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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Wood Products and Equipment Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Wood Products and Equipment Codes Louisiana contains NAICS codes and associated SIC codes for wood products and wood products equipment manufacturers, lathes, and routers to shape wood. NAICS SIC Corresponding Index Entries 321912 2426 Blanks, wood (e

2

Production of Synthetic Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Society of Chemical Industry. It has long been the desire of chemists to synthesise rubber by a method which would permit of cheap ... by a method which would permit of cheap production on a large scale, and very many attempts have been made to do this. ...

1912-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 1999 synthetic rubber capacity by type is presented in Table 18.1, and Table 18.2 lists the rubber consumption forecast by type for 2000. Table 18.1 Synthetic Rubber Production by Type—1999 Type

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Monomers for Synthetic Rubber Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to describe briefly industrial processes for the manufacture of the more common of the olefinic monomers which are used in the production of synthetic rubbers. Some indication of th...

D. C. Blackley B.Sc.; Ph.D.; F.P.R.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Synthetic Rubber Production in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... called the Polymer Corporation, Ltd., with headquarters in Toronto, which will undertake the production in Canada of synthetic ... in Canada of synthetic rubber of the Buna type. According to the Ottawa correspondent of The Times, Mr. ...

1942-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production process starts with the trees. Over the ... of growth before a tree is ready for rubber recovery. Peak rubber production is reached at 12–15 years of...

D. F. Graves

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Functionalized lignin, rubber containing functionalized lignin and products containing such rubber composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to functionalized lignin, rubber compositions which contain functionalized lignin and to products which have at least one component comprised of such rubber composition.

Benko, David Andrew; Hahn, Bruce Raymond; Cohen, Martin Paul; Dirk, Shawn Matthew; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Production of Rubber in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... basin it is possible to cultivate plants from which a secretion having the characteristics of rubber has been extracted. This question attained great importance after the occupation of the Ukraine ... of koksagyz, a dandelion-like plant, from which it is claimed that fairly satisfactory rubber could be obtained ; the percentage of ...

1943-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Possibilities of Production and Use of Rubber-Bitumen Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Procedures are discussed for production of rubber-bitumen compounds based on spent rubber items. A possibility of using these binders...

D. G. Shunin; A. G. Filippova; N. A. Okhotina…

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Mutual changes in bitumen and rubber related to the production of asphalt rubber binders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphalt rubber (AR) mixtures are currently a material with an increasing use in road pavements due to their improved performance and environmental benefit of recycling rubber from used tires. AR binders have been widely applied, but the bitumen and rubber interactions remain poorly understood. The aim of this work is to quantify and correlate the changes in bitumen and rubber during AR binders’ production, in order to characterize the interactions between the AR constituent materials, e.g. residual bitumen and recovered rubber. A good correlation between the rheological and physical changes in the properties of rubber, bitumen and AR binder was observed.

Joana Peralta; Hugo M.R.D. Silva; Loic Hilliou; Ana V. Machado; Jorge Pais; R. Christopher Williams

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Plastics and Rubber Products (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Plastics Sector (NAICS 326) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

12

Bitumen-rubber composite binders for production of asphalt concretes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dissolution of vulcanized rubber in bitumen in the presence of a devulcanizing additive and the formation of bitumen-rubber composites, which are promising binders for the production of asphalt concretes, wer...

R. G. Zhitov; V. N. Kizhnyaev; V. V. Alekseenko…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Lanxess opens new rubber-production line at Dormagen facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

German speciality chemicals company Lanxess Deutschland GmbH, a major producer of synthetic rubber, has completed the expansion of its Baypren polychloroprene solid rubber production operations in Dormagen, Germany.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Use of rubber crumb in the production of building ceramic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prospects for using rubber crumb, obtained by processing automobile tires, in the production of building ceramic are examined. It is ... and preliminary statistical calculations that the addition of rubber cr...

O. A. Kizinievich; V. G. Kizinievich; D. R. Zabulenis

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Recycling, production and use of reprocessed rubbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the various methods used to produce recycled rubber and to compare their characteristics and application. The topics discussed include reclaiming by chemical digestion, devulcanization by the severing of sulfur bonds, ambient temperature and cryogenically ground rubber, processing and mixing of ground rubber, and properties of reclaimed rubbers by reclamation method.

Klingensmith, B. (Akron Rubber Consulting, OH (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Adoption of Smallholder Rubber Production by Shifting Cultivators in Northern Laos: A Village Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rubber smallholdings are being established by shifting cultivators ... particular, from shifting cultivation to tree crop production. This study examines the economics of smallholder rubber production in an estab...

Vongpaphane Manivong; R. A. Cramb

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Research of Fine Control Technology About the Tire Rubber Production Line Auxiliary Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smelting auxiliary machine is an equipment which provide rubber matrix for tire rubber production. This paper describes a technology which’s ... powder state materials weighing automatic device on tire rubber production

Jin Chen; Rong-rong Zhang; Mao-lin Ji…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development, Production and Implementation of Low Cost Rubber Bearings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations and the results discussed in this chapter are related to development, production and implementation of low cost rubber isolators. In addition to production of isolators, one of the main objecti...

Mihail Garevski

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Production of Synthetic Rubber in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE scarcity of rubber is being felt more and more in Sweden. While through a rapid perfection and ... the motor fuel problem has been relatively satisfactorily solved, it is now the shortage of rubber and lubricants that is the great cause for anxiety and which has made necessary the ...

1942-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Silicone rubber membrane bioreactors for bacterial cellulose production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulose production byAcetobacter pasteurianus...was investigated in static culture using four bioreactors with silicone rubber membrane submerged in the medium. The shape ... , flat sack, tube and cylindrical b...

Masayuki Onodera; Ikuro Harashima; Kiyoshi Toda…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technical developments in natural rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing importance of natural rubber is shown by the fact that 600,000 long tons are imported into the United States annually. Considerable increases in yield resulted from direct field experiments, and...

C. E. Rhines

22

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving...

23

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

24

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; " " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

25

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3. Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of...

26

Production of rubber pads by tyre recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tyre recycling is a social problem but it may be a profitable operation if valid industrial applications would be experimented. In this study, the authors suggest that the combination of powder comminution and compression moulding of powders is an efficient solution to produce large rubber pads with good mechanical properties. An experimental approach is reported to design a 'direct powder moulding' (in absence of virgin rubber or linking agent). Small samples were moulded in stainless steel moulds to evaluate the mechanical performances. Good results were obtained even if medium size particles are directly moulded, whereas the existing scientific contributions only deal with fine particles. Large pads were moulded in an aluminium mould to reduce cycle time. Due to the technical limits, the moulding pressure was reduced and this occurrence limited the final performances of the rubber pad. Nevertheless, the final properties are high enough to allow structural and functional applications.

Alessandro Guglielmotti; Carmine Lucignano; Fabrizio Quadrini

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

First Stand-by Rubber Plant Back in Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First Stand-by Rubber Plant Back in Production ... The first reactor was charged Oct. 12, and baled and dried GR-S was produced three days later-an elapsed time of 95 days between notification date and first production. ...

1950-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recovery and evaluation of the solid products produced by thermocatalytic decomposition of tire rubber compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermal catalytic decomposition process has been developed to recycle used tire rubber. This process enables the recovery of useful products, such as hydrocarbons and carbon blacks. During the catalytic decomposition process, the tire rubber...

Liang, Lan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rheological changes in the bitumen caused by heating and interaction with rubber during asphalt–rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The demand for more safe and durable roads, combined with the need to preserve the environment, led to the production and application of asphalt–rubber (AR) on roads. Nevertheless, this ... among the phenomena th...

Joana Peralta; Loic Hilliou; Hugo M. R. D. Silva; Ana V. Machado…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NAICS Search | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NAICS Search NAICS Search NAICS Search The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying businesses. 10000 21000 22000 23000 31000 32000 33000 42000 44000 45000 48000 49000 51000 53000 54000 56000 61000 62000 81000 92000 NAICS uses six-digit codes at the most detailed level, with the first two digits representing the largest business sector, the third designating a subsector, the fourth designating the industry group, and the fifth showing the particular industry. Use the documents below, which are labeled by series, to see Department of Energy facilities that have historically procured goods/services in that

31

Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber.

Romine, Robert A. (Pasco, WA); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. (Benton City, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber. 8 figs.

Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Resource-based industrialization in Peninsular Malaysia. A case study of the rubber products manufacturing industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This economic history and examination of the rubber products manufacturing industry in Peninsular Malaysia contributes to the subject of resource-based industrialization in the field of… (more)

Goldthorpe, Christopher C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Use of Waste Materials from the Production of Synthetic Rubber for Preparing Aluminosilicate Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An aluminum-silicon-chromium powder (ASC) extracted from waste gases in synthetic rubber production is used as an addition to kaolin-...

V. N. Antsiferov; T. S. Golodnova; S. E. Porozova…

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NAICS Codes Description:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Codes Codes Description: Filters: Date Signed only show values between '10/01/2006' and '09/30/2007', Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001') Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Actions Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 251 $164,546,671 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 236 $52,396,806 514210 DATA PROCESSING SERVICES 195 $28,941,727 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 190 $6,460,652 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 165 $33,006,079 163 $11,515,387 541690 OTHER SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL CONSULTING SERVICES 92 $40,527,088 531390 OTHER ACTIVITIES RELATED TO REAL ESTATE 79 -$659,654 337214 OFFICE FURNITURE (EXCEPT WOOD) MANUFACTURING 78 $1,651,732

36

Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): In Vitro Production of Haploids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rubber is one of the main raw materials for industry and has many uses in traffic, industry, national defence etc. The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) has been cultivated for only 100 years. Its c...

Zhenghua Chen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Relationship of morphological variables to rubber production in guayule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to find measurable characters to aid the plant breeder in predicting both rubber percentage and rubber yield of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray). A field of 234 guayule breedin...

D. A. Dierig; A. E. Thompson; D. T. Ray

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rubber-The Primary Sources For American Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite extensive war-time investigations of other rubber-containing latex plants, the Pará rubber tree of Brazil remains, by any measure, the world's foremost source, and only guayule and the Russian dandelio...

W. Gordon Whaley

39

Financial potential of rubber plantations considering rubberwood production: Wood and crop production nexus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globalization and urbanization have significantly increased the food and non-food commodity demand for the last century, and it is vital to consider a business strategy with economical and ecological sustainability. The objective of this study was to project the contribution of wood to the financial performance of rubber plantations. We adopted cost and revenue data of rubber plantations in Cambodia and utilized land expectation value (LEV) as the criterion for profitability analysis. Among the top-ten rubber-producing countries in pan-tropics, the areas of rubber plantation were equivalent to from 1% to 90% of forest plantations and 0.3%–10.2% of total forest areas. Rubberwood revenue accounts for about 4%–10% of the 30th year LEV in rubber plantations at discount rates of 2% y?1–10% y?1, and this was sufficient to cover the cost of re-establishing the plantations. The proportion of the 30th year LEV contributed by wood revenue increased under conditions normally associated with a more difficult business environment, i.e., at higher wage costs, and lower latex revenue. We found that the wood revenue can improve the profitability of rubber plantations by up to 40% depending on the price of the rubberwood. We assert that timber from wood producing commodity plantations should be encouragingly utilized as industrial timber by linking the wood production in the management strategy of the plantations.

Akira Shigematsu; Nobuya Mizoue; Khun Kakada; Pheng Muthavy; Tsuyoshi Kajisa; Shigejiro Yoshida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Trial Production of Condoms from Irradiated Natural Rubber Latex on a Factory Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRIAL PRODUCTION OF CONDOM FROM IRRADIATED NATURAL RUBBER LATEX IN FACTORY SCALE: Irradiation of latex...60Co at 20 kGy in the presence of 1 phr (part hundred ratio of rubber) of normal bu til acrylate (nBA)...4....

Marga Utama

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Trial Production of Examination Gloves from Irradiated Natural Rubber Latex on a Factory Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRIAL PRODUCTION OF EXAMINATION GLOVES FROM IRRADIATED NATURAL RUBBER LATEX IN FACTORY SCALE: The production of irradiated latex by gamma rays from60...Co at 20 kGy dose in the presence of 1 phr (part hundred rat...

Marga Utama

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Production of Tensile Shock Waves in Stretched Natural Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... expected for propagation of finite tensile pulses travelling along bands of highly stretched vulcanized natural rubber, because in this region the material becomes increasingly stiff with increasing tensile strain3. Lee ... , however, although Mason5 describes evidence of a similar phenomenon for the retraction of stretched rubber, but in this case the pulse must be considered as compressional.

H. KOLSKY

1969-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Production and Manipulation of India-Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN this work the author gives a description of the various stages through which india-rubber passes from the time when it oozes, out of the tree until it leaves ... the general reader. It does not, except incidentally, deal with the chemistry of india-rubber, nor with the minute details of manufacture; the volume is neither a laboratory guide ...

C. SIMMONDS

1908-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > Industrial > Manufacturing > Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of the United States, Canada, and Mexico Featured topics are: What is NAICS? Why replace the SIC system? How is NAICS better than SIC? How can data series be adjusted from SIC to NAICS? How is NAICS structured? Is there a source for more information about NAICS? What is NAICS? A new classification system has arrived for manufacturing establishments, and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has incorporated this new

45

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel...

46

Development of Eco-efficiency Indicators for Rubber Glove Product by Material Flow Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rubber glove product Thailand shows the trend of higher growth. Currently, the average export value of rubber glove product is 826.72 US$/year. Thus, the development guideline of this product for Thailand should be concerned. However, rubber glove process caused the environmental and human impacts. Hence, the eco-efficiency concept of rubber glove product was interested. Initial important step of eco-efficiency concept was indicator development. Therefore, this research developed the eco efficiency indicators including economic and environmental indicators of rubber glove product based on the eco-efficiency theory and material flow analysis. The result showed that economic indicators consisted of quantity product and net sale and environmental indicators consisted of material consumption, energy consumption, water consumption, wastewater production, solid waste production, greenhouse gas emission, were selected to eco-efficiency indicators based on eco-efficiency theory and material flow analysis. These eco-efficiency indicators would help to discover more economic and effective ways to improve productivity process and to enhance recyclability or reducing energy and material intensity.

Cheerawit Rattanapan; Thunwadee Tachapattaworakul Suksaroj; Weerawat Ounsaneha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected rubber and plastic consumer products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the thermal oxidation or pyrolysis of the various chemical species present in the rubber product may remain in the ash once the material has burned, or be given off as smoke particulates or gases during incineration. The partitioning of contaminants... airborne or ash phase) when selected plastics or rubberized materials undergo controlled combustion. The results are indicative of what can occur in municipal incinerators or as a result of residential or industrial Ares or the intentional burning...

Caraballo, Simon A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Forums How important are NAICS and PSC to wining federal contracts? Submitted by Gregory James on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 12:39pm Log in to vote 3 Small business owners can improve their ability to get federal contracts if they understand the nature and use of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and Product and Service Codes. The purposes of these codes are to collect, analyze and publish statistical data on economic activity in the United States, Mexico and Canada. The Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) uses these codes to track federal procurement historyNAICS is a two through six-digit hierarchical

49

Velocimeter for quality control monitoring in rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A velocimeter was designed for longitudinal sound?speed measurements on 3?mm?thick (ASTM) rubber samples. Batch?to?batch variations in sound speed are detected to 0.1% precision by operators without technical experience. Each measurement required five minutes with the prototype device and substantial reductions are expected with minor design modifications. The device consists of two ultrasonic transducers with a rubber sample sandwiched between them. During device assembly the sample is squeezed by the transducers such that a known and reproducible transducer?transducer separation distance is obtained. A 5?MHz cw signal is then applied to one transducer. The phase angle difference of the signal received by the other transducer is read on a meter face and is related to the wave speed in the rubber. By performing a detailed theoretical analysis of this geometry we are able to meaningfully compensate the value of the meter reading for variations in temperature thickness (related to the degree of sample squeezing used) and sound absorption and also use the device for absolute sound speed and attenuation measurements.

R. D. Corsaro; J. Jarzynski; L. Burns; W. B. Moniz

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

NSF Astronomy Senior Review Recommendations for NAIC: NAIC Statement and Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NSF Astronomy Senior Review Recommendations for NAIC: NAIC Statement and Implementation Plan for NAIC. These are: 1. Reduce NSF astronomy division support for Arecibo to $8M over the next 3 years; 2. Schedule the survey programs for 80% of the time used for astronomy on the telescope through 2010; 3

51

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

establishments using the North American" "Industry Classification System (NAICS). " " (b) Employment Size categories were supplied by the" "Bureau of the Census." " NFNo...

52

" Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

53

" Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

54

Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Product formulations using recycled tire crumb rubber. Final report/project accomplishments summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to combine crumb rubber and synthetic fiber obtained from scrap tires with thermoplastic polymers and convert these materials into commercially useful, high-value products. A specific goal was to use these materials for roofing, while remaining cognizance of other potential applications.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Rhizopus oligosporus grown on natural rubber waste serum for production of single cell protein: a preliminary study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maximum production of mycelium and utilization of total organic...R. oligosporus grown on natural rubber waste serum was achieved at 28°C ... initial pH of 4.0. The maximum production of total crude protein, howe...

M. S. Mahat; I. C. MacRae

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Trade-offs between rubber production and maintenance of diversity: the structure of rubber gardens in West Kalimantan, Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to assess the potential of small-holder rubber cultivation in agroforestry gardens to fulfill simultaneously the goals of conservation and sustainable rural development. I examined t...

