National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for running time approx

  1. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis Tianzhenl y s i s Development of EnergyPlus for Use in Title 24 andCommission Staff Use of EnergyPlus Deliverable for Task

  2. Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Presentation). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

  3. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models...

  4. Running Time vs. Processors Processors, K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Alan

    a ST W T S 1 1 0 1E0 1E1 1E2 1E3 1E4 N = 10M N = 20M N = 40M N = 80M N = 160M N = 320M Running Time ikjm Q vwe b X UW ST h de cf a ST cT e Q xwe b X UW ST h a ST W T S 1 1 0 100 1E1 1E2 1E3 1E4 N ¤¨ § " ) $ 0 ¤ ¡ 2 67 8 8 9@ 9A AB A 8@ CD @ 97 7E FD G E HI 8P Q RST UVWXY `TXa bcWde f Xd gW T h ciW pqr st

  5. Estimation of run times in a freight rail transportation network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonsra, Kunal (Kunal Baldev)

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to improve the accuracy of individual freight train run time predictions defined as the time between departure from an origin node to arrival at a destination node not including yard time. ...

  6. Reducing EnergyPlus Run Time For Code Compliance Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Schultz, Robert W.; Glazer, Jason

    2014-09-12

    Integration of the EnergyPlus simulation engine into performance-based code compliance software raises a concern about simulation run time, which impacts timely feedback of compliance results to the user. EnergyPlus annual simulations for proposed and code baseline building models, and mechanical equipment sizing result in simulation run times beyond acceptable limits. This paper presents a study that compares the results of a shortened simulation time period using 4 weeks of hourly weather data (one per quarter), to an annual simulation using full 52 weeks of hourly weather data. Three representative building types based on DOE Prototype Building Models and three climate zones were used for determining the validity of using a shortened simulation run period. Further sensitivity analysis and run time comparisons were made to evaluate the robustness and run time savings of using this approach. The results of this analysis show that the shortened simulation run period provides compliance index calculations within 1% of those predicted using annual simulation results, and typically saves about 75% of simulation run time.

  7. Models at Run-time for Sustaining User Interface Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Models at Run-time for Sustaining User Interface Plasticity Jean-Sbastien Sottet1 Galle Calvary1, Environment>) while preserving usability. This capacity of UIs is called Plasticity. In a forward engineering) to code. It is now well understood that plasticity may impact UIs at any level of abstraction. This calls

  8. Infinite Runs in Weighted Timed Automata with Energy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Infinite Runs in Weighted Timed Automata with Energy Constraints Patricia Bouyer1 , Uli Fahrenberg2 Cachan, France {bouyer,markey}@lsv.ens-cachan.fr 2 Dept. of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Denmark and negative weights on transitions and locations, corresponding to the production and consumption of some

  9. Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing Bonneville dam on the Columbia River White Paper Prepared by: W. Nicholas Beer Columbia Basin Research School of Aquatic....................................................................................................................... 8 In-River Conditions

  10. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: Optimality of walk-run-rest mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground to go from your house to the bus stop and have very little time to do so. You would likely run the whole

  11. Run-Time Adaptation in River REMZI H. ARPACI-DUSSEAU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpaci-Dusseau, Andrea

    Run-Time Adaptation in River REMZI H. ARPACI-DUSSEAU University of Wisconsin--Madison We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of run-time adaptation within the River dataflow programming insight on the positives and negatives of run-time adaptation both specifically in River and in a broader

  12. Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    timing, water temperature, total dissolved gas, flow, and spill at various dams. CRiSP model runs problems at Lower Granite Dam and small run sizes for some stocks (notably Catherine Creek for which only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii List of Figures

  13. The Importance of Run-time Error Detection Glenn R. Luecke 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luecke, Glenn R.

    Iowa State University's High Performance Computing Group, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, USA State University's High Performance Computing Group for evaluating run-time error detection capabilities

  14. Online Prediction of the Running Time of Tasks: Summary Peter A. Dinda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    of the Running Time Advisor (or RTA) system, the broader context of which it is a part, and the queries(16) models. We have implemented an extremely low overhead online host load prediction system, based Load Prediction System Running Time Advisor Realtime Scheduling Advisor Application Measurement Stream

  15. Online Prediction of the Running Time of Tasks: Summary Peter A. Dinda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    of the Running Time Advisor (or RTA) system, the broader context of which it is a part, and the queries(16) models. We have implemented an extremely low overhead online host load prediction system, based Prediction System Running Time Advisor Real-time Scheduling Advisor Application Measurement Stream Load

  16. Run-time Modification of the Class Hierarchy in a Live Java Development Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Kenneth J.

    1 Run-time Modification of the Class Hierarchy in a Live Java Development Environment Joel R. Louis {jbrandt, kjg}@wustl.edu Abstract Class hierarchy design is central to object-oriented software work on live development environments to allow run-time modification of the class hierarchy. The result

  17. CLIPPER: Counter-based Low Impact Processor Power Estimation at Run-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    is dif- ficult as measurement systems for power and energy usage draw too much power themselves, making Parameswaran School of Computer Science and Engineering, National ICT Australia The University of New South the knowledge of processor power/energy consumption at run- time. So far, no efficient method to provide run

  18. Linearizing Mile Run Times Garrett I. Ash, J. Marshall Ash, and Stefan Catoiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash, J. Marshall

    Linearizing Mile Run Times Garrett I. Ash, J. Marshall Ash, and Stefan Catoiu Garrett Ash (gash1. He ran his most recent 1500-meter race in 247.5 seconds. J. Marshall Ash (mash

  19. A Simplified Method for Implementing Run-Time Polymorphism in Fortran95

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Decyk, Viktor K.; Norton, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a simplified technique for software emulation of inheritance and run-time polymorphism in Fortran95. This technique involves retaining the same type throughout an inheritance hierarchy, so that only functions which are modified in a derived class need to be implemented.

  20. Run-Time Software Monitor of the Power Consumption of Wireless Network Interface Cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogliolo, Alessandro

    is limited by their power consumption, that is responsible of a large fraction of the energy budgetRun-Time Software Monitor of the Power Consumption of Wireless Network Interface Cards Emanuele: the nominal behavior of the card (taken from protocol and product specifications), its inherent power

  1. Transcending Static Deployment of Circuits: Dynamic Run-Time Systems and Mobile Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Transcending Static Deployment of Circuits: Dynamic Run-Time Systems and Mobile Hardware Processes of reconfigurable hardware has been shown in research and commercial applications. Unquestionably, this has. The advancements in this technology have particularly led to a convergence between software and hardware domains

  2. Running time variability and resource allocation : a data-driven analysis of high-frequency bus operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snchez-Martnez, Gabriel Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Running time variability is one of the most important factors determining service quality and operating cost of high-frequency bus transit. This research aims to improve performance analysis tools currently used in the bus ...

  3. A Run-Time Verification Framework for Smart Grid Applications Implemented on Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2013-05-18

    Smart grid applications are implemented and tested with simulation frameworks as the developers usually do not have access to large sensor networks to be used as a test bed. The developers are forced to map the implementation onto these frameworks which results in a deviation between the architecture and the code. On its turn this deviation makes it hard to verify behavioral constraints that are de- scribed at the architectural level. We have developed the ConArch toolset to support the automated verification of architecture-level behavioral constraints. A key feature of ConArch is programmable mapping for architecture to the implementation. Here, developers implement queries to identify the points in the target program that correspond to architectural interactions. ConArch generates run- time observers that monitor the flow of execution between these points and verifies whether this flow conforms to the behavioral constraints. We illustrate how the programmable mappings can be exploited for verifying behavioral constraints of a smart grid appli- cation that is implemented with two simulation frameworks.

  4. A near-Zero Run-time Energy Overhead within a Computation Outsourcing Framework for Energy Management in Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    incurring a near-Zero run-time overhead. Key Words- Energy Management, Outsourcing, Smart Spaces, Energy Monitor, Battery Monitor. 1. Introduction Energy/Power management in mobile devices has been and continues and therefore their energy consumption must be managed. The energy problem has been and continues to be tackled

  5. IEEE TRANSACTION ON CLOUD COMPUTING, FEB 2014 1 Run Time Application Repartitioning in Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Neeraj

    infrastructures, provide opportu- nities to develop mobile applications using cloud com- puting technologiesCloud, have been proposed, aiming to offload parts of the mobile application execution to the cloud as the application is running. Unfortunately, this assumption does not hold in dynamic mobile cloud environments

  6. Design Methodology and Run-time Management for Predictable Many-Core Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Jrgen

    of hardware resources due to thermal and power management or faults. Particularly, when applications with real-time requirements while heuristically optimizing the system objectives. Here, minimization of the energy consumption (manufacturing variability and aging) or due to shutoffs caused by temperature/power management. The challenge

  7. First limit from a surface run of a 10 liter Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr

    2009-01-01

    A 10 liter prototype Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) is operated on the surface of the earth at 75 Torr using carbon-tetrafluoride (CF4) as a target material to obtain a 24.57 gram-day exposure. A limit is set ...

  8. Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-10-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

  9. Run Rules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRun Rules Run

  10. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRunJobs Running

  11. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobsjobs Running

  12. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRunJobs

  13. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRunJobsJobs

  14. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRunJobsJobs

  15. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs byjobs

  16. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs

  17. Neutron-Proton Radii in N \\approx Z Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Auerbach

    2010-06-10

    A simple formula is derived that describes how the Coulomb interaction affects the proton radius in nuclei. It determines the difference between neutron and proton radii in nuclei with N approx Z. It also provides an estimate for the difference between the radii of the Z core neutrons and the protons in nuclei with a large neutron excess. The results obtained from the derived formula are compared with radii calculated in a Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculation.

  18. Seasonal Run Distribution Seasonal Run Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The term "total run" defines the number of adult sockeye salmon that home to the Karluk River before197 Seasonal Run Distribution CHAPTER 6 Seasonal Run Distribution They arrived from the sea in one, what was the seasonal run distribution of its sockeye salmon? Was the original run distribution which

  19. THE END OF HELIUM REIONIZATION AT z {approx_equal} 2.7 INFERRED FROM COSMIC VARIANCE IN HST/COS He II Ly{alpha} ABSORPTION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worseck, Gabor; Xavier Prochaska, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); McQuinn, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dall'Aglio, Aldo; Wisotzki, Lutz [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Fechner, Cora; Richter, Philipp [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Reimers, Dieter, E-mail: gworseck@ucolick.org [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universitaet Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, 21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-06-01

    We report on the detection of strongly varying intergalactic He II absorption in HST/COS spectra of two z{sub em} {approx_equal} 3 quasars. From our homogeneous analysis of the He II absorption in these and three archival sightlines, we find a marked increase in the mean He II effective optical depth from <{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}>{approx_equal}1 at z {approx_equal} 2.3 to <{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}>{approx}>5 at z {approx_equal} 3.2, but with a large scatter of 2{approx}<{tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}{approx}<5 at 2.7 < z < 3 on scales of {approx}10 proper Mpc. This scatter is primarily due to fluctuations in the He II fraction and the He II-ionizing background, rather than density variations that are probed by the coeval H I forest. Semianalytic models of He II absorption require a strong decrease in the He II-ionizing background to explain the strong increase of the absorption at z {approx}> 2.7, probably indicating He II reionization was incomplete at z{sub reion} {approx}> 2.7. Likewise, recent three-dimensional numerical simulations of He II reionization qualitatively agree with the observed trend only if He II reionization completes at z{sub reion} {approx_equal} 2.7 or even below, as suggested by a large {tau}{sub eff},He{sub ii}{approx}>3 in two of our five sightlines at z < 2.8. By doubling the sample size at 2.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 3, our newly discovered He II sightlines for the first time probe the diversity of the second epoch of reionization when helium became fully ionized.

  20. Using a two-step matrix solution to reduce the run time in KULL's magnetic diffusion package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, T A; Kolev, T V

    2010-12-17

    Recently a Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) package has been added to the KULL code. In order to be compatible with the underlying hydrodynamics algorithm, a new sub-zonal magnetics discretization was developed that supports arbitrary polygonal and polyhedral zones. This flexibility comes at the cost of many more unknowns per zone - approximately ten times more for a hexahedral mesh. We can eliminate some (or all, depending on the dimensionality) of the extra unknowns from the global matrix during assembly by using a Schur complement approach. This trades expensive global work for cache-friendly local work, while still allowing solution for the full system. Significant improvements in the solution time are observed for several test problems.

  1. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2010-01-08

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  2. THE SINS SURVEY: MODELING THE DYNAMICS OF z {approx} 2 GALAXIES AND THE HIGH-z TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cresci, G.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Genzel, R.; Schreiber, N. M. Foerster; Davies, R.; Bouche, N.; Buschkamp, P.; Genel, S.; Tacconi, L.; Eisenhauer, F.; Gerhard, O.; Lutz, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Shapiro, K. [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sommer-Larsen, J. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmanstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Burkert, A.; Naab, T. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen D-81679 (Germany); Sternberg, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Erb, D. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: gcresci@mpe.mpg.de (and others)

    2009-05-20

    We present the modeling of SINFONI integral field dynamics of 18 star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 from H{alpha} line emission. The galaxies are selected from the larger sample of the SINS survey, based on the prominence of ordered rotational motions with respect to more complex merger-induced dynamics. The quality of the data allows us to carefully select systems with kinematics dominated by rotation, and to model the gas dynamics across the whole galaxy using suitable exponential disk models. We obtain a good correlation between the dynamical mass and the stellar mass, finding that large gas fractions (M {sub gas} {approx} M {sub *}) are required to explain the difference between the two quantities. We use the derived stellar mass and maximum rotational velocity V {sub max} from the modeling to construct for the first time the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation at z {approx} 2.2. The relation obtained shows a slope similar to what is observed at lower redshift, but we detect an evolution of the zero point. We find that at z {approx} 2.2 there is an offset in log(M {sub *}) for a given rotational velocity of 0.41 {+-} 0.11 with respect to the local universe. This result is consistent with the predictions of the latest N-body/hydrodynamical simulations of disk formation and evolution, which invoke gas accretion onto the forming disk in filaments and cooling flows. This scenario is in agreement with other dynamical evidence from SINS, where gas accretion from the halo is required to reproduce the observed properties of a large fraction of the z {approx} 2 galaxies.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 0.9 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Matsubayashi, K.; Riguccini, L.; Aida, Y.; Ideue, Y.; Murayama, T.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 as a function of the local galaxy density in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COSMOS 2 deg{sup 2} field. [O II] emitters are selected by the narrowband excess technique with the NB711-band imaging data taken with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. We carefully selected 614 photo-z-selected galaxies with M{sub U3500} < -19.31 at z = 0.901 - 0.920, which includes 195 [O II] emitters, to directly compare the results with our previous study at z {approx} 1.2. We found that the fraction is almost constant at 0.3 Mpc{sup -2} < {Sigma}{sub 10th} < 10 Mpc{sup -2}. We also checked the fraction of galaxies with blue rest-frame colors of NUV - R < 2 in our photo-z-selected sample, and found that the fraction of blue galaxies does not significantly depend on the local density. On the other hand, the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation predicted that the fraction of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 decreases with increasing projected galaxy density even if the effects of the projection and the photo-z error in our analysis were taken into account. The fraction of [O II] emitters decreases from {approx}60% at z {approx} 1.2 to {approx}30% at z {approx} 0.9 independent of galaxy environment. The decrease of the [O II] emitter fraction could be explained mainly by the rapid decrease of star formation activity in the universe from z {approx} 1.2 to z {approx} 0.9.

  4. THE FORMATION OF THE FIRST COSMIC STRUCTURES AND THE PHYSICS OF THE z {approx} 20 UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, Ryan M.; McQuinn, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We perform a suite of cosmological simulations in the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of the formation of the first structures in the universe prior to astrophysical reheating and reionization (15 {approx}< z < 200). These are the first simulations initialized in a manner that self-consistently accounts for the impact of pressure on the rate of growth of modes, temperature fluctuations in the gas, and the dark matter-baryon supersonic velocity difference. Even with these improvements, these are still difficult times to simulate accurately as the Jeans length of the cold intergalactic gas must be resolved while also capturing a representative sample of the universe. We explore the box size and resolution requirements to meet these competing objectives. Our simulations support the finding of recent studies that the dark matter-baryon velocity difference has a surprisingly large impact on the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (which have masses of {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }). In fact, the halo gas is often significantly downwind of such halos and with lower densities in the simulations in which the baryons have a bulk flow with respect to the dark matter, modulating the formation of the first stars by the local value of this velocity difference. We also show that dynamical friction plays an important role in the nonlinear evolution of the dark matter-baryon differential velocity, acting to erase this velocity difference quickly in overdense gas, as well as sourcing visually apparent bow shocks and Mach cones throughout the universe. We use simulations with both the GADGET and Enzo cosmological codes to test the robustness of these conclusions. The comparison of these codes' simulations also provides a relatively controlled test of these codes themselves, allowing us to quantify some of the tradeoffs between the algorithms. For example, we find that particle coupling in GADGET between the gas and dark matter particles results in spurious growth that mimics nonlinear growth in the matter power spectrum for standard initial setups. This coupling is alleviated by using adaptive gravitational softening for the gas. In a companion paper, we use the simulations presented here to make detailed estimates for the impact of the dark matter-baryon velocity differential on redshifted 21 cm radiation. The initial conditions generator used in this study, CICSASS, can be publicly downloaded.

  5. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z {approx}< 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); O'Meara, J. M. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael's College, Vermont, One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Ribaudo, J. [Department of Physics, Utica College, 1600 Burrstone Road, Utica, New York 13502 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We assess the metal content of the cool ({approx}10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z {approx}< 1 using an H I-selected sample of 28 Lyman limit systems (LLS; defined here as absorbers with 16.2 {approx}< log N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 18.5) observed in absorption against background QSOs by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The N{sub H{sub I}} selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N{sub H{sub I}} in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] {approx_equal} -1.6 and -0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z {approx}< 1 galaxies.

  6. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning JobsjobsRunning

  7. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunningRunning on Carver

  8. Running with Java

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunningRunning on

  9. When the facts are just not enough: Credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Barbara J.

    2011-07-15

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials.

  10. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, X. L. [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Pipino, A. [Institut fur Astronomie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Matteucci, F., E-mail: fan@oats.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Universit a di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L{sub IR} Succeeds-Above-Single-Line-Equals-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) MIPS-LBGs.

  11. THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3: A TEST FOR STELLAR FEEDBACK, GALACTIC OUTFLOWS, AND COLD STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Sijing; Madau, Piero; Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Guedes, Javiera [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-9057 Zurich (Switzerland); Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2013-03-10

    We present new results on the kinematics, thermal and ionization state, and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of massive galaxies at redshift {approx}3, using the Eris suite of cosmological hydrodynamic ''zoom-in'' simulations. The reference run adopts a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback that produces large-scale galactic outflows, a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. The effect of the local UV radiation field is added in post-processing. The CGM (defined as all gas at R > 0.2 R{sub vir} = 10 kpc, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius) contains multiple phases having a wide range of physical conditions, with more than half of its heavy elements locked in a warm-hot component at T > 10{sup 5} K. Synthetic spectra, generated by drawing sightlines through the CGM, produce interstellar absorption-line strengths of Ly{alpha}, C II, C IV, Si II, and Si IV as a function of the galactocentric impact parameter (scaled to the virial radius) that are in broad agreement with those observed at high redshift by Steidel et al. The covering factor of absorbing material declines less rapidly with impact parameter for Ly{alpha} and C IV compared to C II, Si IV, and Si II, with Ly{alpha} remaining strong (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 300 mA) to {approx}> 5 R{sub vir} = 250 kpc. Only about one third of all the gas within R{sub vir} is outflowing. The fraction of sightlines within one virial radius that intercept optically thick, N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2} material is 27%, in agreement with recent observations by Rudie et al. Such optically thick absorption is shown to trace inflowing ''cold'' streams that penetrate deep inside the virial radius. The streams, enriched to metallicities above 0.01 solar by previous episodes of star formation in the main host and in nearby dwarfs, are the origin of strong (N{sub C{sub II}}>10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) C II absorption with a covering factor of 22% within R{sub vir} and 10% within 2 R{sub vir}. Galactic outflows do not cause any substantial suppression of the cold accretion mode. The central galaxy is surrounded by a large O VI halo, with a typical column density N{sub O{sub VI}} {approx}> 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and a near unity covering factor maintained all the way out to 150 kpc. This matches the trends recently observed in star-forming galaxies at low redshift by Tumlinson et al. Our zoom-in simulations of this single system appear then to reproduce quantitatively the complex baryonic processes that determine the exchange of matter, energy, and metals between galaxies and their surroundings.

  12. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    toward the goal of net zero energy buildings. EnergyPlusdesigns and low or net-zero energy buildings. EnergyPlus

  13. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    types and configurations, plant equipment types and controls, service water heating systems, and renewable energy

  14. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    convection only heat transfer coefficients; radiation heatThe combined heat transfer coefficient includes radiation to

  15. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    PACKAGEDTERMINAL:HEATPUMP:AIRTOAIR, Unit Ventilator, andCONTROLLER:SIMPLE, UnitarySystem:HeatPump:WaterToAir,and UnitarySystem:HeatPump:WaterToAir. These convergence

  16. Running.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein StructuresMaintenance / AP SpearRunning Parallel Jobs

  17. Running Grid Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRun Rules

  18. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRun

  19. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs by Group

  20. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs by

  1. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobsjobs

  2. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  5. Hazard % free free espresso Over Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, David L.

    Total Products Hazard Hazard % free free espresso Over Run name in/out Method exact head time 5 0 1 dmefastopt 5/3 8 8 0 1 Table 2. Comparison of HazardFree Logic Minimization with espressolevel hazardfree minimization prob lem for several reasons: the general problem has not pre viously been

  6. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  7. Running of scalar spectral index in multi-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-05-20

    We compute the running of the scalar spectral index in general multi-field slow-roll inflation. By incorporating explicit momentum dependence at the moment of horizon crossing, we can find the running straightforwardly. At the same time, we can distinguish the contributions from the quasi de Sitter background and the super-horizon evolution of the field fluctuations.

  8. Classification of Superdeformed Bands in the Mass A{approx}60 Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, L.-L.; Rudolph, D.; Fahlander, C.; Johansson, E. K.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ragnarsson, I.; Torres, D. A.

    2008-11-11

    The experimental knowledge of the {sub 29}{sup 61}Cu{sub 32} and {sub 30}{sup 61}Zn{sub 31} nuclei has been largely extended via the joint results from three experiments. The fusion-evaporation reaction used a {sup 36}Ar beam and a {sup 28}Si target foil to produce the two nuclei via the evaporation of either three protons ({sup 61}Cu) or two protons and a neutron ({sup 61}Zn). The experimental set-ups comprised the Ge-array GAMMASPHERE as well as neutron and charged-particle detectors placed around the target position.The resulting level schemes include around ten rotational superdeformed structures in each isotope. Most of them are linked to normally deformed states and in many cases spins and parities of the low-lying states in each structure have been determined.The collective structures are compared with results from configuration dependent Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations. The different structures are in general well understood from the calculation but the results do also suggest modifications of the standard Nilsson parameters in the mass A{approx}60 region.

