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Sample records for rs riley stoker

  1. Katherine Riley | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katherine Riley Director of Science Katherine Riley Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 2125 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-5786 riley@alcf.anl.gov...

  2. Dear Mayor Riley: I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~. Washington, DC 20585 ' . . aaAq 3 .A , Tbs %z;y;bl& &r& Ri!ey !llll Brookshire Avenue Downey, California 90247 ' Dear Mayor Riley: I Secretary of.Energy Hazel O!.Leary has announced a new approach, to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the pubTic. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed 'info'rmation related to:the former North American Aviation site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its

  3. Women @ Energy: Katherine Riley | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Katherine Riley Women @ Energy: Katherine Riley June 18, 2014 - 3:49pm Addthis Katherine Riley manages a team of computational scientists at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Katherine Riley manages a team of computational scientists at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Principal scientific applications engineer Katherine Riley manages a team of computational scientists at the Argonne

  4. QER- Comment of Jennifer Riley

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To Whom It May Concern - I am writing to strongly object to the proposed natural gas pipeline extension from Wright, NY to Dracut, MA. There would be no benefit to Massachusetts whatsoever from such a pipeline, which would carry natural gas ultimately to be exported. It would, however, damage sensitive ecosystems and farmland across the state, and carry a constant risk of explosion and leaks. Now is the time to turn decisively away from the use of fossil fuels, especially such a potent greenhouse gas as methane. Governor Patrick has committed our state to a clean energy future, and we are seeing unprecedented development of renewable energy projects. When you add in sensible and planned conservation efforts, it becomes abundantly clear that we do not need the natural gas from this pipeline - even if we were it's intended recipients. This proposed pipeline would benefit only the natural gas companies involved, and would cause significant damage not only to the environment of Massachusetts, but would also contribute to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere at a time when it is imperative that we reduce atmospheric CO2. I cannot urge you strongly enough to deny approval of this pipeline; it is not the way forward. - Jennifer Riley

  5. Cofiring Wood and Coal to Stoker Boilers in Pittsburgh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T., Jr.; Elder, W.W.

    1997-07-01

    The prime objective of the University of Pittsburgh's overall wood/coal cofiring program is the successful introduction of commercial cofiring of urban wood wastes into the stoker boilers of western Pennsylvania. Central to this objective is the demonstration test at the Pittsburgh Brewing Company. In this test the project team is working to show that two commercially-available clean wood wastes - tub-ground pallet waste and chipped clearance wood - can be included in the fuel fed daily to an industrial stoker boiler. Irrespective of its economic outcome, the technical success of the demonstration at the brewery will allow the local air quality regulation agency to permit a parametric test at the Bellefield Boiler Plant. The objective of this test is to obtain comprehensive data on all key parameters of this operational boiler while firing wood with coal. The data would then be used for thorough generic technical and economic analyses. The technical analysis would be added to the open literature for the general planning and operational guidance for boiler owners and operators. The economic analysis would gage the potential for providing this stoker fuel commercially in an urban setting and for purchasing it regularly for combustion in an urban stoker boiler.

  6. Riley County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Riley County, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.3686475, -96.8350999 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  7. Bart Riley > A123 Systems > Scientific Advisory Board > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell Bart Riley A123 Systems

  8. Demonstration of wood/coal co-firing in a spreader stoker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Elder, W.W.; Geiger, G.E.; Campus, N.J.; Miller, W.F.; Freeman, M.C.; McCreery, L.R.

    1999-07-01

    The Forest Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture is sponsoring a series of demonstrations of wood/coal co-firing in stoker boilers. The first demonstration was conducted in 1997 in an industrial traveling-grate stoker boiler and the second in May 1999 in a spreader stoker boiler operated by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Bruceton Research Laboratory. The principal wood used in both demonstrations was tub-ground broken pallets. In the first phase of the NIOSH demonstration, four five-ton loads of wood/coal mixtures, varying from 3% to 12% wood (by Btu content), were combusted. The second phase of this demonstration was a 50-hour test using a 10% wood/coal blend delivered in two 20-ton loads. It has been concluded from both demonstrations that (1) a 10% wood/coal blend burns acceptably in the boiler, but (2) tub-ground urban wood is unacceptably difficult to feed through the grill above the delivery pit and through the spreader stokers. A method is being sought to acquire urban waste wood, having a more chip-like nature, to use in further testing and for commercialization.

  9. Gas cofiring in coal-fired stokers for emissions reduction and performance improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, H.B.; Drennan, S.; Chan, I.; Kinney, W.L.; Borland, D.

    1996-12-31

    Adding gas burners above the grate of a coal-fired stoker can be an economical method of reducing gaseous and particulate emissions and improving efficiency and operational flexibility. With this cofiring configuration, the improved heat distribution and mixing with the stoker combustion products can give reduced opacity, reduced emissions of particulate, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}, improved carbon burnout and lower overall ash, reduced excess air, faster load response, cleaner and quicker lightoffs, improved turndown at both lower and upper capacity limits, and improved performance with problematic coals. To develop and validate the cofiring technology, three cofire field experiments have been conducted. A 165,000 lb/hr spreader stoker and mass feed chain grate stokers rated at 40,000 and 75,000 lb/hr have been retrofit with gas burners and tested in the field. The two larger units used dual, opposed burners, while the smaller unit was retrofit with a single burner. With the spreader stoker, the primary benefits of gas cofire was reduction in opacity episodes with coal quality variability and recovery of lost derate. With the larger chain grate unit, the primary benefit was reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} to within Title V limits and elimination of opacity episodes during startup and load swings. With the smaller chain grate, the primary benefit was ability to operate at low loads without unacceptable opacity excursions which had previously required a backup boiler. In all cases, the economics justified the capital burner system retrofit cost and incremental fuel costs.

  10. Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Ohm, Robin A.; Riley, Robert...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Ohm, Robin A.; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol; Grigoriev, Igor V. Not Available Elsevier None USDOE United States...

  11. Performance of a small underfed wood chip-fired stoker in a hot air-heated home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the study was to provide space heat for a home using forest biomass presently not in demand by industry, and by using a convenient, automatic, low-emission heating system. A stoker firing wood chips was installed in a home, and chips were prepared for it from the residues of a softwood clearcut. Residues from 1 and a quarter acre provided enough fuel to heat the house for the heating season. The chip-fired heating system was convenient, maintained the house at whatever temperature was set on the room thermostat, and generated little creosote or wood smoke. It was better at converting fuel to heat than the previous combustion heating systems in the house, with steady-state combustion efficiency of approximately 75% and longer-term appliance efficiency of 69%. Electric energy required for heating hot water was reduced approximately 27% as a result of a preheating coil located in the chip-fired furnace. The major cause of heat interruptions was jamming of the stoker which occurred on the average of every 18 and a half days. Clearing such jams was simple. The system operated safely throughout the test period.