D. C. Lawrence

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13312 13312 Textile and Fabric Finishing (except Broadwoven Fabric) Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314991 Rope, Cordage, and Twine Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 314999 All Other Miscellaneous Textile Product Mills EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov

59

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31112 31112 Electrometallurgical Ferroalloy Product Manufacturing EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 331210 Iron and Steel Pipe and Tube Manufacturing from Purchased Steel EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 331221 Rolled Steel Shape Manufacturing

60

Water Content Determination of Rubber Stoppers Utilized for Sealing Lyophilized Pharmaceutical Products: Assessment of Two Karl Fischer Titration Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to factors such as the storage environment and the drug's container/closure system, typically a vial, stopper, and cap. The water present in the rubber stopper may interact with the vial contents, potentially influencing the drug product's stability...

Voth, Laura Marie

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Land tenure and farm management efficiency: The case of smallholder rubber production in customary land areas of Sumatra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of land tenure institutions on the efficiency of farm management based on a case study of rubber production in customary land areas of Sumatra, Indonesia ... rates of return to tree...

S. Suyanto; T. P. Tomich; K. Otsuka

62

Pitfalls in assessment of progesterone production by granulosa cells cultured in contact with silicone rubber or paraffin oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To test the possibility that some substances may be released out of the silicone rubber into medium which inhibit the progesterone production of the granulosa-lutein cells, the cells... n=3), indicating that no i...

Jochen Reinsberg; Dietlind Ackermann…

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Specific biogas production and role of packing medium in the treatment of rubber thread manufacturing industry wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wastewater from three rubber thread manufacturing industries collected from three different...4.../g?COD added when the organic loading rate was altered from 2.0 to 14.0?g?COD/l/d respectively. The biogas production

P. Agamuthu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

65

Empirical Analysis on the Economies of Scale of Natural Rubber Production: Based on the Panel Data of 86 Rubber Farms of HSF Between 1998 and 2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the panel data of 86 rubber farms of HSF (Hainan State Farm) between 1998 and 2007, the number of rubber trees being tapped and annual output of ... non-linear regression was applied to analyze natural rubber

Nengrui Xu; Na Qi; Junli Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biodegradation of rubber particles in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biodegradation of rubber particles in rubber-soil mixtures at different rubber contents was monitored by the carbon dioxide production. The cumulative carbon dioxide production was modelled according to a two...

Guus T. G. Keursten; Pieter H. Groenevelt

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

68

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

69

Multi-exposure imaging for measurements in rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, the application of high dynamic range and exposure fusion techniques to image-based measurement systems is described. The advantages of such techniques are discussed, and their performances are compared to the original high-contrast images and between them. Results will show the improvements of measurement reliability achieved with the technique presented in the case of length measurements of industrial products characterized by different surface reflectance.

M Bevilacqua; G Di Leo; M Landi; A Paolillo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Continuous production of liquid reclaimed rubber from ground tire rubber and its application as reactive polymeric plasticizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Liquid reclaimed rubber (LRR) was produced from ground tire rubber (GTR) in a continuous operation by using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. The effects of reclaiming recipe, screw configuration combination, barrel temperature, and screw speed on the degree of reclamation were investigated. Through the adjustment of these conditions, an LRR with a sol fraction of 73.5% was obtained. Characterizations of the LRR by gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and re-vulcanized ability tests showed that the LRR had unique properties – low viscosity, good compatibility with natural rubber (NR), and re-vulcanized ability. Because of these properties of LRR, it was used as reactive polymeric plasticizer in NR to replace the conventional oils such as the environmental aromatic oil (EAO) used in this study. The plasticizing effect, acetone extraction, mechanical properties, and thermostability of the LRR/NR compounds were investigated and compared with those of EAO/NR compounds. The results show that the plasticizing efficiency of LRR is somehow lower than that of EAO. In addition, the LRR-plasticized NR has higher tensile strength, modulus at 100% and 300% elongation, hardness, extraction resistance, and thermostability than EAO-plasticized NR.

Jinwei Shi; Hua Zou; Linlin Ding; Xiaolin Li; Kuan Jiang; Tung Chen; Xiaodan Zhang; Liqun Zhang; Dongyun Ren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Rubber smallholders' flexibility No windfall, no crisis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breakthrough, the production of new, highly productive clonal material. With regard to rubber, the adoption access to highly productive clonal material rubber in 1996. This percentage was achieved, first rubber with limited productivity. How may krismon influence these `jungle rubber' and `clonal' farming

Boyer, Edmond

72

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

73

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

74

MECS 2006- Forest Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

75

Comparison Study of Rubber Seed Shell and Kernel (Hevea Brasiliensis) as Raw Material for Bio-oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study focuses on characterization of two biomass samples namely rubber seed shell (RSS) and rubber seed kernel (RSK), as raw materials for the production of biofuel. The biomass samples were collected from Kedah, Malaysia and examined for their physical and chemical characteristics as well as to determine proximate compositions, extractives, holocellulose and hemicelluloses content, elemental properties, calorific value, oil yield and pyrolysis. Among the two samples, RSK shows high carbon (64.5 wt%) and volatile matter (92.4 wt%) content. The calorific values of all the biomasses were found within the range of 23 MJ/kg to 27 MJ/kg. This study also supports the production of biofuel from rubber seed as a viable alternative to other conventional fuel.

S.N.A.M. Hassan; M.A.M. Ishak; K. Ismail; S.N. Ali; M.F. Yusop

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermocatalytic decomposition of vulcanized rubber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and natural rubber. The liquid product yields of SBR and natural rubber consistently represented 20 to 30% of the original feedstock by weight. Generally, approximately 1 to 3% of the feedstock was converted to naphtha, while the remainder was liquefied...

Qin, Feng

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

" Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Assistance;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States"

78

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Search Tool The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the purpose of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy. NAICS was developed under the auspices of the Office of Management and Budget, and adopted in 1997 to replace the Standard Industrial Classification system. Through our website, you can search for procurement opportunities using your company's NAICS code, and you can learn more about the history of purchasing for your NAICS code at the Department. Visit our Industry Information page to learn more about our procurements by

79

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" 2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat"," ",," "

80

Production and characterization of natural rubber–Ca/P blends for biomedical purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study presents the development of natural rubber–Ca/P blends, as promising candidates for biomedical purposes. The specific objective was the incorporation of Ca/P into a natural rubber polymeric matrix. Ca/P crystalline phases were synthesized by the sol–gel method and the polymeric matrices were produced using natural rubber extracted from latex of the Hevea brasiliensis. The shape and size of natural rubber particles present in the NR membrane, as well as, the way the Ca/P powder grains aggregate in the polymeric matrix were investigated, giving information about the interactions between the Ca/P and the natural rubber particles. Confocal fluorescence scanning microscopy measurements allowed us to propose a structure where the Ca/P grains are surrounded by natural rubber particles. This structure may mediate Ca2 + release for tissue regeneration. The system investigated may open new horizons for development of a bandage which provides the controlled-release of biomaterials.

R.M. Nascimento; F.L. Faita; D.L.S. Agostini; A.E. Job; F.E.G. Guimarães; I.H. Bechtold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Large-scale altitudinal gradient of natural rubber production in Vietnam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of elevation dependence of latex productivity of natural rubber (NR, Hevea brasiliensis Mull. Arg.) plantations and determination of elevation thresholds for landuse management are an urgent need of study. The current study was, therefore, conducted, aiming to investigate attitudinal gradient of NR production in Vietnam. The study was based on 146,000 ha of harvested NR plantations located from the southeast region to highland. There were 45 NR clones planted in the areas studied and GT1, the clone planted with a largest portion, was examined separately from the other 44 clones, combined in processing (the Rest). Three main variables, latex productivity, individual yield and tapping density were calculated for two tapping periods, from year 1 to 10 (1–10) and from year 11 to 20 (11–20). Over the investigated elevation range, 15–738 m, the latex productivity declined at different rates, 109 for GT1 (1–10), 127 for GT1 (11–20), 110 for the Rest (1–10) and 117 kg ha?1 year?1 for the Rest (11–20) for every 100-m increase in elevation. An S-like curve, obtained by fitting latex productivity along the altitudinal gradient using 3-order polynomial could be separated into three stages, of which the first and the last stages were characterized with a rapid drop of, and the middle was with a stability of, latex productivity. With a rise in elevation, tapping density (tapped tree ha?1) and individual yield (kg tree?1 year?1) significantly declined. As tapping density increased, individual yield declined whereas latex productivity rose. The results indicated that not all lands are suitable for a good NR production and that only areas with elevation under a certain magnitude depending on individual NR clones should be considered for NR cultivation. The altitudinal gradient of NR production could involve a number of soil and climatic variables, which need to be further investigated.

Binh Thanh Nguyen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

"NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1.3,1.7,"--","--","--","--","--","--" ," Energy Audit or Assessment",0.7,2.6,3.9,4.9,6.3,16.5,12.3,6.8

83

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

84

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

85

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

86

Use of a warm mix asphalt additive to reduce the production temperatures and to improve the performance of asphalt rubber mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphalt rubber mixtures are often described as environmentally friendly mixtures due to the incorporation of recycled rubber from used tires and due to their improved service life. In fact, their fatigue cracking and rut resistance properties are better than those of conventional asphalt concrete mixtures. However, asphalt rubber mixtures demand higher production temperatures than conventional mixtures due to the higher viscosity of the asphalt rubber binder. The objective of this paper is to assess the efficiency of using a surfactant based additive in the production of warm mix asphalts, by lowering the mixing temperatures of asphalt rubber and asphalt concrete mixtures without changing their performance. Several laboratory tests were carried out on asphalt rubber and asphalt concrete mixtures, with and without the additive, in order to evaluate and compare the performance of the mixtures. It was concluded that the incorporation of small amounts of a surfactant based additive allowed reducing the production temperatures of both types of mixture by 30 °C without compromising their performance, and this can be seen as a great step forward towards the production of cleaner asphalt rubber mixtures.

Joel R.M. Oliveira; Hugo M.R.D. Silva; Liliana P.F. Abreu; Sara R.M. Fernandes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

NAICS Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Codes @ Headquarters Codes @ Headquarters Description: NAICS Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services Filters: Signed Date only show values between , Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001'), Date Signed only show values between '05/01/2011' and '04/30/2012', Last Modified Date only show values between Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 NAICS Code NAICS Description Action Obligation 541519 OTHER COMPUTER RELATED SERVICES 341 $141,587,250.76 531210 OFFICES OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS 286 $2,204,687.38 541330 ENGINEERING SERVICES 245 $80,827,391.54 611430 PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT TRAINING 216 -$1,452,480.09 541611 ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES 206 $67,689,373.27 562910 REMEDIATION

88

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

89

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

90

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

91

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

92

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

93

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

94

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

95

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

96

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

97

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

98

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

99

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

100

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

102

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

103

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

104

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

105

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment...

106

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

107

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

108

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit:...

109

Climate and natural production of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) in Xishuangbanna, southern part of Yunnan province, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the author's and his collaborators' investigations, the climate influences the growth of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) in Xishuangbanna, the southern part of Yunnan Province, China, in at least f...

Ailiang Jiang

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Management strategies for Indonesian rubber production under yield and price uncertainty: a bioeconomic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simplified version of the BEAM Rubber Agroforestry Model is embedded in a dynamic economic model to examine the impact of uncertainty about prices and climate on decision variables. Solutions, in terms of op...

R. Purnamasari; O. Cacho; P. Simmons

111

A life cycle assessment case study of ground rubber production from scrap tires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The number of scrap tires generated in China has grown dramatically every year. Generation of ground rubber from scrap tires is the dominant management ... necessary to assess the environmental impacts of ground

Wei Li; Qiaoli Wang; Jiajia Jin; Sujing Li

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Rubber production of salt-stressed guayule at various plant populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hypothesis that increasing the plant population of guayule (Parthenium argentatum...) to compensate for the reduced plant canopy size caused by soil salinity coupled with an anticipated enchancement of rubber

G. J. Hoffman; M. C. Shannon; E. V. Maas; L. Grass

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

114

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

115

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

116

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

117

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

118

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

119

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

120

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

122

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

123

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

124

Carbon footprint reduction: a critical study of rubber production in small and medium scale enterprises in Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In response to the winds of change world over, as a result of rapid advance in science and technology, it has strengthened the Small and Medium Scale Enterprises (SMEs) to exert themselves as engines of their economy in the sphere of production as a whole economy as well as increase of production and competition in the market. This situation is augmented as a result of consumer demand. Its impact is such that we discern a rapid increase of population, urbanization, social mobility and transition with vigorous competition. Looking at opportunities to maximize production to satisfy customer needs, \\{SMEs\\} do not consider the factors that affect environment during manufacturing process, selling and distribution and consumption stages. Considering the magnitude of the excessive toxic effect on the bio-sphere and in order to protect the natural environment for the sustenance and conservation of organisms, it is imperative for all the parties concerned to take up responsibility to include carbon footprint mitigating measures during industrial processes. Available literature revealed that different types of systems have been set up to minimize carbon footprint by the industry at both national and international levels, but still there are issues on identifying carbon footprint usage and emission levels along with implementation systems/methodologies introduced. Researchers identified energy consumption being largely associated at the rubber mill and emissions are extraordinarily connected to productivity of kW/H of energy consumption. In order to carry out research goal barriers in implementing energy-efficient carbon footprint minimization measures, responses to one hundred questionnaires were collected from rubber product manufacturing \\{SMEs\\} registered under the Ministry of Industry and Commerce, Sri Lanka. Twenty five unstructured interviews were conducted with relevant professionals in order to ascertain their opinion. There are vital findings in this research — mainly the correlation of factors affecting relationship on minimizing energy efficient carbon footprint effects which will phase-in obliging emphasis on policy makers to rethink their planning. This was proved by using the fishbone model. Major barriers were identified by using content analysis of respondents. In order to identify the CO2 emission level, the researcher examined the calculation model developed from the results to quantify carbon emission level from the three rubber-band manufacturing factories that were selected as case study domains. Case-studies revealed the overall emissions from the production of rubber band amounting to 1.16, 1.53 and 1.23 ton CO2-eq/ton product respectively. These findings could be directly benefited by any country where rubber production is being put into practice; in order to identify factors that would minimize global warming potentials of rubber manufacturing SMEs, by the application of cleaner manufacturing model to achieve sustainable production.

Sampath P. Dayaratne; Kennedy D. Gunawardana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Synthetic Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... acutely sensitive, justifiably, about synthetic rubber. His review of my book in NATURE of December 26, p. 751, is unfair in several respects. Undoubtedly, there are errors in ...

HARRY BARRON

1943-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rubber economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AFTER 74 years of publication, the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and ... of Chemistry and Physics (the 'Rubber' book) appears in every technical library worth its salt, and ...

J. A. D. Matthew

1988-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

Rubber Erasures, Rubber Producing Rights: Making Racialized Territories in West Kalimantan, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as an example. It shows how rubber production gave rise to territorialities associated with and productive and land and their claims to legitimate access or `rightfulness'. Changing rubber production practices) The contentious relationship between rubber and swidden rice production has long caused dilemmas in Borneo

Silver, Whendee

128

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

129

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

130

Impedance?transfer technique for quality control monitoring in rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new acoustic technique is described for monitoring the batch?to?batch consistency of rubberproperties. Previously a velocimeter was described which was suitable for acoustic property determinations at 5 MHz on 3 mm thick 1 cm diameter ASTM rubber samples [Corsaro Jarzynski Burns and Moniz paper A8 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 66 S2 (1979)]. The present device extends this type of measurement to lower frequencies (70 Hz to 20 kHz) and larger sample sizes (typically 2 cm thick and 15 cm in diameter). This impedance?transfer technique involves sandwiching the rubber sample between a shaker table and an upper covering plate each section containing an accelerometer. The output signal of the upper accelerometer is referenced to that of the lower and is used to determine the amplitude loss and phase shift of the vibration due to the presence of the rubber sample. These are shown to correlate well with acoustic properties of the material including previous velocimeter measurements. Further the measurement requires less than 5 min by operators without technical expertise and may use uncut portions of a larger rubber sheet.

R. D. Corsaro; A. Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CHEMICAL INDUCTION OF RUBBER BIOSYNTHESIS IN GUAYULE: AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the mechanism of rubber production and the nature andthe discovery of the rubber production enhancing effects ofrubber biosynthesis in guayule would appear to be the production

Bauer, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

133

Biodiesel Production from Rubber Seed Oil using Activated Cement Clinker as Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the potential of limestone based catalyst for transesterification of high free fatty acid (FFA) rubber seed oil (RSO). Pre-calcinated limestone known as clinker was activated using methanol and transesterification was performed under reflux with constant stirring. Mineral composition of the catalyst was analysed using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) with in build x-ray diffraction (XRD). The rubber seed oil was obtained using both microwave and soxhlet extraction using hexane as solvent. FFA content and fatty acid methyl ester content were determined using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed an efficient conversion (up to 96.9%) of high FFA rubber seed oil to biodiesel. The results suggest that the catalyst employed in this work is not negatively affected by moisture and free fatty acids and can be recycled very easily without significant loss in its activity. The highest conversion of 96.9% was achieved from catalyst activated at 700 °C, with catalyst loading of 5 wt. %; methanol to oil molar ratio of 4:1; reaction temperature of 65 °C and reaction time of 4 hours. The biodiesel produced in this work is within the limits of specification described by American standard test method (ASTM D6751).

Jolius Gimbun; Shahid Ali; Chitra Charan Suri Charan Kanwal; Liyana Amer Shah; Nurul Hidayah Muhamad @ Ghazali; Chin Kui Cheng; Said Nurdin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

135

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

136

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

137

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

138

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

139

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

140

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

142

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

143

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

144

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

145

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

146

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

147

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

148

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

149

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

150

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

151

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

152

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" 3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

153

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

154

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

155

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

156

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

157

Guayule rubber for South Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reported that Agtec together with South Africa's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, is investigating the possibility of large-scale production of guayule. The rubber-yielding shrub grows in semi-arid climates and may be the source of a $35-million natural rubber industry in South Africa.