  9. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A. [Institute of Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, Mainz (Germany); Mantica, P. F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Moeller, P. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (United States)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  10. Electrons in ATLAS: from Run1 to Run2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezhilov, Alexey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An excellent performance of the electron reconstruction, identification and calibration is of vital importance both for precision measurements as well as for searches for new physics. This poster will present the techniques used for the reconstruction, identification and calibration of electrons in ATLAS, and will show the performance obtained at the end of Run1. If available, it will also present first results from Run2.

  11. Effects of technicolor on standard model running couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Holdom; Randy Lewis

    1994-02-18

    We discuss the running couplings in the standard model, SU(3$)_C \\times $SU(2$)_L \\times $U(1$)_Y$, when the Higgs sector is replaced by SU($N_{TC})$ technicolor. Particular attention is given to the running of the couplings at momentum scales where technicolor is nonperturbative, and in this region we apply a relativistic constituent technifermion model. This model has been tested against the known running of the QED coupling due to nonperturbative QCD. An understanding of this low momentum running allows the calculation of the couplings at a higher scale, $\\Lambda_{pert}$, where technicolor becomes perturbative. We provide numerical values for the changes in the three standard model couplings between $m_Z$ and $\\Lambda_{pert}$ due to technicolor, assuming separately ``one doublet'' and ``one family'' technicolor models. The distinction between a running and walking technicolor coupling is also considered.

  12. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  13. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  14. COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS OF WARM INTERVENING GAS AT z {approx} 0.325 TOWARD 3C 263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanan, Anand [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India); Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P., E-mail: anand@iist.ac.in, E-mail: savage@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: wakker@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    We present HST/COS high-S/N observations of the z = 0.32566 multiphase absorber toward 3C 263. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) data show absorption from H I (Ly{alpha} to Ly{theta}), O VI, C III, N III, Si III, and C II. The Ne VIII in this absorber is detected in the FUSE spectrum along with O III, O IV, and N IV. The low and intermediate ions are kinematically aligned with each other and H I and display narrow line widths of b {approx} 6-8 km s{sup -1}. The O VI {lambda}{lambda}1031, 1037 lines are kinematically offset by {Delta}v {approx} 12 km s{sup -1} from the low ions and are a factor of {approx}4 broader. All metal ions except O VI and Ne VIII are consistent with an origin in gas photoionized by the extragalactic background radiation. The bulk of the observed H I is also traced by this photoionized medium. The metallicity in this gas phase is Z {approx}> 0.15 Z{sub Sun} with carbon having near-solar abundances. The O VI and Ne VIII favor an origin in collisionally ionized gas at T = 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K. The H I absorption associated with this warm absorber is a broad-Ly{alpha} absorber (BLA) marginally detected in the COS spectrum. This warm gas phase has a metallicity of [X/H] {approx}-0.12 dex, and a total hydrogen column density of N( H) {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, which is {approx}2 dex higher than what is traced by the photoionized gas. Simultaneous detection of O VI, Ne VIII, and BLAs in an absorber can be a strong diagnostic of gas with T {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} K corresponding to the warm phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium or shock-heated gas in the extended halos of galaxies.

  15. Run

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein StructuresMaintenance / AP Spear Down University

  16. Run

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein StructuresMaintenance / AP Spear Down UniversityPAMM

  17. Running A Conference Justin Zobel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zobel, Justin

    Running A Conference Justin Zobel Alistair Moffat Last updated August 2003 1 Introduction Much of the research in computer science is published in conferences, often complex affairs in- cluding paper presentations, tutorials, workshops, invited speakers, and tours and entertainment. Even a small conference has

  18. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  19. Running Behavior and Its Energy Cost in Mice Selectively Bred for High Voluntary Locomotor Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    662 Running Behavior and Its Energy Cost in Mice Selectively Bred for High Voluntary Locomotor. This increase in time spent running impinged on high energy costs because the majority of running costs stemmed. 2006; Oufiero and Garland 2007). In these contexts, both the limits to performance and the energy costs

  20. Penning-trap mass spectrometry of highly charged, neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes in the vicinity of $A\\approx100$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Simon; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; B. Eberhardt; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; E. Man; M. C. Simon; P. Delheij; M. R. Pearson; G. Audi; G. Gwinner; D. Lunney; H. Schatz; J. Dilling

    2012-05-29

    The neutron-rich mass region around $A\\approx100$ presents challenges for modeling the astrophysical $r$-process because of rapid shape transitions. We report on mass measurements using the TITAN Penning trap at TRIUMF-ISAC to attain more reliable theoretical predictions of $r$-process nucleosynthesis paths in this region. A new approach using highly charged ($q=15+$) ions has been applied which considerably saves measurement time and preserves accuracy. New mass measurements of neutron-rich $^{94,97,98}$Rb and $^{94,97-99}$Sr have uncertainties of less than 4 keV and show deviations of up to 11$\\sigma$ to previous measurements. An analysis using a parameterized $r$-process model is performed and shows that mass uncertainties for the A=90 abundance region are eliminated.

  1. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O'Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a direct probe of the first stars and black holes. In addition, we show that structure formation shocks are unable to heat the universe sufficiently to erase a strong 21 cm absorption trough at z {approx} 20 that is found in most models of the sky-averaged 21 cm intensity.

  2. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  3. In-situ Sensing Using Mass Spectrometry and its Use for Run-To-Run Control on a W-CVD Cluster Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    In-situ Sensing Using Mass Spectrometry and its Use for Run-To-Run Control on a W-CVD Cluster Tool , and E. Zafiriou2 1 Institute for Systems Research and Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering 2 gases directly from the reactor of an ULVAC ERA-1000 cluster tool has been used for real time process

  4. THE ROAD TO THE RED SEQUENCE: A DETAILED VIEW OF THE FORMATION OF A MASSIVE GALAXY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Pasquali, Anna; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Kuemmel, Martin; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Cohen, Seth; O'Connell, Robert W.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Ryan, Russell E.; Yan Haojing

    2012-08-15

    Over half of the census of massive galaxies at z {approx} 2 are dominated by quiescent stellar populations. The formation mechanism for these galaxies is still under debate, with models relying either on massive and early mergers or cold accretion. It is therefore imperative to understand in detail the properties of these galaxies. We present here a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of FW4871, a massive galaxy at z = 1.893 {+-} 0.002. We compare rest-frame optical and NUV slitless grism spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope with a large set of composite stellar populations to constrain the underlying SFH. Even though the morphology features prominent tidal tails, indicative of a recent merger, there is no sign of ongoing star formation within an aperture encircling one effective radius, which corresponds to a physical extent of 2.6 kpc. A model assuming truncation of an otherwise constant SFH gives a formation epoch z{sub F} {approx} 10 with a truncation after 2.7 Gyr, giving a mass-weighted age of 1.5 Gyr and a stellar mass of (0.8-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} (the intervals representing the output from different population synthesis models), implying star formation rates of 30-110 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. A more complex model including a recent burst of star formation places the age of the youngest component at 145{sup +450}{sub -70} Myr, with a mass contribution lower than 20%, and a maximum amount of dust reddening of E(B - V) < 0.4 mag (95% confidence levels). This low level of dust reddening is consistent with the low emission observed at 24 {mu}m, corresponding to rest-frame 8 {mu}m, where polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission should contribute significantly if a strong formation episode were present. The color profile of FW4871 does not suggest a significant radial trend in the properties of the stellar populations out to 3 R{sub e}. We suggest that the recent merger that formed FW4871 is responsible for the quenching of its star formation.

  5. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1-3 IN THE HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Yan, H.; O'Connell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Kimble, R. A.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx_equal} 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high-redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout-selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope {beta} is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are massive, dustier, and more highly star forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L* {approx}< L {approx}< 2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1{sigma} uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, finds physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.46, and star formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.90. These relations hold true-within luminosities probed in this study-for LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z {approx_equal} 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z {approx_equal} 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties and their evolution.

  6. 2.1E Sample Run Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    SS-J @e RUN 6 PACKAGED HEAT PUMPS PER_P. 'rER DOE-2.tE-O01RUN It RESY$ with on/off heat pump WEATH[RPILl- TRY CHICAGOR_;NI: RBSYSwith on/off heat pump MEA? HERFILE- TRY CHICA(]O

  7. THE DETECTION OF THE LARGE-SCALE ALIGNMENT OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Cheng [Partner Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics at the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China); Jing, Y. P. [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Faltenbacher, A. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Box Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Wang Jie, E-mail: leech@shao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-06-10

    We report on the detection of the alignment between galaxies and large-scale structure at z {approx} 0.6 based on the CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 9. We use two statistics to quantify the alignment signal: (1) the alignment two-point correlation function that probes the dependence of galaxy clustering at a given separation in redshift space on the projected angle ({theta}{sub p}) between the orientation of galaxies and the line connecting to other galaxies, and (2) the cos (2{theta})-statistic that estimates the average of cos (2{theta}{sub p}) for all correlated pairs at a given separation s. We find a significant alignment signal out to about 70 h {sup -1} Mpc in both statistics. Applications of the same statistics to dark matter halos of mass above 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} in a large cosmological simulation show scale-dependent alignment signals similar to the observation, but with higher amplitudes at all scales probed. We show that this discrepancy may be partially explained by a misalignment angle between central galaxies and their host halos, though detailed modeling is needed in order to better understand the link between the orientations of galaxies and host halos. In addition, we find systematic trends of the alignment statistics with the stellar mass of the CMASS galaxies, in the sense that more massive galaxies are more strongly aligned with the large-scale structure.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru; Nakano, Hiromi; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2011-08-15

    A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

  9. ATLAS Jet Trigger Performance in LHC Run I and Initial Run II Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The immense rate of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be reduced from the nominal bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to approximately 1 kHz before the data can be written on disk offline. The ATLAS Trigger System performs real-time selection of these events in order to achieve this reduction. Dedicated selection of events containing jets is uniquely challenging at a hadron collider where nearly every event contains significant hadronic energy. Following the very successful first LHC run from 2010 to 2012, the ATLAS Trigger was much improved, including a new hardware topological module and a restructured High Level Trigger system, merging two previous software-based processing levels. This allowed the optimization of resources and a much greater re-use of the precise but costly offline software base. After summarising the overall performance of the jet trigger during the first LHC run, the software design choices and use of the topological module will be reviewed. The expected perform...

  10. Jitblt : efficient run-time code generation for digital compositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelang, Daniel James

    2008-01-01

    87. [4] Blinn, J. , 1994: Composting, part 2: practice. IEEEgiven region. For some composting operator and pixel format

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Self-* programming: run-time parallel control search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gera

    engines shut down. The pilots saved the airplane by directing it out of the ash cloud, letting the engines that experience an unexpected disaster emergency scenario. We suggest a formal framework for automatic runtime

  12. Run-time optimization of adaptive irregular applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hao

    2004-11-15

    deployed an off-line, systematic experiment process to generate prediction models. These models, in turn, match the parameters to the best optimization transformations for a given machine. The technique has been evaluated thoroughly in terms of applications...

  13. Jitblt : efficient run-time code generation for digital compositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelang, Daniel James

    2008-01-01

    to maintain these software qualities while still allowingthat large gains in software quality can be had, but furtherabandon many important qualities of software implementation.

  14. Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2008-01-01

    the capabilities of building energy performance simulationdynamic performance into the whole building energy balance

  15. Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2008-01-01

    be sufficient. In that case EnergyPlus is in the range of 2per zone. If in future EnergyPlus can take advantages ofsite, gundog.lbl.gov EnergyPlus web site, www.energyplus.gov

  16. Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2008-01-01

    types and configurations, plant equipment types and controls, service water heating systems, and renewable energy

  17. OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond(Abstract).

  18. Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech ConnectDiagnosticsScientificTransmission

  19. Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klann, Jeffrey G

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

  20. The Performance and Development of the Inner Detector Trigger Algorithms at ATLAS for LHC Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowden, Benjamin Charles; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A description of the design and performance of the newly reimplemented tracking algorithms for the ATLAS trigger for LHC Run 2, to commence in spring 2015, is provided. The ATLAS High Level Trigger (HLT) has been restructured to run as a more flexible single stage process, rather than the two separate Level 2 and Event Filter stages used during Run 1. To make optimal use of this new scenario, a new tracking strategy has been implemented for Run 2 for the HLT. This new strategy will use a Fast Track Finder (FTF) algorithm to directly seed the subsequent Precision Tracking, and will result in improved track parameter resolution and significantly faster execution times than achieved during Run 1 but with no significant reduction in efficiency. The performance and timing of the algorithms for numerous physics signatures in the trigger are presented. The profiling infrastructure, constructed to provide prompt feedback from the optimisation, is described, including the methods used to monitor the relative performan...

  1. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  2. ARE PULSING SOLITARY WAVES RUNNING INSIDE THE SUN?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Charles L.

    2012-09-10

    A precise sequence of frequencies-detected four independent ways-is interpreted as a system of solitary waves below the Sun's convective envelope. Six future observational or theoretical tests of this idea are suggested. Wave properties (rotation rates, radial energy distribution, nuclear excitation strength) follow from conventional dynamics of global oscillation modes after assuming a localized nuclear term strong enough to perturb and hold mode longitudes into alignments that form 'families'. To facilitate future tests, more details are derived for a system of two dozen solitary waves 2 {<=} l {<=} 25. Wave excitation by {sup 3}He and {sup 14}C burning is complex. It spikes by factors M{sub 1} {<=} 10{sup 3} when many waves overlap in longitude but its long-time average is M{sub 2} {<=} 10. Including mixing can raise overall excitation to {approx}50 times that in a standard solar model. These spikes cause tiny phase shifts that tend to pull wave rotation rates toward their ideal values {proportional_to}[l(l + 1)]{sup -1}. A system like this would generate some extra nuclear energy in two spots at low latitude on opposite sides of the Sun. Each covers about 20 Degree-Sign of longitude. Above a certain wave amplitude, the system starts giving distinctly more nuclear excitation to some waves (e.g., l = 9, 14, and 20) than to neighboring l values. The prominence of l = 20 has already been reported. This transition begins at temperature amplitudes {Delta}T/T = 0.03 in the solar core for a typical family of modes, which corresponds to {delta}T/T {approx} 0.001 for one of its many component oscillation modes.

  3. Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sderholm, Patrik

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

  4. LAr Calorimeter Performance and Commissioning for LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spettel, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of $8 \\times 10^{33} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$. During the next run, peak luminosities of $1.5 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$ and even higher are expected at a 25ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminos...

  5. Chaotic inflation with curvaton induced running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin S. Sloth

    2014-09-08

    While dust contamination now appears as a likely explanation of the apparent tension between the recent BICEP2 data and the Planck data, we will here explore the consequences of a large running in the spectral index as suggested by the BICEP2 collaboration as an alternative explanation of the apparent tension, but which would be in conflict with prediction of the simplest model of chaotic inflation. The large field chaotic model is sensitive to UV physics, and the nontrivial running of the spectral index suggested by the BICEP2 collaboration could therefore, if true, be telling us some additional new information about the UV completion of inflation. However, before we would be able to draw such strong conclusions with confidence, we would first have to also carefully exclude all the alternatives. Assuming monomial chaotic inflation is the right theory of inflation, we therefore explore the possibility that the running could be due to some other less UV sensitive degree of freedom. As an example, we ask if it is possible that the curvature perturbation spectrum has a contribution from a curvaton, which makes up for the large running in the spectrum. We find that this effect could mask the information we can extract about the UV physics. We also study different different models, which might lead to a large negative intrinsic running of the curvaton.

  6. Effective run-and-tumble dynamics of bacteria baths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Paoluzzi; R. Di Leonardo; L. Angelani

    2013-07-30

    {\\it E. coli} bacteria swim in straight runs interrupted by sudden reorientation events called tumbles. The resulting random walks give rise to density fluctuations that can be derived analytically in the limit of non interacting particles or equivalently of very low concentrations. However, in situations of practical interest, the concentration of bacteria is always large enough to make interactions an important factor. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the dynamic structure factor of a model bacterial bath for increasing values of densities. We show that it is possible to reproduce the dynamics of density fluctuations in the system using a free run-and-tumble model with effective fitting parameters. We discuss the dependence of these parameters, e.g., the tumbling rate, tumbling time and self-propulsion velocity, on the density of the bath.

  7. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  8. AMBER Task Force February 2008 run report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Malbet; G. Duvert; A. Chelli; P. Kern

    2008-08-08

    AMBER was installed in March 2004 in the VLTI focal lab of the VLT observatory in Cerro Paranal run by ESO. Since then, there have been 4 commissioning runs and additional VLTI infrastructure installed (IRIS, FINITO and ATs,...), but AMBER is not yet fulfilling all its initial specifications and some important primary science objectives cannot be achieved. At the consortium level, an action plan has been decided in Oct 2007 that created an AMBER Task Force (ATF) to understand and possibly cure the eventual technical issues. The objectives of the February 2008 run was mainly to bring AMBER into contractual specifications the accuracy of the absolute visibility, of the differential and of the closure phase through a fundamental analysis of the instrument status and limitations. This report is the official report of the AMBER Task Force.

  9. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 23, 2013: Run like...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images available here: http:www.fnal.govpubpresspasspressreleases2013Run-Like-Proton-20130523-images.html Run like a proton at Fermilabs new playground It's one thing...

  10. Rotary running tool for rotary lock mandrel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollison, W.W.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a running tool for a rotary lock mandrel. It comprises: a housing having a connection on the end thereof; an anvil slidably mounted in the housing and extending from the other end of the housing; means in the housing for rotating the anvil relative to the housing including: a helical slot in the housing, a lug slidably mounted in the helical slot and attached to the anvil and a spring biasing the anvil to extend from the housing; and means on the extending anvil for rotatively and releasably connecting the running tool to a rotary lock mandrel.

  11. Getting in Sync with Dimeric Eg5 INITIATION AND REGULATION OF THE PROCESSIVE RUN*S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabe, Michael

    Getting in Sync with Dimeric Eg5 INITIATION AND REGULATION OF THE PROCESSIVE RUN*S Received the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 Eg5/KSP assembly and dynamics. Recent work using a dimeric form of Eg5 has found it to be a processive motor

  12. THE SLOW DEATH (OR REBIRTH?) OF EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN z {approx} 0.1 GREEN VALLEY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Salim, Samir [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47404 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jjfang@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim and Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call ''extended star-forming early-type galaxies'' (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that Almost-Equal-To 13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies with low-level ongoing star formation.

  13. CMS computing operations during run 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    During the first run, CMS collected and processed more than 10B data events and simulated more than 15B events. Up to 100k processor cores were used simultaneously and 100PB of storage was managed. Each month petabytes of ...

  14. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  15. The ATLAS Trigger System - Ready for Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backes, Moritz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware based Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. During the course of the ongoing Run-2 data-taking campaign at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy the trigger rates will be approximately 5 times higher compared to Run-1. In these proceedings we briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger system, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger subsystem and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single ev...

  16. Run Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find out more, visit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    and public holidays will be announced in advance via the Library Web site and will be posted at the Library1 Run Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find

  17. Run Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find out more, visit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    , semester breaks and public holidays will be announced in advance via the Library Web siteRun Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find

  18. Run Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find out more, visit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    and public holidays will be announced in advance via the Library Web site and will be posted at the LibraryRun Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find

  19. Run Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find out more, visit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    examination periods, semester breaks and public holidays will be announced in advance via the Library Web siteRun Run Shaw Library, City University of Hong Kong Library Homepage: http://www.cityu.edu.hk/lib/ This guide serves as an introduction to selected resources and services of the Run Run Shaw Library. To find

  20. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch. [IPN Lyon, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R.; Dimmock, M.; Gros, S.; McGuirck, B.; Paul, E. S.; Petri, M.; Scraggs, H.; Turk, G. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G. [GANIL, B.P. 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France)] (and others)

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  1. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  2. z {approx} 4 H{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: TRACING THE DOMINANT MODE FOR GROWTH OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark; Lin Lihwai; Yan, Chi-Hung; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We present evidence for strong H{alpha} emission in galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 3.8 < z < 5.0 over the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. Among 74 galaxies detected in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, more than 70% of the galaxies show clear excess at 3.6 {mu}m compared to the expected flux density from stellar continuum only. We provide evidence that this 3.6 {mu}m excess is due to H{alpha} emission redshifted into the 3.6 {mu}m band, and classify these 3.6 {mu}m excess galaxies to be H{alpha} emitter (HAE) candidates. The selection of HAE candidates using an excess in broadband filters is sensitive to objects whose rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) is larger than 350 A. The H{alpha} inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of the HAEs range between 20 and 500 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and are a factor of {approx}6 larger than SFRs inferred from the UV continuum. The ratio between the H{alpha} luminosity and UV luminosity of HAEs is also on average larger than that of local starbursts. Possible reasons for such strong H{alpha} emission in these galaxies include different dust extinction properties, young stellar population ages, extended star formation histories, low metallicity, and a top-heavy stellar initial mass function. Although the correlation between UV slope {beta} and L{sub H{alpha}}/L{sub UV} raises the possibility that HAEs prefer a dust extinction curve which is steeper in the UV, the most dominant factor that results in strong H{alpha} emission appears to be star formation history. The H{alpha} EWs of HAEs are large despite their relatively old stellar population ages constrained by spectral energy distribution fitting, suggesting that at least 60% of HAEs produce stars at a constant rate. Under the assumption that the gas supply is sustained, HAEs are able to produce {approx}> 50% of the stellar mass density that is encompassed in massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies at z {approx} 3. This 'strong H{alpha} phase' of star formation plays a dominant role in galaxy growth at z {approx} 4, and they are likely progenitors of massive red galaxies at lower redshifts.

  3. Run II Jet Physics Proceedings of the Run II QCD and Weak Boson Physics Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blazey, G C; Ellis, S D; Elvira, V D; Frame, K C; Grinstein, S; Hirosky, R; Piegaia, R; Schellman, H; Snihur, R; Sorin, V; Zeppenfeld, Dieter; Blazey, Gerald C.; Dittmann, Jay R.; Ellis, Stephen D.; Hirosky, Robert; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    The Run II jet physics group includes the Jet Algorithms, Jet Shape/Energy Flow, and Jet Measurements/Correlations subgroups. The main goal of the jet algorithm subgroup was to explore and define standard Run II jet finding procedures for CDF and DO. The focus of the jet shape/energy flow group was the study of jets as objects and the energy flows around these objects. The jet measurements/correlations subgroup discussed measurements at different beam energies; strong coupling constant measurements; and LO, NLO, NNLO, and threshold jet calculations. As a practical matter the algorithm and shape/energy flow groups merged to concentrate on the development of Run II jet algorithms that are both free of theoretical and experimental difficulties and able to reproduce Run I measurements. Starting from a review of the experience gained during Run I, the group considered a variety of cone algorithms and KT algorithms. The current understanding of both types of algorithms, including calibration issues, are discussed i...

  4. ATLAS Run-2 status and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastore, Francesca; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    During the 2013/2014 shutdown of the LHC the ATLAS detector has been improved. A new silicon pixel detector layer has been installed, and the muon detector coverage has been improved substantially. In addition nearly all other parts of the detector have also been revised to adapt them to the higher pileup conditions or make them more robust in general. This talk will describe these improvements, and how they affect the performance of physics objects. The initial results showing the detector performance as obtained from cosmic runs and/or initial beam data will also be shown.