  12. Installation of a stoker-coal preparation plant in Krakow, Poland. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, January--March, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozelle, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made during this reporting period of a two year project to demonstrate that the air pollution from a traveling-grate stoker being used to heat water at a central heating plant in Krakow, Poland can be reduced significantly by (1) substituting the unwashed, unsized coal currently being used with a mechanically cleaned, double-sized stoker fuel and by (2) optimizing the operating parameters of the stoker. It is anticipated that these improvements will prove to be cost-effective and hence will be adopted by the other central heating plants in Krakow and ideally, throughout Eastern European cities where coal continues to be the primary source of fuel. EFH Coal Company has formed a partnership with two Polish institutions -- MPEC, a central heating company in Krakow, and Naftokrak-Naftobudowa, preparation plant designers and fabricators-for the execution of this effort. Five potential candidate sources have been located and contracts for coal deliveries should be executed early next quarter. TInitial delays in formalizing the EFH/Polish Partners agreement delayed finalizing the coal supply contracts and hence, precluded collecting the Polish coal samples for characterization and combustion performance studies. Work on this Task will be initialed next quarter after the raw coal supply contracts are executed. A conceptual design for a plant to wash 25mm x 0 raw coal fines at a need rate of 300 mtph was completed. This plant will receive raw coals ranging in ash content from 20 to 30 percent and produce a compliance coal containing about 1 percent ash, 0.8 percent sulfur and 27, 840 KJ/kg (12,000 Btu/lb). A heavy-media cyclone will be used to wash the 20mm x 1mm stoker coal. Discussions with financial institutions regarding the cost of producing a quality stoker coal in Poland and A for identifying sources of private capital to help cost share the project continued.

  13. Julia Riley

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Julia is a student representative to the board for FY 2013-14. She is a senior at Hardin Valley Academy, where she participates in the National Honor Society, Leo Club, a Lions Club organization,...

  14. A FANAROFF-RILEY TYPE I CANDIDATE IN NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 1239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-01-10

    We report finding kiloparsec-scale radio emissions aligned with parsec-scale jet structures in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy Mrk 1239 using the Very Large Array and the Very Long Baseline Array. Thus, this radio-quiet NLS1 has a jet-producing central engine driven by essentially the same mechanism as that of other radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most of the radio luminosity is concentrated within 100 parsecs and overall radio morphology looks edge-darkened; the estimated jet kinetic power is comparable to Fanaroff-Riley Type I radio galaxies. The conversion from accretion to jet power appears to be highly inefficient in this highly accreting low-mass black hole system compared with that in a low-luminosity AGN with similar radio power driven by a sub-Eddington, high-mass black hole. Thus, Mrk 1239 is a crucial probe to the unexplored parameter spaces of central engines for a jet formation.

  15. Development of METHANE de-NOX Reburn Process for Wood Waste and Biomass Fired Stoker Boilers - Final Report - METHANE de-NOX Reburn Technology Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rabovitser; B. Bryan; S. Wohadlo; S. Nester; J. Vaught; M. Tartan L. Szymanski; R. Glickert

    2007-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the METHANE de-NOX® (MdN) Reburn process in the Forest Products Industry (FPI) to provide more efficient use of wood and sludge waste (biosolids) combustion for both energy generation and emissions reduction (specifically from nitrogen oxides (NOx)) and to promote the transfer of the technology to the wide range of wood waste-fired stoker boilers populating the FPI. This document, MdN Reburn Commercial Technology Manual, was prepared to be a resource to promote technology transfer and commercialization activities of MdN in the industry and to assist potential users understand its application and installation requirements. The Manual includes a compilation of MdN commercial design data from four different stoker boiler designs that were baseline tested as part of the development effort. Design information in the Manual include boiler CFD model studies, process design protocols, engineering data sheets and commercial installation drawings. Each design package is unique and implemented in a manner to meet specific mill requirements.

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - RS-90 Transition IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsRS-90 Transition IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : RS-90...

  17. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains Site (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature,

  18. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  19. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  20. RS-PO-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RS-PO-0001-001.doc Radiation Badge Date: 20000509 1. Introduction: CAMD is a radiation producing facility. Therefore, there is a need to monitor the radiation exposure of all...

  1. Krm. WLZS spc-IG?rs, JR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    z. I DATE 0; MESSAGE . :: ,.; : ALEmY, ?I. T. " : :' 'i: -. .: Krm. WLZS spc-IG?rs, JR ,., pi, : ,. .' ..;.-:r-.:L...:~. :. .: : :. .' ..:".;:.' . ,. / : _" l--- 3 -,- J-c;2 I .' _: D :I .: .' .. :: : . : -- ."lD

  2. Riley_1989.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. RS India Wind Energy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RS India Wind Energy Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: RS India Wind Energy Pvt Ltd Place: New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip: 110001 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind...

  4. MOA-2010-BLG-523: 'FAILED PLANET' = RS CVn STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L.-W.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Greenhill, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Bensby, T.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Lee, C.-U.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; RoboNet Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2013-02-15

    The Galactic bulge source MOA-2010-BLG-523S exhibited short-term deviations from a standard microlensing light curve near the peak of an A {sub max} {approx} 265 high-magnification microlensing event. The deviations originally seemed consistent with expectations for a planetary companion to the principal lens. We combine long-term photometric monitoring with a previously published high-resolution spectrum taken near peak to demonstrate that this is an RS CVn variable, so that planetary microlensing is not required to explain the light-curve deviations. This is the first spectroscopically confirmed RS CVn star discovered in the Galactic bulge.

  5. Katherine Riley | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric...

  6. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report for FY15 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report for ...

  7. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year Deliverable Report for FY15 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis ...

  8. LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report for FY13 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report for ...

  9. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Country of ...

  10. The ARIES-RS power core -- Recent development in Li/V designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.C.; Hua, T.Q.

    1997-04-01

    The ARIES-RS fusion power plant design study is based on reversed-shear (RS) physics with a Li/V (lithium breeder and vanadium structure) blanket. The reversed-shear discharge has been documented in many large tokamak experiments. The plasma in the RS mode has a high beta, low current, and low current drive requirements. Therefore, it is an attractive physics regime for a fusion power plant. The blanket system based on a Li/V has high temperature operating capability, good tritium breeding, excellent high heat flux removal capability, long structural life time, low activation, low after heat and good safety characteristics. For these reasons, the ARIES-RS reactor study selected Li/V as the reference blanket. The combination of attractive physics and attractive blanket engineering is expected to result in a superior power plant design. This paper summarizes the power core design of the ARIES-RS power plant study.