Not Available

1981-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

159

Environmental stratification to model climate change impacts on biodiversity and rubber production in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis and multi-model approach, based on a statistically derived Global Environmental Stratification (GEnS) and using a downscaled ensemble (n = 63) of CIMP5 Earth System Models applied across four representative concentration pathways (RCP), has been used to project the impact of climate change on spatial distribution of bioclimatic zones and ecosystems within the biodiverse rich Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province, by the year 2050. Four bioclimatic zones and 9 strata were identified, overlaid with protected areas, and associated with on-going landuse change, i.e. a rapid increase in rubber plantation from 8% to 22% of total area between 2002 and 2010. Significant changes in the areal extent and distribution of all zones and strata are projected, with an averaged mean annual temperature increase ranging from 1.6 °C to 2.4 °C. By 2050, there are significant geographical shifts in all identified strata, with an average upward shift of 309 m of elevation for all strata. On average, more than 75% of Xishuangbanna is predicted to shift to a different zone, with 96% shifting to a different stratum. The area conducive to rubber plantations, currently limited by climatic conditions, expands to nearly 75% of the total area. Climatic change potentially removes the bioclimatic barriers to further expansion of rubber plantations within the area and increases pressure on remaining biodiversity both within and outside of protected areas. The analysis provides the basis for understanding potential impacts of changing bioclimatic conditions on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and landuse change trends, within the context of ongoing rapid change and agricultural expansion in the area. Current efforts to conserve forests, biodiversity and traditional landuse systems require an improved understanding of both the projected climatic changes and the responses of biodiversity and traditional agricultural systems to changing conditions.

Robert J. Zomer; Antonio Trabucco; Mingcheng Wang; Rong Lang; Huafang Chen; Marc J. Metzger; Alex Smajgl; Philip Beckschäfer; Jianchu Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Forest Products (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321, 322) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

162

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

163

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

164

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

165

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

166

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

167

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

168

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

169

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

170

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

171

Biochar production from waste rubber-wood-sawdust and its potential use in C sequestration: Chemical and physical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biochars have received increasing attention because of their potential environmental applications such as soil amending and atmospheric C sequestration. In this study, biochar was produced from waste rubber-wood-sawdust. The produced biochars were characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) gas porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Pyrolysis temperature was shown to have a strong influence on both thermal and chemical characteristic of biochar samples. The experimental data shows that the biochar samples can absorb around 5% water by mass (hydrophilic) at lower temperatures (650 °C), biochar samples were thermally stable and became hydrophobic due to the presence of aromatic compounds. Carbon content (over 85%) increased with increasing temperature, and showed an inverse effect to the elemental ratios of H/C and O/C. The very low H/C and O/C ratios obtained for the biochar indicated that carbon in this material is predominantly unsaturated. BET results showed that the sawdust derived biochars have surface areas between 10 and 200 m2 g?1 and FTIR indicated an aromatic functional group about 866 cm?1 in most of the samples. The rate of CO2 adsorption on sawdust derived biochar generally increased with increasing temperature from 450 to 650 °C but then decreased with increase in the production temperature. Derived biochar represents a potential alternative adsorbent for C sequestration.

Wan Azlina Wan Abdul Karim Ghani; Ayaz Mohd; Gabriel da Silva; Robert T. Bachmann; Yun H. Taufiq-Yap; Umer Rashid; Ala’a H. Al-Muhtaseb

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Oil Natural Gas million kWh NAICS Residual Fuel OilNAICS Iron and Steel Mills Steel Products from Purchased Steel Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil Natural GasNAICS Industry Other Shipments of Energy Sources Produced Onsite Total Electricity Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil Natural Gas

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

submitted to International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, JOSE, 1998 Title: Adaptive Process Control in Rubber Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in more detail for a concrete type of production: the rubber industry. 1.1 A rubber industry production not only on the often very dull and dusty rubber and tire production rooms where the products are ,,baked parameters (in our case: the unknown best shape of the extrusion metal mask) for an acceptable rubber product

Brause, R.

174

The potential for increasing rubber production by matching tapping intensity to leaf area index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding resource capture can help design appropriate species combinations, planting designs and management. Leaf area index (LAI) and its longevity are the most important factors defining dry matter production

Ciro Abbud Righi; Marcos Silveira Bernardes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Experimental plant for production of synthetic triplex-polymerized ethylene-propylene rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental plant with an output of 500 kg/day, which is intended for the formulation of process production regimes, and the running times of experimental ... various grades of synthetic triple-polymerized et...

V. I. Peretyatko; V. P. Pogrebtsov; V. A. Shepelin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

177

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

178

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

179

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134

180

Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 51.17 49.59 50.96 50.35 50.94 -1.2 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 111.56 115.95 113.47 113.49 117.55 -3.5 313 Textile Mills 115.95 118.96 127.41 117.40 128.07 -8.3 315 Apparel Manufacturing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3b. Value of Production a by Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2006 > Table 3b and 2006 > Table 3b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 429 456 539 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 103 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 31 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 152 171 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 95 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 136 218 551 325 Chemical Manufacturing 419 452 662 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 172 212

182

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 432 459 487 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 116 110 115 313 Textile Mills 55 52 42 314 Textile Product Mills 32 34 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 67 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 88 95 98 322 Paper Manufacturing 172 163 160 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 107 106 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 221 241 254 325 Chemical Manufacturing 437 468 510 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 181 175

183

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mines or wells." "During manufacturing processes, it is possible that the thermal energy content of" "an energy input is not completely consumed for the production of...

184

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to other energy products" "(e.g., crude oil converted to residual and distillate fuel oils) are excluded." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less...

185

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"to other energy products (e.g., crude oil converted to residual and distillate" "fuel oils) are excluded." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less...

186

Using RBF-Nets in Rubber Industry Process Control U. Pietruschka, R. Brause  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a rubber profile used in tyre production. After introducing the problem, we describe the RBF net algorithm dull and dusty rubber and tyre production rooms where the products are ,,baked" by heat and steam for our ex- ample of tyre profile production. Fig. 1 The tire rubber profile extrusion The task of process

Brause, R.

187

Forecasting the price of natural rubber in Malaysia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The high volatility of the price of natural rubber (NR) posts a significant risk to producers, traders, consumers, and others involved in the production of… (more)

In, Sakan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Review of the Impacts of Crumb Rubber in Artificial Turf Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rubber fields, for it is well-known that lead is used in tire production.production processes, it seems safe to conclude that given judicious selection of crumb rubber

Simon, Rachel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

190

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

191

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

192

Part 2, Chapter 2 From shifting agriculture to sustainable rubber agroforestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production, other farmers became aware of the possibility of growing rubber in a very extensive way agroforestry system (CAF) called 'jungle rubber". Productivity was sufficient to produce a very attractive and rehabilitation of degraded lands. Alongside their rubber production, farmers continued to slash and burn new

Boyer, Edmond

193

When Madagascar produced natural rubber: a brief, forgotten yet informative history.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Madagascar, like other western African countries, was a production zone for forest rubber destined for export to a revitalisation of the Malagasy rubber sector as Asian production was mainly out of reach. A second consequence, the worlds natural rubber was produced entirely through collections from wild plants. The commercial product

Boyer, Edmond

194

A Comprehensive Decision Approach for Rubber Tree Planting Management in Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rubber tapping, cumulative production during 15 years, cumulative production between 15 and 25 years (Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia) where natural rubber production takes place with more than 92% of the world1 A Comprehensive Decision Approach for Rubber Tree Planting Management in Africa (Revised Version

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Settling of rubber particles in asphalt-rubber blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional asphalt-rubber binders have faced problems ics. in pavement compaction, due to phase separation or sedimentation of undissolved rubber. A homogeneous asphalt-rubber binder is desirable for alleviating this problem. In addition, a blend...

Wattanachai, Piyachat

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hyundai plans rubber unit despite overcapacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the oversupply of synthetic rubber in South Korea, the government has granted approval to Hyundai Petrochemical (Seoul) to build the country's second synthetic rubber unit, to be located alongside its petrochemical complex at Daesan. The plant is due for startup during second-half 1995, when the local market is expected to be in better balance. Hyundai will use Goodyear Tire Rubber technology for the plant, which will have annual capacities for 40,000 m.t. of polybutadiene rubber (BR), 30,000 m.t. of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and 12,000 m.t. of nitrile rubber (NBR). Styrene and butadiene requirements will be met from Hyundai's own production at Daesan. The current local producer of synthetic rubber is Korea Kumho Petrochemicals (Seoul), which has annual capacities for 150,000 m.t. of SBR, 95,000 m.t. of BR, and 10,000 m.t. of NBR. Korean SBR demand is about 141,000 m.t./year but is expected to increase to 161,000 m.t./year by 1996 and reach 194,000 m.t./year by the end of the decade.

Hyoungjin Kim

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United...

198

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

199

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

200

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

202

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

203

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

204

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

205

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

206

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

207

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ",,," Source of Financial Support for Activity",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Other","Don't Know","Factors"

208

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

209

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

210

Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Study on Production Process of Biodiesel from Rubber Seed (Hevea Brasiliensis) by in Situ (Trans)Esterification Method with Acid Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel is fatty acid methyl or ethyl esters made from vegetable oils (edible and non edible) or animal fats. The objective of this research was to produce biodiesel from rubber seed by in situ method with acid catalyst with a goal for obtaining environmentally friendly alternative fuels from non edible raw material. This research focuses on influence of reaction time, concentration of acid catalyst and ratio raw material to methanol. The first stage was carried out in order to get reaction time based on the density and viscosity of mixture produced. In this process H2SO4 0.5% (v/v) was used as catalyst and ratio of raw material to methanol (1:2). The experiments were conducted by investigating the catalyst concentration in range 0.1-1%(v/v) and ratio of raw material to methanol in range 1:1.5-1:3. The research method included, the preparation of samples, biodiesel production, biodiesel separation, and biodiesel characterization i.e density, viscosity, GC analysis, acid value and Iodine number. The results shows that the operation time for biodiesel production by in situ method with acid catalyst was 120 minutes and the yield of Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) obtained was at 91,05%.

Widayat; Agam Duma Kalista Wibowo; Hadiyanto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Processing-Morphology-Property Relationships and Composite Theory Analysis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/Natural Rubber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-8 latex mixing could provide an effective means for production of graphene/rubber nanocomposites. Latex Oxide/Natural Rubber Nanocomposites Jeffrey R. Potts, Om Shankar, Ling Du, and Rodney S. Ruoff of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton St., Austin, Texas 78712, United States Goodyear Tire and Rubber

213

A SOCIAL CHOICE APPROACH TO PRIMARY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: THE RUBBER TREE CASE IN AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who have had a relatively stable situation over the last decade. Natural rubber production is nowadaysA SOCIAL CHOICE APPROACH TO PRIMARY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: THE RUBBER TREE CASE IN AFRICA MOUSSA approach to a decision making problem related to the management of a primary resource, namely the rubber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

215

Prospects for using the copolymer of N,N-dimethyl-N,N-diallylammonium chloride with acrylamide in production of butadiene-styrene rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flocculating performance of a cationic polyelectrolyte, copolymer of N,N-dimethyl-N,N-diallylammonium chloride with acrylamide, in the recovery of butadiene-styrene rubber from latex was studied in relation t...

S. S. Nikulin; T. N. Poyarkova; V. M. Misin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Improvement of cephalosporin C production by Acremonium chrysogenum M35 in submerged culture with glass beads or silicone rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physical stimulation using a baffle or an impeller has been previously reported to improve cephalosporin C (CPC) production and cell growth. In this study, the effect of glass beads on CPC production in Acremoniu...

Hwan Hyo Lee; Yoon Seok Song; Seung Wook Kim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

More U. S. , Canada synthetic rubber use seen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to M.J. Rhoad of the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers Inc., the total U.S. and Canadian natural and synthetic rubber consumption will amount to (in thousands of metric tons/yr) 3385, 3305, 3855, and 4295 for 1979, 1980, 1985, and 1990, respectively, with synthetic rubber use increasing from an estimated 2.54 million metric tons/yr in 1979 to 3.27 million metric tons/yr by 1990, including an increase from 2.35 to 3.02 million metric tons/yr for the U.S. Rubber consumption for tires and tire products in the U.S. will increase at 2%/yr, with synthetic rubber accounting for 61.9% of the rubber used for tires in 1990, down from the 63.4% in 1979. In 1980, the decline in automobile and tire production will cause a 2.4% decline in new rubber consumption. During 1979-90, the amount of rubber used for nontire purposes will increase at 2.5%/yr.

Rhoad, M.J.

1980-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

219

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

220

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

222

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

223

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

224

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

225

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

226

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

227

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

228

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

229

Composites of wood and trans-1,4-isoprene rubber II: Processing conditions for production of the composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The occurrence of grafting between WF and MTIR through esterification, the processing conditions for production of the composites, and the effect of MAH concentration on some physical and mechanical propertie...

F. Febrianto; M. Yoshioka; Y. Nagai; M. Mihara; N. Shiraishi

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Control of carbohydrate metabolism by ethylene in latex vessels ofHevea brasiliensis MUEL. ARC in relation to rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The treatment of the bark of regularly tapped trees with 2-ohloroethylphosphonio acid (CEPA) in the long run brings down sucrose level in the latex even when latex production is not increased. The sucrose deficit...

J. Ttxpy; L. Peimot

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in later stages of rubber production will be pre- sentedhas embarked on a rubber production effort designed to useas a crop are its high rubber production~~up to 26% of its

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method for co-processing waste rubber and carbonaceous material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a process for the co-processing of waste rubber and carbonaceous material to form a useful liquid product, the rubber and the carbonaceous material are combined and heated to the depolymerization temperature of the rubber in the presence of a source of hydrogen. The deploymerized rubber acts as a liquefying solvent for the carbonaceous material while a beneficial catalytic effect is obtained from the carbon black released on deploymerization the reinforced rubber. The reaction is carried out at liquefaction conditions of 380--600{degrees}C and 70--280 atmospheres hydrogen pressure. The resulting liquid is separated from residual solids and further processed such as by distillation or solvent extraction to provide a carbonaceous liquid useful for fuels and other purposes.

Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.M.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Impact of petroleum prices on the natural rubber industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is concerned with a quantitative investigation of the natural rubber industry. The objective is to determine the impact of increased petroleum prices on the natural rubber industry. To pursue this objective, an annual equilibrium market model for the world natural rubber industry is developed that consists of three sets of equations that explain consumption, production, and stockholding of natural rubber. The price of natural rubber in the world market is hypothesized to be endogenously determined by the world supply, world demand, and world stockholding of natural rubber. The two-stage least squares procedure was used to estimate the parameters of the behavioral equations in the model. The data were obtained primarily from various issues of the Rubber Statistical Bulletin, International Financial Statistics Yearbook and Malaysia's Quarterly Economics bulletin. The study covers the period of 1962-1984. The model was simulated (1) to determine its predictive performance and stability during the sample period and (2) to examine the impact of increased petroleum prices on the natural rubber industry.

Jajri, I.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Model for Oxidative Aging of Rubber-Modified Asphalts and Implications to Performance Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Minus 10 and ?40 mesh rubber were acquired from Granular Products, also known as Tire Gator (TG), a Mexia, TX, company no longer in business. ... The Base Cure for each featured binder is represented in Table 5 by Blends #301, #307, and #313:? 10% rubber content, ?10 mesh Tire Gator rubber, 4000 rpm, and 260 °C (500 °F). ... Then for supplemental blends, one element of the Base Cure was alternated in turn to one of the following:? 20% rubber content, ?40 mesh Tire Gator rubber, 8000 rpm, and 232 °C (450 °F). ...

Jason F. Chipps; Richard R. Davison; Charles J. Glover

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review NAIC Senior Review Memo Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences (AST) about its planning for a "Senior Review". The purpose of the Senior Review is to enable AST of the recent Decade Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics. This AST plan to assess and reallocate its facilitiesNSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review NAIC Senior Review Memo Series Memo #1

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult rubber trees Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MONTPELLIER I, FACULTE DES SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES Summary: sous la forme des "jungle rubber", systmes agroforestiers hvicoles traditionnels. La production qui... : le...

237

Profile of the rubber and plastics industry. EPA Office of Compliance sector notebook project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rubber and miscellaneous plastics products industry, as defined by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 30, includes establishments that manufacture products from plastic resins, natural and synthetic rubber, reclaimed rubber, futta percha, balata, and gutta siak. The second section provides background information on the size, geographic distribution, employment, production, sales, and economic condition of the Rubber and Plastics Products industry. The type of facilities described within the document are also described in terms of their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes. Additionally, this section contains a list of the largest companies in terms of sales.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston Chemical Plant, Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A walk-through survey was conducted at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston, Texas in November, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on production processes for styrene/butadiene rubber, styrene/butadiene latex and acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber, and to evaluate the potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure.

Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The biogenesis of rubber (CIS-polyisoprene) in guayule, Parthenium argentatum gray (Asteraceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

history. The first display of guayule rubber in the United States was sent from Mexico to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876. Production of rubber began on a commercial scale in 1905 in Mexico with the production of domestic rubber... years operations were shifted to Arizona and Salinas, California in search of optimal plant gro?yth and rubber production. This thesis follows the style of The American Journal of Botattr. Between 1931 and 1941 the sd, 11 at Salinas produced over 3...