  5. Running River PLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast JumpInformation SanjunyanRouttRumbleRunning

  6. SunRun Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember Corp Jump to:CDC1 LLCSunPowerSunRun Inc

  7. SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6 Commercial8thUSERS'6/02 Run Shutdown

  8. Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs by Group

  9. Sandia Energy - Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model Previous Next Developing a...

  10. Alcator C-MOD Runs for CY 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runs for CY 2015 Administer Run Database Select Calendar Year 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993...

  11. Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalakes, John

    Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run John Michalakes Josh Hacker overview and petascale issues Nature run methodology Results and conclusion #12;Mesoscale & Microscale's atmosphere #12;Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR Description of Science Kinetic energy

  12. Long run changes in driver behavior due to variable tolls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konduru, Karun K.

    2004-09-30

    As many variable pricing projects are still in the implementation stage, long-run driver responses to the variable tolls are largely unknown. This research examined the long-run changes in driver behavior in an existing ...

  13. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeda, Junpei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. During the next data-taking period starting in 2015 (Run-2) the LHC will operate at a centre-of-mass energy of about 13 TeV resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. We will briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger system, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter fa...

  14. STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J'JN13 1952 WOODS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J blueback salmon counts over Bonneville and Rock Island Dams and total run data 1938-51 8 5. Columbia River

  15. SALMON RUNS -UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    364; SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS HOLE, MAt L. McKernan, Director SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER. 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle Dams. IV #12;SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle ABSTRACT

  16. WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    461 WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES ON WATER TEMPERATURE REPORT-FISHERIES Na 461 #12;#12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES HAMILTON CITY O Frontispiece.--Upper Sacramento River and Tributaries iv #12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON

  17. Single superpartner production at Tevatron Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Deliot; G. Moreau; C. Royon

    2000-07-25

    We study the single productions of supersymmetric particles at Tevatron Run II which occur in the $2 \\to 2-body$ processes involving R-parity violating couplings of type $\\l'_{ijk} L_i Q_j D_k^c$. We focus on the single gaugino productions which receive contributions from the resonant slepton productions. We first calculate the amplitudes of the single gaugino productions. Then we perform analyses of the single gaugino productions based on the three charged leptons and like sign dilepton signatures. These analyses allow to probe supersymmetric particles masses beyond the present experimental limits, and many of the $\\l'_{ijk}$ coupling constants down to values smaller than the low-energy bounds. Finally, we show that the studies of the single gaugino productions offer the opportunity to reconstruct the $\\tilde \\chi^0_1$, $\\tilde \\chi^{\\pm}_1$, $\\tilde \

  18. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campana, Simone; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  19. ULTRA-DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF STARS WITH M {approx}< 1 M {sub Sun}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Anderson, Jay; Dotter, Aaron; Reid, I. Neill; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Rich, R. Michael; Hurley, Jarrod; Shara, Michael M. E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: jhurley@swin.edu.au

    2013-02-15

    We present a new measurement of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) based on ultra-deep, high-resolution photometry of >5000 stars in the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) galaxy. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys observations reveal this rich, cospatial population behind the foreground globular cluster 47 Tuc, which we targeted for 121 HST orbits. The stellar main sequence of the SMC is measured in the F606W, F814W color-magnitude diagram down to {approx}30th magnitude, and is cleanly separated from the foreground star cluster population using proper motions. We simulate the SMC population by extracting stellar masses (single and unresolved binaries) from specific IMFs and converting those masses to luminosities in our bandpasses. The corresponding photometry for these simulated stars is drawn directly from a rich cloud of 4 million artificial stars, thereby accounting for the real photometric scatter and completeness of the data. Over a continuous and well-populated mass range of M = 0.37-0.93 M {sub Sun} (e.g., down to a {approx}75% completeness limit at F606W = 28.7), we demonstrate that the IMF is well represented by a single power-law form with slope {alpha} = -1.90 ({sup +0.15} {sub -0.10}) (3{sigma} error) (e.g., dN/dM{proportional_to} M {sup {alpha}}). This is shallower than the Salpeter slope of {alpha} = -2.35, which agrees with the observed stellar luminosity function at higher masses. Our results indicate that the IMF does not turn over to a more shallow power-law form within this mass range. We discuss implications of this result for the theory of star formation, the inferred masses of galaxies, and the (lack of a) variation of the IMF with metallicity.

  20. A River Runs/Ran Through It: The interplay between fluvial geomorphology, stream ecosystems and people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    A River Runs/Ran Through It: The interplay between fluvial geomorphology, stream ecosystems and people Course Mission: We spend most of our time studying and teaching about rivers in their most physical or biological processes, it does not address the current state of most rivers within our nation

  1. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab - Test Run Results and Full Run Plans; Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beacham, James

    2015-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ~ (10^-6 - 10?)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e?+e? pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10?. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ~ 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 x 10??, and is expected to occur sometime in 2016 or 2017.

  2. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  4. The NUHM? after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flcher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 10? points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs?????) by LHCb and CMS togethermorewith other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 2Hu 2Hd 2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with ?2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and ?2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.less

  5. The NUHM2 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flcher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 10? points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs?????) by LHCb and CMS togethermorewith other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 2Hu 2Hd 2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with ?2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and ?2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.less

  6. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  7. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Look, Nicole [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McDermott, William J. [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States)] [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States); Bradley, Elizabeth [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)] [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  8. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  9. RIS-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS Jrn Roed Abstract. In order to find the run-off from roof material a roof has been constructed with two different slopes (30 and 45). Beryllium-7 and caesium-137 has been used as tracers. Considering new roof material the pollution removed by runoff processes has been shown

  10. Metabolic cost of generating horizontal forces during human running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kram, Rodger

    . Using a wind tunnel to apply horizontal impeding forces, Pugh (19) showed that the metabolic cost forces. Davies (5) compared the metabolic cost of running with wind resistance vs. wind assistanceMetabolic cost of generating horizontal forces during human running YOUNG-HUI CHANG AND RODGER KRAM

  11. Review of recent LHCb results and prospects for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicheur, A

    2015-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  12. Review of recent LHCb results and prospects for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hicheur

    2015-09-25

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  13. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  14. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2012 d river run by Alex Dugas Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna Mc jokes. Together these things helped shape the 2012 edition of the Onion River Review. A worthwhile departing on an adventure, you simply have no idea what will happen or who you will meet. You may run

  15. Crystal structure of lanthanum bismuth silicate Bi{sub 2-x}La{sub x}SiO{sub 5} (x{approx}0.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georges, Samuel . E-mail: samuel.georges@lepmi.inpg.fr; Goutenoire, Francois; Lacorre, Philippe

    2006-12-15

    A melting and glass recrystallization route was carried out to stabilize a new tetragonal form of Bi{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} with bismuth partially substituted by lanthanum. The crystal structure of Bi{sub 2-x}La{sub x}SiO{sub 5} (x{approx}0.1) was determined from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data (space group I4/mmm, a=b=3.8307(3)A, c=15.227(1)A, V=224.18A{sup 3}, Z=2; reliability factors: R{sub Bragg}=5.65%, R{sub p}=14.6%, R{sub wp}=16.8%, R{sub exp}=8.3%, {chi}{sup 2}=8.3 (X-ray) and R{sub Bragg}=2.40%, R{sub p}=8.1%, R{sub wp}=7.5%, R{sub exp}=4.2%, {chi}{sup 2}=3.3 (neutrons); 11 structural parameters refined). The main effect of lanthanum substitution is to introduce, by removing randomly some bismuth 6s{sup 2} lone pairs, a structural disorder in the surroundings of (Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sup 2+} layers, that is in the (SiO{sub 3}){sup 2-} pyroxene files arrangement. It results in a symmetry increase relatively to the parent compound Bi{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}, which is orthorhombic. The two structures are compared.

  16. Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the other with rinse water. Run your washing machine and dishwasher only instead and save gallons every time. For cold drinks keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator instead

  17. Lower Three Runs Remediation Safety Preparation Strategy - 13318

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackay, Alexander; Fryar, Scotty; Doane, Alan [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. It is a large blackwater stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 20 mile stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows and provides a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood-plain. Based on data collected during the years 2009 and 2010 under American Recovery and Re-investment Act funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. In agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, three areas were identified for remediation [1] (SRNS April 2012). A comprehensive safety preparation strategy was developed for safe execution of the LTR remediation project. Contract incentives for safety encouraged the contractor to perform a complete evaluation of the work and develop an implementation plan to perform the work. The safety coverage was controlled to ensure all work was observed and assessed by one person per work area within the project. This was necessary due to the distances between the fence work and three transects being worked, approximately 20 miles. Contractor Management field observations were performed along with DOE assessments to ensure contractor focus on safe performance of the work. Dedicated ambulance coverage for remote worker work activities was provided. This effort was augmented with access to medical evacuation services. The areas where the work was performed were remote and difficult to get emergency vehicles to in a timely manner in case of an accident. Satellite phones were utilized due to intermittent phone coverage. High visibility vests were utilized to enable any hunters in the area to see the workers; due to the limited buffer areas along the stream route. An innovative approach to providing the necessary protection for workers during periods of extreme heat and humidity was also employed, which included the use of 'heat islands' with fans and crew trailers and ice vests for workers. (authors)

  18. Level-2 Milestone 3244: Deploy Dawn ID Machine for Initial Science Runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, D

    2009-09-21

    This report documents the delivery, installation, integration, testing, and acceptance of the Dawn system, ASC L2 milestone 3244: Deploy Dawn ID Machine for Initial Science Runs, due September 30, 2009. The full text of the milestone is included in Attachment 1. The description of the milestone is: This milestone will be a result of work started three years ago with the planning for a multi-petaFLOPS UQ-focused platform (Sequoia) and will be satisfied when a smaller ID version of the final system is delivered, installed, integrated, tested, accepted, and deployed at LLNL for initial science runs in support of SSP mission. The deliverable for this milestone will be a LA petascale computing system (named Dawn) usable for code development and scaling necessary to ensure effective use of a final Sequoia platform (expected in 2011-2012), and for urgent SSP program needs. Allocation and scheduling of Dawn as an LA system will likely be performed informally, similar to what has been used for BlueGene/L. However, provision will be made to allow for dedicated access times for application scaling studies across the entire Dawn resource. The milestone was completed on April 1, 2009, when science runs began running on the Dawn system. The following sections describe the Dawn system architecture, current status, installation and integration time line, and testing and acceptance process. A project plan is included as Attachment 2. Attachment 3 is a letter certifying the handoff of the system to a nuclear weapons stockpile customer. Attachment 4 presents the results of science runs completed on the system.

  19. First operational experience with the CMS Run Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The Run Control System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) controls the sub-detector and central data acquisition systems and the high-level trigger farm of the experiment. ...

  20. The run IIb trigger upgrade for the DO experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; Padley, P.; Olsen, J.; Narain, M.; Mitrevski, J.; Le Du, P.; Laurens, P.; Johnson, M.; Johns, K.; Hirosky, R.; Hildreth, M.

    2004-06-01

    The increase in instantaneous luminosity anticipated in Run IIb of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab requires increased background rejection capabilities from the trigger system of the DO detector. A set of upgrades is under way to improve...

  1. Analysis of Long-Running Replicated Systems Sriram Ramabhadran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquale, Joseph

    Analysis of Long-Running Replicated Systems Sriram Ramabhadran Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering University of California, San Diego sriram@cs.ucsd.edu Joseph Pasquale Dept. of Computer Science

  2. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pope, "The EPA is pleased with the cleanup of hot spots of contaminated soil and sediment along Lower Three Runs. EPA worked closely with the Department of Energy, South...

  3. Design of running-man, a bipedal robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jin

    2011-01-01

    are the muscles of the robot. Two types of RC servo motorsforce at the end. This robot is based on a previous robot ofSpecifications of Running Man robot prototype Hip range of

  4. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2009 d river run by Eireann Aspell Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynch Matt Serron #12 lives. #12;BLANK Editors' Note There were portents hinting at the Onion River Review's future as early

  5. New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, you may have to run. In fact, his first weeks in his new job have looked like a sprint.

  6. Running Head: EMOTION AND AGING Emotion and Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running Head: EMOTION AND AGING Emotion and Aging Mara Mather, M., & Ponzio, A. (in press). Emotion and aging. In L. Feldman Barrett, M. All of these basic mechanisms and contextual factors change in normal aging

  7. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  8. Presenter:! Time & Date: !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    a checkbook, you can understand which energy options have the promise of supporting humankind - wind, hydro://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! #12;A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! Presenter: Liz Moyer! Time a bigger, richer population without fossil fuels (which will definitely run out someday)? Energy is a hot

  9. THE LBT BOOeTES FIELD SURVEY. I. THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET AND NEAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CLUSTERING OF BRIGHT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dave, Romeel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, Richard F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maiolino, Roberto [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U{sub spec}-band imaging survey (9 deg{sup 2}) covering the NOAO Booetes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by {>=}3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z {approx} 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z {approx} 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 {mu}m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity.

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 4}Si{sub 2}C{sub 5}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Sugiura, Keita [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    We have prepared a new layered oxycarbide, [Al{sub 5.25(5)}Si{sub 0.75(5)}][O{sub 1.60(7)}C{sub 3.40(7)}], by isothermal heating of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}) at 2273 K near the carbon-carbon monoxide buffer. The crystal structure was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3m (centrosymmetric), Z=3, and hexagonal cell dimensions a=0.32464(2) nm, c=4.00527(14) nm and V=0.36556(3) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The reliability indices were R{sub wp}=4.45% (S=1.30), R{sub p}=3.48%, R{sub B}=2.27% and R{sub F}=1.25%. The crystal is composed of three types of domains with nearly the same fraction, one of which has the crystal structure of space group R3-bar m. The crystal structure of the remaining two domains, which are related by pseudo-symmetry inversion, is noncentrosymmetric with space group R3m. - Graphical Abstract: A new aluminum silicon oxycarbide, (Al{sub 6-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub 5-y}) (x{approx}0.8 and y{approx}1.6). The crystal is composed of three types of domains (I, II and III), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al,Si){sub 4}(O,C){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al,Si)(O,C){sub 2}] single layers.

  11. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-04-05

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

  12. Well casing hanger and packoff running and retrieval tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, J.R.; Valka, W.A.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a well tool for running a casing hanger and a packoff into, and retrieving a packoff from, a subsea wellhead. It comprises a tubular body including means to releasably connect a packoff to the body for running the packoff into a subsea wellhead; means to releasably connect a packoff to the body for retrieving the packoff from a subsea wellhead; means to relocate the packoff running means and the packoff retrieving means between their functional and non-functional positions; means to releasably connect a casing hanger to the body for running the hanger into a subsea wellhead; a tubular mandrel surrounded by and rotatable with respect to the body; means surrounding the mandrel for moving the casing hanger connection means into functional position; first anti-rotation means preventing relative rotation between the body and the means for moving the casing hanger connection means; second anti-rotation means for preventing relative rotation between connection means; second anti-rotation means for preventing relative rotation between the body and a casing hanger connected thereto: and means for connecting the mandrel to a pipe string for running the tool into a subsea wellhead.

  13. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS physics goals require excellent resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and on the quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the Run II of the LHC, the system was upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration of the IBL into the alignment framework, techniques allowing to identify and eliminate tracking systematics as well as strategies to deal with time-dependent alignment. Performance from the commissioning of Cosmic data and potentially early LHC Run II proton-proton collisions will be discussed.

  14. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    in Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry Wang Liurong.YRCCsin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry not just importantin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry emerging market

  15. Still the Wild River Runs: Congress, the Sierra Club and the Fight to Save Grand Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2003-01-01

    Review: Still the Wild River Runs: Congress, the Sierra ClubE. Pearson. Still the Wild River Runs: Congress, the Sierrarecounted in Still the Wild River Runs by Byron E. Pearson,

  16. Absorbing Phase Transitions and Dynamic Freezing in Running Active Matter Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

    2014-06-12

    We examine a two-dimensional system of sterically repulsive interacting disks where each particle runs in a random direction. This system is equivalent to a run-and-tumble dynamics system in the limit where the run time is infinite. At low densities, we find a strongly fluctuating state composed of transient clusters. Above a critical density that is well below the density at which non-active particles would crystallize, the system can organize into a drifting quiescent or frozen state where the fluctuations are lost and large crystallites form surrounded by a small density of individual particles. Although all the particles are still moving, their paths form closed orbits. The average transient time to organize into the quiescent state diverges as a power law upon approaching the critical density from above. We compare our results to the random organization observed for periodically sheared systems that can undergo an absorbing transition from a fluctuating state to a dynamical non-fluctuating state. In the random organization studies, the system organizes to a state in which the particles no longer interact; in contrast, we find that the randomly running active matter organizes to a strongly interacting dynamically jammed state. We show that the transition to the frozen state is robust against a certain range of stochastic fluctuations. We also examine the effects of adding a small number of pinned particles to the system and find that the transition to the frozen state shifts to significantly lower densities and arises via the nucleation of faceted crystals centered at the obstacles.

  17. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  18. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  19. Fast Bunch Integrators at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas; Briegel, Charles; Fellenz, Brian; Vogel, Greg; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The Fast Bunch Integrator is a bunch intensity monitor designed around the measurements made from Resistive Wall Current Monitors. During the Run II period these were used in both Tevatron and Main Injector for single and multiple bunch intensity measurements. This paper presents an overview of the design and use of these systems during this period. During the Run II era the Fast Bunch integrators have found a multitude of uses. From antiproton transfers to muti-bunch beam coalescing, Main Injector transfers to halo scraping and lifetime measurements, the Fast Bunch Integrators have proved invaluable in the creation and maintenance of Colliding Beams stores at Fermilab.

  20. Running as fast as it can: How spiking dynamics form object groupings in the laminar circuits of visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossberg, Stephen

    1 Running as fast as it can: How spiking dynamics form object groupings in the laminar circuits laminar cortical circuits Submitted: July 6, 2009 Revised: January 5, 2010 Technical Report CAS/CNS-0009 timing across many interacting cells. Some models have demonstrated spiking dynamics in recurrent laminar

  1. Study of the Influence of Air Supply Temperature on Air Distribution in the Run-through Large Space Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, M.; He, J.

    2006-01-01

    museum) under winter operating conditions. At the same time, the indoor air flow regulations are summarized according to the simulation results. On the above basis, a new solution for airflow control of the connection in a run-through large space is put...

  2. An extension of generalized Taylor dispersion in unbounded homogeneous shear flows to run-and-tumble chemotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearon, Rachel

    -and-tumble chemotactic bacteria R. N. Bearon School of Oceanography, Box 357940, University of Washington, Seattle of flow, the biased random walk of bacteria such as Escherichia coli is modeled by straight runs. In the well-studied situation of weak bias in tumble rate, bacteria disperse over a diffusive time scale

  3. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  4. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; et al

    2015-09-15

    The accurate determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided somorefar, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.less

  5. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Habitat; Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook Salmon. VolumeStatus of Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook Salmon. Volumeplasticity in Sacramento River winter-run chinook salmon (

  6. Polarization induced hole doping in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shibin; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yajie; Wang, Zhiming; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Zhi; Jiang, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2013-02-11

    Polarization induced hole doping on the order of {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} is achieved in linearly graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and conventional Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layers grown on AlN are beryllium (Be) doped via epitaxial growth. The hole concentration in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N:Be (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layers demonstrates that polarization generates hole charges from Be dopant. The Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layer is not conductive owing to the absence of carriers generated from the Be dopant without the inducement of polarization. Polarization doping provides an approach to high efficiency p-type doping in high Al composition AlGaN.

  7. Running head: Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running head: Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Oliver, O. C., & Wirth, M. M. (2008). Biopsychological aspects of motivation. In J. Heckhausen & H. Heckhausen (Eds.), Motivation and action (2 ed., pp. 247-271). New York: Cambridge University Press. #12

  8. Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

  9. Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids Remi Tailleux in classi- cal thermodynamics, however, usually relies on the concept of exergy, and is usually measured/eddy decompositions, APE in incompressible fluids, APE and irreversible turbulent mixing, and the role of mechanical

  10. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  11. Zero Capacity Region of Multidimensional Run Length Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeger, Kenneth

    there are at least consecutive zeros. An -dimensional pattern of zeros and ones arranged in an hyper For integers and satisfying , a binary sequence is said to satisfy a one-dimensional run length constraint. For , the -dimensional -constrained capacity is defined as where denotes the number of -dimensional binary rectangular

  12. Running A Conference Justin Zobel # Alistair Mo#at +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zobel, Justin

    Running A Conference Justin Zobel # Alistair Mo#at + Last updated August 2003 1 Introduction Much of the research in computer science is published in conferences, often complex a#airs in cluding paper presentations, tutorials, workshops, invited speakers, and tours and entertainment. Even a small conference has

  13. Future Choices 1 Running head: EFFECT OF FUTURE CHOICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Choices 1 Running head: EFFECT OF FUTURE CHOICES The Effect of Highlighting Future Choices on Current Preferences Uzma Khan Carnegie Mellon University Ravi Dhar Yale School of Management #12;Future future choices rather than as an isolated choice. Our finding contrasts with the general wisdom

  14. PRO: CLAS Comprehensive Vitae Run Date: 4/4/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in groundwater; Origins of isotopes and major and trace elements in formation waters (deep basin/oil & gas field: Oxford University Press, 1998. Macpherson, G. L., and M. A. Townsend. "Chapter 5, Water chemistry Association of GeoChemistry, June 2013 #12;Gwendolyn L. Macpherson 2 PRO: CLAS Comprehensive Vitae Run Date: 4

  15. D0 status and first results from Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aurelio Juste

    2004-01-12

    In order to fully exploit the physics potential of the Tevatron Run 2, the D0 detector has been upgraded. Having nearly completed the commissioning phase, the D0 detector is starting to produce its first physics results. An overview of the status of the main subdetectors involved in the upgrade is given, followed by some examples of preliminary physics results already emerging.

  16. Evidence for Spring Loaded Inverted Pendulum Running in a Hexapod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saranl, Ulu

    Evidence for Spring Loaded Inverted Pendulum Running in a Hexapod Robot Richard Altendorfer, Uluc recently designed compliant leg hexapod robot, RHex. Experimentally measured RHex center of mass for hierarchical control of hexapod robots. 1. Introduction We have recently reported on a prototype robot

  17. The long-run evolution of energy prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price ...

  18. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2013 d river run by Alex Dugas Sarah Fraser Bryan Hickey Nick Lemon Diana Marchessault Mickey O'Neill Amy Wilson #12;#12;Editors' Note For this edition of the Onion River Review, we are finally able to present to you this year's edition of the Onion River Review: our love child, our shining

  19. The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Triggers towards Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karamaoun, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Triggers towards Run 2 Tau triggers are used in a variety of highly anticipated ATLAS physics analyses, including the measurement of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions and searches for Higgs boson partners or heavy resonances decaying into pairs of tau leptons. As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10^34cm^ -2s-1, the strategies for triggering have become more sophisticated than in Run 1. In these conditions single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitations, despite the advancements in algorithms used in the tau identification. Further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main developments to allow a large program of physics analysis. In Run 2 topological criteria can be applied already at the first trigger level, due to the addition of the L1 topological processor. This makes it possible to use detailed information from sub-detectors in order to apply real-time event topology cuts...