  11. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deliverable Report for FY15 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year Deliverable Report for FY15 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year Deliverable Report for FY15 This document is a mid-year report on a deliverable for the PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT) for project LANL12-RS-107J in FY15. The deliverable is deliverable number 2 in the work package and

  12. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report for FY15

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report for FY15 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report for FY15 Authors: Temple, Brian Allen [1] ; Armstrong, Jerawan Chudoung [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-09-17 OSTI Identifier: 1215800 Report Number(s): LA-UR--15-27231 DOE Contract

  13. LANL12-RS-108J Report on Device Modeler Testing of the Device Modeler Tool

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kit. DMTK in FY14 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Report on Device Modeler Testing of the Device Modeler Tool Kit. DMTK in FY14 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL12-RS-108J Report on Device Modeler Testing of the Device Modeler Tool Kit. DMTK in FY14 This document covers the various testing and modifications of the Device Modeler Tool Kit (DMTK) for project LANL12-RS-108J in FY14. The testing has been comprised of different device modelers and trainees for device modeling

  14. LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report for FY13

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report for FY13 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report for FY13 Authors: Temple, Brian A. [1] ; Armstrong, Jerawan C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-09-27 OSTI Identifier: 1095194 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-27560 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report

  15. USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 This document describes the Statement of Work (SOW) of the Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) Contract for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program's Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). An M&O contract is defined at Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 17.6 and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) 970. Inasmuch as

  16. Crystallization of lysozyme with (R)-, (S)- and (RS)-2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stauber, Mark; Jakoncic, Jean; Berger, Jacob; Karp, Jerome M.; Axelbaum, Ariel; Sastow, Dahniel; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Hrnjez, Bruce J.; Asherie, Neer

    2015-03-01

    Chiral control of crystallization has ample precedent in the small-molecule world, but relatively little is known about the role of chirality in protein crystallization. In this study, lysozyme was crystallized in the presence of the chiral additive 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) separately using the R and S enantiomers as well as with a racemic RS mixture. Crystals grown with (R)-MPD had the most order and produced the highest resolution protein structures. This result is consistent with the observation that in the crystals grown with (R)-MPD and (RS)-MPD the crystal contacts are made by (R)-MPD, demonstrating that there is preferential interaction between lysozymemore » and this enantiomer. These findings suggest that chiral interactions are important in protein crystallization.« less

  17. Coordinated optical and ultraviolet observations of short period RS CVn and W UMa type stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Fiber Optic Echelle Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Spectrograph at KPNO as well as IUE data were analyzed in this study of short period RS CVn and W UMa type binaries. Optical data were analyzed using a spectral subtraction technique to find excess emission (or absorption) in the component spectra. Analysis of data for the W UMa type contact binary VW Cep strongly suggests the existence of extended material near the contact region but clearly outside the Roche lobes. This material is presumably confined in magnetic loops bridging the two components. Making simple assumptions, the density can be estimated at 4 to 5 times 10 {sup 12} cm (sup {minus}3). A possible prominence was also detected on the secondary component of the detached short period RS CVn system DH Leo.

  18. THE SUPERSOFT X-RAY PHASE OF NOVA RS OPHIUCHI 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Beardmore, A. P.; Goad, M. R.; Bode, M. F.; O'Brien, T. J.; Starrfield, S.; Rauch, T.; Ness, J.-U.; Krautter, J.; Schwarz, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Drake, J. J.; Evans, A.; Eyres, S. P. S.

    2011-02-01

    Swift X-ray observations of the {approx}60 day supersoft phase of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) 2006 show the progress of nuclear burning on the white dwarf (WD) in exquisite detail. First seen 26 days after the optical outburst, this phase started with extreme variability likely due to variable absorption, although intrinsic WD variations are not excluded. About 32 days later, a steady decline in count rate set in. NLTE model atmosphere spectral fits during the supersoft phase show that the effective temperature of the WD increases from {approx}65 eV to {approx}90 eV during the extreme variability phase, falling slowly after about day 60 and more rapidly after day 80. The bolometric luminosity is seen to be approximately constant and close to Eddington from day 45 up to day 60, the subsequent decline possibly signaling the end of extensive nuclear burning. Before the decline, a multiply-periodic {approx}35 s modulation of the soft X-rays was present and may be the signature of a nuclear fusion driven instability. Our measurements are consistent with a WD mass near the Chandrasekhar limit; combined with a deduced accumulation of mass transferred from its binary companion, this leads us to suggest that RS Oph is a strong candidate for a future supernova explosion. The main uncertainty now is whether the WD is the CO type necessary for a Type Ia supernova. This may be confirmed by detailed abundance analyses of spectroscopic data from the outbursts.

  19. Crystallization of lysozyme with (R)-, (S)- and (RS)-2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauber, Mark; Jakoncic, Jean; Berger, Jacob; Karp, Jerome M.; Axelbaum, Ariel; Sastow, Dahniel; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Hrnjez, Bruce J.; Asherie, Neer

    2015-03-01

    Crystallization of lysozyme with (R)-2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol produces more ordered crystals and a higher resolution protein structure than crystallization with (S)-2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol. The results suggest that chiral interactions with chiral additives are important in protein crystal formation. Chiral control of crystallization has ample precedent in the small-molecule world, but relatively little is known about the role of chirality in protein crystallization. In this study, lysozyme was crystallized in the presence of the chiral additive 2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol (MPD) separately using the R and S enantiomers as well as with a racemic RS mixture. Crystals grown with (R)-MPD had the most order and produced the highest resolution protein structures. This result is consistent with the observation that in the crystals grown with (R)-MPD and (RS)-MPD the crystal contacts are made by (R)-MPD, demonstrating that there is preferential interaction between lysozyme and this enantiomer. These findings suggest that chiral interactions are important in protein crystallization.

  20. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    7 Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report B Schmid C Flynn March 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  1. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report March 2016 B Schmid C Flynn DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

  2. Evaluation of two Vaisala RS92 radiosonde solar radiative dry bias correction algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dzambo, A. M.; Turner, D. D.; Mlawer, E. J.