Goss, Rachel Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Guayule rubber: Cultivation and manufacture. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Rsearch Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of guayule as a natural rubber source. Cultivation methods and locations, physical and chemical properties, economic factors of cultivation through manufacture, production forecasts, effects of mixing with synthetic rubbers, and vulcanization are among the topics discussed. Industrial health hazards, performance in the world market, and applications are considered. (Contains a minimum of 206 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

243

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

244

Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 7. Automatic photointerpretation. Final report, Sep 84-Dec 89  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) was created by the Air Force Systems Command, Rome Air Development Center, and the Office of Scientific Research. Its purpose was to conduct pertinent research in artificial intelligence and to perform activities ancillary to this research. This report describes progress during the existence of the NAIC on the technical research tasks undertaken at the member universities. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photointerpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech understanding systems, knowledge base maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge-based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topics for this volume are the use of expert systems for automated photo interpretation and other AI techniques to image segmentation and region identification.

Modestino, J.; Sanderson, A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SCRAP TIRE RUBBER in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

246

New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmentally friendly products including octane- boosting gas and rubber for tires. #12;WHAT'S NEXT? FutureNew Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Usefulness Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber it first, potentially keeping costs lower and production times faster. Reported by researchers

247

Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as petroleum, natural gas, minerals, coal, air, and water into more than 70,000 diverse products. Chemical products are critical...

248

Bioregulator doubles guayule's rubber output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In greenhouse experiments, treatment of guayule with a bioregulator has resulted in a two fold stimulation of rubber synthesis. The work which is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station is investigating the potential of guayule as a source of rubber.

Not Available

1983-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

Petroleum Refining Sector (NAICS 324110) Energy and GHG Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the manufactured products are energy commodities that are often measured in terms of energy content, separate from the energy content of purchased fuels and electricity. Most...

250

Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short wavelength roughness, which may give the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the substrate surface asperities. The presented results are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

M. Mofidi; B. Prakash; B. N. J. Persson; O. Albohl

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

The effect of air blowing on the properties of rubber-modified asphalt binder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and use. Air blowing, accompanied by high shear mixing at elevated temperatures, was used to produce many asphalt-rubber blends in an attempt to discover a binder which resists phase separation. These air-blown, rubber-modified binders were...

Bauer, Shauna Erin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

253

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

254

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. PRODUCING CRUMB RUBBER MODIFIER (CRM) FROM USED TIRES . . . . . 3 2.1 PRODUCTION OF CRM THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

255

Rubber Economy in Typewriter Cylinders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... rubber is vulcanized on the arbor, and then ground to the proper size and to roughen its surface so as to grip the paper firmly. With extensive use, the cylinders ...

1942-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

257

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

258

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

259

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

260

An investigation of the use of tire rubber in asphalt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-rubber binder. The selected variables chosen are curing time, curing temperature, rubber content (weight percent), rubber particle size, base asphalt type, and carbonyl area. Results confirmed that the addition of rubber increased the viscosity of the asphalt...

Koo, Heamo Lee

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Physical Characteristics of Synthetic Rubbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A summary of the nature and special applications of the more important types of synthetic rubbers is given. Two series of rubber and synthetic rubber stocks compounded on the basis of comparable pigmentation were selected for study. In addition to the conventional physical properties (tensile strength and elongation at rupture modulus aging etc.) a number of other mechanical properties such as dynamic rigidity hysteresis loss ``blowout resistance '' ``running temperature '' and tensile strength at elevated temperature were measured. Swelling tests in various solvents were also made. Results are plotted in the form of correlation charts in an effort to select proper methods of measurement. Some observations on comparative service tests in tires in the case of three synthetic rubbers indicate them to be satisfactory on a quality basis for use in time of emergency. The importance of care in selecting the proper physical tests and methods of analysis is emphasized in the light of the results given. It is concluded that rubbertesting techniques and interpretation must be modified in certain instances in evaluating synthetic rubber stocks.

J. N. Street; J. H. Dillon

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Characterizing guayule rubber transferase activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber transferase (RuT) activity, measured as incorporation of {sup 14}C(isopentenyl pyrophosphate) (IPP) into rubber, was assayed in suspensions of rubber particles purified from bark tissue of Parthenium argentatum, Gray. Rubber particle suspensions (RSP) have high RuT activity which is not diminished by repeated washing of the particles, demonstrating the firm association of the enzyme system with the particles. RuT activity varied with line: 11591 yielded more rubber particles with a greater activity per particle, than did other lines tested. Variation in activity also varied with bark age and season. Activity rapidly declined at temperatures above 16{degree}C in line 593, but was more stable in RSP isolated form line 11591. IPP-incorporation depends upon the concentration of two substrates, IPP and the starter molecule farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). In lines 593 and 11591, 20 uM FPP saturated the enzyme present in 6 {times} 10{sup 10} particles {times} cm{sup {minus}3}, whereas about 1 mM IPP was required for saturation. Under saturating FPP, the apparent K{sub m} of RuT was about 250 uM.

Cornish, K.; Backhaus, R.A. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rubber friction on smooth surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the sliding friction for viscoelastic solids, e.g., rubber, on hard flat substrate surfaces. We consider first the fluctuating shear stress inside a viscoelastic solid which results from the thermal motion of the atoms or molecules in the solid. At the nanoscale the thermal fluctuations are very strong and give rise to stress fluctuations in the MPa-range, which is similar to the depinning stresses which typically occur at solid-rubber interfaces, indicating the crucial importance of thermal fluctuations for rubber friction on smooth surfaces. We develop a detailed model which takes into account the influence of thermal fluctuations on the depinning of small contact patches (stress domains) at the rubber-substrate interface. The theory predicts that the velocity dependence of the macroscopic shear stress has a bell-shaped f orm, and that the low-velocity side exhibits the same temperature dependence as the bulk viscoelastic modulus, in qualitative agreement with experimental data. Finally, we discuss the influence of small-amplitude substrate roughness on rubber sliding friction.

B. N. J. Persson; A. I. Volokitin

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Microbiological Deterioration of Rubber Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiological Deterioration of Rubber Insulation John T. Blake Donald W. Kitchin Orison...Microbiological Deterioration of Rubber Insulation JOHN T. BLAKE, DONALD W. KITCHIN...By burying wire samples with thin insulation in active soil, the rate of failure...

John T. Blake; Donald W. Kitchin; Orison S. Pratt

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Rubber friction and tire dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, e.g., in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (B.N.J. Persson, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 18, 7789 (2006)). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to calculate accurate mu-slip (and the self-aligning torque) curves for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g., braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of Anti-Blocking System (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

B. N. J. Persson

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Guayule - natural rubber from the desert  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Guayule is the most likely source of home grown natural rubber in the United States and research is currently underway on methods of increasing rubber content, seed germination and survival, climate and soil requirements and rubber content determination by solvent extraction.

Bucks, D.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Performance of Low Energy Crumb Rubber Modified Bituminous Mixes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rising energy costs and increased awareness of emission problems in the production of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) have brought attention to the potential benefits of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) in India. Warm-mix asphalt is the generic term for a variety of technologies that allow the producers of hot-mix asphalt pavement material to lower the temperatures at which the material is mixed and placed on the road. Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen (CRMB) is a popular binder in India. CRMB is composed of bitumen binder and tyre rubber. Tyre rubber, at various percentages, is added to the binder, addition of tyre rubber into binder results in a new product, which requires higher mixing temperatures compared to the conventional one, as well as increased mixing time, so as to get the uniformity of the product. A laboratory study was conducted at CSIR-Central Road Research Institute (CRRI) to investigate, how a commercially available chemical additive can be used to bring down the mixing and compaction temperature of CRMB mix as compared to the hot mix CRMB. Four different temperature ranges were considered in this study viz 1000C to 1050C, 1100C to 1150C, 1200C to 1250C and 1300C to 1350C to determine the various performance characteristics. The CRMB bituminous mix was prepared in these four temperature ranges and various mix tests were carried out to indicate to how the lower production and compaction temperatures affect the properties and performance characteristics of the mixes. After the laboratory evaluation it was found that CRMB Warm mix can be successfully produced at temperature as low as 110 °C and can be compacted at 80- 900C as compared to CRMB hot mix (155 °C). Full scale performance study indicate that process is highly energy efficient and environment friendly, warm mixes performed equivalent to “Hot Bituminous Mixes” and indicated encouraging results. After laboratory evaluation, a test track was successfully laid using low energy Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen.

Ambika Behl; Gajendra Kumar; Girish Sharma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Improved rubber nanofillers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this task, Silane functionalized TiO2 and HK3Ti4O4(SiO4)3 were sent to Goodyear (GY) for testing. These materials were characterized based on their interaction with the model elastomer, squalene. The Van der Waals interactions and Hamaker Constants for ZnO particles in squalene and rubber materials were characterized and it was determined that a 10-20 nm spacing was necessary between primary filler particles to maintain a stable nanocomposite. Contact angle measurements on the ZnO and ZnO-silane materials indicated that the solvent should wet the particles, and solvophobic attractions should not be present. These studies showed that the surface modification with sulfosilane coupling agents was successful, and high levels of dispersion of the particles remained possible. Further, a novel surface charging phenomenon where negative surface charging is developed in the squalene environment was observed and corroborated by measurements of particle size and of the surface modified materials in squalene. This impacts the dispersion of the particles according to the traditional colloidal interpretation of electrostatic repulsive forces between particles. Additionally, thin nanocomposite fibers were developed using electrospinning. The size and shape of the oxides did not change during the electrospinning process, although the shape of the fiber and the distribution of the particles, particularly for ZnO, was not ideal. There was an obvious increase in elastic modulus and hardness from the addition of the oxides, but differentiating the oxides, and particularly the surfactants, was difficult. The A-1289 lead to the greatest dispersion of the filler particles, while the A-1589 and the NXT produced clustered particle aggregates. This agrees with previous study of these materials in low molecular weight squalene solvent studies reported earlier. The behavior of the nanoparticle ZnO and the microparticle silica is different as well, with the ZnO being contained within the elastomer, and the SiO2 forming monolayers at the surface of the elastomer. The dynamic mechanical analysis did not show clear trends between the surface modification and the aggregate structure. In the silica particles, the NXT led to the least particle interaction, followed by the A-1289 and highest particle interaction found for the A-1589. For the nanosized ZnO, the best dispersion was found for the A-1589, with both the A-1289 and NXT exhibiting frequency dependent responses.

Boyle, T. J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

"Rubberized" eggs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Rubberized" eggs "Rubberized" eggs Name: cdahncke Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I need to know why an egg that has been "rubberize" by soaking it in a vinegar solution will gain in weight and size when soaked in water, and shrink when soaked in corn syrup. Replies: This has to do with osmotic pressure and the concentration of solutes in a solution. When you rubberize an egg, you allow it to change size when it gains or loses water. Soaking it in water, which has fewer solutes (salts usually) than the egg does, will cause water to rush into the egg to surround the solutes in the egg. This is because a system has a tendency to reach an equilibrium. The concentration of solutes in the egg will decrease as water goes into it, and the concentration of solutes in the water will increase as the solutes in the egg are leached out. Similarly, corn syrup has a very high concentration of solutes (sugars). The corn syrup is a solution that will pull water out of the egg, causing it to shrink

272

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

273

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

274

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

275

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

276

Morphology development in nanoclay filled rubber compounds and rubber blends detected by online measured electrical conductance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The online measured electrical conductance (OMEC) during the rubber mixing process has been used as a novel method to characterize the dispersion of organoclay in rubber compounds and blends. This method was a...

Z. Ali; H. H. Le; S. Ilisch; H.-J. Radusch

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dual, rotating stripper rubber drilling head  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a drilling head for a well bore through which a tool string of varying outside diameter is run, the drilling head sealing against fluid flow past the tool string to divert such fluid through a side outlet port, said drilling head including a housing having an axial passageway through which the tool string is run and a bearing assembly to facilitate rotation of the tool string within the axial passageway, the improved drilling head comprising: first and second stripper rubbers rotatably mounted within the drilling head housing in seating contact with the tool string, said stripper rubbers having substantially identical inner diameters through which the tool string extends, said first stripper rubber formed of an abrasive resistant material to divert fluid flow from the axial passageway of the housing to the side outlet port and said second stripper rubber formed on a sealingly resilient material which maintains sealing contact with the tool string extending there through preventing fluid flow past said tool string; said first stripper rubber being corrected to clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a first drive ring such that said first stripper rubber rotates with the tool string; and said second stripper rubber is rotatably connected to said clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a second drive ring, said first and second drive rings coaxially mounted within the housing whereby said first stripper rubber is positioned axially below said second stripper rubber in sealing contact with the tool string.

Bailey, T.F.; Campbell, J.E.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321 and 322) Energy and GHG Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonprocess energy 1 94 Feedstock energy 6 8 Total primary and feedstock energy* 3 3,565 GHG combustion emissions MMT CO 2 e Total 3 140 Onsite 3 68 * When total primary energy and...

279

Thailand's natural rubber economy in an international setting: an econometric investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thai natural rubber economy is described in the context of the world rubber market. An econometric model is estimated for 15 structural equations; it includes the Thai, US, and rest-of-the-world rubber economies. Several simulation experiments are analyzed for the period from 1984 to 1995. Impact and dynamic multipliers are reported for major endogenous variables in response to changes in US GDP, world crude oil price, Thai replanting cess tax and Thai natural rubber production. A 1%, one-time increase in the US GDP has a positive effect on the Singapore natural rubber price. A world crude oil price decline shock has a negative effect in both the short-run and the long-run. The INRO buffer stock stabilization policy as well as alternative domestic Thai policies of market intervention are analyzed. The simulation results show that buffer stock management which allows a price band of +/-20% around the price target has the most stabilized price, compared to other band widths and no stock management. The outcome of the increase of the Thai replanting cess tax raises not only cess tax revenue, but also producer and export earning. Results showed that a decrease in rubber production positively affected producer and export earnings in the long-run.

Suwanakul, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

THE STRESS-STRAIN RELATIONS OF RUBBER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE STRESS-STRAIN RELATIONS OF RUBBER 10.1126/science.8.202.673-a C. M. BROOMALL M EDIA , P A. THE STRESS-STRAIN RELATIONS OF RUBBER. | Journal Article SCIENCE. Prominent as the object is thus likely to become...

C. M. BROOMALL

1898-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effect of Nanoclay on Natural Rubber Microstructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Nanoclay on Natural Rubber Microstructure ... The inclusion of highly anisotropic clay nanoparticles (nanoclays) in cross-linked natural rubber (NR) provides a more homogeneous distributed network structure and induces an early onset as well as enhancement of crystallization under uniaxial deformation. ...

Javier Carretero-González; Haris Retsos; Raquel Verdejo; Shigeyuki Toki; Benjamin S. Hsiao; Emmanuel P. Giannelis; Miguel A. López-Manchado

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Intermediate inputs and economic productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...US sectoral-level production functions. Both the...316) and plastics and rubber-(326). The relationship...coefficients of the production function sum to a quantity...inputs were used in the production process. 16 This estimate...products 326 plastics and rubber products 327 non-metallic...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An economic analysis of supervised credit for Mexican rubber producers in the El Palmar region of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is recomtended, in which the participation of several government agencies is required in the '. HARP to achieve real econo nic progress. Concerr. ing the analysis of rare of return on rubbe- invest- men , production data for rubber were scarce ano difficult... by Production Purpose of the Loans, 1962-1967, the El Palmer Region, Mexico. 36 Estimated - er Hectare* Cash-Expenditure Requirements for the Establishment of Rubber Plantings in the El Palmer Region, Mexico, 19 68. 44 Annual Current end Projected. per...

De Armero Tapia, Luis Ernesto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

285

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

286

Rubber friction: role of the flash temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a rubber block is sliding on a hard rough substrate, the substrate asperities will exert time-dependent deformations of the rubber surface resulting in viscoelastic energy dissipation in the rubber, which gives a contribution to the sliding friction. Most surfaces of solids have roughness on many different length scales, and when calculating the friction force it is necessary to include the viscoelastic deformations on all length scales. The energy dissipation will result in local heating of the rubber. Since the viscoelastic properties of rubber-like materials are extremely strongly temperature dependent, it is necessary to include the local temperature increase in the analysis. At very low sliding velocity the temperature increase is negligible because of heat diffusion, but already for velocities of order 0.01 m/s the local heating may be very important. Here I study the influence of the local heating on the rubber friction, and I show that in a typical case the temperature increase results in a decrease in rubber friction with increasing sliding velocity for v > 0.01 m/s. This may result in stick-slip instabilities, and is of crucial importance in many practical applications, e.g., for the tire-road friction, and in particular for ABS-breaking systems.

B. N. J. Persson

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Quality assurance during fabrication of high-damping rubber isolation bearings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful implementation of a high-damping rubber (HDR) base isolation project requires the application of Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) methodology through all phases of the bearing fabrication process. HDR base isolation bearings must be fabricated with uniform physical characteristics while being produced in large quantities. To satisfy this requirement, manufacturing processes must be controlled. Prototype tests that include dynamic testing of small samples of rubber are necessary. Stringent full scale bearing testing must be carried out prior to beginning production, during which manufacturing is strictly regulated by small rubber sample and production bearing testing. All such activities should be supervised and continuously inspected by independent and experienced QA/QC personnel.

Way, D.; Greaves, W.C. [Base Isolation Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Enhanced Stuffing Box Rubbers Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Scott's Oil Field Service tested an enhanced stuffing box rubber at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. The enhanced stuffing box rubbers have saved money from not having to replace packing as often and not spilling valuable oil on the ground. A reduction in environmental hazards and the cost of cleaning up spilled oil have also been a benefit.

Rochelle, J.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

State of the practice: Design and construction of asphalt paving materials with crumb-rubber modifier. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document is a comprehensive overview of the terminology, processes, products, and applications of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) technology. The technology includes any use of scrap tire rubber in asphalt paving materials. In general, CRM technology can be divided into two categories--the wet process and the dry process. When CRM is incorporated into an asphalt paving material, it will modify the properties of the binder (asphalt rubber) and/or act as a rubber aggregate (rubber modified hot mix asphalt). The five concepts for using CRM discussed in the report are McDonald, PlusRide, generic dry, chunk rubber asphalt concrete, and continuous blending asphalt rubber. There are two principal unresolved engineering issues related to the use of CRM in asphalt paving materials. On the national level, the ability to recycle asphalt paving mixes containing CRM has not been demonstrated. At the State and local levels, these modified asphalt mixes must be field evaluated to establish expected levels of performance. The appendices provide guidelines for material specifications, mix design, and construction specifications. An experimental work plan for monitoring performance and a stack emission testing program are also included.