  20. Self-propelled running droplets on solid substrates driven by chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. John; M. Baer; U. Thiele

    2006-11-17

    We study chemically driven running droplets on a partially wetting solid substrate by means of coupled evolution equations for the thickness profile of the droplets and the density profile of an adsorbate layer. Two models are introduced corresponding to two qualitatively different types of experiments described in the literature. In both cases an adsorption or desorption reaction underneath the droplets induces a wettability gradient on the substrate and provides the driving force for droplet motion. The difference lies in the behavior of the substrate behind the droplet. In case I the substrate is irreversibly changed whereas in case II it recovers allowing for a periodic droplet movement (as long as the overall system stays far away from equilibrium). Both models allow for a non-saturated and a saturated regime of droplet movement depending on the ratio of the viscous and reactive time scales. In contrast to model I, model II allows for sitting drops at high reaction rate and zero diffusion along the substrate. The transition from running to sitting drops in model II occurs via a super- or subcritical drift-pitchfork bifurcation and may be strongly hysteretic implying a coexistence region of running and sitting drops.

  1. Theory of Earthquake Recurrence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saichev; D. Sornette

    2006-05-31

    The statistics of recurrence times in broad areas have been reported to obey universal scaling laws, both for single homogeneous regions (Corral, 2003) and when averaged over multiple regions (Bak et al.,2002). These unified scaling laws are characterized by intermediate power law asymptotics. On the other hand, Molchan (2005) has presented a mathematical proof that, if such a universal law exists, it is necessarily an exponential, in obvious contradiction with the data. First, we generalize Molchan's argument to show that an approximate unified law can be found which is compatible with the empirical observations when incorporating the impact of the Omori law of earthquake triggering. We then develop the full theory of the statistics of inter-event times in the framework of the ETAS model of triggered seismicity and show that the empirical observations can be fully explained. Our theoretical expression fits well the empirical statistics over the whole range of recurrence times, accounting for different regimes by using only the physics of triggering quantified by Omori's law. The description of the statistics of recurrence times over multiple regions requires an additional subtle statistical derivation that maps the fractal geometry of earthquake epicenters onto the distribution of the average seismic rates in multiple regions. This yields a prediction in excellent agreement with the empirical data for reasonable values of the fractal dimension $d \\approx 1.8$, the average clustering ratio $n \\approx 0.9$, and the productivity exponent $\\alpha \\approx 0.9$ times the $b$-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  2. Continuous reservoir simulation incorporating uncertainty quantification and real-time data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Jay Cuthbert

    2009-05-15

    of uncertainty in resulting forecasts. A new technology to allow this process to run continuously with little human interaction is real-time production and pressure data, which can be automatically integrated into runs. Two tests of this continuous simulation...

  3. Installing and Using VMWare View Client for Android This document describes how to get up and running with View if your device runs an Android

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    1 Installing and Using VMWare View Client for Android This document describes how to get up and running with View if your device runs an Android operating system. Instructions may differ slightly from

  4. In running, kinetic and potential energy removed from the body during the first half of a running step is transiently stored

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Hartmut

    stability. Kubow and Full (1999) investigated the stability of hexapod running in numerical simulation) found a lateral spring-mass stability for hexapod running on a conservative level where total mechanical

  5. Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8.8 1 Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8.8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8.8 1 Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8.8 People Novell user ID and password and click the Sign In button. #12;Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8: In the top border of your window you will see your user Id. #12;Running the AP DDR Query in PeopleSoft 8.8 3

  6. Solving the coincidence problem in a large class of running vacuum cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. M. Zilioti; R. C. Santos; J. A. S. Lima

    2015-08-26

    Decaying vacuum cosmological models evolving smoothly between two extreme (very early and late time) de Sitter phases are capable to solve naturally several cosmic problems, among them: (i) the singularity, (ii) the horizon, (iii) the graceful-exit from inflation. Here we discuss a solution the coincidence problem based on a large class of running vacuum cosmologies evolving from de Sitter to de Sitter recently proposed. It is argued that even the cosmological constant problem can be solved provided that the characteristic scales of the limiting de Sitter manifolds are predicted from first principles.

  7. SACO-1: a fast-running LMFBR accident-analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Vaurio, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    SACO is a fast-running computer code that simulates hypothetical accidents in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to the point of permanent subcriticality or to the initiation of a prompt-critical excursion. In the tradition of the SAS codes, each subassembly is modeled by a representative fuel pin with three distinct axial regions to simulate the blanket and core regions. However, analytic and integral models are used wherever possible to cut down the computing time and storage requirements. The physical models and basic equations are described in detail. Comparisons of SACO results to analogous SAS3D results comprise the qualifications of SACO and are illustrated and discussed.

  8. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system has been used successfully for data collection in the 2009-2013 Run 1 operation cycle of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of up to 8 TeV. With the restart of the LHC for the new Run 2 data-taking period at 13 TeV, the trigger rates are expected to rise by approximately a factor of 5. This presentation gave a brief overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown period in order to deal with the increased trigger rates while efficiently selecting the physics processes of interest. These upgrades include changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system, and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single processing farm.

  9. CMS physics highlights in the LHC Run 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria for the CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-18

    The main physics results obtained by the CMS experiment during the first three years of operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (2010--2013, aka. Run 1) are summarized. The advances in our understanding of the fundamental particles and their interactions are succinctly reviewed under the following physics topics: (i) Quantum Chromodynamics, (ii) Quark Gluon Plasma, (iii) Electroweak interaction, (iv) Top quark, (v) Higgs boson, (vi) Flavour, (vii) Supersymmetry, (viii) Dark Matter, and (ix) other searches of physics beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Pleasant Run Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehemPlainsboroPlasticCalifornia:Plains,Run Farm,

  11. Pleasant Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehemPlainsboroPlasticCalifornia:Plains,Run

  12. Running the Race for Clean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA Token RequestingRoundtables RoundtablesRunning the

  13. Towards Run-time Flexibility for Process Families: Open Issues and Research Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitt

    process models, e.g., ITIL in IT service management, reference processes in SAP's ERP system, or medical

  14. Automated caching of behavioral patterns for efficient run-time monitoring Natalia Stakhanova1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Samik

    behavioral patterns can be a difficult, labor-intensive process, and (2) that use of such pattern behavior of malicious intruder [13]), or from a low-risk to a high-risk state (e.g., an un- expected load of users [7]). By providing early warning of possible, imminent risk in the dynamic execution envi- ronment

  15. BScope: A Scalable, Run-Time Architecture for Activity Recognition Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teixeira, Thiago

    be con- nected together into hierarchies to provide even more com- plex interpretations. The power are used to generate summaries of daily activities and to trigger various levels of alarms as well as cell-phone

  16. Evaluation of the 2005 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Washington Box 358218 Seattle, Washington 98195 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97283-3621 Project Number 1989 tributary origin, Snake River subyearlings, and Snake River steelhead are tracked to Bonneville. From Mc

  17. Evaluation of the 2003 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    , Washington 98195 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish

  18. Evaluation of the 2002 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    .S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland

  19. Increasing Application Performance In Virtual Environments Through Run-time Inference and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    - Effort sponsored by the National Science Foundation under Grants ANI- 0093221, ACI-0112891, ANI-0301108 into the emerging grid standards environment [19]. An introduc- tion to the state of the art in resource

  20. Coping with Resource Fluctuations: The Run-time Reconfigurable Functional Unit Row

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glette, Kyrre

    accuracy. For the electromyographic (EMG) signal classification, it has been showed that EHW ap- proaches

  1. Adaptive Exchange of Distributed Partial Models@run.time for Highly Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : iliasg@d3s.mff.cuni.cz INRIA Lille / University of Lille 1, France, Email: filip other, the performance, energy and memory consumption as well as privacy are unnecessarily negatively subsystem has its own knowledge exchange policy and there is no central point of coordination from which

  2. DRASTIC: A Run-Time Architecture for Evolving, Distributed, Persistent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J.H.

    Evans,J.H. Dickman,P.W. Proceedings of ECOOP'97. (11th European Conference on Object Oriented Programming). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume No. 1241 pp 243-275 Springer

  3. The Grumps Architecture: Run-time Evolution in a Large Scale Distributed System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J.H.

    Evans,J.H. Dickman,P. Atkinson,M. Proceedings of the Workshop on Engineering Complex Object-Oriented Solutions for Evolution (ECOOSE), held as part of OOPSLA 2001

  4. Sandbox Prefetching: Safe Run-Time Evaluation of Aggressive Prefetchers Seth H Pugsley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    techniques to mitigate the perfor- mance impact of long memory latencies. These prefetch- ers operate on its ability to correctly predict the memory addresses ac- cessed by a program. Accurate prefetches. Therefore, before employing a prefetching technique, it is important to weigh the relative benefit of ac

  5. Submitted to: On Recovering from Run-time Misbehaviour in ADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    Tuosto Department of Computer Science, University of Leicester, UK kyriakos@le.ac.uk emilio@le.ac.uk We to predict the possible problems that could arise during the execution of such systems. Formal approaches aim to devise robust engineering practices to form reliable software products to mitigate the issues described

  6. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication &20081-929-200499Actof Energy 4.367Testing Facilities

  7. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i Framing Document http://energy.gov/QTRDepartment of Energy

  8. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  9. Typical BWR/4 MSIV closure ATWS analysis using RAMONA-3B code with space-time neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.; Saha, P.

    1984-01-01

    A best-estimate analysis of a typical BWR/4 MSIV closure ATWS has been performed using the RAMONA-3B code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics. All safety features, namely, the safety and relief valves, recirculation pump trip, high pressure safety injections and the standby liquid control system (boron injection), were assumed to work as designed. No other operator action was assumed. The results show a strong spatial dependence of reactor power during the transient. After the initial peak of pressure and reactor power, the reactor vessel pressure oscillated between the relief valve set points, and the reactor power oscillated between 20 to 50% of the steady state power until the hot shutdown condition was reached at approximately 1400 seconds. The suppression pool bulk water temperature at this time was predicted to be approx. 96/sup 0/C (205/sup 0/F). In view of code performance and reasonable computer running time, the RAMONA-3B code is recommended for further best-estimate analyses of ATWS-type events in BWRs.

  10. Time Running Out: A Portrait of California Families Reaching the CalWORKs Time Limit in 2004, Detailed Research Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    London, Rebecca A.; Mauldon, Jane G.

    2006-01-01

    Riverside, Sacramento, and Tulare. 4 The survey explores theRiverside Sacramento Tulare Total Sample Size Notes: (1) TheRiverside, Sacramento, and Tulare. The principal data

  11. CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

  12. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Gu, X.; Miyamoto, R.; White, S.; Schmidt, F.; Qiang, J.; /LBNL

    2012-05-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beam-beam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  13. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valishev, A; Miyamoto, R; White, S; Schmidt, F; Qiang, J

    2012-01-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beambeam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  14. SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6 Commercial8thUSERS'6/02 Run Shutdown22/04

  15. Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy BlueBobBoise Buses Running

  16. Birch Run, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-Gas Technologies, LLC JumpBiofameData BookScenarioLake,Run,

  17. Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformation Forest Service ClimateI JumpBrent Run

  18. Wuhu RunPhoton Tech Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation, searchWorldWudupowerWuhu RunPhoton

  19. Date Organization/Group Event Approx. Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Faulk, Virginia Tech BOV Ware Lab tour 2 10-Nov Roanoke Valley Governer's School Ware Lab tour 38 11-Nov

  20. The effects of swing-leg retraction on running performance: analysis, simulation, and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberland, Matt

    Using simple running models, researchers have argued that swing-leg retraction can improve running robot performance. In this paper, we investigate whether this holds for a more realistic simulation model validated against ...

  1. Using the Bran Luminosity Detectors for Beam Emittance Monitoring During LHC Physics Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratti, A.

    2013-01-01

    MONITORING DURING LHC PHYSICS RUNS* A. Ratti", H.S. Matis,IP5 during each of the Physics Runs. This provides a toolthe luminous regions from the physics experiments. Operator

  2. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results...

  3. Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair December 18, 2014 -...

  4. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs October 19, 2015 - 12:38pm Addthis ICM Inc. announced...

  5. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  6. Observational constraints on an inflation model with a running mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Covi; David H. Lyth; Leszek Roszkowski

    1998-09-09

    We explore a model of inflation where the inflaton mass-squared is generated at a high scale by gravity-mediated soft supersymmetry breaking, and runs at lower scales to the small value required for slow-roll inflation. The running is supposed to come from the coupling of the inflaton to a non-Abelian gauge field. In contrast with earlier work, we do not constrain the magnitude of the supersymmetry breaking scale, and we find that the model might work even if squark and slepton masses come from gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. With the inflaton and gaugino masses in the expected range, and $\\alpha = g^2/4\\pi $ in the range $10^{-2}$ to $10^{-3}$ (all at the high scale) the model can give the observed cosmic microwave anisotropy, and a spectral index in the observed range. The latter has significant variation with scale, which can confirm or rule out the model in the forseeable future.

  7. The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Trigger towards Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karamaoun, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Tau triggers are used in a variety of highly anticipated ATLAS physics analyses, including the measurement of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions and searches for Higgs boson partners or heavy resonances decaying into pairs of tau leptons. As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10 34 cm ?2 s ?1 , the strategies for triggering have become more sophisticated than in Run 1. In these conditions single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitations, despite the advancements in algorithms used in the tau identification. Further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main developments to allow a large program of physics analysis. In Run 2, topological criteria can be applied already at the first trigger level, due to the addition of the L1 topological processor. This makes it possible to use detailed information from sub-detectors in order to apply real-time event topology cuts. The evolution of the ATLAS tau trigger and its performance...

  8. Ambiguity in running spectral index with an extra light field during inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunori Kohri; Tomohiro Matsuda

    2015-01-15

    At the beginning of inflation there could be extra dynamical scalar fields that will soon disappear (become static) before the end of inflation. In the light of multi-field inflation, those extra degrees of freedom may alter the time-dependence of the original spectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is possible to remove such fields introducing extra number of e-foldings prior to $N_e\\sim 60$, however such extra e-foldings may make the trans-Planckian problem worse due to the Lyth bound. We show that such extra scalar fields can change the running of the spectral index to give correction of $\\pm 0.01$ without adding significant contribution to the spectral index. The corrections to the spectral index (and the amplitude) could be important in considering global behavior of the corrected spectrum, although they can be neglected in the estimation of the spectrum and its spectral index at the pivot scale. The ambiguity in the running of the spectral index, which could be due to such fields, can be used to nullify tension between BICEP2 and Planck experiments.

  9. Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter-examines existing wave run-up data for regular, irregular and solitary waves on smooth, impermeable plane slopes. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new wave run-up equation in terms of a dimensionless wave

  10. In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 -2009 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 - 2009: Master of Resource Management Title of Research Project: In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser managers I develop an in-river backwards run reconstruction to provide Conservation Unit (CU) specific

  11. Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, Meta; /Munich U.

    2005-06-01

    A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

  12. DOE-2 sample run book: Version 2.1E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelmann, F.C.; Birdsall, B.E.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hirsch, J.J.; Gates, S. [Hirsch (James J.) and Associates, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The DOE-2 Sample Run Book shows inputs and outputs for a variety of building and system types. The samples start with a simple structure and continue to a high-rise office building, a medical building, three small office buildings, a bar/lounge, a single-family residence, a small office building with daylighting, a single family residence with an attached sunspace, a ``parameterized`` building using input macros, and a metric input/output example. All of the samples use Chicago TRY weather. The main purpose of the Sample Run Book is instructional. It shows the relationship of LOADS-SYSTEMS-PLANT-ECONOMICS inputs, displays various input styles, and illustrates many of the basic and advanced features of the program. Many of the sample runs are preceded by a sketch of the building showing its general appearance and the zoning used in the input. In some cases we also show a 3-D rendering of the building as produced by the program DrawBDL. Descriptive material has been added as comments in the input itself. We find that a number of users have loaded these samples onto their editing systems and use them as ``templates`` for creating new inputs. Another way of using them would be to store various portions as files that can be read into the input using the {number_sign}{number_sign} include command, which is part of the Input Macro feature introduced in version DOE-2.lD. Note that the energy rate structures here are the same as in the DOE-2.lD samples, but have been rewritten using the new DOE-2.lE commands and keywords for ECONOMICS. The samples contained in this report are the same as those found on the DOE-2 release files. However, the output numbers that appear here may differ slightly from those obtained from the release files. The output on the release files can be used as a check set to compare results on your computer.

  13. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a new layered organic-inorganic hybrid nickel(II) 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide bis-phosphonate, exhibiting canted antiferromagnetism, with T{sub c}{approx}21 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Elvira M. Bellitto, Carlo; Gomez Garcia, Carlos J. Righini, Guido

    2008-05-15

    A new Ni(II) layered hybrid organic-inorganic compound of formula Ni{sub 2}[(NDI-BP)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O has been prepared in very mild conditions from N,N'-bis(2-phosphonoethyl)napthalene-1,4:5,8-tetracarboximide (NDI-BP ligand) and NiCl{sub 2}. The X-ray powder structure characterization of the title compound suggests a pillared layered organic-inorganic hybrid structure. The distance between the organic and inorganic layers has been found to be 17.8 A. The inorganic layers consist of corner sharing [NiO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O)] octahedra and they are pillared by the diphosphonate groups. DC and AC magnetic measurements as a function of temperature and field indicate the presence of 2D antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the nearest-neighbor Ni(II) ions below 100 K. A long-range magnetic ordering at T{sub c}{approx}21 K has been established and is attributed to the presence of spin canting. AC magnetic measurements as a function of temperature at different frequencies confirm the occurrence of the magnetic ordering temperature at T=21 K and the presence of a slight structural disorder in the title compound. - Graphical abstract: A new layered hybrid organic-inorganic Ni(II) N,N'-bis(2-phosphonoethyl)-naphthalene 1,4:5,8 tetracarboxydiimide complex has been synthesized and characterized. Magnetic measurements as a function of temperature and at different fields show that the compound is magnetically ordered below T{sub c}{approx}21 K.

  15. Computer support to run models of the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, I.

    1996-08-30

    This research is focused on a better quantification of the variations in CO{sub 2} exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere and the factors responsible for these exchangers. The principal approach is to infer the variations in the exchanges from variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} distribution. The principal tool involves using a global three-dimensional tracer transport model to advect and convect CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The tracer model the authors used was developed at the Goddard institute for Space Studies (GISS) and is derived from the GISS atmospheric general circulation model. A special run of the GCM is made to save high-frequency winds and mixing statistics for the tracer model.

  16. Testing LHT at the LHC Run-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Liu, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    We study the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of $pp \\to W_H^+W_H^- \\to W^+W^- A_H A_H$ at the 14 TeV LHC. With the $W$-jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than $5\\sigma$ in the signature of two fat $W$-jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter $f$ that is crucial to testify the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  17. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-06-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC08 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier in air- and oxygen-blown modes during TC08. Test Run TC08 was started on June 9, 2002 and completed on June 29. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen blown was smooth. The gasifier temperature was varied between 1,710 and 1,770 F at pressures from 125 to 240 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC08, 476 hours of solid circulation and 364 hours of coal feed were attained with 153 hours of pure oxygen feed. The gasifier and PCD operations were stable in both enriched air and 100 percent oxygen blown modes. The oxygen concentration was slowly increased during the first transition to full oxygen-blown operations. Subsequent transitions from air to oxygen blown could be completed in less than 15 minutes. Oxygen-blown operations produced the highest synthesis gas heating value to date, with a projected synthesis gas heating value averaging 175 Btu/scf. Carbon conversions averaged 93 percent, slightly lower than carbon conversions achieved during air-blown gasification.

  18. The CMSSM and NUHM1 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; De Roeck, A.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Marrouche, J.; Martinez Santos, D.; et al

    2014-06-13

    We analyze the impact of data from the full Run 1 of the LHC at 7 and 8 TeV on the CMSSM with ? > 0 and 0, incorporating the constraints imposed by other experiments such as precision electroweak measurements, flavour measurements, the cosmological density of cold dark matter and the direct search for the scattering of dark matter particles in the LUX experiment. We use the following results from the LHC experiments: ATLAS searches for events with E/T accompanied by jets with the full 7 and 8 TeV data, the ATLASmoreand CMS measurements of the mass of the Higgs boson, the CMS searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons and a combination of the LHCb and CMS measurements of BR(Bs ? ?+?) and BR(Bd ? ?+?). Our results are based on samplings of the parameter spaces of the CMSSM for both ? > 0 and ? 0 with 6.8106, 6.2106 and 1.6107 points, respectively, obtained using the MultiNest tool. The impact of the Higgs-mass constraint is assessed using FeynHiggs 2.10.0, which provides an improved prediction for the masses of the MSSM Higgs bosons in the region of heavy squark masses. It yields in general larger values of Mh than previous versions of FeynHiggs, reducing the pressure on the CMSSM and NUHM1. We find that the global ?2 functions for the supersymmetric models vary slowly over most of the parameter spaces allowed by the Higgs-mass and the E/T searches, with best-fit values that are comparable to the ?2/dof for the best Standard Model fit. As a result, we provide 95% CL lower limits on the masses of various sparticles and assess the prospects for observing them during Run 2 of the LHC.less

  19. Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tan{beta} vs. M{sub A}, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

  20. Measurement of the t tbar cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric; /Tufts U.

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t{bar t} production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p{bar p} collider with center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 {+-} 0.1 fb{sup -1}. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t{bar t} events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t{bar t} production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.14 {+-} 0.25 (stat){sub -0.86}{sup +0.61}(sys) pb.

  1. Motivation Optimization scheme The problem Running conditions Tools Experiments Conclusions Optimizing the execution of a parallel meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    Motivation Optimization scheme The problem Running conditions Tools Experiments Conclusions 2009 #12;Motivation Optimization scheme The problem Running conditions Tools Experiments Conclusions Contents 1 Motivation 2 Optimization scheme 3 The problem 4 Running conditions 5 Tools 6 Experiments 7

  2. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-run Chinook Salmon (comparable with Sacramento River fall-run stray rates (i.e.reported a Mokelumne River wild fall-run Chinook stray rate

  3. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  4. 310 Data Collection Software Controls 310 run conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for 5 seconds Water wash of capillary capillary is dipped several times in waste water to remove any

  5. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  6. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1997-12-23

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data is disclosed. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer. 3 figs.

  7. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, Gary J. (Beech Island, SC)

    1997-01-01

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  8. Test Run Report of the P348 Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gninenko, S N

    2015-01-01

    The P348 Collaboration preformed test measurements in the H4 SPS beam line during a period of 2 weeks in September-October. The measurements were designed with two main objectives. The first was to test the new detector components such as Micromegas and straw tube tracker, high-energy electron tagging system, ECAL, and HCAL. The second was to explore the feasibility of searching for invisible decays of dark photons in the sub- GeV mass range. Here we report various results of the test measurements. The main outcome of the run is that by using simple selection criteria, without good track definition, we reject background in the signal region down to the level of a few 10^?8 per incident electron. As we do not see any other issues that represent fundamental problems for the experiment, our conclusion is that after small modifications the P348 detector is ready to start data taking in the year 2016. We recall that the A with a mass in sub-GeV range is still one of the favorable explanation of the muon g-2...