    2015-10-20

    Solar heating of the relative humidity (RH) probe on Vaisala RS92 radiosondes results in a large dry bias in the upper troposphere. Two different algorithms (Miloshevich et al., 2009, MILO hereafter; and Wang et al., 2013, WANG hereafter) have been designed to account for this solar radiative dry bias (SRDB). These corrections are markedly different with MILO adding up to 40 % more moisture to the original radiosonde profile than WANG; however, the impact of the two algorithms varies with height. The accuracy of these two algorithms is evaluated using three different approaches: a comparison of precipitable water vapor (PWV),moredownwelling radiative closure with a surface-based microwave radiometer at a high-altitude site (5.3 km MSL), and upwelling radiative closure with the space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The PWV computed from the uncorrected and corrected RH data is compared against PWV retrieved from ground-based microwave radiometers at tropical, mid-latitude, and arctic sites. Although MILO generally adds more moisture to the original radiosonde profile in the upper troposphere compared to WANG, both corrections yield similar changes to the PWV, and the corrected data agree well with the ground-based retrievals. The two closure activities done for clear-sky scenes use the radiative transfer models MonoRTM and LBLRTM to compute radiance from the radiosonde profiles to compare against spectral observations. Both WANG- and MILO-corrected RH are statistically better than original RH in all cases except for the driest 30 % of cases in the downwelling experiment, where both algorithms add too much water vapor to the original profile. In the upwelling experiment, the RH correction applied by the WANG vs. MILO algorithm is statistically different above 10 km for the driest 30 % of cases and above 8 km for the moistest 30 % of cases, suggesting that the MILO correction performs better than the WANG in clear-sky scenes. The cause of this statistical significance is likely explained by the fact the WANG correction also accounts for cloud cover a condition not accounted for in the radiance closure experiments.less

  3. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine Riley...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tin-sulfide; aerogel This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National...

  4. Initial Assessment of Alternate Metals in Chalcogels Riley, Brian...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based chemistries available in the literature for making non-oxide, chalcogen-based aerogels, called chalcogels. In each case, a combination of multiple precursors is required to...

  5. Riley_Venayagamoorthy_PVSC2011_ForWebsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-4179 C 37 th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Seattle, WA, June 2011 COMPARISON OF A RECURRENT NEURAL NETWORK PV SYSTEM MODEL WITH A TRADITIONAL COMPONENT-BASED PV...

  6. Design and development for a low emission boiler system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy initiated the Combustion 2000 program to develop the next generation of coal-fired power plants. Sargent & Lundy (S&L) is working on the Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) portion of the program led by Riley Stoker Corporation, with support from Textron Defense Systems, Tecogen, and Reaction Engineering International. Together these organizations form {open_quotes}the Riley Team.{close_quotes} There are four phases of the LEBS development program. Currently, we are working in Phase I, which involves the design of a 400 MWe unit. Phase II through IV will involve pilot scale component testing and a Proof-of-Concept facility ({approximately}40MWe) design, construction, and operation. This document comprises the Design and Development Report for the LEBS. The report describes the design basis, design uncertainties and development plan for each of the major LEBS subsystems.

  7. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Qingsong; Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin ; Wei, Qingyi; Xu, Ting; Yuan, Xianglin; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Levy, Lawrence B.; Liu, Zhensheng; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Li-E.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ≥2 or ≥3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ≥3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ≥3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  8. 3RS action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Solid Waste Interim Steering Committee (SWISC) process is to develop a long-term waste management system for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), to be in place by 1996, which is environmentally, socially, economically and technically sound. This background report is being released to the public and member Regional Councils to facilitate input to the SWISC planning process. The report documents current reduction, reuse and recycling initiatives in the GTA, identifies opportunities for coordination and collaboration among the GTA communities, and develops an action plan for improving the effectiveness of the reduction, reuse and recycling efforts within the GTA.

  9. Crystallization of lysozyme with (R)-, (S)- and (RS)-2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauber, Mark; Jakoncic, Jean; Berger, Jacob; Karp, Jerome M.; Axelbaum, Ariel; Sastow, Dahniel; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Hrnjez, Bruce J.; Asherie, Neer

    2015-03-01

    Chiral control of crystallization has ample precedent in the small-molecule world, but relatively little is known about the role of chirality in protein crystallization. In this study, lysozyme was crystallized in the presence of the chiral additive 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) separately using the R and S enantiomers as well as with a racemic RS mixture. Crystals grown with (R)-MPD had the most order and produced the highest resolution protein structures. This result is consistent with the observation that in the crystals grown with (R)-MPD and (RS)-MPD the crystal contacts are made by (R)-MPD, demonstrating that there is preferential interaction between lysozyme and this enantiomer. These findings suggest that chiral interactions are important in protein crystallization.

  10. In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements L. M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado H. Vömel and S. J. Oltmans National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Paukkunen Vaisala Oy Helsinki, Finland Introduction Radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements are fundamentally important to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program goals because they are used in a

  11. Riley oxidation: A forgotten name reaction for synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chetan P.; Dwivedi, Charu; Singh, Krishan K.; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N.

    2010-09-15

    A simple wet chemical method, involving reaction of acetone with selenium dioxide, has been developed, to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol-stabilized selenium nanoparticles. The method is capable of producing nanoparticles in the size range of about 100-300 nm, under ambient conditions. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sols by a high-speed centrifuge, and can be re-dispersed in aqueous medium by a sonicator. The effect of concentrations of selenium dioxide, acetone and PVA on the size of the selenium nanoparticles has been studied. The size of the selenium nanoparticles has been found to increase with increase in the reaction time as well as the concentration of selenium dioxide, while it decreases with increase in the concentration of the stabilizer, PVA. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  12. Improvement of the thermoelectric properties of [Bi{sub 1.68}Ca{sub 2}O{sub 4-{delta}}]{sup RS}[CoO{sub 2}]{sub 1.69} cobaltite by chimie douce methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muguerra, Herve; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Traianidis, Maria; Henrist, Catherine; Vertruyen, Benedicte; Cloots, Rudi

    2010-06-15

    [Bi{sub 1.68}Ca{sub 2}O{sub 4-{delta}}]{sup RS}[CoO{sub 2}]{sub 1.69} has been obtained by different chimie douce methods and uniaxially or isostatically pressed. The influence of these parameters on the thermoelectric properties has been investigated. Contrary to the Seebeck coefficient, which remains unchanged, the electrical conductivity is greatly modified. In particular, spray-drying synthesis followed by uniaxial pressing results in an electrical conductivity two times larger than in the case of conventional solid state synthesis. Our results suggest that a narrow particle size distribution is beneficial to the thermoelectric properties of the layered compounds. The spray-drying technique seems to be promising to improve the electrical conductivity of layered materials. Moreover, this method presents other advantages (homogeneous samples and less energetic processing) which could be interesting to the future manufacturing of thermoelectric devices. - Graphical abstract: Small particles and narrow size distribution is obtained for spray-drying [Bi{sub 1.68}Ca{sub 2}O{sub 4}]{sup RS}[CoO{sub 2}]{sub 1.69} cobaltate. The power factor is boosted up two times compared with the conventional solid state method.

  13. Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and Attends National Day of Prayer and Remembrance Service with Governor Riley

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MONTGOMERY, AL – Today, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman traveled to Montgomery, Alabama, to commemorate a National Day of Prayer and Remembrance in honor of victims of Hurricane Katrina.      ...

  14. RS-CO-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Compliance Form By my signature affixed below, I understand that I must stay with a badged person at all times when in the CAMD Experimental Hall, Storage Ring or...

