to three times higher in the dry season. To completely remove the excess ammonium from the leachate, we propose a two-stage treatment system to be implemented. Aeration in the first leachate pond would strongly contribute to aerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrate by providing the currently missing oxygen in the anaerobic leachate and allowing for the growth of ammonium oxidisers. In the second pond the remaining ammonium and produced nitrate can be converted by a combination of nitrate reduction to nitrite and anammox. Such optimization of microbial nitrogen transformations can contribute to alleviating the ammonium discharge to surface water draining the landfill.

Mangimbulude, Jubhar C. [Faculty of Biology, Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana, Jl Diponegoro 52-60, Salatiga 50711 (Indonesia); Straalen, Nico M. van [Department of Ecological Science, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roeling, Wilfred F.M., E-mail: wilfred.roling@falw.vu.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Searches for inspiral gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts in LIGO's fifth and Virgo's first science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mergers of two compact objects, like two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, are the probable progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts. These events are also promising sources of gravitational waves, that are currently motivating related searches by an international network of gravitational wave detectors. Here we describe a search for gravitational waves from the in-spiral phase of two coalescing compact objects, in coincidence with short GRBs occurred during during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The search includes 22 GRBs for which data from more than one of the detectors in the LIGO/Virgo network were available. No statistically significant gravitational-wave candidate has been found, and a parametric test shows no excess of weak gravitational-wave signals in our sample of GRBs. The 90\\%~C.L. median exclusion distance for GRBs in our sample is of 6.7 Mpc, under the hypothesis of a neutron star - black hole progenitor model.

Alexander Dietz

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

Running out of steam. Part III. Development blues. [Alternatives to automotive internal combustion engines  

SciTech Connect

The history is given of systems that have been looked upon alternately as either strong competitors or engineering curiosities in the revived search to replace the Otto-cycle power plant with a cleaner, more efficient, and equally reliable passenger car engine. These recent efforts are largely attempts to polish up old technologies that were around long before a single model-T rolled off Henry Ford's first assembly line. The first steam vehicle, for example, hit the road more than 200 years ago and over the years has undergone considerable refinement. But, in spite of this long history and with the exception of short bursts of enthusiasm, the development of a steam-powered passenger car has never been high on the automobile industry's list of priorities. Some clues are given as to why this is true and why a number of ''think tank'' reports published over the past few years on the future role of steam-driven cars have ranged from mildly optimistic to forthrightly pessimistic. Electric vehicles have had a somewhat parallel history. They were early competitors with the Otto engine, but, unlike the steam cars, they have never completely disappeared. Indeed, for some special uses, they have outperformed all varieties of internal combustion engines (I.C.E.). Further inroads into the Otto-cycle car market, however, depend upon improved car design and the advancement of battery technology, an area of research that has been painfully slow in yielding results. Were it not for the wide public interest in environmental and resource issues that has been translated into new laws dealing with air pollution and resource management, the auto industry would have been content to sit on its I.C.E. for some time to come.

Reitze, A.W. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson in proton-antiproton collisions (p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b}) at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. WH candidate events have a signature of a single lepton (E{sup {+-}}/{mu}{sup {+-}}), missing transverse energy, and two jets. The search looks for candidate events in approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the CDF II detector. The high-p{sub T} lepton (e,{mu}) in the events provides a distinct signature for triggering and most of the events in the dataset come from high-p{sub t} lepton triggers. Our analysis improves on prior searches by including events recorded on the E{sub T} + 2 Jets trigger with a lepton reconstructed as an isolated high-p{sub T} charged particle. We increase the sample purity by identifying ('tagging') long-lived b-hadrons in jets. A neural network combines distinguishing kinematic information into a function optimized for WH sensitivity. The neural network output distributions are consistent with the standard model background expectations and we set limits upper limits on the rate of Higgs production. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the WH production cross section times branching ratio for Higgs masses from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and express our results as a ratio of the experimental limit to the theoretical Standard Model production rate. Our limits range from 3.6 (4.3 expected) to 61.1 (43.2 expected) for Higgs masses from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

Slaunwhite, Jason Michael; /Ohio State U.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

APPLICATION OF CONDITIONAL SIMULATION MODEL TO RUN-OF-MINE COAL SAMPLING FREQUENCY DETERMINATION AND COAL QUALITY CONTROL AT THE POWER PLANT (BLENDING, GOAL PROGRAMMING, MICROCOMPUTER).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Run-of-mine (ROM) coal sampling is one of the most important factors in determining the disposition of ROM coal for an overall emission control strategy. Determination (more)

BARUA, SUKHENDU LAL.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Running fermi with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout,performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CBP-Tech Note-345 (July 2005), devoted to a study of microbunching instability in FERMI@ELETTRA linac quotes '...the above analysis shows that the most of the gain in microbunching instability occurs after BC2, i.e. after transformation of the energy modulation to the spatial modulation that takes place in BC2. It is possible to avoid that if we use only BC1 for all our needs for bunch compression. There are also additional advantages for a mitigation of the microbunching instability related to that. First, we would need to increase R56 in BC1 (for given energy chirp in the electron beam). Second, a relative energy spread is significantly larger at BC1 than at BC2. Both these factors would contribute to instability suppression due to increased Landau damping effect.' One additional argument was however missed in that report. Instability smearing due to finite emittance is stronger in BC1 simply because the geometrical emittance is larger than in BC2. In spite of the considerations in favor of a lattice with one-stage compressor, it was thought at the time that the two bunch compressors configuration was still preferable as it appeared difficult to obtain a flat-flat distribution at the end of the linac with only one bunch compressor. A flat-flat distribution has constant medium energy and a constant peak current along the electron bunch. Now, two years later and more studies behind, this problem is solvable. It has been demonstrated1 that shaping the intensity of the electron bunch at the injector using intensity modulation of the photocathode laser allows to use the linac structural wake fields to advantage to obtain a flat-flat distribution at the end of the linac in a two-stage compressor. This report shows that, using the back-tracking technique, it is possible to obtain a flat-flat distribution also in a single-stage compressor. Preliminary results of a study of the microbunching instability applied to the FERMI lattice with one-stage compressor are shown in this report . There is concern that the effect of jitter in accelerator parameters is more pronounced with one bunch compressor: the results of jitter studies are given and are compared with the case of a two-stage compressor.

Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z