  9. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 10^5 . The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intens...

  10. Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirjol, Dan [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-08-01

    We consider the long-run growth rate of the average value of a random multiplicative process x{sub i+1} = a{sub i}x{sub i} where the multipliers a{sub i}=1+?exp(?W{sub i}?1/2 ?t{sub i}) have Markovian dependence given by the exponential of a standard Brownian motion W{sub i}. The average value (x{sub n}) is given by the grand partition function of a one-dimensional lattice gas with two-body linear attractive interactions placed in a uniform field. We study the Lyapunov exponent ?=lim{sub n??}1/n log(x{sub n}), at fixed ?=1/2 ?t{sub n}n, and show that it is given by the equation of state of the lattice gas in thermodynamical equilibrium. The Lyapunov exponent has discontinuous partial derivatives along a curve in the (?, ?) plane ending at a critical point (?{sub C}, ?{sub C}) which is related to a phase transition in the equivalent lattice gas. Using the equivalence of the lattice gas with a bosonic system, we obtain the exact solution for the equation of state in the thermodynamical limit n ? ?.

  11. Recent program evaluations: Implications for long-run planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.; Schultz, D.K.

    1994-06-08

    Demand-side management (DSM) remains the centerpiece of California`s energy policy. Over the coming decade, California plans to meet 30 percent of the state`s incremental electricity demand and 50 percent of its peak demand with (DSM) programs. The major investor-owned utilities in California recently completed the first round of program impact studies for energy efficiency programs implemented in 1990 and 1991. The central focus of this paper is to assess the resource planning and policy implications of Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Company`s recent program evaluations. The paper has three goals. First, we identify and discuss major issues that surfaced from our attempt to apply evaluation results to forecasting and planning questions. Second, we review and summarize the evaluation results for PG&E`s primary energy efficiency programs. Third, we change long-run program assumptions, based on our assessment in the second task, and then examine the impacts of these changes on a recent PG&E demand-side management forecast and resource plan.

  12. An Ultra-Low Noise Telecom Wavelength Free Running Single Photon Detector Using Negative Feedback Avalanche Diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhizhong Yan; Deny R. Hamel; Aimee K. Heinrichs; Xudong Jiang; Mark A. Itzler; Thomas Jennewein

    2012-05-31

    It is challenging to implement genuine free running single photon detectors for the 1550 nm wavelength range with simultaneously high detection efficiency (DE), low dark noise, and good time resolution. We report a novel read out system for the signals from a negative feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) which allows useful operation of these devices at a temperature of 193 K and results in very low dark counts (~100 CPS), good time jitter (~30 ps), and good DE (~10%). We characterized two NFADs with a time correlation method using photons generated from weak coherent pulses (WCP) and photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC). The inferred detector efficiencies for both types of photon sources agree with each other. The best noise equivalent power of the device is estimated to be 8.1 x 10^(-18) W Hz^(-1/2), more than 10 times better than typical InP/InGaAs SPADs show in free running mode. The afterpulsing probability was found to be less than 0.1% per ns at the optimized operating point. In addition, we studied the performance of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution (QKD) using these detectors and develop a model for the quantum bit error rate (QBER) that incorporates the afterpulsing coefficients. We verified experimentally that using these NFADs it is feasible to implement QKD over 400 km of telecom fibre. Our NFAD photon detector system is very simple, and is well suited for single-photon applications where ultra-low noise and free-running operation is required, and some afterpulsing can be tolerated.

  13. Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-hr)...

  14. Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-...

  15. Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    website links through the BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair map. Last week concluded the beta run of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) sponsored BioenergizeME Virtual...

  16. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard deviation of the average vapor space temperature during each steady state ranged from 2 to 6C; however, those of the measured off-gas data were much larger due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melters. In order to predict the off-gas composition at the sampling location downstream of the film cooler, the measured feed composition was charge-reconciled and input into the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model, which was then run under the conditions for each of the six Phase 1 steady states. In doing so, it was necessary to perform an overall heat/mass balance calculation from the melter to the Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in order to estimate the rate of air inleakage as well as the true gas temperature in the CEF vapor space (T{sub gas}) during each steady state by taking into account the effects of thermal radiation on the measured temperature (T{sub tw}). The results of Phase 1 data analysis and subsequent model runs showed that the predicted concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO by the DWPF model correctly trended and further bounded the respective measured data in the CEF off-gas by over predicting the TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO conversion ratios by a factor of 2 to 5; an exception was the 7X over prediction of the latter at T{sub gas} = 371C but the impact of CO on the off-gas flammability potential is only minor compared to that of H{sub 2}. More importantly, the seemingly-excessive over prediction of the TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversion by a factor of 4 or higher at T{sub gas} < ~350C was attributed to the conservative antifoam decomposition scheme added recently to the model and therefore is considered a modeling issue and not a design issue. At T{sub gas} > ~350C, the predicted TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversions were closer to but still higher than the measured data by a factor of 2, which may be regarded as adequate from the safety margin standpoint. The heat/mass balance calculations also showed that the correlation between T{sub tw} and T{sub gas} in the CEF vapor space was close to that of the scale SGM, whose data were ta

  17. FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill ? Unconsolidated to Consolidated.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-28

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two-phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in other realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Models for waste release scenarios in salt back-fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and validate. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potential usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mechanics, using sieved run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (~900 psi) and temperatures to 90C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill Unconsolidated to Consolidated. Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time-dependent consolidation, or creep, to various degrees. Creep volume strain-time relations obey simple log-time behavior through the range of porosities (~50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as expected. Mercury porosimetry is used to determine characteristic capillary pressure curves from a series of consolidation tests and show characteristic saturation-capillary pressure curves that follow the common van Genuchten (1978, 1980) formulation at low stresses. Higher capillary pressure data are suspect due to the large potential for sample damage, including fluid inclusion decrepitation and pore collapse. Data are supportive of use of the Leverett J function (Leverett, 1941) to use for scaling characteristic curves at different degrees of consolidation, but better permeability determinations are needed to support this hypothesis. Recommendations for further and refined testing are made with the goal of developing a self- consistent set of constitutive laws for granular salt consolidation and multiphase (brine-air) flow.

  18. Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

    2008-01-01

    Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

  19. Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs Elizabeth Deems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs by Elizabeth Deems Submitted;3 Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs by Elizabeth Deems Submitted to the Department are also discussed. Additionally, several risk management strategies are explored, and the advantages

  20. EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH , JOHN M. DUDLEY, AND FREDERIC DIAS Abstract. Wave impact and run-up onto vertical obstacles are among the most impor- tant phenomena which must be taken into account in the design of coastal structures. From linear wave theory, we know

  1. EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH , JOHN M. DUDLEY, AND FREDERIC DIAS Abstract. Wave impact and run-up onto vertical obstacles constitutes one of the main phenomena which have to be taken into account in the design of coastal structures. From the linear wave theory we

  2. EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXTREME WAVE RUN-UP ON A VERTICAL CLIFF FRANCESCO CARBONE, DENYS DUTYKH , JOHN M. DUDLEY, AND FR´ED´ERIC DIAS Abstract. Wave impact and run-up onto vertical obstacles are among the most impor- tant phenomena which must be taken into account in the design of coastal structures. From linear wave theory, we know

  3. Proactive Service Migration for Long-Running Byzantine Fault Tolerant Systems Wenbing Zhao and Honglei Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wenbing

    Proactive Service Migration for Long-Running Byzantine Fault Tolerant Systems Wenbing Zhao scheme based on service migration for long-running Byzantine fault tolerant systems. Proactive recovery threats from malicious adversaries. The primary benefit of our proactive recovery scheme is a reduced

  4. Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel-Running Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel- Running Behavior Justin S variation within and between species is unknown. This study used Fos immunoreactivity to compare brain, and striatum. Results implicate specific brain regions in motivation to run and others in control

  5. Keller's model Variable energy recreation Bounding the derivative of f Optimization of running strategies based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    strategies based on anaerobic energy and variations of velocity J. Frederic Bonnans Inria-Saclay and CMAP of running strategies hal-01024231,version1-15Jul2014 #12;Keller's model Variable energy recreation Bounding.F. Bonnans, Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and variations of velocity. SIAM J

  6. Computer optimization of a minimal biped model discovers walking and running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    University, 306 Kimball Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA. doi:10.1038/nature04113 1 2005 Nature Publishing walking and running use the least energy17 . Addressing this classic1 conjecture with experiments2,3 requires comparing walking and running with many other strange and unpractised gaits. As an alternative

  7. ORNL/TM-2003/259 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/TM-2003/259 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH Government or any agency thereof. #12;#12;ORNL/TM-2003/259 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL ...................................................................................................................1 2. WORLD OIL RESOURCE ESTIMATES

  8. On the distribution of career longevity and the evolution of home-run prowess in professional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    OFFPRINT On the distribution of career longevity and the evolution of home-run prowess of career longevity and the evolution of home-run prowess in professional baseball Alexander M. Petersen era of baseball. We utilize Sean Lahman's Baseball Archive [1], an exhaustive database consisting

  9. Running on water: Three-dimensional force generation by basilisk lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    because it readily yields to any applied force. Previous studies have shown that static stability during during water running. Our results give insight into the mechanics of how basilisk lizards run across challenge established rules for the mechanics of legged locomotion. Basiliscus plumifrons hydrodynamics

  10. A System Architecture for Running Big Data Workflows in the Cloud Andrey Kashlev, Shiyong Lu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Shiyong

    A System Architecture for Running Big Data Workflows in the Cloud Andrey Kashlev, Shiyong Lu management systems (SWFMSs) to utilize the power of Cloud computing to perform big data analyses. Unlike by running a big data workflow in Amazon EC2, FutureGrid Eucalyptus and OpenStack clouds. From

  11. Running Financial Reports For help email Financial.Reports@dartmouth.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 IRA Basic Running Financial Reports For help email Financial.Reports@dartmouth.edu Updated 6-7-2013 #12;2 Training Index Part I Introduction to the IRA Reporting Tool IRA Resources (3) Logging onto the system (4) Navigating the Dashboard (5-9) Running Reports (10-11) Working with Reports (12

  12. Producing Open Source Software How to Run a Successful Free Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Producing Open Source Software How to Run a Successful Free Software Project Karl Fogel #12;Producing Open Source Software: How to Run a Successful Free Software Project by Karl Fogel Copyright 2005 ............................................................................................................ 11 The Rise of Proprietary Software and Free Software ........................................ 11

  13. Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony Bryant Senior Project Alaska Pacific University May 5, 2010 #12;Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy

  14. PEFC-Certified Fencing for 2010 Pamplona Bull Run JUL 05 2010 | SPAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PEFC-Certified Fencing for 2010 Pamplona Bull Run JUL 05 2010 | SPAIN This year, the fences marking the route of the Bull Run at the world-renowned San Fermin Festival will be made from PEFC-certified timber used for the fence is locally sourced from sustainably-managed, PEFC-certified forests. The pinewood

  15. PROCEEDINGS 1 Late-run Sockeye Salmon in the Fraser River, British Columbia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    PROCEEDINGS 1 Late-run Sockeye Salmon in the Fraser River, British Columbia, are Experiencing University of Guelph [Note: Figures for Lapointe et al are included at the end of this paper.] Abstract Late-run stocks are unique among Fraser River sockeye salmon populations in that they typically delay in Georgia

  16. Interannual variation of reach specific migratory success for Sacramento River hatchery yearling late-fall run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    a multitude of habitats the more natural run-riffle-pool structure of the upper river, a channelized lowerInterannual variation of reach specific migratory success for Sacramento River hatchery yearling late-fall run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

  17. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

  18. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  19. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  20. NSTX Run Statistics and Update Friday November 16, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Analyzer (Energetic Neutrals) EN X Fast Camera FC X PC - Video Only Fast H-Alpha FH X IFLIP Interim Fast Gas Puff: imaging GP X plus Video GRITS: GRazing Incidence Time- resolved Spectrometer GR X original Probes (new) LP X EPICS CAMAC Micro Ion Gauge ( MIG) MI X Mirnov Magnetics MM X Electron Density

  1. CSEM WP 133 The Long-Run Effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    This paper is part of the Center for the Study of Energy Markets (CSEM) Working Paper Series. CSEM: Retail real-time pricing (RTP) of electricity -- retail pricing that changes hourly to reflect adopting RTP in a competitive electricity market. Using simple simulations, I demonstrate

  2. The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Vries, K. J.; Cavanaugh, R.

    2015-09-15

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale MSUSY ? $\\sqrt{m$\\tilde{t}$1m$\\tilde{t}$2}$ : the gaugino masses M1,2,3 , the first-and second-generation squark masses m$\\tilde{q}$1 = m$\\tilde{q}$2 , the third-generation squark mass m$\\tilde{q}$3, a common slepton mass m$\\tilde{?}$ and a common trilinear mixing parameter A , as well as the Higgs mixing parameter ? , the pseudoscalar Higgs mass MA and tan? , the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ?more1.2 109 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + E-slashT signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of BR(Bs??+?-) by LHCb and CMS, other B -physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino ?-tilde10 . We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of (g-2)? , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum ?2=20.5 with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a ?2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with ?2/d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses, and we show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the other models, e.g., the gluino may be as light as ? 1250 GeV at the 68 % CL, and squarks, stops, electroweak gauginos and sleptons may be much lighter than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, e+e- colliders and direct detection experiments.less

  3. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

  4. All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy

    2012-04-20

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc^3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range 5 10^-22 Hz^-1/2 to 1 10^-20 Hz^-1/2. The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  5. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  6. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector for the LHC Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An outl...

  7. Gravitational Contributions to Gauge Green's Functions and Asymptotic Free Power-Law Running of Gauge Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Tang; Yue-Liang Wu

    2011-10-30

    We perform an explicit one-loop calculation for the gravitational contributions to the two-, three- and four-point gauge Green's functions with paying attention to the quadratic divergences. It is shown for the first time in the diagrammatic calculation that the Slavnov-Taylor identities are preserved even if the quantum graviton effects are included at one-loop level, such a conclusion is independent of the choice of regularization schemes. We also present a regularization scheme independent calculation based on the gauge condition independent background field framework of Vilkovisky-DeWitt's effective action with focusing on both the quadratic divergence and quartic divergence that is not discussed before. With the harmonic gauge condition, the results computed by using the traditional background field method can consistently be recovered from the Vilkovisky-DeWitt's effective action approach by simply taking a limiting case, and are found to be the same as the ones yielded by the diagrammatic calculation. As a consequence, in all the calculations, the symmetry-preserving and divergent-behavior-preserving loop regularization method can consistently lead to a nontrivial gravitational contribution to the gauge coupling constant with an asymptotic free power-law running at one loop near the Planck scale.

  8. Results From The Two-tower Run Of The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisetter, A J

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search has completed two runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory In the second, two towers of detectors were operated from March to August 2004. CDMS used Ge and Si ZIP (Z-sensitive, Ionization, and Phonon) detectors, operated at 50mK, to look for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPS) which may make up most of the dark matter in our universe. These detectors are surrounded by lead and polyethylene shielding as well as an active muon veto. These shields, as well as the overburden of Soudan rock, provide a low background environment for the detectors. The ZIP detectors record the ratio of ionization signal to phonon signal to discriminate between nuclear recoils, characteristic of WIMPS and neutrons, and electron recoils, characteristic of gamma and beta backgrounds. They also provide timing information from the four phonon channels that is used to reject surface events, for which ionization collection is poor. A blind analysis, defined using calibration data taken in situ thr...

  9. Running the rivers: Scientists say 2011 drought showed importance of environmental flows regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    stream_source_info Running the rivers.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10306 Content-Encoding windows-1252 stream_name Running the rivers.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=windows-1252 Summer... 2012 tx H2O 19 ] Story by Leslie Lee Running the rivers Carrying water so precious it has been called liquid gold, the ?? major rivers in Texas ?ow past pastures and cities, factories and suburbs. ?ese waters have endured the we?est and driest...

  10. Characterization of the LIGO detectors during their sixth science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador. Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Bruckner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderon. Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio, Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal. Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Deleglise; W. Del. Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De. Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; L. Di. Fiore; A. Di. Lieto; I. Di. Palma; A. Di. Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzalez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimenez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris. K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe

    2014-11-18

    In 2009-2010, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observa- tory (LIGO) operated together with international partners Virgo and GEO600 as a network to search for gravitational waves of astrophysical origin. The sensitiv- ity of these detectors was limited by a combination of noise sources inherent to the instrumental design and its environment, often localized in time or frequency, that couple into the gravitational-wave readout. Here we review the performance of the LIGO instruments during this epoch, the work done to characterize the de- tectors and their data, and the effect that transient and continuous noise artefacts have on the sensitivity of LIGO to a variety of astrophysical sources.

  11. Characterization of the LIGO detectors during their sixth science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Bruckner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderon; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deleeuw, E; Deleglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endroczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonzalez, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jimenez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kefelian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J

    2014-01-01

    In 2009-2010, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observa- tory (LIGO) operated together with international partners Virgo and GEO600 as a network to search for gravitational waves of astrophysical origin. The sensitiv- ity of these detectors was limited by a combination of noise sources inherent to the instrumental design and its environment, often localized in time or frequency, that couple into the gravitational-wave readout. Here we review the performance of the LIGO instruments during this epoch, the work done to characterize the de- tectors and their data, and the effect that transient and continuous noise artefacts have on the sensitivity of LIGO to a variety of astrophysical sources.

  12. Primordial Graviton Production in a Class of Running Vacuum Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Tamayo; J. A. S. Lima; D. F. A. Bessada

    2015-08-05

    The problem of cosmological production of (massless) gravitons is discussed in the framework of an expanding, spatially homogeneous and isotropic FRW type Universe with decaying vacuum energy density ($\\Lambda \\equiv \\Lambda(H(t))$) described by general relativity theory. The gravitational wave equation is established and its modified time-dependent part has analytically been solved for different epochs in the case of a flat geometry. Unlike the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology (no interacting vacuum), we show that massless gravitons can be produced during the radiation era. However, for all values of the free parameter, the high frequency modes are damped out even faster than in the standard cosmology both in the radiation and matter-vacuum dominated epoch. The formation of the stochastic background of gravitons and the remnant power spectrum generated at different cosmological eras are also explicitly evaluated.

  13. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodiya, Timothy Paul

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the ...

  14. If your codes run much slower than before the maintenance on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or run much slower than before after recompilation. We believe this is due to some regression introduced in the new CLE version, and have filed a bug with Cray. If you find your...

  15. Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Hector Ulysses

    2005-11-01

    The world is dependent on the production of oil and gas, and every day the demand increases. Technologies have to keep up with the demand of this resource to keep the world running. Since hydrocarbons are finite and will ...

  16. Impact of acquisitions on short-run returns and leverage: two studies in corporate finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Qizhi

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two empirical studies in corporate finance. The first study, The Impact of Acquisitions on the Short-Run Returns to Shareholders and Bondholders, investigates shareholder and bondholder ...

  17. An empirical study of long-run impact of Internet advertising on consumer response behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannan, Raghavan

    2006-01-01

    The long-run effect of banner advertisements is among the most complex topic in the internet world. Media spending on online marketing has grown from $3 billion in 1999 to $9 billion in 2004. Forecasts (Jupiter Research ...

  18. The impact of "Never Run Out" policy assured supply chain with dual reorder point expediting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gil Su

    2008-01-01

    Managing a big supply chain for one of the largest quick service restaurant companies, especially when the company has a policy called "Never Run Out," is very challenging. A traditional way of managing inventory requires ...

  19. The biomechanics and energetics of human running using an elastic knee exoskeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Grant

    While the effects of series compliance on running biomechanics are well documented, the effects of parallel compliance are known only for the simpler case of hopping. As many practical exoskeletal and orthotic designs act ...

  20. Energy-Efficient Scheduling for Parallel Applications Running on Heterogeneous Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    ), energy efficiency, and heterogeneities. Basically, processors, networks, disks, and cooling system1 Energy-Efficient Scheduling for Parallel Applications Running on Heterogeneous Clusters Ziliang 39406 mnijim@usm.edu Department of Computer Science New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

  1. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google...

  2. Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river power plants on rivers with high suspended sediments are endangered by significant sedimentation. INTRODUCTION

  3. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    in Central Valley rivers, many fall-run Chinook salmon nowrun Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, to yearlings at Feather Riverrun Chinook salmon breed and rear in low-elevation mainstem rivers (

  4. TIMING NOISE IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS AND THE MAGNETOSPHERIC MOMENT OF INERTIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, David; Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N. E-mail: kostasg@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-08-10

    We examine timing noise in both magnetars and regular pulsars, and find that there exists a component of the timing noise ({sigma}{sub TN}) with strong magnetic field dependence ({sigma}{sub TN}{approx}B{sub o}{sup 2}{Omega}T{sup 3/2}) above B{sub o} {approx} 10{sup 12.5} G. The dependence of the timing noise floor on the magnetic field is also reflected in the smallest observable glitch size. We find that magnetospheric torque variation cannot explain this component of timing noise. We calculate the moment of inertia of the magnetic field outside of a neutron star and show that this timing noise component may be due to variation of this moment of inertia, and could be evidence of rapid global magnetospheric variability.

  5. QCD Power Corrections from a Simple Model for the Running Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1998-05-27

    A simple parametrization of the QCD running coupling at low scales is introduced and used to illustrate various schemes for the estimation of non-perturbative power corrections. The `infrared matching' scheme proposed earlier gives satisfactory results when combined with next-to-leading (or higher) order perturbative predictions. Estimates based on renormalons are shown to be inconsistent with universal behaviour of the running coupling.

  6. An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beuf, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

  7. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  8. An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Beuf

    2008-03-14

    A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

  9. Can we predict long-run economic growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    For those concerned with the long-term value of their accounts, it can be a challenge to plan in the present for inflation-adjusted economic growth over coming decades. Here, I argue that there exists an economic constant that carries through time, and that this can help us to anticipate the more distant future: global economic wealth has a fixed link to civilization's overall rate of energy consumption from all sources; the ratio of these two quantities has not changed over the past 40 years that statistics are available. Power production and wealth rise equally quickly because civilization, like any other system in the universe, must consume and dissipate its energy reserves in order to sustain its current size. One perspective might be that financial wealth must ultimately collapse as we deplete our energy reserves. However, we can also expect that highly aggregated quantities like global wealth have inertia, and that growth rates must persist. Exceptionally rapid innovation in the two decades following 19...

  10. An analysis of the impact of LHC Run I proton-lead data on nuclear parton densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armesto, Nstor; Penn, Jos Manuel; Salgado, Carlos A; Zurita, Pa

    2015-01-01

    We report on an analysis of the impact of available experimental data on hard processes in proton-lead collisions during Run I at the Large Hadron Collider on nuclear modifications of parton distribution functions. Our analysis is restricted to the EPS09 and DSSZ global fits. The measurements that we consider comprise production of massive gauge bosons, jets, charged hadrons and pions. This is the first time a study of nuclear PDFs includes this number of different observables. The goal of the paper is twofold: i) checking the description of the data by nPDFs, as well as the relevance of these nuclear effects, in a quantitative manner; ii) testing the constraining power of these data in eventual global fits, for which we use the Bayesian reweighting technique. We find an overall good, even too good, description of the data, indicating that more constraining power would require a better control over the systematic uncertainties and/or the proper proton-proton reference from LHC Run II. Some of the observables,...