  15. RS-Weapons X-Rays

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AUTHORITY (See Instructions on reverse) To. G E N E R A L SERVICES A D M I N I S T R A T I ... E C E I V E 0 Lr& - - -- NOTIFICATION T O G E C Y . . - ----- - . - In c c o r ...

  16. RS-PR-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Badge Date: 20000501 1. Take and pass (minimum score 80% i.e. 2430) the radiation safety test online at http:www.camd.lsu.edumsdsTrainingTestradtesttrain...

  17. RS-PR-0004-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-001.doc Roof Access - no beam Date: 2000/12/21 1. During normal operations, inform the operator on duty of the need for roof access during no accelerator operation. Agree upon a mutually acceptable time. 2. During a shutdown, as indicated by a green screen, inform the RSO or RSO designate of the need to access the roof. During shutdowns, the RSO or RSO designate maintains the keys for accelerator operation. Skip steps 3 and 8 below. 3. Remove Linac Chain A and Ring Chain A Enable keys from the

  18. RS-PR-0005-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-001.doc Utility Bldg Roof Access Date: 2000/12/21 1. During normal operations, inform the operator on duty of the need to access the utility building roof. There can be no re- injection during this time. 2. During a shutdown as indicated by a green screen, inform the RSO or the RSO designate of the need to access the utility building roof. During shutdowns, the RSO or RSO designate maintains the keys for accelerator operation. Skip steps 3 and 7 below. 3. Pull Linac Chain A key from control

  19. RS1477_Attachment B.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RFA-14-0002 - In the Matter of Highway Oil, Inc. RFA-14-0002 - In the Matter of Highway Oil, Inc. On December 10, 2014, OHA released funds held in escrow for Highway Oil, Inc. (Highway) in the Subpart V refund proceeding. Highway submitted five applications for refunds in five different Subpart V proceedings and was granted refunds in each proceeding. During the time that these refunds were granted to Highway, Highway was the subject of a Proposed Remedial Order (PRO) issued by the Economic

  20. Geary County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Kansas Fort Riley North, Kansas Fort Riley-Camp Whiteside, Kansas Grandview Plaza, Kansas Junction City, Kansas Milford, Kansas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  1. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions (Online) Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions (Online); Journal ...

  2. Microsoft Word - Group3Cloud Properties(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for (a) column clouds and (b) circle clouds. 2.0 References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Group 1 Boundary Layer(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pesquisas Espaciais, Brazil Suzane S. de S, Harvard University Jae-In Song, Yonsei ... Chandra, AS, K Pavlos, SE Giangrande, and SA Klein. 2010. "Long-term observations of the ...

  4. Microsoft Word - Group6Modeling Summary(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For example, the dependency of the cloud overlap ratio to the thickness of clouds was illustrated; this relationship could help future researchers understand cloud radiative ...

  5. Marti Aye.rs From: Sent: Subject: Hi, Jaami Ali

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martha Schlicher About Us Martha Schlicher - Martha Schlicher Martha Schlicher led Monsanto's bioenergy and sustainability efforts in the technology organization focused on utilizing Monsanto's scientific expertise and capabilities to support the existing renewables industry, to develop Monsanto's sweet sorghum and sugarcane product pipeline in Brazil and to identify and act upon new opportunities to create value for growers in the field of renewables. Martha has over 23 years of direct

  6. Microsoft Word - Group2 CloudBirthFraction(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Birth and Fraction Report Participants: Jingyi Chen, Stony Brook University George Duffy, Vanderbilt University Elizabeth Smith, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wei Zhao, University of Washington Instructors: Allison McComiskey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Dave Turner, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 2015 Group 2, July 2015, ARM Summer Training and Science Applications 1 1.0 Cloud Birth and Fraction A case of low-level cumulus was observed over the

  7. Microsoft Word - Group5PrecipProperties(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can We See Precipitation Properties Conserved through the Melting Layer Report Participants: Shuaiqu Tang, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jonathan Edwards-Opperman, University of Oklahoma Kathryn Verlinden, Oregon State University Nils Küchler, University of Cologne, Germany Instructors: Matt Kumjian, Pennsylvania State University Herman Russchenberg, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands July 2015 Group 5, July 2015, ARM Summer Training and Science Applications 1 1.0 Can We See

  8. Microsoft Word - Group4CloudtoPrecip(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ceilometer first cloud base, radar reflectivity, and various Doppler moments (Doppler velocity power spectrum, spectrum width, and spectrum skewness) were smoothed to 2-, 5-, and ...

  9. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boiler systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Riley Stoker Corporation is leading an R&D program for the expedited development of a new generation of pulverized coal-fired boiler systems. The overall objective is to develop relatively near term technologies to produce Low-Emission coal-fired Boiler Systems (LEBS) ready for full scale commercial generating plants by the end of the decade. The specific goal is to develop a LEBS incorporating an advanced slagging system for improved ash management in addition to meeting the emission and performance goals. This Concept Selection Report documents an evaluation of subsystems and LEBS concepts. Priority was given to the evaluation of the boiler system, steam cycle, and advanced slagging combustor. Some findings are as follows: An ultra supercritical steam cycle is required to meet project efficiency goals. The cost of electricity (COE) for this cycle, at today`s fuel prices, and without externality costs, is slightly higher than a conventional subcritical cycle. The supercritical cycle includes a substantial contingency. Reduction of contingency, escalation of fuel cost, or inclusion of externalities all lead to a lower COE for the supercritical cycle compared to the subcritical cycle. The advanced cycle is selected for inclusion in the LEBS. The advanced slagging combustor (TVC), should it meet the projected performance goals, yields a lower COE than either a dry firing system or a more conventional slagger fitted with post combustion NO{sub x} controls. Verification and development of the advanced slagger performance is the primary focus of this project. A commercial slagging configuration know as U-firing is selected for parallel development and as a platform for adaptation to the TVC.

  10. Iodine solubility in a low-activity waste borosilicate glass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4651; fax: +1 (509)372 5997. E-mail address: brian.riley@pnnl.gov (B.J. Riley). Journal of Nuclear Materials 452 (2014) 178-188 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect...

  11. EECBG Success Story: Resourceful Kansas Puts Energy Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    One of Riley County Public Works' new wind turbines. | Courtesy of Riley County Public Works As one of the windiest states in the country, Kansas is a great place to harness wind ...

  12. CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Two commonly used amines are dodecylalamine and octadeccylamine. Benefits From a Proper ... This can be controlled by proper adjustment of the stoker. On traveling and chain grate ...

  13. SAND2009-3494C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    th Annual IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference June 7 June 7 - - 12, 2009 12, 2009 Daniel Riley, Christopher Cameron, Joshua Jacob, Jennifer Granata, Gary Galbraith Sandia...