Heitzman, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

291

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

292

The curing of asphalt with rubber and its effect on the physical and chemical properties of asphalt-rubber binders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research was to develop a potentially useful asphalt-rubber binder using the curing process. For the curing process, six parameters, which altered the physical and chemical properties of the asphalt-rubber binder, were tested...

Chun, Jay Sung

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Rubber linings as surface protection in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacturers of the German rubber lining industry have executed the rubber lining of over 1 million m{sup 2} of steel surfaces in over 150 scrubbers of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants, thereby effectively protecting them against corrosion. The application of rubber linings as surface protection in FGD plants has proven effective.

Fenner, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bromoform production from seawater treated with bromoperoxidase ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

production from BrPO incubations was greater, presumably due to increased DOMreact. ... with a rubber septum and an aluminum crimped cap, and it.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

STODEREGGER, KAREN, AND GERHARD J. HERNDL. Production ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production and release of bacterial capsular material and its subsequent ..... rubber stoppers, t” which a well filled with a filter wick was attached. Prior to ...

296

Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

model strongly interacting particles as rubber bands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model strongly interacting particles as rubber bands. Nothing is perfect, of course. Some relativity, there is a tempta- tion to carry intelligent design to an ex- treme in which God wrote (recall Bohr's admonition, "Stop telling God what to do!"). The landscape picture derails this thinking

Hughes, Kim

298

Prompt non-tire rubber recycling : final report for phases 1 and 2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an assessment conducted by Environmental Technologies Alternatives, Inc., under a subcontract to Argonne National Laboratory. The project was conducted in two phases. An assessment of alternative technologies for recycling of prompt non-tire rubber was conducted in the first phase, and an experimental program focusing on a new technology called the catalytic Regeneration Process offered the greatest opportunity for recovery of high-value recyclable rubber material. An experimental and large-scale test program was undertaken to further delineate the economic potential as an essential step leading to commercial deployment and to determine the course of continued development of the technology by the private sector. The experimental program defined process-operating conditions for the technology and verified the degree of devulcanisation achievable for two rubber compounds: ethylene-propylene-nonconjugated-diene monomer (EPDM) and neoprene. To determine product acceptance, samples of devulcanized EPDM and neoprene were prepared and used in factory trials for the production of automotive moldings (EPDM) and fiber-filled belting (neoprene). The factory trials indicated that the physical properties of the products were acceptable in both cases. The appearance of molded and calendared surface finishes was acceptable, while that of extruded finishes was unsatisfactory. The fiber-filled neoprene belting application offers the greatest economic potential. Process costs were estimated at $0.34/lb for neoprene waste rubber relative to a value of $0.57/lb. The results of the experimental program led to the decision to continue development of this technology is being planned, subject to the availability of about $3 million in financing from private-sector investors. The ability to recycle non-tire rubber scrap could conserve as much as 90,000 Btu/lb, thus yielding an estimated energy savings potential of about 0.25 quad/yr.

Smith, F. G.; Daniels, E. J.

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

Ayari, F. [Laboratory of Mechanics, College of Science and Technology, 1008 Montfleury, Tunis (Tunisia); Supmeca/LISMMA-Paris, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (France); Bayraktar, E. [Supmeca/LISMMA-Paris, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (France); Zghal, A. [Laboratory of Mechanics, College of Science and Technology, 1008 Montfleury, Tunis (Tunisia)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg (University of Texas-Austin)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The rate of mucus production by corals and its assimilation by the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overall mucus production results in about 51 mg of particulate ... production in relation .to environmcn tal .... from a rubber bulb attached to a glass tube.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

The enzymatic synthesis of rubber polymer in Parthenium argentatum Gray  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washed rubber particles isolated from stem homogenates of Parthenium argentatum Gray by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration on columns of LKB Ultrogel AcA34 contain rubber transferase which catalyzes the polymerization of isopentenyl pyrophosphate into rubber polymer. The polymerization reaction requires Mg{sup 2+} isopentenyl pyrophosphate, and an allylic pyrophosphate. The K{sub m} values for Mg{sup 2+}, isopentenyl pyrophosphate, and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate were 5.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} molar, 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} molar, and 9.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} molar, respectively. The molecular characteristics of the rubber polymer synthesized from ({sup 14}C)isopentenyl pyrophosphate were examined by gel permeation chromatography. The peak molecular weight of the radioactive polymer increased from 70,000 in 15 minutes to 750,000 in 3 hours. The weight average molecular weight of the polymer synthesized over a 3 hour period was 1.17 {times} 10{sup 6} compared to 1.49 {times} 10{sup 6} for the natural rubber polymer extracted from the rubber particles. Over 90% of the in vitro formation of the rubber polymer was de novo from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate. Treatment of the washed rubber particles with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio) -1-propanesulfonate solubilized the rubber transferase. The solubilized enzyme(s) catalyzed the polymerization of isopentenyl pyrophosphate into rubber polymer with a peak molecular weight of 1 {times} 10{sup 5} after 3 hours of incubation with Mg{sup 2+} and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. The data support the conclusion that the soluble preparation of rubber transferase is capable of catalyzing the formation of a high molecular weight rubber polymer from an allylic pyrophosphate initiator and isopentenyl pyrophosphate monomer.

Benedict, C.R.; Madhavan, S.; Greenblatt, G.A.; Venkatachalam, K.V.; Foster, M.A. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Study of the interaction between bitumen and rubber.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia Civil (área de especialização em Engenharia Rodoviária) Approximately 9 to 10 kg of rubber from tyres per inhabitant and year… (more)

Peralta, Elvira Joana Ferreira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of commercial polymerization conditions on rubber particle size and efficiency in high impact polystyrene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . 48 FIGURE Page 4. 1 1 a Effect of Polystyrene Subocclusion Size on Rubber Efficiency. . . . . . . . 49 4. 11b Effect of Polystyrene Subocclusion Thickness on Rubber Efficiency . 49 4. 12 Insoluble Gel to Rubber Ratio Versus Peroxide Initiator... Presence 50 4. 13 Effect of Initiator Presence on Rubber Phase Morphology . . . . . . . . 51 4. 14 Effect of Initiator Presence on Excessive Grafting and Rubber Particle Disintegration. 53 4. 15a Insoluble Gel to Rubber Ratio Versus Polymerization...

Klussmann, Bradley Ryan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

On-site rubber lining -- Application of precured and self-curing rubber linings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber linings are applied as a corrosion protection system in a wide range of plants and installations of the industrial sector. In addition to the execution of lining works in a workshop, the on-site application of this corrosion protection system on the construction site has gained increasing importance. The various procedures utilized to apply the corrosion protection linings will be briefly presented in the following paper. In particular the precured and self curing rubber linings together with their scope of use and application on construction sites will be described in more detail.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Agricultural R&D, technology and productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irrational. It is the animal production systems that are a danger...where plantations (tea, rubber) and processors (tobacco...varietal development and seed production in less than half a dozen...redistribution rather than production. Adam Smith's invisible...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

CATTANEO, A., AND J. KALFF. Primary production of algae growing ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Apr 27, 1978 ... of the epiphytes (production per unit of Chl) was not significantly different OII the two .\\ub- ... gen, Montreal) and flexible rubber tubing. “stems.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

VI.5 Recycling of plastic waste, rubber waste and end-of-life cars in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Among different types of consumer waste in Germany, plastic waste, rubber waste, and end-of-life cars are closely intertwined. Processing techniques applied to these types of consumer waste are identical in many cases. This chapter outlines these similarities and discusses each type of consumer waste. The regulations for plastic waste recycling only apply to private households. Regulations are limited to packaging waste with the ordinance on packaging waste being the legal provision. The recycling of packaging remnants from production or defective production units is partially organized by producers themselves. Energy recovery of plastic packaging is limited to combined heat and power stations. Packaging waste that cannot be submitted to mechanical recycling is usually treated by the means of feedstock recycling. The treatment of plastic waste comprises fragmentation, sizing, sorting, washing and drying, agglomeration, and granulation. Rubber waste is unsuitable for deposition at landfill sites because of poor compressibility, resilient surfaces, extremely long rotting time, and forming of cavities with air inclusion. An increased utilization of rubber waste in the production of new tires depends directly on the quality of the vulcanization process.

Peter Dreher; Martin Faulstich; Gabriele Weber-Blaschke; Burkhard Berninger; Uwe Keilhammer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

311

Effect of Nanoclay on Natural Rubber Microstructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inclusion of highly anisotropic clay nanoparticles (nanoclays) in cross-linked natural rubber (NR) provides a more homogeneous distributed network structure and induces an early onset as well as enhancement of crystallization under uniaxial deformation. The molecular structure of the polymer network and its morphological changes during deformation were characterized by using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction, respectively. It was found that the presence of nanoclay introduces a dual crystallization mechanism due to the alignment of nanoparticles during stretching. The improved properties in NR-nanoclay nanocomposites can be attributed to both microstructural and morphological changes induced by nanoclay as well as to the nanoclay mobility in the NR matrix during crystallization. The interplay of these factors during deformation contributes to the formation of a supernetwork structure containing cross-linked chemical chains, nanofiller, and crystallizable networks with similar length scales.

Carretero-Gonzalez,J.; Retsos, H.; Verdejo, R.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.; Giannelis, E.; Lopez-Manchado, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41222 41222 Boat Dealers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 441229 All Other Motor Vehicle Dealers CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com LOS ALAMOS LAB

313

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

53210 53210 Office Supplies and Stationery Stores BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NEW BRUNSWICK LAB NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PRINCETON PLASMA LAB Arlene White (609) 243-2080

314

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41219 41219 Other Accounting Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671

315

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11410 11410 Business and Secretarial Schools EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 611420 Computer Training ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov

316

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

621420 621420 Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com 621493 Freestanding Ambulatory Surgical and Emergency Centers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov

317

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21213 21213 Engineered Wood Member (except Truss) Manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 321920 Wood Container and Pallet manufacturing BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512

318

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21119 21119 Other Electric Power Generation Y-12 SITE Gloria Mencer (865) 576-2090 mencergd@y12.doe.gov 221121 Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 221122 Electric Power Distribution BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

319

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

91110 91110 Postal Service EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov PANTEX PLANT Brad Beck (806) 477-6192 bbrack@pantex.com RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Sally Leingang (504) 734-4362 sally.leingang@spr.doe.gov 492110 Couriers and Express Delivery Services EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen

320

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11110 11110 Newspaper Publishers EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov 511120 Periodical Publishers AMES LAB Lisa Rodgers (515) 294-4191 rodgers@ameslab.gov ARGONNE LAB Karl Duke (630) 252-8842 sblo@anl.gov BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov BROOKHAVEN LAB Jill Clough-Johnston (631) 344-3173 clough@bnl.gov CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov FEMI LAB Joe Collins (630) 840-4169 jcollins@fnal.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23110 23110 Automobile and Other Motor Vehicle Merchant Wholesalers BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NEVADA SITE OFFICE Anita Ross (702) 295-5690 rossal@nv.doe.gov NEVADA TEST SITE Trudy Rocha (702) 295-0557 rocha@nv.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 423120 Motor Vehicle Supplies and New Parts Merchant Wholesalers

322

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61110 61110 Office Administrative Services BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov KANSAS CITY PLANT C. J. Warrick (816) 997-2874 cwarrick@kcp.com NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OHIO FIELD OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov PORTSMOUTH PADUCAH OFFICE Pam Thompson (859) 219-4056 pam.thompson@lex.doe.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov ROCKY FLATS ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER Jenny Krom (307) 233-4818 jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

323

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31110 31110 Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov IDAHO LAB Stacey Francis (208) 526-8564 stacey.francis@inl.gov IDAHO OPERATIONS Maria Mitchell (208) 526-8600 mitchemm@id.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER

324

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

113110 Timber tract operations 113110 Timber tract operations BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 113310 Cutting and transporting timber BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

325

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million sq ft)","(counts)","(sq ft)","(counts)","(counts)" ,,"Total United...

326

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

83111 83111 Deep Sea Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 483211 Inland Water Freight Transportation EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov RIVER PROTECTION Susan Johnson (509) 373-7914 susan_c_johnson@orp.doe.gov 484110 General Freight Trucking, Local BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER

327

SBOT NAICS Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

922120 922120 Police Protection CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE Roland Taylor roland.taylor@wipp.ws CHICAGO OPERATIONS Larry Thompson (630) 252-2711 larry.thompson@ch.doe.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Karen Downs (720) 356-1269 karen.downs@go.doe.gov HEADQUARTERS PROCUREMENT Michael Raizen (202) 287-1512 michael.raizen@hq.doe.gov LOS ALAMOS LAB Dennis Roybal (505) 667-4419 dr@lanl.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB Larry Sullivan (412) 386-6115 larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov OAK RIDGE LAB Cassandra McGee Stu (865) 576-3560 mcgeecm@ornl.gov OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS Freda Hopper (856) 576-9430

328

Production of the giant kelp, Macrocystis, estimated by in situ ... - ASLO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

May 4, 1972 ... and Prescott 1959)) and oxygen production by isolated blade discs (Sargent ... base of the pneumatocyst with latex rubber tubing. For control ...

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

List of Manufacturing Groups Displayed in the 1998 Manufacturing Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 311 Food 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 313 Textile Mills 314 Textile Product Mills 315 Apparel 316 Leather and Allied Products 321 Wood Products 322 Paper 323 Printing and Related Support 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 325 Chemicals 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 331 Primary Metals 332 Fabricated Metal Products 333 Machinery 334 Computer and Electronic Products 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 336 Transportation Equipment 337 Furniture and Related Products 339 Miscellaneous 6 industry groups (4-digit NAICS codes); 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 3219 Other Wood Products 3272 Glass and Glass Products 3312 Steel Products from Purchased Steel 3313 Alumina and Aluminum

330

Utilization of surface-treated rubber particles from waste tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a 12-month program, the author successfully demonstrated commercial applications for surface-treated rubber particles in two major markets: footwear (shoe soles and components) and urethane-foam carpet underlay (padding). In these markets, he has clearly demonstrated the ease of using R-4080 and R-4030 surface-treated rubber particles in existing manufacturing plants and processes and have shown that the material meets or exceeds existing standards for performance, quality, and cost-effectiveness. To produce R-4080 and R-4030, vulcanized rubber, whole-tire material is finely ground to particles of nominal 80 and mesh size respectively. Surface treatment is achieved by reacting these rubber particles with chlorine gas. In this report, the author describes the actual test and evaluations of the participant companies, and identifies other potential end uses.

Smith, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Environmental Technologies Alternatives, Inc., Lima, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electric pulse resistance of liquid nitrogen and rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of experimental investigations of the breakdown amplitudes of pulsed voltages applied to centimeter-thick layers of liquid nitrogen and various kinds of rubber at 77 K. We report the char...

V. I. Kurets; É. N. Tarakanovskii; G. P. Filatov

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Successful corrosion protection in FGD plants utilizing rubber lining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1970`s--and predominantly in the mid-1980`s--when the construction of flue gas desulfurization plants in Germany was still in its early stages, both the US and Japan had already accumulated several years of experience in the operation of such plants. Whereas Japan adopted the almost exclusive use of synthetic resin coatings--usually as flake coatings--applied on carbon steel as structural material, all three corrosion protection materials mentioned here (rubber linings, synthetic resin coatings, and stainless steel coatings) were applied in the US--in addition, stainless steel was also utilized as structural material. On the other hand, in Germany the use of soft rubber linings was much more widespread. The paper discusses rubber linings as corrosion protection and the experience gained with rubber linings in flue gas desulfurization plants.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany); Peavy, M. [Smith Corrosion Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

MODELING DROUGHT IMPACT ON H. BRASILIENSIS TRANSPIRATION, GROWTH AND LATEX PRODUCTION OF A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, growth and production for a pure rubber tree stand. However, in our conditions of much degraded soil and latex production are two distinct physiological phenomena in rubber trees (Rao et al., 19981 MODELING DROUGHT IMPACT ON H. BRASILIENSIS 2 TRANSPIRATION, GROWTH AND LATEX PRODUCTION

Boyer, Edmond

334

A Preliminary Study of Oxidation of Lignin from Rubber Wood to Vanillin in Ionic Liquid Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, lignin was oxidised to vanillin by means of oxygen in ionic liquid (1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylsulphate) medium. The parameters of the oxidation reaction that have been investigated were the following: concentration of oxygen (5, 10, 15 and 20 ft3 h-1), reaction time (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h) and reaction temperature (25, 40, 60, 80 and 100{\\deg}C). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet-visible analyses were used to characterise the product. The results revealed vanillin as the product obtained via the oxidation reaction. The optimum parameters of vanillin production were 20 ft3 h-1 of oxygen for 10 h at 100{\\deg}C. In conclusion, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylsulphate could be used as an oxidation reaction medium for the production of vanillin from rubber wood lignin.