  11. THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil selective withdrawal operations from historical patterns. INTRODUCTION The Bull Run River-Reservoir system from Reservoir #2 into the Lower Bull Run River during the summer months. Water temperatures

  12. Improving Speedup and Response Times by Replicating Parallel Programs on a SNOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Improving Speedup and Response Times by Replicating Parallel Programs on a SNOW Gaurav D. Ghare to as a shared network of workstations (SNOW). The speedup of parallel programs running on a SNOW can be greatly affected by workstation owner interference. In this paper we consider a SNOW where parallel jobs are run

  13. 1.2000-2009 time-series return information for Snake River: a. Fall Chinook Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Content: 1.2000-2009 time-series return information for Snake River: a. Fall Chinook Salmon b. Sockeye Salmon c. Summer Steelhead d. Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon 2.2010 run-size forecasts for: a. Sockeye Salmon b. Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon #12;#12;Species: Run: Origin: Period: Chinook Salmon Fall

  14. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  15. The updated ATLAS Jet Trigger for the LHC Run~II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Prince; for the ATLAS collaboration

    2015-11-03

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and center of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High-Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level~1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimensional energy deposits in the ATLAS calorimeter to be used as the basic input to the jet finding algorithms. To allow this costly reconstruction step, a partial detector readout scheme was developed, that effectively suppresses the low activity regions of the calorimeter and significantly reduces the needed resources. In this paper we describe the overall jet trigger software and its physics performance. We then focus on detailed studies of the algorithm timing and the performance impact of the full and partial calorimeter readout schemes. We conclude with an outlook of the jet trigger plans for the next LHC data-taking period.

  16. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  17. An FPGA-Based Framework for Run-time Injection and Analysis of Soft Errors in Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    . Br., Germany 94032 Passau, Germany {sauerm is applicable to arbitrary software, we demonstrate its usage by characterizing soft errors effects on several and energy constraints limit the applicability of massive redundancy, while increased complexity of cal

  18. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  19. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  20. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  1. Real Time Analysis of Thermal Activation via Sphaleron Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Boyanovsky; C. A. de Carvalho

    1993-06-07

    We study the process of thermal activation mediated by sphaleron transitions by analyzing the real-time dynamics of the decay out of equilibrium in a $1+1$ dimensional field theory with a metastable state. The situation considered is that of a rapid supercooling in which the system is trapped in a metastable state at a temperature larger than the mass of the quanta, but smaller than the energy to create a critical droplet. The initial density matrix is evolved in time and the nucleation rate (probability current at the saddle point) is computed. The nucleation rate is {\\it time dependent}, vanishing at early times, reaching a maximum at a time $t \\approx 1/m$ with $m$ the mass of quanta in the metastable state, and decreasing at long times as a consequence of unitarity. An estimate for the average number of particles of ``true vacuum'' produced as a function of time during the nucleation process is obtained.

  2. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  3. Real-Time Android RealTime DSP AB is a consultant firm, supplying expertise within the areas embedded systems and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    Real-Time Android RealTime DSP AB is a consultant firm, supplying expertise within the areas The Android platform is widely used for smartphones running all sorts of applications. Though most-time demands. Since Android is based on a Linux kernel, which is not made for real-time applications, you

  4. ATLAS strategy for primary vertex reconstruction during Run-II of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Based on experience gained from run-I of the LHC, the ATLAS vertex reconstruction group has developed a refined primary vertex reconstruction strategy for run-II. With instantaneous luminosity exceeding 10^34 cm-2 s-1, an average of 40 to 50 pp collisions per bunch crossing are expected. Together with the increase of the center-of-mass collision energy from 8 TeV to 13 TeV, this will create a challenging environment for primary vertex pattern recognition. This contribution explains the ATLAS strategy for primary vertex reconstruction in high pile-up conditions. The new approach is based on vertex seeding with a medical-imaging algorithm, adaptive reconstruction of vertex positions, and iterative recombination of occasional split vertices. The mathematical foundation and software implementation of the method are described in detail. Monte Carlo-based estimates of vertex reconstruction performance for LHC run-II are presented.

  5. Improving the Data Quality of Advanced LIGO Based on Early Engineering Run Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. K. Nuttall; T. J. Massinger; J. Areeda; J. Betzwieser; S. Dwyer; A. Effler; R. P. Fisher; P. Fritschel; J. S. Kissel; A. P. Lundgren; D. M. Macleod; D. Martynov; J. McIver; A. Mullavey; D. Sigg; J. R. Smith; G. Vajente; A. R. Williamson; C. C. Wipf

    2015-08-28

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors have completed their initial upgrade phase and will enter the first observing run in late 2015, with detector sensitivity expected to improve in future runs. Through the combined efforts of on-site commissioners and the Detector Characterization group of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, interferometer performance, in terms of data quality, at both LIGO observatories has vastly improved from the start of commissioning efforts to present. Advanced LIGO has already surpassed Enhanced LIGO in sensitivity, and the rate of noise transients, which would negatively impact astrophysical searches, has improved. Here we give details of some of the work which has taken place to better the quality of the LIGO data ahead of the first observing run.

  6. Improving the Data Quality of Advanced LIGO Based on Early Engineering Run Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuttall, L K; Areeda, J; Betzwieser, J; Dwyer, S; Effler, A; Fisher, R P; Fritschel, P; Kissel, J S; Lundgren, A P; Macleod, D M; Martynov, D; McIver, J; Mullavey, A; Sigg, D; Smith, J R; Vajente, G; Williamson, A R; Wipf, C C

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors have completed their initial upgrade phase and will enter the first observing run in late 2015, with detector sensitivity expected to improve in future runs. Through the combined efforts of on-site commissioners and the Detector Characterization group of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, interferometer performance, in terms of data quality, at both LIGO observatories has vastly improved from the start of commissioning efforts to present. Advanced LIGO has already surpassed Enhanced LIGO in sensitivity, and the rate of noise transients, which would negatively impact astrophysical searches, has improved. Here we give details of some of the work which has taken place to better the quality of the LIGO data ahead of the first observing run.

  7. HLA TIME MANAGEMENT AND DIS Richard M. Fujimoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 3) the Run­Time Infrastructure (RTI) that provides the software environment needed by the federates to exchange information in a coordinated fashion. The RTI is a special purpose distributed operating system will address the services concerning time management. The challenge to the RTI is to bring together

  8. HLA TIME MANAGEMENT AND DIS Richard M. Fujimoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 3) the Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI) that provides the software environment needed by the federates to exchange information in a coordinated fashion. The RTI is a special purpose distributed operating system will address the services concerning time management. The challenge to the RTI is to bring together

  9. Time-spatial drift of decelerating electromagnetic pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Time-spatial drift of decelerating electromagnetic pulses Alexander G. Nerukh1* and Dmitry A dependent electromagnetic pulse generated by a current running laterally to the direction of the pulse propagation is considered in paraxial approximation. It is shown that the pulse envelope moves in the time

  10. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  11. GridRun: A lightweight packaging and execution environment forcompact, multi-architecture binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalf, John; Goodale, Tom

    2004-02-01

    GridRun offers a very simple set of tools for creating and executing multi-platform binary executables. These ''fat-binaries'' archive native machine code into compact packages that are typically a fraction the size of the original binary images they store, enabling efficient staging of executables for heterogeneous parallel jobs. GridRun interoperates with existing distributed job launchers/managers like Condor and the Globus GRAM to greatly simplify the logic required launching native binary applications in distributed heterogeneous environments.

  12. Antineutrino Running

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319Another keyAnthonyofWindow of

  13. Antineutrino Running

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319Another keyAnthonyofWindow

  14. Constraints on the time-scale of nuclear breakup from thermal hard-photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ortega; D. d'Enterria; G. Martinez; D. Baiborodin; H. Delagrange; J. Diaz; F. Fernandez; H. Loehner; T. Matulewicz; R. W. Ostendorf; S. Schadmand; Y. Schutz; P. Tlusty; R. Turrisi; V. Wagner; H. W. Wilschut; N. Yahlali

    2005-08-26

    Measured hard photon multiplicities from second-chance nucleon-nucleon collisions are used in combination with a kinetic thermal model, to estimate the break-up times of excited nuclear systems produced in nucleus-nucleus reactions at intermediate energies. The obtained nuclear break-up time for the $^{129}${Xe} + $^{nat}${Sn} reaction at 50{\\it A} MeV is $\\Delta$$\\tau$ $\\approx$ 100 -- 300 fm/$c$ for all reaction centralities. The lifetime of the radiating sources produced in seven other different heavy-ion reactions studied by the TAPS experiment are consistent with $\\Delta$$\\tau$ $\\approx$ 100 fm/$c$, such relatively long thermal photon emission times do not support the interpretation of nuclear breakup as due to a fast spinodal process for the heavy nuclear systems studied.

  15. Application of a Hough search for continuous gravitational waves on data from the 5th LIGO science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; A. Dietz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

    2014-03-17

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range $\\mathrm{50-1000 Hz}$ with the first derivative of frequency in the range $-8.9 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s to zero in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run. Our results employ a Hough transform technique, introducing a $\\chi^2$ test and analysis of coincidences between the signal levels in years 1 and 2 of observations that offers a significant improvement in the product of strain sensitivity with compute cycles per data sample compared to previously published searches. Since our search yields no surviving candidates, we present results taking the form of frequency dependent, 95$%$ confidence upper limits on the strain amplitude $h_0$. The most stringent upper limit from year 1 is $1.0\\times 10^{-24}$ in the $\\mathrm{158.00-158.25 Hz}$ band. In year 2, the most stringent upper limit is $\\mathrm{8.9\\times10^{-25}}$ in the $\\mathrm{146.50-146.75 Hz}$ band. This improved detection pipeline, which is computationally efficient by at least two orders of magnitude better than our flagship Einstein$@$Home search, will be important for "quick-look" searches in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector era.

  16. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  17. The TileCal Energy Reconstruction for LHC Run2 and Future Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seixas, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the main hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS and it covers the central part of the detector (|eta|energy deposited by the particles in TileCal is read out by approximately 10,000 channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm. The increase of LHC luminosity leads to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest and compromises the amplitude estimation performance. This work presents the proposed algorithm for energy estimation during LHC Run 2. The method is based on the same approach used during LHC Run 1, namely the Optimal Filter (OF). The only difference is that the signal baseline (pedestal) will be subtracted from the received digitized samples, while in Run 1 this quantity was estimated on an event-by-event basis. The pedestal value is estimated through special calibration runs and it is stored in a data base for online and offline usage. Addi...

  18. Running Head: Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets The Basis of Hyperspecificity in Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClelland, James L. "Jay"

    1 Running Head: Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets The Basis of Hyperspecificity in Autism)-268-5060 (Fax) #12;Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets 2 Abstract This article reviews a few key ideas to address one aspect of autism, namely the apparent hyperspecificity that is often seen in autistic children

  19. Running head: IMPLICIT POWER MOTIVATION A Biobehavioral Model of Implicit Power Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running head: IMPLICIT POWER MOTIVATION A Biobehavioral Model of Implicit Power Motivation Arousal: Schultheiss, O. C. (2007). A biobehavioral model of implicit power motivation arousal, reward and frustration and psychological explanations of social behavior (pp. 176-196). New York: Guilford. #12;Implicit power motivation 2

  20. Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 1 Running head: Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 1 Running head: Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation Public speaking in front of an unreceptive audience increases implicit power motivation: Oliver.Schultheiss@fau.de #12;Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 2 Abstract The present

  1. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    metabolism was not a major energy source during running in hypoxia. We combined these data with values taken and source are credited. Funding: The project was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: l

  2. Use of Regression Equations 1 Running head: Equations from summary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    Use of Regression Equations 1 Running head: Equations from summary data Neuropsychology, in press the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record Using regression equations.crawford@abdn.ac.uk #12;Use of Regression Equations 2 Abstract Regression equations have many useful roles

  3. Quantum Information Processing Theory 1 Running head: QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    Quantum Information Processing Theory 1 Running head: QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING THEORY Quantum, IN USA jstruebl@indiana.edu jbusemey@indiana.edu In D. Quinones (Ed.) Encyclopedia of the Sciences provides new conceptual tools for constructing social and behavioral science theories. Theoretical

  4. Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from the Beacon Supergroup in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from of shallow burial diagenesis, contact diagenesis (temperatures of 200-300C), and post-contact diagenesis, on the basis of petrographic and geochemical analyses. Shallow burial diagenesis is characterised by minor

  5. Experience on Running a Small-Size Simulated Car Racing Tournament in an Introductory Programming Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sung-Bae

    Experience on Running a Small-Size Simulated Car Racing Tournament in an Introductory Programming Intelligence and Games (CIG) 2009 Car Racing Competition software and rules with small modifications. Five General Terms Algorithms, Measurement, Performance, Human Factors Keywords Competition, Game, Car Racing

  6. DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 1 Running head: DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 1 Running head: DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY Developing A Software Testing Ontology in UML for A Software Growth Environment of Web-Based Applications;DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 2 Developing A Software Testing Ontology in UML for A Software Growth

  7. Interplay of Energy and Performance for Disk Arrays Running Transaction Processing Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    centers could grow to over 100 Watts per square foot, and future centers could add 5 GW of demand (whichInterplay of Energy and Performance for Disk Arrays Running Transaction Processing Workloads for these systems. This paper examines the energy and performance ramifications in the design of disk arrays which

  8. Comparison of a TRAC calculation to the data from LSTF run SB-CL-05

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motley, F.; Schultz, R.

    1986-01-01

    Run SB-CL-05 is a 5% break in the side of the cold leg. The test results show that the core was uncovered briefly and that the rods overheated at certain core locations. Liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam generator tubes was observed. When the loop seal cleared, the core refilled and the rods cooled. The TRAC results are in reasonable agreement with the test data, meaning that TRAC correctly predicted the major trends and phenomena. TRAC predicted the core uncovery, the resulting rod heatup, and the liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam generator tubes correctly. The clearing of the loop seal allowed core recovery and cooled the overheated rods just as it had in the data, but TRAC predicted its occurrence 20 s late. The experimental and TRAC analysis results of run SB-CL-05 are similar to those for Semiscale Run S-UT-8. In both runs there was core uncovery, rod overheating, and steam generator liquid holdup. These results confirm scaling of these phenomena from Semiscale (1/1650) to LSTF (1/48).

  9. Neural Networks 1 Running Head: NETWORKS AND SPEED-ACCURACY TRADEOFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Networks 1 Running Head: NETWORKS AND SPEED-ACCURACY TRADEOFF Neural Networks Associated@columbia.edu (Y. Stern) #12;Neural Networks 2 Abstract This functional neuroimaging (fMRI) study examined the neural networks (spatial patterns of covarying neural activity) associated with the speed

  10. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l?<50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  11. Combination of couplings of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS experiment with Run 1 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Nan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A review of the Run 1 combination of the mass. coupling, and spin CP properties measurements of the Higgs boson using the ATLAS detector and up to 25 fb-1 of 7 TeV and 8 TeV pp collision data collected in 2011 and 2012 will be presented.

  12. Tangible Programming 1 Running head:TANGIBLE PROGRAMMING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    to help solve human problems. Early childhood education hasn't ignored this; it is common to see young in notions of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP), a perspective within early childhood educationTangible Programming 1 Running head:TANGIBLE PROGRAMMING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD Tangible Programming

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF RUNNING STRATEGIES BASED ON ANAEROBIC ENERGY AND VARIATIONS OF VELOCITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMIZATION OF RUNNING STRATEGIES BASED ON ANAEROBIC ENERGY AND VARIATIONS OF VELOCITY AMANDINE extend this analysis, based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of anaerobic energy (or accumulated oxygen deficit) and an energy recreation term when the speed decreases. We

  14. Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS TITLE: A psychological construction account of emotion regulation and dysregulation: The role Boston, MA 02115 Phone: 617-373-2044 Fax: 617-373-8714 Email: l.barrett@neu.edu #12;Emotion Regulation

  15. IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION How to Bite Your Tongue without Blowing Your Top: Implicit Evaluation of Emotion Regulation Predicts EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 2 Abstract People frequently have to control their emotions to function

  16. Effects of Virtualization on a Scientific Application Running a Hyperspectral Radiative Transfer Code on Virtual Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    radiance distribution within/leaving a water body Ex. parameters: water depth, wavelength, wind speed.0.4 includes other aspects Run Parameters: opcontrol --start --separate=kernel \\ --event=GLOBAL_POWER profiles "--event=GLOBAL_POWER_EVENTS:100000:1:1:1 " event: GLOBAL_POWER_EVENTS reset counter: 100000reset

  17. Coverage Update -19 July 2013 Mobile phones running on urine power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    mobile phones with that most ubiquitous of by- products, human urine. Yes, it's pee power. The team from;British scientists claim to have discovered a way to use human urine to power mobile phones. ResearchersCoverage Update - 19 July 2013 Mobile phones running on urine power This week has seen exceptional

  18. Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS On the Dangers Northwestern University Word Count: 5096 #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 2 On the Dangers of Resolving forgiveness helps victims preserve a relationship #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 3 that is likely

  19. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2005 RUN WITH COPPER IONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; GARDNER, C.J.

    2005-05-16

    Copper ions for the 2005 run [1] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of these accelerators with copper are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

  1. Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy as if consumers respond to gasoline prices. We estimate a selection-corrected regression equation and exploit operating costs between vehicles. Keywords: automobile prices, gasoline prices, environmental policy JEL

  2. The TileCal Energy Reconstruction for LHC Run2 and Future Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peralva, Bernardo Sotto-Maior

    2015-01-01

    The TileCal is the main hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS and it covers the central part of the detector ($|\\eta|$ energy deposited by the particles in TileCal is read out by approximately 10,000 channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm. The increase of LHC luminosity leads to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest and compromises the amplitude estimation performance. This work presents the proposed algorithm for energy estimation during LHC Run 2. The method is based on the same approach used during LHC Run 1, namely the Optimal Filter. The only difference is that the signal baseline (pedestal) will be subtracted from the received digitized samples, while in Run 1 this quantity was estimated on an event-by-event basis. The pedestal value is estimated through special calibration runs and it is stored in a data base for online and offline usage. Additionally, the backg...

  3. Long Run Purchasing Power Parity: Cassel or Balassa-Samuelson? David H. Papell and Ruxandra Prodan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Long Run Purchasing Power Parity: Cassel or Balassa-Samuelson? David H. Papell and Ruxandra Prodan countries to investigate two alternative versions of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP): reversion to a constant (713) 743-3798, email: dpapell@mail.uh.edu #12;1 1. Introduction Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) is one

  4. Long-Run Growth in Open Economies: Export-Led Cumulative Causation or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Long-Run Growth in Open Economies: Export-Led Cumulative Causation or a Balance. On the one hand, models of export-led cumulative causation (ELCC) stress the possibility that some countries competitiveness, rising exports, and rapid output growth (although, in this view, other countries may be doomed

  5. Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! & ! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION& & & Brain&oscillations&mediate&successful&suppression&of&unwanted&memories& Gerd&T.&Waldhauser1,&Karl1Heinz.de& Phone:&+49(0)753118815707& Fax:&+49(0)753118814829& #12;Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&2

  6. How Run-of-River Operation Affects Hydropower Generation Henriette I. Jager Mark S. Bevelhimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    How Run-of-River Operation Affects Hydropower Generation and Value Henriette I. Jager Mark S) are mandated to protect aquatic biota, (2) decrease hydropower generation per unit flow, and (3) decrease energy revenue. We tested these three assump- tions by reviewing hydropower projects with license

  7. Good Food is the longest running weekly food and wine guide in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Good Food Overview Good Food is the longest running weekly food and wine guide industry. Written and edited by some of the most noted food and wine writers and columnists, Good Food food related feature articles. Why Advertise 262,000 or 60% of Good Food Epicure readers have been

  8. Running Scheme on a PIC microcontroller Marc Feeley (Universite de Montreal) and Danny Dube (Universite Laval)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeley, Marc

    Running Scheme on a PIC microcontroller Marc Feeley (Universite de Montreal) and Danny Dube (Universite Laval) Objective: create a Scheme system for PIC that is R4 RS conformant (except for file I/O) The PIC is an inexpensive single-chip general purpose computer with little RAM Model Pins MIPS ROM RAM

  9. Program Availability Software for running SCHEMA calculations is available at the Arnold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Program Availability Software for running SCHEMA calculations is available at the Arnold group web and engineer many types of protein function, such as stability, activity, affinity, selectivity, substrate been described,6 such as 1 S. Forrest, Science 261, 872 (1993). 2 O. Kuchner and F. H. Arnold, Trends

  10. Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove, William M.

    Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT Prediction Issues and the Role of Incremental Validity in Sex Offender Risk Assessment Martin D. Lloyd University of Minnesota #12;Risk Assessment 2 Abstract We review issues of prediction and discuss their relevance

  11. Letter and word priming 1 Running head: Letter and word priming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Jeff

    Letter and word priming 1 Running head: Letter and word priming Orthographic, phonological, and articulatory contributions to masked letter and word priming Jeffrey S. Bowers Rice University Gabriella Vigliocco University of Wisconsin-Madison Richard Haan University of Arizona #12;Letter and word priming 2

  12. Word and psuedoword priming 1 Running head: Word and pseudoword priming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Jeff

    Word and psuedoword priming 1 Running head: Word and pseudoword priming Different perceptual codes support priming for words and pseudowords: Was Morton right all along? Jeffrey S. Bowers Rice University #12;Word and psuedoword priming 2 Abstract A perceptual identification task was used to assess priming

  13. Running in the real world: adjusting leg stiffness for different surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mechanical spring during ground contact. Experimental observations have revealed that an animal's leg sti¡ness properties. However, if leg sti¡ness was invariant, the biomechanics of running (e.g. peak ground reaction world. We found that human runners adjust their leg sti¡ness to accommodate changes in surface sti¡ness

  14. Design of Robust Distribution Networks Run by fourth Party Logistics Service Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armbruster, Dieter

    Design of Robust Distribution Networks Run by fourth Party Logistics Service Providers M logistics service provider (LSP), who faces the problem of distributing different products from suppliers distributions. 1 Introduction The logistics networks considered in this paper consist of production facilities

  15. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  16. Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY Digital library nouvelle 1 hal-00718385,version1-16Jul2012 Author manuscript, published in "Digital library as a controversy: Gallica vs Google, Dubrovnik : Croatia (2009)" #12;Digital library as a controversy Abstract

  17. What will happen to a hurricane that runs through this oil slick?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What will happen to a hurricane that runs through this oil slick? Most hurricanes span remains small in comparison to a typical hurricane's general environment and size, the anticipated impact on the hurricane would be minimal. The oil is not expected to appreciably affect either the intensity

  18. A distributed hard real-time Java system for high mobility components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rho, Sangig

    2005-02-17

    applications to adapt to changes in user requirements or to external events. We describe how we achieve run-time recon?guration in distributed Java applications by appropriately migrating servers. Guaranteed-rate schedulers at the servers provide...