  14. Paleogeographic Setting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    April 1, 2005 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2005 Principal Authors: Douglas G. Patchen, Taury Smith, Ron Riley, Mark Baranoski, David Harris, John Hickman, John Bocan ...

  15. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antypas, NERSC Richard Gerber, NERSC Paul Messina, ALCF Katherine Riley, ALCF Tim Williams, ALCF James J. Hack, OLCF Jack Wells, OLCF Tjerk Straatsma, OLCF Julia White, OLCF...

  16. Paleogeographic Setting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    April 1, 2005 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2005 Principal Authors: Douglas G. Patchen, Taury Smith, Ron Riley, Mark Baranoski, David Harris, John Hickman, John Bocan...

  17. Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and Attends National Day of Prayer and Remembrance Service with Governor Riley Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and Attends ...

  18. Genomics of wood-degrading fungi (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 1, 2015 Title: Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Authors: Ohm, Robin A. ; Riley, Robert ;...

  19. Comparison of a Recurrent Neural Network PV System Model with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neural Network PV System Model with a Traditional Component-Based PV System Model Daniel Riley, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA | Ganesh K....

  20. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    411 C 40 th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Denver, CO, June 2014 Determining the Effect of Temperature on Microinverter Inversion Efficiency Daniel Riley and Armando...

  1. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4882 C 39 th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Tampa, FL, June 2013 Testing and Characterization of PV Modules with Integrated Microinverters Daniel Riley, Joshua Stein,...

  2. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CreatorsAuthors contains: "Grigoriev, Igor V" Full Text and Citations Filters ... Filter Results Filter by Author Grigoriev, Igor V. (5) Lipzen, Anna (3) Riley, Robert (3) ...

  3. Microsoft Word - UserSurvey09results.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use of ALCF resources. Our catalyst team: Charles Bacon, Ramesh Balakrishnan, Graham Fletcher, Kumar Kalyan, Ray Loy, Vitali Morozov, James Osborn, Scott Parker, Katherine Riley,...

  4. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Floudas, Dimitrios ; Held, Benjamin W. ; Riley, Robert ; Nagy, Laszlo G. ; ... Robin A. ; Kes, Ursula ; Blanchette, Robert A. ; Grigoriev, Igor V. ; Minto, Robert ...

  5. LANL12-RS-108J Device Modeler Tool Kit - DMTK Final Report for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Mathematics & Computing(97) Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full ...

  6. 35095,"AGWAY PETRO CORP",1,231,"PROPANE/NGL",0712,"CHAMPL-RS...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    REFG CO",7,850,"UNFINISHED OILS, RESIDUUM",1003,"NEWARK, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",219,0,20.5,"BAYWAY REFG CO","BAYWAY","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 35095,"BAYWAY REFG...

  7. 34730,"AGWAY PETRO CORP",1,231,"PROPANE/NGL",0712,"CHAMPL-RS...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",7,850,"UNFINISHED OILS, RESIDUUM",1903,"PASCAGOULA, MS","MISSISSIPPI",3,830,"SPAIN",219,0,0,"CHEVRON USA INC","PASCAGOULA","MS","MISSISSIPPI",3 34730,"CHEVRON...

  8. LANL13-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool Final Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-09-27 OSTI Identifier: 1095194 ... MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to ...

  9. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON radiography analysis tool final report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Temple, Brian Allen 1 ; Armstrong, Jerawan Chudoung 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) Publication Date: ...

  10. LANL12-RS-108J Report on Device Modeler Testing of the Device...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI: ...

  11. LANL12-RS-108J Device Modeler Tool Kit - DMTK Final Report for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Mathematics & Computing(97) Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI: ...

  12. LANL12-RS-108J Report on Device Modeler Testing of the Device...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    There has been a local secure network training drill where one of the trainees has used DMTK for real data. DMTK has also been used on a laptop for a deployed real data training ...

  13. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 2-21 2.20 Cross section of overfeed, traveling-grate, mass-feed stoker......To restrict emis- sions and ensure that environmental benefits are achieved and ...

  14. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  15. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Riley, Brian J. ; Pierce, David A. ; Chun, Jaehun Publication Date: 2013-08-28 OSTI Identifier: 1097940 Report Number(s): PNNL-22678 AF5805000 DOE Contract Number: ...

  16. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Small Business Users Awarded ARPA-E Funding Part of Cyclotron Road at Berkeley Lab, ... awarded a total of 125 million by DOE's ARPA-E. Spark Thermionics, led by Dan Riley and ...

  17. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Riley and Schwede's thermionics collaboration was recently awarded 3.8 million from the Department of Energy's Advance Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E), which they will ...

  18. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... MA Riley, Betsy A. MA Altamirano, Joelle NA Beg, Michelle F. NA Cofer, Joshua A. NA Hamilton, Michelle D. NA Loyd, Stephanie L. NA McKisson, Jacquelin A. NA McIntyre, Todd A. NA ...

  19. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    114179c.pdf filesize 7.74 MB Version 1 Date added April 25, 2012 Downloaded 586 times Category Energy Security, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Technology Validation author Daniel Riley, Ganesh K. Venayagamoorthy

  20. Publications, 2015 | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 2015 Brandt, Riley E.; Kurchin, Rachel C.; Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Poindexter, Jeremy R.; ... Phys. Chem. Lett., 6, 4297-4302 (2015). DOI: 10.1021acs.jpclett.5b02022 ...

  1. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomics of wood-degrading fungi","Ohm, Robin A.; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol; Grigoriev, Igor V.","2014-11-01T04:00:00Z",1222394,"10.1016...

  2. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomics of wood degrading fungi Ohm Robin A Riley Robert Salamov Asaf Min Byoungnam Choi In Geol Grigoriev Igor V Not Available Elsevier None USDOE United States English Journal...

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project in the Southern Great Plains Torn, M.S.(a), Berry, J.(b), Riley, W.J.(a), Fischer, M.L.(a), Billesbach, B.(c), Helliker, B.(b), and Giles, L.(b), Lawrence Berkeley...

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Monitoring at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Torn, M.S. (a), Berry, J. (b), Fischer, M.L. (a), Billesbach, D. (c), Riley, W. (a), and Zhao, W. (a), Lawrence Berkeley...

  5. On the influence of shrub height and expansion on boreal climate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bonfils, C ; Phillips, T ; Lawrence, D ; Cameron-Smith, P ; Riley, W ; Subin, Z Publication Date: 2011-08-22 OSTI Identifier: 1113486 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-495260 ...

  6. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) welcomed two new student representatives at its May meeting. Gracie Hall and Julia Riley will serve on the board through April 2014.

  7. Specific Manufacturing Capability Project presented with special...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Manufacturing Capability Project presented with special thank-you note From left, DOE-ID's Ray Furstenau, INL's Riley Chase, SMC's Joel Duling, Army's Ltc. Evans and Mike...