Shamsuri, A A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Soil Carbon Sequestration Under Rubber Plantations in North-East India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rubber plantations on degraded forest lands are expanding worldwide due to economic, social and environmental perspectives. The study was conducted to evaluate the temporal effects of rubber plantations on soil carbon

D. Mandal; K. R. Islam

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

337

Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy dissipation characteristics of rubber crash cushion elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cylinder Cushion, Before and During Test 79 28 Energy Dissipation of 4. 5-in. and 1. 75-in. Five Element Cushions 80 29 Full-Scale Rubber Crash Cushion Prototype 30 Steel Drum Crash Cushions After Head-On 83 Collisions 87 31 Numerical Analysis... 300 Natural rubber circular cylinder 0. 60 inch wall thickness Displacement at closure: 3. 6 inch 200 100 0 0. 0 0. 5 1. 0 1. 5 2. 0 2. 5 3. 0 3. 5 4. 0 Displacement (in. ) FIGDEE 4. Typical Static Force vs. Displacement Curve 16 and square...

Thompson, Michael Fowlkes

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Additional Studies of Interferon Production by Human Leukemic Leukocytes in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hemocytometer. Interferon Production and Assay Our protocol for interferon production and assay has been modified...Additional Studies of Interferon Production by Human Leukemic Leukocytes...E1D50 per cell (14). Rubber-stoppered test tubes...

S. H. S. Lee; C. E. vanRooyen; and R. L. Ozere

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anthracycline Antibiotic-stimulated Superoxide, Hydrogen Peroxide, and Hydroxyl Radical Production by NADH Dehydrogenase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supporting oxygen radical production by anthracycline drugs (4...legends. Superoxide Assay. The production of Superoxide ani nin the...7). In this study, the production of the hydroxyl radical by...tubes were rapidly sealed with rubber stoppers, and the experimental...

James H. Doroshow

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons and Related Compounds in Processed Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is made by the incomplete combustion of natural gas. Furnace black...obtained by the incomplete combustion of oils and tars. It might...BARRON,H. Modern Rubber Chemistry, pp. 154-81, 202- 34...3,4-Benzpyrene from Coal Tar. Nature, 156:601...

Hans L. Falk; Paul E. Steiner; Sam Goldfein; Alexander Breslow; and Ruth Hykes

1951-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Experimental study on sound absorbing performance of rubber crumb  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper describes an experimental campaign aimed at the determination of acoustical properties of vulcanized rubber crumbs obtained by the shredding of used tires. In particular their performance as sound absorbing material in lined ducts was investigated. The most innovative aspect that is addressed in the study is the use of a waste material such as rubber tires reduced into small grains as a sound absorbing material: tires are in fact usually used at the end of their life cycle as fuel and burned in cement kilns in order to take advantage of their high heating value with all the problems of pollution that this solution produces. Two kinds of rubber crumbs have been investigated in terms of characteristic dimension of the grains porosity and sound absorbing coefficient while their "in situ" performance when used inside lined and parallel-baffle rectangular ducts has been evaluated measuring their insertion loss. The results of this research show that the acoustical behaviour of the tested rubber crumbs is the typical behaviour of the granular materials showing a noteworthy performance of the tested material in the low frequency range opening a scenery of possible applications where noise has relevant tonal components below 315 Hz.

Davide Borelli; Corrado Schenone; Ilaria Pittaluga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Experimental study on sound absorbing performance of rubber crumb  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper describes an experimental campaign aimed at the determination of acoustical properties of vulcanized rubber crumbs obtained by the shredding of used tires. In particular their performance as sound absorbing material in lined ducts has been investigated. The most innovative aspect that is addressed in the study is the use of a waste material such as rubber tires reduced into small grains as a sound absorbing material: tires are in fact usually used at the end of their life cycle as fuel and burned in cement kilns in order to take advantage of their high heating value with all the problems of pollution that this solution produces. Two kinds of rubber crumbs have been investigated in terms of characteristic dimension of the grains porosity and sound absorbing coefficient while their “in situ” performance when used inside lined and parallel-baffle rectangular ducts has been evaluated measuring their insertion loss. The results of this research show that the acoustical behavior of the tested rubber crumbs is the typical behavior of the granular materials showing a noteworthy performance of the tested material in the low frequency range opening a scenery of possible applications where noise has relevant tonal components below 315 Hz.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Investigating Low Temperature Properties of Rubber Seals - 13020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To achieve the required tightness levels of containers for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes rubbers are widely applied as main sealing materials. The save encapsulation of the radioactive container contents has to be guaranteed according to legislation and appropriate guidelines for long storage periods as well as down to temperatures of -40 deg. C during transportation. Therefore the understanding of failure mechanisms that lead to leakage at low temperatures is of high importance. It is known that the material properties of rubbers are strongly influenced by temperature. At low temperatures this is caused by the rubber-glass transition (abbr. glass transition). During continuous cooling the material changes from rubber-like entropy-elastic to stiff energy-elastic behaviour, that allows nearly no strain or retraction. Therefore, rubbers are normally used above their glass transition but the minimum working temperature limit is not defined precisely, what can cause problems during application. The temperature range where full functionality is possible is strongly dependent on the application conditions and the material. For this investigation mainly ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and fluorocarbon rubbers (FKM) were selected as they are often used for radioactive waste containers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) are typically used for the determination of the temperature range of the glass transition process. The standardized compression set measurement according to ISO 815 is common for investigation of rubber sealing materials as the test simulates the seal behaviour after release. To reduce the test time of the standard tests a faster technique giving the same information was developed. Additionally, the breakdown temperature of the sealing function of complete O-ring seals is measured in a component test setup to compare it with the results of the other tests. The experimental setup is capable of measuring the leakage rate at low temperatures by the pressure rise method. A model was developed that allows calculating the minimum working temperature limit of a seal by combining the results of the applied methods. (authors)

Jaunich, M.; Wolff, D.; Stark, W. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12203 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12203 Berlin (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improvement of industrial drying of natural rubber through analysis of heat and mass transfers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of convective drying of natural rubber in granule form. Exploitation of the mathematical model developed from analysis of internal transfers requires determination of the drying rate and the energy exchange coefficient between the material and the drying air. This was performed using a portable laboratory dryer at the production site, avoiding the problem of changes in the material during transport. Analysis of the drying kinetics of material in thin layers led to modelling the drying rate at the temperatures, rates and relative humidity values encountered in industrial dryers. The energy exchange coefficient was found by measurement of air and granule temperatures. Thick layer trials showed the suitability of the model for simulation of changes in moisture content and temperature of air and granules in a granular environment. The study as a whole led to the development of a computer program for simulating a zone dryer. This software can be used to optimize the management of an industrial natural rubber drying installation.

Naon, B.; Berthomieu, G.; Benet, J.C.; Saix, C. [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Electrical performance of RTV silicone rubber coating of different thicknesses on porcelain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the effects of coating thickness of room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber on its electrical performance in salt-fog of 250 {micro}S/cm and 1,000 {micro}S/cm at 0.5 kV{sub rms}/cm is presented. Porcelain rods coated with RTV silicone rubber to a thickness from 0.17 to 0.99 mm were studied. The dependence of current pulse rate and cumulative number of current pulses on coating thickness were determined as a function of time of exposure to combined electric stress and salt-fog. The surface roughness and the total content of low molecular weight (LMW) silicone fluid in the coating were measured before and after the salt-fog test as a function of coating thickness. The effects of heating the RTV in an electric oven on the production and loss of LMW silicone fluid were investigated in order to elucidate the influence of the heat generated by dry band discharges. The loss of weight of RTV at high temperatures (370 C) due to the decomposition of the alumina trihydrate filler into alumina and water was measured and found to be close to the theoretical value.

Deng, H.; Hackam, R. [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Composites, Compression, Crumb Rubber, Flexure, Microstructure, Polyurethane.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With the enormous growth of automobile industry initiating the needs of tire production all over the world, the disposal of scrap tires has become a… (more)

Bennur, Shubhapriya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; primary aluminum production, 6%; continuous casting, 4%; rubber and thermoplastics, 4%; pharmaceuticals, 294 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production resources, reported production and value of production were withheld from publication to avoid disclosing

350

California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Regional Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with NAICS code 3117 (“Seafood Production, Preparation andaround that time several seafood companies (many of whichfor NAICS sector 3117 (“Seafood Production, Preparation and

Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Rubber membrane liner confines low level radioactive material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most sophisticated membrane lining projects in the world was undertaken in 1979 by the Cotter Corporation, Canon City, Colorado, producers of vanadium and uranium, when a new tailings pond was built to handle mill tailings and effluents. To comply with local, state and federal regulations, Cotter sought maximum protection for downstream residents. The lining was designed to keep leakage near zero and withstand tailings and water pressure at the deepest part of the pond. Other considerations were compatibility with alkalis and acids and durability and effectiveness of the lining beyond the life of the mill. ''We had to be sure the impoundment would outlast the mill because of the need for long-term isolation of the tailings,'' said Joseph McCluskey, Cotter's executive vice presient. Gotter chose an industrial grade sheeting made of Hypalon synthetic rubber, a chlorosulfonated polyethylene, that has an exposed life expectancy of 40 years; however, once covered with earth and tailings, it will last much longer. The sheeting consists of a reinforced scrim sandwiched between two sheets of Hypalon. The rubber comprises nearly 50 percent of the total linear weight, and the reinforcement is a 10' x 10' 1000D polyester scrim whose open weave allows the rubber to penetrate the fabric and create excellent adhesion between the layers. After two years, the impoundment contains approximately 1400 acre feet of liquid. Currently, about one half of the pond consists of run-off with tailings and liquids from the new mill making up the difference.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fracture properties of natural rubber filled with hybrid carbon black/nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid carbon black (CB) and nanoclay (NC) in a rubber matrix have provided superior mechanical performances over conventional composites. Yet the fracture and fatigue properties have...

Yuanbo Liu; Li Li; Qi Wang; Xin Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemi-microbial processing of waste tire rubber: A project overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNL is developing a method to use thiophillic microorganisms to devulcanize (biodesulfurize) the surface of ground rubber particles, which will improve the bonding and adhesion of the ground tire rubber into the virgin tire rubber matrix. The Chemi-microbial processing approach, introduced in this paper, is targeted at alleviating the waste tire problem in an environmentally conscious manner; it may also be applied to improve asphaltic materials and rubber and polymeric wastes to facilite their recycling. This paper outlines the logic and technical methods that will be used.

Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Casein Production by Human Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human breast cancers. Casein production by human breast cancer...Thus it appears that casein production is not a common characteristic...magnesium, by scraping with a rubber policeman and collected by...sulfate. MARCH 1977 749 Casein Production by Human Breast Cancer Marie...

Marie E. Monaco; Diane A. Bronzert; Douglass C. Tormey; Phillip Waalkes; and Marc E. Lippman

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass Sector (NAICS 3272, 327993) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

357

"NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","Don't Know","Not Applicable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.4;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","Don't Know","Not Applicable" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Full-Time Energy Manager (c)",0.7,4.8,3.9,"--" ,"Set Goals for Improving Energy Efficiency",1.2,2.8,3,"--" ,"Measure and Monitor Steam Used (d)",0.8,4.1,3.3,8 ,"Dedicated Staff that Performs Insulation Inspections (e)",0.9,4.5,3.3,8.3 ,"Formal Steam Maintenance Program that Includes the Following:" ," Annual Testing of All Steam Traps",0.9,3.7,3.1,8

358

Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production is obtained from proved reserves but the determinants of the scale of production in the industry and country components of the world total are many and complex with some unique to the individual com...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites filled with thermally treated attapulgite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural rubber (NR) nanocompositeswere prepared in a double-roller plasticator mixer with purified attapulgite (PAT) or modified attapulgite, which was treated at 450°C (PAT-450) and 850°C (PAT-850) for two hours. The structures of the pristine, ...

Jihu Wang; Dajun Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Structural analysis of sulfur in natural rubber using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The opportunity to employ X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy techniques to investigate the alteration of the structural properties of sulfur in various vulcanized rubber sheets is presented.

Pattanasiriwisawa, W.

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mechanical, thermal and transport properties of nitrile rubber (NBR)—nanoclay composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes the properties of nitrile rubber (NBR)—nanoclay composites prepared by a two-step method. ... 1 [by weight] masterbatch of NBR and nanoclay followed by compounding on a two roll ... diffusio...

Meera Balachandran; S. S. Bhagawan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Smart audio frequency energy flow control by magneto-sensitive rubber isolators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A magneto-sensitive rubber isolator inserted between a source and an infinite plate is modelled in the audible frequency range, and the energy flow into the plate with the rubber subjected to a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the axial displacement is calculated. Subsequently the result is compared to the corresponding energy flow for zero magnetic induction; upon the application of an external magnetic field the rubber becomes stiffer, thus shifting the internal resonances of the isolator. This is a fast and reversible process enabling adaption of the isolator to rapidly changing audio frequency conditions by simply turning on and off a magnetic field. In the application example considered, the energy flow into the plate at the first internal dynamic peak stiffness frequency is reduced by approximately 7 dB—a large difference in a sound and vibration context—by inducing magnetic saturation of the rubber.

Peter Blom; Leif Kari

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Agroecological zones and the assessment of crop production potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the assessment of crop production potential M. V. K. Sivakumar...and sustainable agricultural production systems to feed the growing...Agroecological ones and crop production potential Table 3. Land use...perennial tree crops (palm oil, rubber, cocoa, coffee) AEZ4 cool...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

3219," Other Wood Products",0,0,0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",25,34,35 311221," Wet Corn Milling",29,40,7 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 3121," Beverages",0,0,0 3122," Tobacco ",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",3,0,52

366

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

367

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

368

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

369

Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. (Carbohydrate Nutrition Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Corrosion protection by means of rubber linings in a flue gas scrubber made of concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber linings have been applied as a corrosion protection measure for steel surfaces, particularly in the absorbers, in the flue gas desulfurization plants of a large number of power stations in Europe and have decidedly proven their effectiveness. The rubber linings applied consist of either precured and/or cold-curing rubber sheets. In the course of the past five to seven years, the eastern European states have also begun retro-fitting their existing power stations with flue gas desulfurization plants. As the first of its kind, a scrubber in the flue gas desulfurization plant of the Konin Power Station in Poland, which operates on the basis of the limestone-gypsum process, was constructed of concrete. In this case also, the corrosion protection measures implemented consisted in the application of a precured rubber lining on the basis of butyl rubber. A surface area measuring 1,500 m{sup 2} of the concrete absorber was protected by means of this corrosion protection system.

Fenner, J.; Matos, A.; Seiffert, W. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus, and bucking using a chainsaw and skidding logs with a rubber-tired grapple skidder and a mechanical system

Dodson, Beth

372

Where the Rubber Meets the Road -- the Alternative Fuel Station Locator |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Where the Rubber Meets the Road -- the Alternative Fuel Station Where the Rubber Meets the Road -- the Alternative Fuel Station Locator Where the Rubber Meets the Road -- the Alternative Fuel Station Locator August 10, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities Last week, this blog highlighted the highly efficient vehicles competing for the Automotive X Prize. The innovative designs on display in that competition may very well reflect the future of the auto industry, but there are many alternative vehicles already on the road, actively doing their part to cut emissions and improve efficiency. By decreasing the amount of petroleum we use for transportation and running our vehicles on alternative fuels, we can improve our country's social, economic, and environmental sustainability. However, those of us that drive

373

Evaluation of plastic–rubber asphalt: Engineering property and environmental concern  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Waste rubber and plastic are accumulating heavily in China and causing significant environmental issues. In this study, the rubber and one kind of plastic, polypropylene (PP), were powdered and mixed with base asphalt to form plastic–rubber asphalt (PRA). This study evaluated PRA and the mixture in two-folds, engineering properties and environmental concerns. SBS asphalt, one commonly used asphalt binder in China, was adopted as a control. To evaluate the environmental burdens of PRA mixture and SBS asphalt mixture, a cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment (LCA) modeling was performed. Throughout the study, it is revealed that: (1) as a binder, PRA is weaker in terms of softening point, elastic recovery and fatigue performance versus SBS asphalt, but the differences are limited; (2) PRA mixture are close to SBS asphalt mixture for the high temperature, low temperature performances and water durability; (3) PRA mixture is more environmental-friendly compared to SBS asphalt mixture.

Bin Yu; Liya Jiao; Fujian Ni; Jun Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Laboratory evaluation of crumb rubber asphalt concrete mixtures using the concepts of SMA mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 0 3. 1 4. 2 43 3. 8 0 y wcig t o aggregate From this Table, we may conclude that the mixtures containing rubber contents of 0. 5% by weight of the aggregate were the optimum rubber contents that can be incorporated in this dense-graded mix... LABORATORY INVESTIGATION 35 Testing Program . Preparation of the Samples Preconditioning of the Test Specimens Testing of the Samples . V DISCUSSION OF TEST RESULTS AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION 39 39 43 45 48 Resilient Modulus Indirect Tensile...

Rebala, Somasekhar Reddy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thermoplastic nanoclay-modified vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermoplastic vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber containing modified organoclay were developed. It was shown that composites containing 1 to 5 pbw of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite added to rubber show improved physical-mechanical characteristics. Their swelling degree in AI-92 and motor oil was determined. The swelling degree of composites in petrol and motor oil decreases substantially by 20-63% due to the introduction of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite. Modification of thermoplastic vulcanizates using layered silicates raised the degradation onset temperature and decreases weight loss upon high temperature heating.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Equilibrium and thermodynamics of dye removal from aqueous solution by adsorption using rubber wood saw dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Batch equilibrium experiments were carried out for the sorption of Bismarck brown onto rubber wood saw dust particles. The operating variables studied were the initial dye concentration, particle diameter and solution temperature. A linearised Langmuir isotherm was found to well represent the equilibrium uptake for the range of operating conditions studied. The monolayer sorption capacity of rubber wood saw dust for the sorption of Bismarck brown was estimated to be 35 mg g?1. The sorption capacity was found to increase with decreasing particle size. The negative value of ?G and ?H suggests the spontaneity and exothermic nature of the process.