  19. Time Management in the DoD High Level Architecture Richard M. Fujimoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of cooperating simulations (federates), and 3) the Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI) that provides the software environment needed by the federates to exchange information in a coordinated fashion. The RTI is a special

  20. Helical tomotherapy with dynamic running-start-stop delivery compared to conventional tomotherapy delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Yi, E-mail: yi.rong@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Yu; Lu, Weiguo [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States)] [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States); Shang, Lu [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China)] [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China); Zuo, Li [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Quan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Despite superior target dose uniformity, helical tomotherapy{sup } (HT) may involve a trade-off between longitudinal dose conformity and beam-on time (BOT), due to the limitation of only three available jaw sizes with the conventional HT (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). The recently introduced dynamic running-start-stop (RSS) delivery allows smaller jaw opening at the superior and inferior ends of the target when a sharp penumbra is needed. This study compared the dosimetric performance of RSS delivery with the fixed jaw HT delivery. Methods: Twenty patient cases were selected and deidentified prior to treatment planning, including 16 common clinical cases (brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate) and four special cases of whole brain with hippocampus avoidance (WBHA) that require a high degree of dose modulation. HT plans were generated for common clinical cases using the fixed 2.5 cm jaw width (HT2.5) and WBHA cases using 1.0 cm (HT1.0). The jaw widths for RSS were preset with a larger size (RSS5.0 vs HT2.5 and RSS2.5 vs HT1.0). Both delivery techniques were planned based on identical contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared using dose-volume histograms, BOT, and monitor units. Results: The average BOT was reduced from 4.8 min with HT2.5 to 2.5 min with RSS5.0. Target dose homogeneity with RSS5.0 was shown comparable to HT2.5 for common clinical sites. Superior normal tissue sparing was observed in RSS5.0 for optic nerves and optic chiasm in brain and HN cases. RSS5.0 demonstrated improved dose sparing for cord and esophagus in lung cases, as well as penile bulb in prostate cases. The mean body dose was comparable for both techniques. For the WBHA cases, the target homogeneity was significantly degraded in RSS2.5 without distinct dose sparing for hippocampus, compared to HT1.0. Conclusions: Compared to the fixed jaw HT delivery, RSS combined with a larger jaw width provides faster treatment delivery and improved cranial-caudal target dose conformity. The target coverage achieved by RSS with a large jaw width is comparable to the fixed jaw HT delivery for common cancer sites, but may deteriorate for cases where complex geometry is present in the middle part of the target.

  1. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Lambda_b Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna; /Glasgow U.

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce {Lambda}{sub b} baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} baryon in the semileptonic channel {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. In total 186 pb{sup -1} of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 {Lambda}{sub b} candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} is measured to be {tau} = 1.29 {+-} 0.11(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of c{tau} = 387 {+-} 33(stat.) {+-} 21 (syst.) {micro}m.

  2. Execution Characteristics of JustInTime Compilers Technical Report TR99071701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Execution Characteristics of JustInTime Compilers Technical Report TR99071701 R@cse.psu.edu Abstract JustInTime (JIT) compilers interact with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) at run time and compile appropriate bytecode sequences into native machine code. Loading and compilation time penalties are incurred

  3. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    tshawytscha) in the SacramentoSan Joaquin River Delta. [salmon in Californias Sacramento Valley. Climatic ChangeCritical Habitat; Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook

  4. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootterss conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  5. Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, M S; Hurley, K C; Jenke, P A; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X -L; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These ...

  6. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agatsuma, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2012-11-20

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10{sup -2} M {sub Sun} c {sup 2} at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short-hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc, respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

  7. Chow Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  8. Like this post? Subscribe to our RSS feed and stay up to date. Navy Develops Battery that Runs on Mud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Planetsave Like this post? Subscribe to our RSS feed and stay up to date. Navy Develops Battery that Runs on Mud (http://planetsave.com/blog/2010/04/20/navy-develops-battery-that-runs-on- mud/) (http by Joshua S Hill Published on April 20th, 2010 in Energy & Fuel 1 Comment 5/4/2010 Navy Develops Battery

  9. Ozone Climatologies Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m(a), percentage change in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Ozone Climatologies (a) (b) (c) Figure 1: Ozone climatology for control run in kg/m(a), percentage change in ozone for the perturbed runs; tropopause region (b), whole stratosphere (c). Determining the impact of lower stratospheric ozone depletion on Southern Hemisphere climate Sarah P.E. Keeley and Nathan

  10. A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL APPROVED: Dean, College of Natural Science and Mathematics Dean of the Graduate School Date #12;A CONCEPT TO ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF A PERMAFROST MODEL RUN FULLY COUPLED WITH A CLIMATE MODEL A DISSERTATION

  11. Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING Of Plight and Providence: Big Pharma and The Effects of Pharmaceutical Advertising on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING 1 Of Plight and Providence: Big Pharma and The Effects of Pharmaceutical Advertising on U.S. patients with RLS, Insomnia, GERD, and GAD Farley Hamada Advisor: Dr. Keith Murphy University of California, Irvine Spring 2011 #12;Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING 2

  12. Summary Report and Run Control for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Report and Run Control for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment for the 2012 WIPP Panel Closure System Performance Assessment Revision 0 Author: R. Chris Camphouse 6/( C~ L~--_A~~_I/iJ+__WIPP:1.4.1.2:PAQA-L:557393 Information Only #12;Summary Report and Run Control

  13. Running coupling constant from lattice studies of gluon and ghost propagators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-12-02

    We present a numerical study of the running coupling constant in four-dimensional pure-SU(2) lattice gauge theory. The running coupling is evaluated by fitting data for the gluon and ghost propagators in minimal Landau gauge. Following Refs. [1, 2], the fitting formulae are obtained by a simultaneous integration of the {beta} function and of a function coinciding with the anomalous dimension of the propagator in the momentum subtraction scheme. We consider these formulae at three and four loops. The fitting method works well, especially for the ghost case, for which statistical error and hyper-cubic effects are very small. Our present result for {lambda}MS is 200{sub -40}{sup +60} MeV, where the error is purely systematic. We are currently extending this analysis to five loops in order to reduce this systematic error.

  14. Evolution of ATLAS conditions data and its management for LHC run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehler, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration; Gallas, Elizabeth; Formica, Andrea; Borodin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector consists of several sub-detector systems. Both data taking and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation rely on an accurate description of the detector conditions from every sub system, such as calibration constants, different scenarios of pile-up and noise conditions, size and position of the beam spot, etc. In order to guarantee database availability for critical online applications during data-taking, two database systems, one for online access and another one for all other database access have been implemented. The long shutdown period has provided the opportunity to review and improve the run-1 system: revise workflows, include new and innovative monitoring and maintenance tools and implement a new database instance for run-2 conditions data. The detector conditions are organized by tag identification strings and managed independently from the different sub-detector experts. The individual tags are then collected and associated into a global conditions tag, assuring synchronization of various sub-d...

  15. Evolution of ATLAS conditions data and its management for LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehler, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration; Formica, Andrea; Gallas, Elizabeth; Radescu, Voica

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector consists of several sub-detector systems. Both data taking and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation rely on an accurate description of the detector conditions from every subsystem, such as calibration constants, different scenarios of pile-up and noise conditions, size and position of the beam spot, etc. In order to guarantee database availability for critical online applications during data-taking, two database systems, one for online access and another one for all other database access have been implemented. The long shutdown period has provided the opportunity to review and improve the Run-1 system: revise workflows, include new and innovative monitoring and maintenance tools and implement a new database instance for Run-2 conditions data. The detector conditions are organized by tag identification strings and managed independently from the different sub-detector experts. The individual tags are then collected and associated into a global conditions tag, assuring synchronization of various sub-de...

  16. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Fitzgerald, J.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2011-10-06

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. With Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  17. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Final topical report, Bench Run 03 (227-93)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-03, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept--Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-03 was the third of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the US DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. The Bench Run PB-03 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst loadings and types on the performance of two-stage direct coal liquefaction, the effect of HTI`s new iron catalyst, modified with phosphorus, and the evaluation of the effect of recycle solvent hydrotreatment on the overall process performance. PB-03 employed a close-coupled (no interstage separator) configuration of hydroconversion reactors. Other features of PB-03 included the use of an in-line fixed bed hydrotreater for the net product. No significant effects on process performance was found by changing the loadings of iron and molybdenum in the ranges of 1,000--5,000 ppm for iron and 50--100 ppm for molybdenum. However, the modification of HTI`s iron-based gel catalyst with 100 ppm of phosphorous improved the process performance significantly. A newly tested Mo-Carbon dispersed catalyst was not found to be any better than Molyvan-A, which was used during all but one condition of PB-03. Hydrotreatment of part of the recycle solvent was found to have a positive influence on the overall performance.

  18. Upgrade of the Minos+ Experiment Data Acquisition for the High Energy NuMI Beam Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Badgett; Steve R. Hahn; Donatella Torretta; Jerry Meier; Jeffrey Gunderson; Denise Osterholm; David Saranen

    2015-06-06

    The Minos+ experiment is an extension of the Minos experiment at a higher energy and more intense neutrino beam, with the data collection having begun in the fall of 2013. The neutrino beam is provided by the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam-line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The detector apparatus consists of two main detectors, one underground at Fermilab and the other in Soudan, Minnesota with the purpose of studying neutrino oscillations at a base line of 735 km. The original data acquisition system has been running for several years collecting data from NuMI, but with the extended run from 2013, parts of the system needed to be replaced due to obsolescence, reliability problems, and data throughput limitations. Specifically, we have replaced the front-end readout controllers, event builder, and data acquisition computing and trigger processing farms with modern, modular and reliable devices with few single points of failure. The new system is based on gigabit Ethernet TCP/IP communication to implement the event building and concatenation of data from many front-end VME readout crates. The simplicity and partitionability of the new system greatly eases the debugging and diagnosing process. The new system improves throughput by about a factor of three compared to the old system, up to 800 megabits per second, and has proven robust and reliable in the current run.

  19. One-Family Walking Technicolor in Light of LHC Run-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Matsuzaki

    2015-10-23

    The LHC Higgs can be identified as the technidilaton, a composite scalar, arising as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson for the spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry in walking technicolor. One interesting candidate for the walking technicolor is the QCD with the large number of fermion flavors, involving the one-family model having the eight-fermion flavors. The smallness of the technidilaton mass can be ensured by the generic walking feature, Miransky scaling, and the presence of the "anti-Veneziano limit" characteristic to the large-flavor walking scenario. To tell the standard-model Higgs from the technidilaton, one needs to wait for the precise estimate of the Higgs couplings to the standard model particles, which is expected at the ongoing LHC-Run II. In this talk the technidilaton phenomenology in comparison with the LHC Run-I data is summarized with the special emphasis placed on the presence of the anti-Veneziano limit supporting the lightness of technidilaton. Besides the technidilaton, the walking technicolor predicts the rich particle spectrum such as technipions and technirho mesons, arising as composite particles formed by technifermions. The LHC phenomenology of those technihadrons and the discovery channels are also discussed, which are smoking-guns of the walking technicolor, to be accessible at the LHC-Run II.

  20. Running Spectral Index as a Probe of Physics at High Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ballesteros; J. A. Casas; J. R. Espinosa

    2006-03-23

    The WMAP results on the scalar spectral index n and its running with scale, though preliminary, open a very interesting window to physics at very high energies. We address the problem of finding inflaton potentials well motivated by particle physics which can accomodate WMAP data. We make a model independent analysis of a large class of models: those with flat tree-level potential lifted by radiative corrections, which cause the slow rolling of the inflaton and the running of n. This includes typical hybrid inflation models. In the small-coupling regime the predictions for the size and running of n are remarkably neat, e.g. -dn/dln k=(n-1)^2 price of having a small number of e-folds, Ne. We also examine the effect of mass thresholds crossed during inflation. Finally, we show that the presence of non-renormalizable operators for the inflaton, suppressed by a mass scale above the inflationary range, is able to give both dn/dln k ~ O(-0.05) and Ne ~ 50.

  1. AGR-2 irradiation test final as-run report, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities; (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing; and, (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  2. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  3. Energy Reduction in Distributed Real-Time Embedded Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Flvio Rech

    control and command activities more efficient. Many examples can be quoted, like automotive and avionic requirements, although embedded platforms provide limited resources. Reduced architecture, small memory size room for time and energy optimizations. The focus is on applications that run over an embedded platform

  4. Time Management in the High Level Architecture Richard M. Fujimoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that must flow between federates and the Runtime Infrastructure (RTI) software in order to efficiently the interface to the Run Time Infrastructure (RTI) that provides the means for simulators to coordinate.g., vehicle simulators) interconnected through the RTI. Each simulator is referred to as a federate

  5. Time-Reversal Invariance and the Relation between Wave Chaos and Classical Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    for the corresponding wave system perturbations grow at a much smaller rate algebraically with time ( t). 1 Time such as the heat equation. This means that when we let the clock run backwards rather than forwards field E and the magnetic field B obey in vacuum Maxwell's equations, which contain only the first time

  6. Sensitivity Achieved by the LIGO and Virgo Gravitational Wave Detectors during LIGO's Sixth and Virgo's Second and Third Science Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration

    2012-03-15

    We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for low-mass compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's sixth science run and Virgo's second and third science runs. We present strain noise power spectral densities (PSDs) which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors in these science runs. The data presented here and in the accompanying web-accessible data files are intended to be released to the public as a summary of detector performance for low-mass CBC searches during S6 and VSR2-3.

  7. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8105 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Don?t let the river run dry Effi ciency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin Story by Danielle Supercinski txH2O | pg. 6 An unknown fact to most is that high water demands by agriculture along with the ever-increasing urban...

  8. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8105 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Don?t let the river run dry Effi ciency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin Story by Danielle Supercinski txH2O | pg. 6 An unknown fact to most is that high water demands by agriculture along with the ever-increasing urban...

  9. Constr. Approx. (1993) 9:509-523 CONSTRUCTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borwein, Peter

    1993-01-01

    of the identities and their proofs can be effected almost entirely computationally with the aid of a symbolic Ismail. AMS classification: Primary 33A25; Secondary 33A30, llF10, 39B10. Key words and phrases: Schwartz" digits for n iterations). The fact of convergence and the speed of convergence is an easy exercise

  10. PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CARBON MONOXIDE; EMISSION; FINE STRUCTURE; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; INFRARED SPECTRA; INTERSTELLAR SPACE; LUMINOSITY; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC...

  11. PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to(Conference) |ofPDVGLENELG IN GALE CRATERGALAXIES THROUGH

  12. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

  13. THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS CONFIGURATIONS, AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RHIC 2003 AU - D PHYSICS RUN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L; Benjamin, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Brennan, J M; Brown, K A; Carlson, K A; Delong, J; D' Ottavio, T; Frak, B; Gardner, C J; Glenn, J W; Harvey, M; Hayes, T; Hseuh, H- C; Ingrassia, P; Lowenstein, D; Mackay, W; Marr, G; Morris, J; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smith, G; Smith, K S; Steski, D; Tsoupas, N; Thieberger, P; Zeno, K

    2003-05-12

    The RHIC 2003 Physics Run [1] required collisions between gold ions and deuterons. The injector necessarily had to deliver adequate quality (transverse and longitudinal emittance) and quantity of both species. For gold this was a continuing evolution from past work [2]. For deuterons it was new territory. For the filling of the RHIC the injector not only had to deliver quality beams but also had to switch between these species quickly. This paper details the collider requirements and our success in meeting these. Some details of the configurations employed are given.

  14. Off-momentum beta-beat correction in the RHIC proton run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    In this article, we will review the techniques to measure the off-momentum {beta}-beat and the correction algorithms with the chromatic arc sextupoles in RHIC. We will focus on the measurement and correction of the off-momentum {beta}*-beat at the interaction points. The off-momentum {beta}* is measured with the quadrupole strength change and a high resolution phase lock loop tune meter. The results of off-momentum {beta}* correction performed in a dedicated beam experiment in the 2012 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run are presented.

  15. Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems FAQ | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProteinTotalSciTechAprilFacility Queuing and Running

  16. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN

  17. Synthesis and crystal structure of two new cerium rhodium oxides: Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.12) with Ce mixed valency and Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Zakharov, L.N.; Bhuvanesh, N.S.P.; Sleight, A.W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2011-06-15

    The new compounds Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) and CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been prepared. Their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Electrical and magnetic properties were also evaluated. Based on the structural analysis and physical properties, oxidation states for CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be assigned as Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A small variation in x was detected for Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} indicating a formula ranging from Ce{sup 3.64+}{sub 0.55}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} to Ce{sup 3.81+}{sub 0.525}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: The new compounds Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) and CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been prepared and their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Electrical and magnetic properties were also evaluated. Highlights: > The new compounds CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) have been prepared. > Their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. > Valence picture is Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ce{sup 3.64+}{sub 0.55}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} to Ce{sup 3.81+}{sub 0.525}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  18. A Fast Pulsed Neutron Source for Time-of-Flight Detection of Nuclear Materials and Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; James, Colt; Madden, Robert [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, 3077 Teagarden Street, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Lane, Stephen [NSF Center for Biophotonics and School of Medicine, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA, 95817 (United States)

    2011-12-13

    AASC has built a fast pulsed neutron source based on the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF). The more current version stores only 100 J but fires at {approx}10-50 Hz and emits {approx}10{sup 6}n/pulse at a peak current of 100 kA. Both sources emit 2.45{+-}0.1 MeV(DD) neutron pulses of {approx}25-40 ns width. Such fast, quasi-monoenergetic pulses allow time-of-flight detection of characteristic emissions from nuclear materials or high explosives. A test is described in which iron targets were placed at different distances from the point neutron source. Detectors such as Stilbene and LaBr3 were used to capture inelastically induced, 847 keV gammas from the iron target. Shielding of the source and detectors eliminated most (but not all) of the source neutrons from the detectors. Gated detection, pulse shape analysis and time-of-flight discrimination enable separation of gamma and neutron signatures and localization of the target. A Monte Carlo simulation allows evaluation of the potential of such a fast pulsed source for a field-portable detection system. The high rep-rate source occupies two 200 liter drums and uses a cooled DPF Head that is <500 cm{sup 3} in volume.

  19. Confinement Time Exceeding One Second for a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} are trapped in a 270 deg. toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents {approx_equal}10{sup 5} periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  20. Multiscale modeling and control of crystal shape and size distributions: accounting for crystal aggregation, evaluation of continuous crystallization systems and run-to-run control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Joseph Sangil

    2015-01-01

    of continuous crystallization process . . . . . . . 99demonstrated that a continuous process with a fines trap canresidence time of a continuous process is typically one or

  1. The compatibility of LHC Run 1 data with a heavy scalar of mass around 270\\,GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan von Buddenbrock; Nabarun Chakrabarty; Alan S. Cornell; Deepak Kar; Mukesh Kumar; Tanumoy Mandal; Bruce Mellado; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; Robert G. Reed

    2015-11-15

    The first run of the LHC was successful in that it saw the discovery of the elusive Higgs boson, a particle that is consistent with the SM hypothesis. There are a number of excesses in Run 1 ATLAS and CMS results which can be interpreted as being due to the existence of another heavier scalar particle. This particle has decay modes which we have studied using LHC Run 1 data. Using a minimalistic model, we can predict the kinematics of these final states and compare the prediction against data directly. A statistical combination of these results shows that a best fit point is found for a heavy scalar having a mass of 272$^{+12}_{-9}$\\,GeV. This result has been quantified as a three sigma effect, based on analyses which are not necessarily optimized for the search of a heavy scalar. The smoking guns for the discovery of this new heavy scalar and the prospects for Run 2 are discussed.

  2. Design and evaluation of a quasi-passive robotic knee brace : on the effects of parallel elasticity on human running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Grant (Grant Andrew)

    2012-01-01

    While the effects of series compliance on running biomechanics are documented, the effects of parallel compliance are known only for the simpler case of hopping. As many practical exoskeleton and orthosis designs act in ...

  3. Evaluation of daytime vs. nighttime red-light-running using an advanced warning for end of green phase system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obeng-Boampong, Kwaku Oduro

    2005-11-01

    The problem of dilemma zone protection and red-light-running is especially important in certain rural intersections due to the higher speeds at these intersections and their isolated nature. In addition, the presence of ...

  4. MFR PAPER 1274 Puget Sound angler proudly displays a fine sea-run cutthroat troul. (Photo courtesy of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    varying from fly casting to worms. In Washington, anglers also use a wide variety of techniques and num'*' 01 p,.--Ioupawnlng. 01 _run cutthroat trout ta"'n at Sand C.... Oreg 194&-41 (Sum.... 1182

  5. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    above normal water year brought rain events and winter-runFor example, early rain events in 2006, a wet water year,late-arriving rain events of 2001, a dry water year, showed

  6. CSE 441T/541T: Advanced Algorithms Fall Semester, 2004 Using Euclidean TSP Approx. for General TSP Approx.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Sally A.

    in the TSPWTI input G 0 obtained by this proposed transformation. Observe that C 0 T = C T + nW since there are n = jV j edges in the tour each of which is larger by an additive factor of W . Since n and W are independent of the tour T it follows that the tour which minimizes C 0 T also minimizes C T +nW . Now suppose

  7. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  8. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  9. Technical Results from the Surface Run of the LUX Dark Matter Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUX Collaboration; D. S. Akerib; X. Bai; E. Bernard; A. Bernstein; A. Bradley; D. Byram; S. B. Cahn; M. C. Carmona-Benitez; J. J. Chapman; T. Coffey; A. Dobi; E. Dragowsky; E. Druszkiewicz; B. Edwards; C. H. Faham; S. Fiorucci; R. J. Gaitskell; K. R. Gibson; M. Gilchriese; C. Hall; M. Hanhardt; M. Ihm; R. G. Jacobsen; L. Kastens; K. Kazkaz; R. Knoche; N. Larsen; C. Lee; K. T. Lesko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; A. Lyashenko; D. C. Malling; R. Mannino; D. N. McKinsey; D. Mei; J. Mock; M. Moongweluwan; M. Morii; H. Nelson; F. Neves; J. A. Nikkel; M. Pangilinan; K. Pech; P. Phelps; A. Rodionov; T. Shutt; C. Silva; W. Skulski; V. N. Solovov; P. Sorensen; T. Stiegler; M. Sweany; M. Szydagis; D. Taylor; M. Tripathi; S. Uvarov; J. R. Verbus; L. de Viveiros; N. Walsh; R. Webb; J. T. White; M. Wlasenko; F. L. H. Wolfs; M. Woods; C. Zhang

    2013-02-22

    We present the results of the three-month above-ground commissioning run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility located in Lead, South Dakota, USA. LUX is a 370 kg liquid xenon detector that will search for cold dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The commissioning run, conducted with the detector immersed in a water tank, validated the integration of the various sub-systems in preparation of the underground deployment. Using the data collected, we report excellent light collection properties, achieving 8.4 photoelectrons per keV for 662 keV electron recoils without an applied electric field, measured in the center of the WIMP target. We also find good energy and position resolution in relatively high-energy interactions from a variety of internal and external sources. Finally, we have used the commissioning data to tune the optical properties of our simulation and report updated sensitivity projections for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering.