  8. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NeuralNetworkPoster_Riley1.pdf filesize 7.74 MB Version 1 Date added February 15, 2013 Downloaded 59 times Category Energy Security, Photovoltaic, Posters, Presentation, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Technology Validation Tags sand2011-4179c location SNL, Albuquerque, New Mexico Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri report-id SAND2011-4179C author Daniel Riley, Ganesh K. Venayagmoorthy

  9. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION PROJECT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (BETO) Project Peer Review BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION PROJECT 5/23/2013 Heat and Power Ed Olthoff Cedar Falls Utilities STREETER STATION Unit #6 - 1963 Stoker 16.5 MW Coal/Natural Gas Unit #7 - 1973 Pulverized 35.0 MW Coal/Natural Gas Goal Statement & Project Overview 3 * Densification process to mimic stoker coal - ¾" to 1 ¼" chunks of coal - Suitable for corn stover and other energy crops - Compatible with the existing fuel handling equipment and boiler - Validity determined by

  10. Implement Method for Automated Testing of Markov Chain Convergence into INVERSE for ORNL12-RS-108J: Advanced Multi-Dimensional Forward and Inverse Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, Keith C.

    2015-04-01

    The DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) method is a powerful optimization/uncertainty quantification tool used to solve inverse transport problems in Los Alamos National Laboratorys INVERSE code system. The DREAM method has been shown to be adept at accurate uncertainty quantification, but it can be very computationally demanding. Previously, the DREAM method in INVERSE performed a user-defined number of particle transport calculations. This placed a burden on the user to guess the number of calculations that would be required to accurately solve any given problem. This report discusses a new approach that has been implemented into INVERSE, the Gelman-Rubin convergence metric. This metric automatically detects when an appropriate number of transport calculations have been completed and the uncertainty in the inverse problem has been accurately calculated. In a test problem with a spherical geometry, this method was found to decrease the number of transport calculations (and thus time required) to solve a problem by an average of over 90%. In a cylindrical test geometry, a 75% decrease was obtained.

  11. Special Distribution

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Special Distribution Issued: December 1977 ',, Radiological Survey and Decontamination of the Former Main Technical Area (TA-1) at Los Alamos, New Mexico Compiled by A. John Ahlquist Alan K. Stoker Linda K. Trocki c laboratory of, the University of California LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO 87545 An Alfirmdve Action/Equal Opportunity Employer ..-_- .-- .--.-. c T -,--... _ _._-r..l __,.. - .-,_.. ..- _._ -- .--. " . . _ . - . c- - . . . _ -. . _ . - . - . _ - - n - _ _~ ~_. __ _ ~~_ --..&e+

  12. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R.

    1994-12-31

    The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, the authors will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. This quarter pellet production work commenced and planning for collection and processing of a preparation plant fines fraction is underway.

  13. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal mines. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R.; Ho, Ken

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach.

  14. The Challenge: Improving the Energy Efficiency of Buildings Across the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The California Maritime Academy The California Maritime Academy Team roster: David Chang, Business Administration/International Business and Logistics; Nathan Griffin, Business Administration/International Business and Logistics; Jordan Mootz, Business Administration/International Business and Logistics; Franklin Riley, Business Administration/International Business and Logistics; Charles Wiswall, Business Administration/International Business and Logistics; Thomas Herburger, Global Studies and

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Firing Boiler Fluidized Bed Firing Boiler Stoker Boiler Tangential Firing Boiler All Other Boiler Types Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Distillate Fuel Oil* DFO Source: 2, Table 3.1-2a, 3.4-1 & 1.3-1 Lbs per MG

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Tangential Boiler All Other Boiler Types Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Firing Boiler Fluidized Bed Firing Boiler Stoker Boiler Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine

  17. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  18. Property:CommProtocol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Doppler Volume Sampler + RS-232 + MHK ISDBInstrumentsVaisala WINDCAP Ultrasonic Wind Sensor WMT700 + RS-232 + MHK ISDBInstrumentsVector V102 GPS Compass + RS-232 + MHK ISDB...

  19. NERSC Announces 4th Annual HPC Achievement Award Winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Announces 4th Annual HPC Achievement Award Winners NERSC Announces 4th Annual HPC Achievement Award Winners March 22, 2016 NERSC winners 2016 Left to right: Charles Koven, Nathan Howard, Scott French. Not pictured: William Riley, David Lawrence, Min Si. Image: Margie Wylie, Berkeley Lab The Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of the 2016 High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards today (March 22) during the

  20. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii « Prev Next » Title: Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii Authors: Floudas, Dimitrios ; Held, Benjamin W. ; Riley, Robert ; Nagy, Laszlo G. ;

  1. Genome sequence of a white rot fungus Schizopora paradoxa KUC8140 for wood

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    decay and mycoremediation (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Genome sequence of a white rot fungus Schizopora paradoxa KUC8140 for wood decay and mycoremediation This content will become publicly available on July 23, 2016 « Prev Next » Title: Genome sequence of a white rot fungus Schizopora paradoxa KUC8140 for wood decay and mycoremediation Authors: Min, Byoungnam ; Park, Hongjae ; Jang, Yeongseon ; Kim, Jae-Jin ; Kim, Kyoung Heon ; Pangilinan, Jasmyn ; Lipzen, Anna ; Riley, Robert ;

  2. Genomics of wood-degrading fungi (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomics of wood-degrading fungi « Prev Next » Title: Genomics of wood-degrading fungi Authors: Ohm, Robin A. ; Riley, Robert ; Salamov, Asaf ; Min, Byoungnam ; Choi, In-Geol ; Grigoriev, Igor V. Publication Date: 2014-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1222394 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Fungal Genetics and Biology (Print) Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Fungal Genetics and Biology (Print); Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: C;

  3. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to the Open Source PV LIB for Python Photovoltaic System Modelling Package Robert W. Andrews 1 , Joshua S. Stein 2 , Clifford Hansen 2 , and Daniel Riley 2 1 Calama Consulting, Toronto, Ontario, M5T1B3, Canada 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, USA Abstract-The proper modeling of Photovoltaic(PV) systems is critical for their financing, design, and operation. PV LIB provides a flexible toolbox to perform advanced data analysis and research into the performance

  4. Staff > Scientific Advisory Board > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Advisory Board List Image Michelle Buchanan Oak Ridge National Laboratory List Image Gary Calabrese Corning Inc. List Image Thomas Mallouk Pennsylvania State University List Image Mark Mathias General Motors - Fuel Cell Research List Image Linda Nazar University of Waterloo List Image Bart Riley A123 Systems List Image Eugene Smotkin Northeastern University List Image Esther Takeuchi Stony Brook University List Image M. Stanley Whittingham Binghamton University List Image Piotr

  5. Title Goes Here

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presented at 6 th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems, Freiberg, Germany, April, 2010 Performance Model Assessment for Multi-Junction Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems Christopher Cameron 1 , Clark Crawford 2 , James Foresi 3 , David King 1 , Robert McConnell 2 , Dan Riley 1 , Aaron Sahm 4 , and Joshua Stein 1 1 Sandia National Laboratories, P O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 2 Amonix, Inc. 1709 Apollo Court, Seal Beach, CA 90740 3 Emcore, Inc., 10420 Research Rd.