K. Vasanth Kumar; K. Porkodi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Composite molding of SPECTRA{reg_sign} extended chain polyethylene fibers in a flexible rubber matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THETA Technologies, Inc. is a multidisciplinary research and development firm involved in the design and development of affordable, lightweight, high ballistic protection modular body armor ensemble for future military, law enforcement, and specialized commercial market applications. In the course of their research, THETA Technologies, Inc. identified that current state-of-the-art in ballistic protection and overall composite reinforcement is a high density extended chain polyethylene (HDECPE) fiber known as SPECTRA{reg_sign}, a product of AlliedSignal Fibers, Petersburg, VA. SPECTRA{reg_sign} is ten times stronger than steel of equal weight. As a non-aramid polyethylene, it offers highly desirable properties in areas of resistance to chemical degradation, virtual neutral buoyancy (0.97), and increased capacity for composite bonding over competing nylon-based fibers, such as KEVLAR{reg_sign}. SPECTRA Shield{trademark}, a woven ballistic-resistant fabric using the SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber, is presently the most effective ballistic-resistant component for both flexible and hard plate composite armors. THETA Technologies, Inc. identified a market need for a boot sole design that would measurably increase protection to the wearer without significantly degrading performance in other areas, such as flexibility and overall weight. THETA Technologies, Inc. proposed a nitrile rubber and SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber matrix to produce an optimal boot sole. The objective of this CRADA effort was to develop and test a process for combining the SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber, in both chopped fiber and SPECTRA Shield{trademark} form, within a semiflexible nitrile composite having desirable and marketable properties in areas of resistance to penetration and mechanical stress.

McKeehan, K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Developing a process for commercial silica production from Salton Sea brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this joint LLNL-CalEnergy project is to develop a method for precipitating marketable silica from spent Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brines. Many markets for silica exist. We have initially targeted production of silica as a rubber additive. Silica reinforced rubber gives tires less rolling resistance, greater tear strength, and better adhesion to steel belts. Previous silica precipitates produced by CalEnergy from Salton Sea brines were not suitable as rubber additives. They did not to disperse well in the rubber precursors and produced inferior rubber. CalEnergy currently minimizes silica scaling in some of their production facilities by acidifying the brine pH. The rate of silica precipitation slows down as the pH is lowered, so that energy extraction and brine reinfection are possible without unacceptable amounts of scaling even with more than 700 ppm SiO{sub 2} in solution. We are adding a step in which a small amount of base is added to the acidified brine to precipitate silica before reinfection. By carefully controlling the type, rate, and amount of base addition, we can optimize the properties of the precipitate to approach those of an ideal rubber additive.

Bourcier, W; McCutcheon, M; Leif, R; Bruton, C

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Erythrocyte Production and Survival in Rauscher Murine Leukemia Virus-infected BALB/c Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Erythrocyte Production and Survival in Rauscher Murine...0, were used. Lactate production was determined using a 0...glucose utilization and lactate production were expressed in mmol per...plastic cup connected to the rubber cap closing the reaction vessel...

N. J. de Both; E. Kwak; and E. Klootwijk-van Dijke

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Inhibition of Phorbol Ester Stimulated Interleukin 2 Production by Copper(II) Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...COMPOUNDS AND INTERLEUKIN 2 PRODUCTION Equimolar amounts of perchloric...Bioassay of Interleukin 2 Production. A stock solution of PDB...cells were scraped with a rubber policeman. Cells were counted...COMPOUNDS AND INTERLEUKIN 2 PRODUCTION Cu0MeTIM was only minimally...

Janet Rauch Harrison; D. Paul Rillema; Joseph H. Ham IV; and Julianne J. Sando

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Suppression of Proliferative Response and Lymphokine Production during the Progression of a Spontaneous Tumor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B-lymphocyte proliferation and MIF production were also inhibited by macrophages...that macrophages suppress MIF production as well as proliferative responses...me moved by scraping with a rubber policeman. When anti-Thy...of both TBS and NS and MIF production by PHA-stimulated NS. When...

L. Varesio; M. Giovarelli; S. Landolfo; and G. Forni

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Production and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Bladder Tumor-associated Antigens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This report describes the production of four murine McAbs against...harvested with the aid of a rubber policeman and washed three...enough to screen for antibody production (about 3 weeks). Screening...as feeder cells. Antibody Production and Purification. As a source...

Deborah A. Young; George R. Prout, Jr.; and Chi-Wei Lin

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER-BASED POLYMERIC MATERIALS WITH THERMAL RELAXATION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NONLINEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER-BASED POLYMERIC MATERIALS WITH THERMAL RELAXATION MODELS R. V. N of the material and their close connection with the effect of thermal relaxation time can be best appreciated (phonons). A relaxation time appears naturally as the characteristic of thermal resistance in the solid

Melnik, Roderick

384

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

385

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

386

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

387

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

388

Expression of p53 Enhances Selenite-Induced Superoxide Production and Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...apoptosis was mediated by ROS production (21-25). We also showed...was mediated by superoxide production via posttranscriptional modification...determined that superoxide production by selenite was also p53 dependent...PBS thrice, scraping with a rubber policeman in 10-mL PBS...

Rui Zhao; Nong Xiang; Frederick E. Domann; and Weixiong Zhong

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lord Justice of Appeal John Fletcher Moulton and explosives production in World War I: ‘the mathematical mind triumphant’  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...total British prewar toluene production. When gas companies distilled...guncotton is weighed into an India rubber bag. The required volume...30 Unforeseen snags delayed production, so A6 filled the gap by...and expanding picric acid production. 37 Enough nitrate was available...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Studies on erosion of silicone rubber exposed to partial arc discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of electrolyte conductivity on the partial arc discharge development between two electrolyte electrodes on a silicone rubber sheet surface was investigated. Tests were executed by placing the salt-waterlogged glass-filter paper on a silicone rubber sheet to simulate a polluted electrolyte layer, and partial arc discharges with a constant current value of 10 mA were observed. It was found that the formation of an arc channel and a temperature distribution on the sample surface varied with the electrolyte conductivity. In addition, the relation between the electrolyte conductivity and the weight loss due to the heat erosion of specimens was also investigated by a 3D morphological observation and a simulated calculation. The partial arc discharge did significantly not influence on the sample surface erosion under serious polluted conditions. In contrast, the severest erosion appeared under the light pollution with comparatively lower conductivity of the electrolyte electrodes.

Kenichi Haji; Yong Zhu; Masahisa Otsubo; Tatsuya Sakoda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Sensitive, High-Strain, High-Rate Bodily Motion Sensors Based on Graphene–Rubber Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The resulting capabilities would facilitate applications not only in human motion sensing but also in a range of areas including monitoring of inflatable devices such as airbags, vibration detection and motion in robots or other moving mechanical objects. ... A County Stationary No. 32 elastic band (natural rubber based) was placed in a vial of toluene in a low power sonic bath (Branson 1510 model 42 kHz) for 3.5 h. ...

Conor S. Boland; Umar Khan; Claudia Backes; Arlene O’Neill; Joe McCauley; Shane Duane; Ravi Shanker; Yang Liu; Izabela Jurewicz; Alan B. Dalton; Jonathan N. Coleman

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

392

Aero-acoustics of silicone rubber lip reeds for alternative voice production in laryngectomees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To improve voice quality after laryngectomy a small pneumatic sound source to be incorporated in a regular tracheoesophageal shunt valve was designed. This artificial voice source consists of a single floppy lip reed which performs self-sustaining flutter-type oscillations driven by the expired pulmonary air that flows through the tracheoesophageal shunt valve along the outward-striking lip reed. In this in vitro study aero-acoustic data and detailed high-speed digital image sequences of lip reed behavior are obtained for 10 lip configurations. The high-speed visualizations provide a more explicit understanding and reveal details of lip reed behavior such as the onset of vibration beating of the lip against the walls of its housing and chaotic behavior at high volume flow. We discuss several aspects of lip reed behavior in general and implications for its application as an artificial voice source. For pressures above the sounding threshold volume flow fundamental frequency and sound pressure level generated by the floppy lip reed are almost linear functions of the driving force static pressure difference across the lip. Observed irregularities in these relations are mainly caused by transitions from one type of beating behavior of the lip against the walls of its housing to another. This beating explains the wide range and the driving force dependence of fundamental frequency and seems to have a strong effect on the spectral content. The thickness of the lip base is linearly related to the fundamental frequency of lip reed oscillation.

Marein van der Torn; Hans F. Mahieu; Joost M. Festen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Microprocessors in rheological testing for increasing safety and quality in rubber and plastics production and processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microprocessor control in off-line and on-line capillary rheometry leads to an extension of the range of application of these instruments. Furthermore, microprocessors also help to increase safety and quality ...

Dr. K.-H. Moos

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Transesterification of rubber seed oil by sonication technique for the production of methyl esters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research and development activities in several countries on this subject have been mostly on sunflower, safflor, soybean, rapeseed and peanut among others; most of these being edible in Indian context. Thus, ...

S. Nivetha Ragavan; D. Vetha Roy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Polyacryl prosthesis for cranioplasty—Their production in silicon rubber casts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The frequently observed osteolysis after reimplantation of deepfrozen skullcap bone have led us to use polyacryl as the material of choice if a secondary covering of a skull bone defect becomes necessary. Poly...

F. Alesch; R. Bauer

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Wild Rubber Production As A Livelihood Strategy In A North-Amazonian Extractive Reserve.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study is based on and contributes to the multidisciplinary debate of the extractive reserves as a method of sustainable development of the Brazilian Amazonia.… (more)

Savolainen, Unna

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Parthenium argentatum Gray (Guayule): In Vitro Culture and the Production of Rubber and Other Secondary Metabolites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The genus Parthenium L. with its 17 recognized species is native to the western hemisphere, extending, with the exception of the tropics, from southern Bolivia and northern Argentina as far north as Massachusetts...

I. A. Trautmann; H. S. C. Spies

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improvement of the neodymium catalyst preparation step in isoprene rubber production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of pilot tests of a tubular reactor of the diffuser-confuser type in modification of neodymium chloride isopropanol complex in turbulent flows were presented. The new procedure leads to reduced cat...

V. P. Zakharov; V. Z. Mingaleev; E. M. Zakharova…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

production presents economic challenges to agroforestry. While not wishing to understate the economic challenges of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production presents economic challenges to agroforestry. While not wishing to understate in the system espoused by Struebig et al. of intensive production directly abutting HCV areas. We recognise. Indonesia. Hum. Ecol. 35, 427­438 4 Therville, C. (2008) Dynamics of Rubber Agroforest Conversion in Bungo

Barnosky, Anthony D.

400

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population in vitro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population the proportion of protozoa with attached methanogens decreased, however no estimate of CH4 production under were re-filled with H2:CO2, sealed with butyl rubber stoppers and incubated at 39�C with shaking

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fermentative Production of Chemicals That Can Be Used for Polymer Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermentative Production of Chemicals That Can Be Used for Polymer Synthesis Sang Y. Lee,*1,2 Soon H in maintaining life. Naturally occurring polymers such as rubber and cellulose have been widely employed biodegradable polymers have been developed, but their high production costs have been a major barrier

402

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: For the first time in history, Chile surpassed the United States as the largest producer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production W W W W W Imports98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production for domestic consumption as well as for export to other countries; reported production and value of production

403

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production States, Russia, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

404

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 199598 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production worldwide. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1996. Two

405

Stimulative Effects of Estrogens on Tumor Growth and 5?-Steroid Production in a Mouse Leydig Cell Tumor Line (T 124958-R)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cells were harvested by a rubber policeman at the indicated...conditions used, the rate of production of 5 -or 17/3-hydroxy...FEBRUARY 1986 574 5 -ANDROGEN PRODUCTION IN MOUSE LEYDIG CELL TUMOR...FEBRUARY 1986 575 5a-ANDROGEN PRODUCTION IN MOUSE LEYDIG CELL TUMOR...

Shinzaburo Noguchi; Yasuko Nishizawa; Daishiro Takatsuka; Bunzo Sato; and Keishi Matsumoto

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, the United States, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

407

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and synthetic rubber production. Salient Statistics--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1995. Two companies

408

Materials Science and Engineering A, 2006. 417(1-2): p. 249-258 249 Investigation of Flexural Strength Properties of Rubber and Nanoclay Reinforced Hybrid Syntactic Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strength Properties of Rubber and Nanoclay Reinforced Hybrid Syntactic Foams Rahul Maharsia* , Nikhil Gupta are developed by using rubber and nanoclay particles to modify the matrix microstructure in syntactic foams% by volume quantity. In nanoclay hybrid foams, volume of nanoclay particles is maintained at 2 and 5

Gupta, Nikhil

409

Sorption of anionic surfactants on a fixed bed of rubber granules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of a fixed-bed adsorber (FBR) column for the removal of anionic surfactants from aquatic environments has been studied. Waste tyre rubber granules were used as the adsorbent material, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, as the adsorbate. The FBR column design parameters were evaluated using the column breakthrough data at different bed depths. The Bohert and Adams model was used with the bed depth service time approach for the design of the column. The bed efficiency obtained was 90.97%.

Paritosh Das Purakayastha; Anjali Pal; Manas Bandyopadhyay

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nonlinear viscoelastic response of carbon black-filled butyl rubber and implications for o-ring aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Butyl rubber, unfortunately, has pronounced nonlinear viscoelastic behavior, which may be modelled by a separable KBKZ formalism. While these effects seem to have minimal impact on accelerated sealing force measurements, they do severely impact compression set tests. Therefore, a new test is suggested for evaluating field-return o-rings which is free from such confounding effects.

Adolf, D.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use% kiln furniture, 6% fiberglass, 4% paint, and 3% rubber; ball clay--25% floor and wall tile, 21 Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 19961 e Production, mine: Kaolin 8,740 8,830 8,770 9,480 9

413

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1997, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production: Mine, recoverable 488 570 614 600 6071 Primary slab zinc 240 217

414

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

415

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

416

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major

417

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine, recoverable1 614 600 605 722 775 Primary slab zinc 232 226

418

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

419

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

420

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

422

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1998, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

192 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Production: Mine, recoverable 570 614 598 605 6551 Primary slab zinc

423

Surface analysis of rubbers and plastics using secondary neutral mass spectrometry.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber and plastics are complex mixtures of long-chain polymers, smaller organic additives used as plasticizers, mildicides, fungicides, colorants, etc., and inorganic additives such as carbon and silica. Surface analysis of such materials is at once difficult and important. The difficulty lies in the need to identify specific carbon molecules on a very similar organic surface. The importance arises from the dramatic effect that the distribution and concentration of additives have on the physical properties of polymeric materials. Recently we have had some success in applying laser desorption post-ionization mass spectrometry in measuring the surface concentration and distribution of both additives and the polymer molecules themselves. The key has been to use the photoionization properties of the analyte of interest to augment mass spectrometric information.

Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rubber core with insulation of nylon and conduictors...light gathering power, stable and sensitive...The followXing specifications are cited wXhen...extra filanments, power supply. control...processing in research in plant safety. Send for...precise to +3 sec. (Power-Tronic Systems...

Joshua Stern

1960-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...applied heating power is defined as thermal impedance. Heating currents up to 50...constructed with a rubber core with insulation of nylon and conduictors of copper wire...StylUS iSaSvil-, able. The followXing specifications are cited wXhen uLsed with the manufa-ctur-er's...