  10. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  11. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-04-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

  12. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-12-15

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its predominantly blue horizontal branch morphology-which is more typical of Oosterhoff type II systems. We thus conclude that metallicity plays a key role in defining Oosterhoff type. Finally, based on an application of the 'A-method', we conclude that the cluster RR Lyrae stars have a similar He abundance as M3, although more work on the temperatures of the M62 RR Lyrae is needed before this result can be conclusively established.

  13. Einstein's unified field theory predicts the equilibrium positions of n wires run by steady electric currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Antoci

    2008-03-25

    A particular exact solution of Einstein's Hermitian theory of relativity is examined, after recalling that there is merit in adding phenomenological sources to the theory, and in choosing the metric like it was done long ago by Kursunoglu and Hely. It is shown by intrinsic arguments, relying on the properties of the chosen metric manifold, that the solution describes in Einstein's theory the field of n thin parallel wires at rest, run by steady electric currents, and predicts their equilibrium positions through the injunction that the metric must display cylindrical symmetry in the infinitesimal neighbourhood of each wire. In the weak field limit the equilibrium positions coincide with the ones prescribed by Maxwell's electrodynamics.

  14. Upgrade of the ATLAS Control and Configuration Software for Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avolio, Giuseppe; The ATLAS collaboration; Anders, Gabriel; Caprini, Mihai; Corso-Radu, Alina; D'ascanio, Matteo; De Castro Vargas Fernandes, Julio; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Kazarov, Andrei; Klopov, Nikolai; Kolobara, Bernard; Kotov, Vladislav; Lankford, Andrew; Laurent, Florian; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Magnoni, Luca; Olechko, Serguei; Papaevgeniou, Lykourgos; Ryabov, Yury; Santos, Alejandro; Scannicchio, Diana; Seixas, Jose; Soloviev, Igor; Unel, Gokhan; Yasu, Yoshiji

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS data acquisition (DAQ) system is controlled and configured via a software infrastructure that takes care of coherently orchestrating the data taking. While the overall architecture, established at the end of the 90s, has proven to be solid and flexible, many software components have undergone a complete redesign or re-implementation in 2013/2014 in order to fold-in the additional requirements that appeared in the course of LHCs Run 1, to profit from new technologies and to re-factorise and cleanup software. This paper describes the approach that was taken to plan, organise and carry out this software upgrade project. It highlights the main technical choices that have guided the overall work, describes the major achievements and outlines how the control and configuration software may be further improved or re-shaped in the future.

  15. Searching for Heavier Higgs Boson via Di-Higgs Production at LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan-Chun L; Chun Du; Yaquan Fang; Hong-Jian He; Huijun Zhang

    2015-07-14

    The LHC discovery of a light Higgs particle $h^0$ (125GeV) opens up new prospect for searching heavier Higgs boson(s) at the LHC Run-2, which will unambiguously point to new physics beyond the standard model (SM). We study the detection of a heavier neutral Higgs boson $H^0$ via di-Higgs production channel at the LHC (14TeV), $H^0 \\to h^0h^0 \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$. This directly probes the $Hhh$ cubic Higgs interaction, which exists in most extensions of the SM Higgs sector. For the decay products of final states $WW^*$, we include both pure leptonic mode $WW^* \\to \\ell\\bar{\

  16. Dark Matter in Leptophilic Higgs Models After the LHC Run-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    We examine the leptophilic two Higgs doublet model with fermionic dark matter, considering the range of experimental constraints on the Higgs sector. The measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs from the LHC Run-I allow us to focus on those remaining processes that may play an important role at colliders. We find that the leptophilic model allows for a much lighter Higgs than in other two-Higgs models, although discovery at the LHC will be difficult. Adding a dark matter sector motivated by supersymmetric extensions of the leptophilic model, we find the existing parameter space can accommodate constraints from direct detection and the invisible widths of the Higgs and $Z$, while also fitting the Galactic Center gamma ray excess reported by analyses of Fermi-LAT data. We also discuss the status of the fully supersymmetric version of such models, which include four Higgs doublets and a natural dark matter candidate.

  17. Dark Matter in Leptophilic Higgs Models After the LHC Run-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew R. Buckley; David Feld

    2015-08-04

    We examine the leptophilic two Higgs doublet model with fermionic dark matter, considering the range of experimental constraints on the Higgs sector. The measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs from the LHC Run-I allow us to focus on those remaining processes that may play an important role at colliders. We find that the leptophilic model allows for a much lighter Higgs than in other two-Higgs models, although discovery at the LHC will be difficult. Adding a dark matter sector motivated by supersymmetric extensions of the leptophilic model, we find the existing parameter space can accommodate constraints from direct detection and the invisible widths of the Higgs and $Z$, while also fitting the Galactic Center gamma ray excess reported by analyses of Fermi-LAT data. We also discuss the status of the fully supersymmetric version of such models, which include four Higgs doublets and a natural dark matter candidate.

  18. First measurement of the w boson mass with CDF in Run 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver

    2005-10-01

    This thesis describes a first measurement of the W Boson mass through the decay into a muon and a neutrino in Run 2 of the Tevatron. The W Bosons are produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used for this analysis corresponds to 200 pb{sup -1} recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. The most important quantity in this measurement is the momentum of the muon measured in a magnetic spectrometer which is calibrated using the two quarkonium resonances J/{Psi} and {Upsilon}(1S). Systematic uncertainties arise from the modeling of the recoil when the W Boson is produced, the momentum calibration, the modeling of W Boson production and decay dynamics and backgrounds. The result is: M{sub W} = 80408 {+-} 50(stat.) {+-} 57(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. The ATLAS Distributed Computing project for LHC Run-2 and beyond.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolamo, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  20. Long-run evolution of the global economy - Part 2: Hindcasts of innovation and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Long-range climate forecasts use integrated assessment models to link the global economy to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper evaluates an alternative economic framework outlined in part 1 of this study (Garrett, 2014) that approaches the global economy using purely physical principles rather than explicitly resolved societal dynamics. If this model is initialized with economic data from the 1950s, it yields hindcasts for how fast global economic production and energy consumption grew between 2000 and 2010 with skill scores > 90 % relative to a model of persistence in trends. The model appears to attain high skill partly because there was a strong impulse of discovery of fossil fuel energy reserves in the mid-twentieth century that helped civilization to grow rapidly as a deterministic physical response. Forecasting the coming century may prove more of a challenge because the effect of the energy impulse appears to have nearly run its course. Nonetheless, an understanding of the external forces that drive ...

  1. Planned search for LIGO-GBM coincidence in the first advanced LIGO data run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, Jordan; Briggs, Michael; Christensen, Nelson; Connaughton, Valerie; Singer, Leo; Shawhan, Peter; Veitch, John

    2015-01-01

    In the fall of 2015 the first scientific observing run (O1) of the advanced LIGO detectors will be conducted. Based on the recent commissioning progress at the LIGO Hanford and Livingston sites, the gravitational wave detector range for a neutron star binary inspiral is expected to be of order 60 Mpc. We describe here our planning for an O1 search for coincidence between a LIGO gravitational wave detection and a gamma-ray signal from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. Such a coincidence would constitute measurement of an electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal, with significant corresponding scientific benefits, including revealing the central engine powering the gamma-ray burst, enhanced confidence in the event as a genuine astrophysical detection, and a determination of the relative speed of the photon and graviton.

  2. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  3. 6/18/13 A History Lesson and a Call to Arms -The New York Times movies.nytimes.com/2008/09/12/movies/12secr.html?partner=Rotten Tomatoes&ei=5083&pagewanted=print 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galison, Peter L.

    6/18/13 A History Lesson and a Call to Arms - The New York Times movies.nytimes.com/2008 Village. Running time: 1 hour 20 minutes. This film is not rated. Copyright 2013 The New York Times

  4. Absolute timing measurements of the Ni-like Pd and Sn soft-x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, F.; Braud, M.; Balmer, J.E.; Nilsen, J.

    2005-10-15

    The absolute time of emission of the x-ray laser output with respect to the arrival of a 100-ps pump pulse has been measured with the aid of a calibrated timing fiducial. The results show the x-ray laser to appear up to 60 ps (80 ps) before the peak of the pump pulse in the case of the Sn (Pd) x-ray laser, which is in good agreement with simulations obtained from the LASNEX and CRETIN codes. The pulse duration was found to be {approx}45 ps for both the Sn and the Pd x-ray lasers.

  5. Higgs, supersymmetry and dark matter after Run I of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beranger Dumont

    2014-11-13

    Two major problems call for an extension of the Standard Model (SM): the hierarchy problem in the Higgs sector and the dark matter in the Universe. The discovery of a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV was clearly the most significant piece of news from CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition to representing the ultimate triumph of the SM, it shed new light on the hierarchy problem and opened up new ways of probing new physics. The various measurements performed at Run I of the LHC constrain the Higgs couplings to SM particles as well as invisible and undetected decays. In this thesis, the impact of the LHC Higgs results on various new physics scenarios is assessed, carefully taking into account uncertainties and correlations between them. Generic modifications of the Higgs coupling strengths, possibly arising from extended Higgs sectors or higher-dimensional operators, are considered. Furthermore, specific new physics models are tested. This includes, in particular, the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. While a Higgs boson has been found, no sign of beyond the SM physics was observed at Run I of the LHC in spite of the large number of searches performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The implications of the negative results obtained in these searches constitute another important part of this thesis. First, supersymmetric models with a dark matter candidate are investigated in light of the negative searches for supersymmetry at the LHC using a so-called "simplified model" approach. Second, tools using simulated events to constrain any new physics scenario from the LHC results are presented. Moreover, during this thesis the selection criteria of several beyond the SM analyses have been reimplemented in the MadAnalysis 5 framework and made available in a public database.

  6. Technical Report 2009-003 A Testing Theory for Real-Time Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 2009-003 A Testing Theory for Real-Time Systems Stefan D. Bruda and Chun Dai|cdai}@cs.ubishops.ca 30 October 2009 Abstract We develop a testing theory for real-time systems. We keep the usual notion or failure of infinite runs, using a formalism similar to the acceptance in Buchi automata. We present two

  7. Modeling and Analysis of Load and Time Dependent Software Rejuvenation Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telek, Mikls

    divided into design, coding and test ing phase. Traditionally, software quality improve mentModeling and Analysis of Load and Time Dependent Software Rejuvenation Policies S. Garg 1 , A running clientserver type software systems by many clients, such software ``ages'' with time

  8. Enhancing Security of Real-Time Applications on Grids through Dynamic Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Enhancing Security of Real-Time Applications on Grids through Dynamic Scheduling Tao Xie Xiao Qin on Grids require security protections to completely fulfill their security-critical needs. Unfortunately to seamlessly integrate security into real-time scheduling for applications running on Grids. In this paper we

  9. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  10. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  11. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  12. Effects of the Running of the QCD Coupling on the Energy Loss in the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Braun; Hans-Jrgen Pirner

    2006-10-25

    Finite temperature modifies the running of the QCD coupling alpha_s(k,T) with resolution k. After calculating the thermal quark and gluon masses selfconsistently, we determine the quark-quark and quark-gluon cross sections in the plasma based on the running coupling. We find that the running coupling enhances these cross sections by factors of two to four depending on the temperature. We also compute the energy loss dE/dx of a high-energy quark in the plasma as a function of temperature. Our study suggests that, beside t-channel processes, inverse Compton scattering is a relevant process for a quantitative understanding of the energy loss of an incident quark in a hot plasma.

  13. One-Loop Right-Handed Neutrino Threshold Corrections for Two-Loop Running in Supersymmetric Type I Seesaw Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antusch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The renormalization group (RG) running of the neutrino mass operator is required for comparing the predictions of neutrino models at high energy with the experimental data at low energies. In the type I seesaw scenario with n_G right-handed neutrinos, the RG running is also performed in the effective theories above and between the thresholds given by the masses of the right-handed neutrinos. At these thresholds, the effective theories are matched. When calculating the two-loop RG running, the matching has to be performed at the one-loop level. In this work, we calculate the one-loop matching formulae in the MSSM extended by n_G right-handed neutrinos using supergraph techniques. Moreover we present a general formula for one-loop matching of superpotential operators which can readily be applied to any supersymmetric theory where chiral superfields are integrated out.

  14. Physical and chemical characteristics of fluorinel/sodium calcine generated during 30 cm Pilot-Plant Run 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, K.N.; Kessinger, G.F.; Littleton, L.L.; Olson, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    The 30 centimeter (cm) pilot plant calciner Run 17, of March 9, 1987, was performed to study the calcination of fluroinel-sodium blended waste blended at the ratio 3.5:1 fluorinel to sodium, respectively. The product of the run was analyzed by a variety of analytical techniques that included X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to deduce physical and chemical characteristics. The analytical data, as well as data analyses and conclusions drawn from the data, are presented.

  15. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  16. Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laadan, Oren; Nieh, Jason; Phung, Dan

    2012-10-02

    Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices are provided. In some embodiments, a method includes running one or more processes associated with the distributed application in virtualized operating system environments on a plurality of digital processing devices, suspending the one or more processes, and saving network state information relating to network connections among the one or more processes. The method further include storing process information relating to the one or more processes, recreating the network connections using the saved network state information, and restarting the one or more processes using the stored process information.

  18. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  19. THE NATURE OF HYPERVELOCITY STARS AND THE TIME BETWEEN THEIR FORMATION AND EJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} main-sequence B star at a distance of 50 {+-} 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 {+-} 18 (stat) {+-}30 (sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10{sup 8} yr 'arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10{sup 7} yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10{sup 7} yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10{sup 7} yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3{sigma} level. Together with the 10{sup 8} yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Galactic center origin for the HVSs. If the HVSs were indeed ejected by the central black hole, then the Galactic center was forming stars {approx_equal}200 Myr ago, and the progenitors of the HVSs took {approx_equal}100 Myr to enter the black hole's loss cone.

  20. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Higgs self-coupling in the MSSM and NMSSM after the LHC Run 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lei; Yuan, Chien-Peng; Zhang, Mengchao

    2015-01-01

    We examine the trilinear self-coupling of the SM-like 125 GeV Higgs boson ($h$) in the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) and the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model (NMSSM) after the LHC Run-1. Considering the current experimental constraints, such as the Higgs data, the flavor constraints, the electroweak precision observables as well as the dark matter detections, we scan over the parameter space and obtain the following observations: (1) In the MSSM, the self-coupling is suppressed relative to the SM value. But, due to the tightly constrained parameter space, such a suppression is rather weak and the ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm MSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ is above 0.97; (2) In the NMSSM with $\\lambda0.7$ (also called $\\lambda$-SUSY), the self-coupling can be greatly suppressed or enhanced relative to the SM value (with the ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm NMSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ varying from -1.1 to 1.9), accompanied by a sizable change in $h\\tau^+\\tau^-$ coupling.

  2. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backhaus, Malte; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed as well as a new read-out chip within CMOS 130nm technology and with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. The new detector is the first large scale application of of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project will be presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the productio...

  3. Selective hydrocracking of heavy straight run naphtha bottoms for T90 reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsing, L.H.; Nelson, R.G. [Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Refiners are being presented with a major challenge to meet proposed stringent specifications for reformulated gasoline to lower auto exhaustive emissions. Among the specifications proposed to be regulated by EPA, the T90 boiling point of gasoline is found to have a great influence on hydrocarbon emissions. T90 reduction of naphtha streams by hydrocracking has been identified as a processing scheme to upgrade the heavy naphtha fraction before blending with other refining streams. In this paper, a commercially available catalyst was evaluated for the T90 reduction of the heavy fraction of heavy straight run naphtha with an ASTM D-86 boiling range of 275-386F (HSRN). The catalyst was found to be effective in lowering the T90 of HSRN from 344F to 300F under reaction conditions of 2 LHSV/1000 psig/650 F or 4 LHSV/1000 psig/695 F. The product yield shift by hydrocracking was from C9-C11 hydrocarbons to C4-C6 components, particularly C4 and C5 isoparaffins. Both RON and MON of the liquid products were increased significantly from 36 and 42 up to 78 and 74, respectively. The increase of octane numbers is a function of hydrocracking severity. The liquid product yield was about 75 vol% with a T90 of 300F. The liquid product sulfur and nitrogen contents were less than 30 and 0.15 wppm, respectively.

  4. The ATLAS Hadronic Tau Trigger Initial Run-2 Strategy and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickering, Mark Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10^34cm^ -2s-1, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analyses. In these conditions single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitations, despite the sophisticated algorithms used in the tau identification. The development of further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main challenges to allow a large program of physics analysis. The tau triggers provide many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model, and to get precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson decaying to tau-leptons. One of the major challenges is to sustain high efficiencies in events with multiple interactions. To do this we utilised faster tracking methods, multivariate selection techniques. In Run II topological criteria can now be applied already at the first trigger level, due to the addition of the L1 topological. This makes it possible to use detail...

  5. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullier, Geoffrey Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. A new readout chip has been developed within CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical performan...

  6. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: status and perspectives for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector contributes to the tracking, particle identification, and triggering capabilities of the experiment. It is composed of six layers of multi-wire proportional chambers, each of which is preceded by a radiator and a Xe/CO$_2$-filled drift volume. The signal is sampled in timebins of 100~ns over the drift length which allows for the reconstruction of chamber-wise track segments, both online and offline. The particle identification is based on the specific energy loss of charged particles and additional transition radiation photons, the latter being a signature for electrons. The detector is segmented into 18 sectors, of which 13 were installed in Run I. The TRD was included in data taking since the LHC start-up and was successfully used for electron identification and triggering. During the Long Shutdown 1, the detector was completed and now covers the full azimuthal acceptance. Furthermore, the readout and trigger components were upgraded. When data taking was started for ...

  7. Light Stops and Observation of Supersymmetry at LHC RUN-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Bryan; Nelson, Brent D; Spisak, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Light stops consistent with the Higgs boson mass of $\\sim126\\,{\\rm GeV}$ are investigated within the framework of minimal supergravity. It is shown that models with light stops which are also consistent with the thermal relic density constraints require stop coannihilation with the neutralino LSP. The analysis shows that the residual set of parameter points with light stops satisfying both the Higgs mass and the relic density constraints lie within a series of thin strips in the $m_0-m_{1/2}$ plane for different values of $A_0/m_0$. Consequently, this region of minimal supergravity parameter space makes a number of very precise predictions. It is found that light stops of mass down to 400~GeV or lower can exist consistent with all constraints. A signal analysis for this class of models at LHC RUN-II is carried out and the dominant signals for their detection identified. Also computed is the minimum integrated luminosity for $5\\sigma$ discovery of the models analyzed. If supersymmetry is realized in this manne...

  8. Supersymmetry, Cosmological Constant and Inflation: Towards a fundamental cosmic picture via "running vacuum"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2015-01-01

    On the occasion of a century from the proposal of General relativity by Einstein, I attempt to tackle some open issues in modern cosmology, via a toy but non-trivial model. Specifically, I would like to link together: (i) the smallness of the cosmological constant today, (ii) the evolution of the universe from an inflationary era after the big-bang till now, and (iii) local supersymmetry in the gravitational sector (supergravity) with a broken spectrum at early eras, by making use of the concept of the "running vacuum" in the context of a simple toy model of four-dimensional N=1 supergravity. The model is characterised by dynamically broken local supersymmetry, induced by the formation of gravitino condensates in the early universe. As I will argue, there is a Starobinsky-type inflationary era characterising the broken supersymmetry phase in this model, which is compatible with the current cosmological data, provided a given constraint is satisfied among some tree-level parameters of the model and the renorma...

  9. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  10. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  11. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  12. Adaptive real-time methodology for optimizing energy-efficient computing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Feng, Wu-Chun

    2013-01-29

    Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is an effective way to reduce energy and power consumption in microprocessor units. Current implementations of DVFS suffer from inaccurate modeling of power requirements and usage, and from inaccurate characterization of the relationships between the applicable variables. A system and method is proposed that adjusts CPU frequency and voltage based on run-time calculations of the workload processing time, as well as a calculation of performance sensitivity with respect to CPU frequency. The system and method are processor independent, and can be applied to either an entire system as a unit, or individually to each process running on a system.

  13. Adaptive real-time methodology for optimizing energy-efficient computing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing (Los Alamos, NM); Feng, Wu-Chun (Blacksburg, VA)

    2011-06-28

    Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is an effective way to reduce energy and power consumption in microprocessor units. Current implementations of DVFS suffer from inaccurate modeling of power requirements and usage, and from inaccurate characterization of the relationships between the applicable variables. A system and method is proposed that adjusts CPU frequency and voltage based on run-time calculations of the workload processing time, as well as a calculation of performance sensitivity with respect to CPU frequency. The system and method are processor independent, and can be applied to either an entire system as a unit, or individually to each process running on a system.

  14. Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 1 Running Head: SCANNING OF SCENES IN AUTISM AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 1 Running Head: SCANNING OF SCENES IN AUTISM AND SCHIZOPHRENIA Orienting to Social Stimuli Differentiates Social Cognitive Impairment in Autism and Schizophrenia: (919) 966-7080 #12;Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 2 Abstract Context. Both autism

  15. Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    1 Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 2 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3 4 Seth H. Petersona , Max A. Moritzb , Marco E. Moraisc , Philip E for Fire Research & Outreach, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, & Management,10 UC Berkeley, CA

  16. High-performance computing centres use a great deal of electricity. In order to run its new com-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - puter centre in Lugano as energy-efficiently and cost-effectively as possible, CSCS is using the na to be used. On the contrary, the plan is to use the energy generated as it falls to produce electricityHigh-performance computing centres use a great deal of electricity. In order to run its new com

  17. Running head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis: A framework to simultaneously analyze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Herv

    : A framework to simultaneously analyze behavioral and genetic data Derek Beaton* School of Behavioral and BrainRunning head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis Sciences The University of Texas at Dallas MS: GR4.1 800 West Campbell Rd. Richardson, TX 75080 USA Joseph

  18. Shadow: Running Tor in a Box for Accurate and Efficient Experimentation U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadow: Running Tor in a Box for Accurate and Efficient Experimentation Rob Jansen U.S. Naval@cs.umn.edu Abstract Tor is a large and popular overlay network providing both anonymity to its users and a platform Tor experimentation tech- niques are limited in scale, are inaccurate, or create results

  19. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 65 (2004) 557577 Parallel runs of a large air pollution model on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 65 (2004) 557577 Parallel runs of a large air pollution 20 January 2004; accepted 21 January 2004 Abstract Large-scale air pollution models can successfully. The mathematical description of a large-scale air pollution model will be discussed in this paper. The principles

  20. RUNNING HEAD: THE FOSSIL CALIBRATION DATABASE Title: The Fossil Calibration Database, A New Resource for Divergence Dating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    1 RUNNING HEAD: THE FOSSIL CALIBRATION DATABASE Title: The Fossil Calibration Database, A New Street NW, Washington, DC, 20059, USA; 19 Centre of Evolutionary and Ecological Studies, Marine Evolution continually lest they become obsolete. Here, we announce the Fossil Calibration Database (http