Joshua Stern

1960-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1 8 3 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 1 * 313 Textile Mills 2 1 0 314 Textile Product Mills 1 * 0 315 Apparel * 0 0 316 Leather and Allied Products * * 0 321 Wood Products 6 4 0 322 Paper 2 1 1 323 Printing and Related Support * * * 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,748 3,689 3,572 325 Chemicals 2,772 3,750 2,812 326 Plastics and Rubber Products * Q Q 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 10 7 12 331 Primary Metals 758 646 529 332 Fabricated Metal Products 3 1 1 333 Machinery Q 2 * 334 Computer and Electronic Products * 1 1 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 27 69 21 336 Transportation Equipment

427

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for Basic Chemicals (NAICS 325), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Production1 (Million Short Tons) Inorganic Chemicals 179 163 170 Bulk Petrochemical 69 73 80 Organic Intermediate 73 73 64 Plastic Resins 40 48 50 Synthetic Rubber 2 2 NA Synthetic Fibers 5 5 4 Value of Shipments (Current Billion Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 25 25 34 Bulk Petrochemicals & Intermediates 39 45 90 Plastic Resins 45 47 78 Synthetic Rubber 5 5 7 Synthetic Fibers 13 8 9 Value of Shipments2 (Billion 2000 Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 27 25 26

428

Energy biomass from large rangeland shrubs of the intermountain United States. [Sagebrush, Saltbush, Greasewood, Rubber Rabbitbrush, Spreading Rabbitbush  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large individual plants within a few species of rangeland shrubs were studied in several intermountain states for their potential use in establishing biomass fuel energy plantations. Biomass and other shrub physical characteristics plus site data were recorded for big sagebrush, fourwing saltbush, big saltbush, greasewood, rubber rabbitbrush, and spreading rabbitbrush (C. linifolius) in 34 locations. Samples of current year's growth and woody tissue were analyzed for burning qualities (heat of combustion, S, mositure, and ash content). Greatest biomass/plant of the individuals sampled was found in greasewood with fourwing saltbush, rubber rabbitbrush, and sagebrush following in decreasing order. Burning qualities varied among the species analyzed. The heat of combustion of the woody material from all shrubs was approximately 4500 kcal/kg, but current year's growth varied considerably among species.

van Epps, G.A.; Barker, J.R.; McKell, C.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

BIOLOGY & MEDICINE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978-1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly increases rubber production in guayule. Figurewith one of the rubber production-stimulating chemicals. Thewas treated with a rubber production stimulant. la) XBB 794-

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Women playing a man's game : reconstructing ceremonial and ritual history of the Mesoamerican ballgame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

old traditions of rubber ball production is very importantrules of the game, production of rubber balls, and the roleslandscape, and the production of rubber balls. None of the

Ramos, Maria Isabel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Policies, Political-Economy, and Swidden in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their lands to rubber production. Smallholders receive thethought suitable for rubber production. Accordingly, HanDeng 1993). Limiting rubber production to Han reinforced

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ASSESSMENT OF ABORIGINAL SMALLHOLDER SOILS FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Board. 2004. Natural rubber production and yield. Retrievedtheir suitability for rubber production, an evaluation ofwith regard to rubber production (Chan et al. , 1975; Yew

Kurt A. Schwabe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2012, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

434

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

435

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2010, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

436

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2011, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

437

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1996 was about $800 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production: Mine, recoverable 523 488 570 614 6201 Primary slab zinc

438

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

439

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2009, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

184 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

440

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 417 444 526 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 114 128 144 313 Textile Mills 57 45 38 314 Textile Product Mills 31 30 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 63 40 26 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 111 322 Paper Manufacturing 153 151 167 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 99 95 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 135 212 530 325 Chemical Manufacturing 407 444 639 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 169 208 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 91 94 126 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 166 139 230 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4b 4b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 431 447 473 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 122 96 109 313 Textile Mills 56 46 37 314 Textile Product Mills 31 30 30 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 92 89 100 322 Paper Manufacturing 168 155 153 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 103 93 93 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 224 244 266 325 Chemical Manufacturing 442 450 513 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 168 170 176 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 97 93 103 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 165 145 163 332

442

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Brillion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 173 205 233 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 62 67 79 313 Textile Mills 24 19 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 21 16 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 34 35 44 322 Paper Manufacturing 73 76 80 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 60 59 60 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 32 37 126 325 Chemical Manufacturing 230 254 340 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 86 92 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 53 55 72 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 69 57 84 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

443

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing

444

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary a  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,579 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 157 164 313 Textile Mills 459 377 304 314 Textile Product Mills 86 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 652 520 625 322 Paper 3,224 2,805 2,825 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,571 7,051 7,125 325 Chemicals 7,211 7,499 6,135 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 692 710 684 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,245 1,338 1,394

445

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 193 182 214 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 70 59 73 313 Textile Mills 23 18 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 22 17 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 35 35 37 322 Paper Manufacturing 84 77 85 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 62 56 59 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 38 46 53 325 Chemical Manufacturing 225 248 291 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 84 88 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 55 54 66

446

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3a. Value of Shipments by Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3a. Value of Shipments 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 428 457 538 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 102 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 32 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 45 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 7 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 153 170 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 96 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 138 216 549 325 Chemical Manufacturing 417 454 658 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 173 211

447

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4a. Value of Shipments by Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 4a Table 4a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4a. Value of Shipments1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars ) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 448 472 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 121 96 109 313 Textile Mills 56 47 37 314 Textile Product Mills 31 32 30 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 45 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 92 89 100 322 Paper Manufacturing 168 156 153 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 103 93 92 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 227 242 265 325 Chemical Manufacturing 440 452 509 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 168 171 175

448

Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.

Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Applying APKGS-20Sh catalyst to the purification of aerial effluents in the production of synthetic rubber at OAO voronezhsintezkauchuk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results from pilot tests and the industrial use of crusted 0.2% Pd/?-Al2O3 APKGS-20Sh catalyst for the purification of aerial effluents at OAO Voronezhsintezkauchuk. The stable operation of the cat...

G. O. Turkov; A. I. Aleshin; T. V. Turkova; P. A. Storozhenko…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experimental study on the performance, emission and combustion characteristics of rubber seed oil-diesel blends in a DI diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, experiments have been carried out to assess the suitability of rubber seed oil and its blends with diesel in a diesel engine. Tests were conducted with different blends of R80-D20 (80% of rubber seed oil and 20% of diesel by volume) and R70-D30 (70% of rubber seed oil and 30% of diesel by volume). Experimental results indicate that the brake thermal efficiency increases from 26.5% to 27.7% with the optimum blend of R70-D30. There is a reduction in emissions is also observed except NOx level at all loads. Smoke emission reduces drastically from 6.1 to 4.7 BSU. Combustion parameters indicated a decrease in ignition delay and combustion duration compared with neat RSO. This will also contribute to higher heat release rate in the premixed combustion phase. Current investigations reveal that the performance of R70-D30 blend is closer to diesel.

V. Edwin Geo; G. Nagarajan; B. Nagalingam

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Personal equipment for low seam coal miners. 8. Improved traction rubber boot soles. Report for 1978-82  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on laboratory and preliminary field tests of off-the-shelf steel-toed rubber boots, a molded sole design was developed to provide increased traction over conventional calendared sole miners boots. The pattern provided sharp edges perpendicular to both lateral and fore-aft slip vectors. The sole was designed to reduce mud caking. An instep lace-up capability was added to better secure the foot inside the boot. A 5-month field evaluation compared the prototype boots to the boots the participants usually wear.

Sanders, M.S.; Downing, J.V.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effect of in-situ bonding system and surface modification of montmorillonite on the properties of butyl rubber/MMT composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isobutylene-isoprene rubber (IIR)/nanoclay composites were prepared by solution intercalation method. Cloisite Na + nanoclays and organo-modified montmorillonite (OMT) Cloisite 10 A .15 A and 20 A were used in this study. The effect of In-situ bonding system HRH (hexametylene tetramine: resorcinol: hydrated silica) on the dispersion of used nanoclays in the rubber matrix were examined by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Characterization of the prepared composites was performed by studying the rheometeric and mechanical properties. The burning out behavior of the nanocomposites with and without the bonding system was also measured.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Comparative Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or ?llers in rubber production (particularly carbon black).and the production of plastic and rubber. It does not

Cherry, Christopher R.; Weinert, Jonathan X.; Yang, Xinmiao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effects of Leachate from Crumb Rubber and Zinc in Green Roofs on the Survival, Growth, and Resistance Characteristics of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leachate from Crumb Rubber and Zinc in Green Roofs on the Survival, Growth, and Resistance...Resources, Dover, Delaware, USA. The use of green roofs is a growing practice worldwide...into artificial medium for plant growth in green roofs and similar engineered environments...

Mollee Crampton; Allayna Ryan; Cori Eckert; Katherine H. Baker; Diane S. Herson

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Notice Type: Presolicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAICS Code: 332 -- Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing/332322 -- Sheet Metal Work Manufacturing Storage Container. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - acyl coa-synthase transgenic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GENOMICS OF RUBBER BIOSYNTHESIS JAEHEUNG KO and KYUNG-HWAN HAN Summary: -natural Rubber ? Production From Transgenic Plants or Microorganisms RATIONALE FOR STUDYING RUBBER...

460

Effect of nanoclay and carboxyl-terminated (butadiene-co-acrylonitrile) (CTBN) rubber on the reaction induced phase separation and cure kinetics of an epoxy/cyclic anhydride system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nano clay, carboxyl-terminated (butadiene-co-acrylonitrile) (CTBN) liquid rubber and the combination of both on the cure kinetics of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin/nadic ...

P. Poornima Vijayan; Debora Puglia; P. Jyotishkumar…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Food and Beverage Sector (NAICS 311 and 312) Combustion Emissions...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nonprocess energy 4 63 Feedstock energy 9 3 Total primary and feedstock energy* 4 1,932 GHG combustion emissions MMT CO 2 e Total 4 117 Onsite 4 56 *When total primary energy and...

462

Toxicity potential of compounds found in parenteral solutions with rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leached stopper components found in parenteral solutions produced by several manufacturers were identified and quantitated. Their toxicity potential was determined by comparing the types and quantities of the leached components with known toxicity levels and/or harmful effects. Toxicity potentials for benzaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, cyclohexanone, ethylbenzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene are listed. Breakdown products of dextrose (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural), which may also have harmful effects, were quantitated.

Danielson, J.W. (Sterility Analysis Research Center, Food and Drug Administration, Minneapolis, MI (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anthony K. Weatherspoon #12;Visit our homepage at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional...............................................................................................................................20 #12;1 INTRODUCTION Michigan's wood products manufacturing industry employs more than 28,000 workers with an output of approximately $6.7 billion (NAICS 321--Wood product manufacturing, and NAICS 322

464

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keith Jacobson #12;Visit our Web site: www.nrs.fs.fed.us Published by: For additional copies: U ..........................................................................................................................20 #12;#12;1 INTRODUCTION Minnesota's wood products manufacturing industry employs more than 28,442 workers with an output of about $8.7 billion (NAICS 321--Wood product manufacturing, and NAICS 322--Paper

465

Ronald J. Piva Gregory W. Cook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resource Bulletin NRS-46 #12;Visit our homepage at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional Virginia's wood products manufacturing industry employs 9,400 workers with an output of more than $2.0 billion (NAICS 321--Wood product manufacturing, and NAICS 322--Paper manufacturing) (U.S. Census Bureau

466

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web site: www.nrs.fs.fed.us Published by: For additional copies: U.S. Forest Service U.S. Forest ..........................................................................................................................21 #12;#12;1 INTRODUCTION Wisconsin's wood products manufacturing industry (NAICS 321--wood product manufacturing, and NAICS 322--paper manufacturing) employed more than 59,000 workers with an output of about $18

467

Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last Name URL Products/Services NAICS Code NAICS Description &yet 2008 140 Gage Blvd Suite 100 Richland and user experience professionals. Build products, consult, and educate internationally and locally. 5415 Engineering, construction--air conditioning 5413 Architectural, engineering, and related services Advanced

468

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Visit our Web site: www.nrs.fs.fed.us Published by: For additional copies: U.S. Forest Service U ..........................................................................................................................20 #12;#12;1 INTRODUCTION The wood products manufacturing industry in Kansas employs more than 4,900 workers with an output of approximately $1.06 billion (NAICS 321--wood product manufacturing and NAICS 322

469

Effect of montmorillonite on carboxylated styrene butadiene rubber/hindered phenol damping material with improved extraction resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Three methods of blending, including direct blending, melt blending and latex blending, were introduced to disperse sodium based montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and N,N?-hexane-1,6-diylbis{3-(5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-propionamide)} (HP1098) into the carboxylated styrene butadiene (XSBR) matrix. Small angle X-ray Diffraction testing indicated that melting Na-MMT with HP1098 enlarged the d-spacing of Na-MMT, which was further enlarged by mechanical blending with XSBR, and this led to homogeneous dispersion of Na-MMT and HP1098, which was indicated by Transmission Electronic Microscopy; latex blending was found most advantageous in dispersing HP1098 which was essential for improved damping performance. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was utilized to characterize damping properties, and enhanced static mechanical properties were presumably originated from molecule chains being intercalated into the enlarged galleries of Na-MMT by mechanical blending. Formation of hydrogen bonds was observed by Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectrum and was supposed to be responsible for exceptional damping performance at elevated temperature. Extraction measurement of XSBR/Na-MMT/HP1098 composite indicated that XSBR and Na-MMT showed synergic effect in protecting HP1098 molecules from being extracted, which is a promising method in preparing rubber/hindered phenol damping materials with improved extraction resistance, whereby increasing the performance stability and lifespan of the composite materials. Additional advantage of this type of materials is better processability and shortened vulcanization process.

Yuan Gao; Xiaoping Wang; Meijun Liu; Xue Xi; Xin Zhang; Demin Jia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Crystallization Behavior of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber Measured Using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Two dynamic temperature sweep tests, 25 to -100 C and 25 to -70 to 0 C (ramp rate = 1 C/min), were conducted at a frequency of 6.28 rad/s (1 Hz) using a torsion rectangular test geometry. A strain of 0.1% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on an initial dynamic strain sweep test. Storage (G{prime}) and loss (G{double_prime}) moduli, the ratio G{double_prime}/G{prime} (tan {delta}), and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion ({alpha}) were determined as a function of temperature. Crystallization occurred between -40 and -60 C, with G{prime} increasing from {approx}6 x 10{sup 6} to {approx}4 x 10{sup 8} Pa. The value of {alpha} was fairly constant before ({approx}4 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) and after ({approx}3 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) the transition, and peaked during the transition ({approx}3 x 10{sup -3} mm/mm- C). Melting occurred around -30 C upon heating.

Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

471

Pipeline system insulation: thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. December 1985-February 1988 (citations from the rubber and plastics research association data base). Report for December 1985-February 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulating of pipeline systems used to transfer liquids and gases. Thermal aging of polyurethane foam for insulating heating pipes, extrusion-film pipeline-insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile-rubber pipeline insulation with class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass-reinforced polyester insulated-pipeline systems are among the topics discussed. Applications in solar-heating systems, underground water, oil, and gas, interior hot water and cold water lines under seawater, and chemical-plant pipeline-system insulation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 139 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Analysis of the useable power of a dual-worm mixer with a modular impeller configuration for the production of rubber-asphalt compositions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One possible alternative means is presented for analysis of the power of a continuous-action dual-worm mixer by ascertaining the useful power of the components of a sectional impeller through determination of ...

M. V. Zabavnikov; P. S. Belyaev; O. G. Malikov…

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Genetic Transformation of Hevea Brasiliensis (Rubber Tree) and Its Applications towards Crop Improvement and Production of Recombinant Proteins of Commercial Value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg. belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae Although it originated in South America primarily in the Amazon basin, but it is now, mainly cultivated in South East Asia. Of t...

P. Arokiaraj

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Mal-das-folhas da seringueira: dinâmica de inóculo do patógeno, progresso e danos, em três condições topográficas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Brazil currently accounts for only 1.15% of the world production of natural rubber. A limiting factor on the rubber production in Brazil is the South… (more)

Jaime Honorato Júnior

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

RMOTC - Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

476

PRODUCTS & MATERIALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1995-96 Spectrum Chemical and Safety Prod-ucts Catalog features products for molecular and life science laboratories and cleanroom environments. Spectrum Chemical Manu-facturing. Circle 150. SCIENCE * VOL. 268 * 23 JUNE 1995

1995-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

478

Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 992 1,079 1,124 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 109 104 101 313 Textile Mills 255 206 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 285 198 296 322 Paper 1,648 1,413 1,350 323 Printing and Related Support 97 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 1,475 1,290 1,434 325 Chemicals 3,377 3,154 2,772 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 347 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 921 960 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,010 1,614 1,353 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 396

479

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

480

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and"," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rubber products naics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

482

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals

483

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1a 1a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1a. Consumption of Energy (Site Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,123 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 105 107 313 Textile Mills 256 207 178 314 Textile Product Mills 50 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 509 377 451 322 Paper 2,747 2,363 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,320 6,799 6,864 325 Chemicals 6,064 6,465 5,149 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 328 351 337 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 979 1,059

484

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1a. Table 1a. Consumption of Site Energy For  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1a. Consumption of Energy (Site Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,123 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 105 107 313 Textile Mills 256 207 178 314 Textile Product Mills 50 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 509 377 451 322 Paper 2,747 2,363 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,320 6,799 6,864 325 Chemicals 6,064 6,465 5,149 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 328 351 337 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 979 1,059 1,114 331 Primary Metals 2,560 2,120 1,736

485

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 992 1,079 1,124 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 109 104 101 313 Textile Mills 255 206 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 285 198 296 322 Paper 1,648 1,413 1,350 323 Printing and Related Support 97 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 1,475 1,290 1,434 325 Chemicals 3,377 3,154 2,772 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 347 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 921 960 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,010 1,614

486

PRODUCTS & MATERIALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Phar-macia Biotech. Circle 141. Cell Culture Production The CellCube offers the fastest, most com-pact system available for high-volume...culture production, according to the manu-facturer. The CellCube not only saves up to four times the space of roller bottles...

1995-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

487

Rigid polyurethane foams in refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of rigid polyurethane as thermal insulation in refrigerators. Production machinery, foam systems such as one-shot prepolymer systems, and properties of rigid polyurethane foams used in refrigerators are among the topics discussed. Curing methods, in-place foaming, and bun foaming are also included. (Contains a minimum of 70 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains a minimum of 88 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains a minimum of 80 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Notice Type: Presolicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334511 -- Search, Detection, Navigation, Guidance, Aeronautical, and Nautical System and Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

493

Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

Meng, Jianbing, E-mail: jianbingmeng@126.com; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049 (China)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...security of unmatched sample traceability. Manufactured from high-quality polypropylene in a fully automated class-7 cleanroom environment ensures the laser-etched alphanumeric tubes exhibit absolute product consistency, near-zero contaminants...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

495

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bind cells and biomolecules through passive hydrophobic interactions. Molded from ultrapure polystyrene in a class 100,000 cleanroom production environment, the untreated culture plates are supplied with lids in individual sterile packs. The plates include...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

Production Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is obvious that we must bring a number of things into our controlled environment besides clean conditioned air, equipment, and ultrapure water. If we are to do any production work, or research involving the pr...

M. Kozicki; S. Hoenig; P. Robinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Finally, as a personal pipetting system, Liquidator 96 fits any benchtop or laminar-flow cabinet making it suitable for cleanroom conditions. Mettler Toledo For info: 800-472-4646 www.mt.com/liquidator Electronically submit your new product...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

498

Forest Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Purchased energy remains the third largest manufacturing cost for the forest products industry–despite its extensive use of highly efficient co-generation technology. The industry has worked with...

499

NEW PRODUCTS:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also be used with other heating elements and probes...content of diesel and heating oils. A highly specific titration...requirements for fuel oil products are consistently...de- scriptions, and prices are included for columns......

New Products

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the area scanned. When the earth's thermal gradient appears, the vibrating mirror...Write for a Product Data Sheet giving specifications, typical drying perform-ance, and...pebble-bed heaters and electrical insulation at elevated temperatures. (Minneapolis-Honeywell...

Joshua Stern

1961-11-10T23:59:59.000Z