  6. Photovoltaic systems are often described and marketed in terms of the DC power rating of their modules, expressed in $'s/Watt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rd IEEE PVSC, San Diego, CA 2008 1 COMPARISON OF PV SYSTEM PERFORMANCE-MODEL PREDICTIONS WITH MEASURED PV SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Christopher P. Cameron, William E. Boyson, Daniel M. Riley Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy has supported development of the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) to provide a common platform for evaluation of the solar energy technologies being developed with the support of the Department. This report describes a detailed

  7. University of Massachusetts Lowell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Lowell University of Massachusetts Lowell Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley, Michael Schaefer. Not pictured: Christopher Daly, Erik Anderson. Photo by David Willis. Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf,

  8. TITLE PAGE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    October 1, 2004 Reporting Period End Date: March 31, 2005 Principal Authors: Douglas G. Patchen, Katharine Lee Avary, John M. Bocan, Michael Hohn, John B. Hickman, Paul D. Lake, James A. Drahovzal, Christopher D. Laughrey, Jaime Kostelnik, Taury Smith, Ron Riley and Mark Baranoski April 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-03NT41856 West Virginia University Research Corporation P.O. Box 6845, Morgantown, WV 26506-6845 University of Kentucky Research Foundation 109 Kinkead Hall, Lexington, KY

  9. SAND2009-37487C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE EFFECTS OF AVERAGING AND SAMPLING RATES ON PV SYSTEM AND WEATHER DATA Daniel M. Riley, Christopher P. Cameron, Joshua A. Jacob, Jennifer E. Granata, Gary M. Galbraith Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM ABSTRACT When modeling photovoltaic (PV) system performance data, modelers typically reduce the amount of data analyzed by reducing the sampling frequency below the maximum sampling frequency of their instruments (under-sampling), averaging a number of samples together, or a

  10. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    242 Unlimited Release April 2014 Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations Daniel M. Riley, Clifford W. Hansen Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  11. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0179 Unlimited Release January 2015 A Performance Model for Photovoltaic Modules with Integrated Microinverters Daniel Mark Riley Clifford W. Hansen Michaela Farr Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  12. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7844 Unlimited Release November 2014 Photovoltaic Microinverter Testbed for Multiple Device Interoperability Jimmy E. Quiroz, Sigifredo Gonzalez, Bruce King, Dan Riley, Jay Johnson, and Josh Stein Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's

  13. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1099 Unlimited Release Printed February 2012 Effect of Time Scale on Analysis of PV System Performance Clifford W. Hansen, Joshua S. Stein, and Daniel Riley Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

  14. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Riley, Penn State Targeting professionals, employers, and education program leaders in selected advanced energy retrofit (AER) project fields (including energy auditors, building operators, energy managers, and

  15. Submission Format for IMS2004 (Title in 18-point Times font)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calibration of the Sandia Array Performance Model Using Indoor Measurements Clifford W. Hansen 1 , Daniel M. Riley 1 , and Manuel Jaramillo 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA, 87185 2 CFV Solar Test Laboratory, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, USA, 87106 Abstract - The Sandia Array Performance Model (SAPM) describes the DC output of a PV module under a range of irradiance and temperature conditions. Coefficients for SAPM are normally obtained through a sequence of on-sun tests, which

  16. PRODUCTION TEAM Team Leader: Julia C. White Publication Director: Dawn Levy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRODUCTION TEAM Team Leader: Julia C. White Publication Director: Dawn Levy Editors: Priscilla Henson, Dawn Levy Contributing Science Writers: Cheryl Drugan, Eric Gedenk, Kathryn Jandeska, Scott Jones, Dawn Levy, Caitlin Rockett, Leo Williams, Laura Wolf Graphic Designer: Jason Smith Reviewers: Arthur Bland, Susan Coghlan, James J. Hack, Bronson Messer, Paul Messina, Michael Papka, Katherine Riley, Julia C. White Advisors: Ashley Barker, Jayson Hines, David Martin CONTACT Julia C. White INCITE

  17. PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware. Abstract not provided. Authors: Keedy, Ryan Michael ; James Riley [1] ; Alberto Aliseda [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UW) Publication Date: 2014-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1242774 Report Number(s): SAND2014-20245C 547539 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference

  18. Monitoring Current, Voltage and Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Current, Voltage and Power in Photovoltaic Systems Anton Driesse 1 , Joshua S. Stein 2 , Daniel Riley 2 , Craig Carmignani 2 1 PV Performance Labs, Freiburg, Germany 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract - Accurate photovoltaic system performance monitoring is critical for profitable long-term operation. Irradiance, temperature, power, current and voltage signals contain rapid fluctuations that are not observable by typical monitoring systems. Nevertheless

  19. Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method over the Southern Great Plains Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget Method over the Southern Great Plains Williams, Ian University of Chicago Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Concentration gradients of CO2 and H2O at the transition between the

  20. The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams April 25, 2014 - 10:14am Addthis <strong>UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley,

  1. The Development and On-Road Performance and Durability of the Four-Way

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley, Michael Schaefer. Not pictured: Christopher Daly, Erik Anderson. Credit: David Willis UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determining Coefficients for the Sandia Array Performance Model Clifford Hansen and Daniel Riley Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (USA) 2 nd PV System Modeling Workshop May 1, 2013 Outline and Summary  Sandia Array Performance Model  Predicts on-sun module performance with good accuracy  Calibration using outdoor testing  Proven techniques, but,  Testing can take weeks  Documentation is lacking  Calibration using indoor testing:  Proof of concept presented at 38

  3. The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams The Collegiate Wind Competition Is Approaching Fast: Meet the Teams April 25, 2014 - 10:14am Addthis <strong>UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL</strong> Back row: Isaac Grulon, Dean Kennedy, Erika Sjoberg, Albert Andino, Robert Leboeuf, Gregory Lennartz, Michael Dube. Middle row: David Phung, Jigar Patel, Alexandre Sampaio, Patrick Logan, Jeffrey Chung, Peter Jones. Front row: Parth Patel, Donna DiBattista, Meaghan Riley,

  4. Climate Feedbacks from Permafrost Charlie Koven Lawrence Berkeley Na?onal Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding and Modeling of Climate Feedbacks from Permafrost Charlie Koven Lawrence Berkeley Na?onal Lab With many others: Bill Riley, Dave Lawrence, Jen Harden, Gustaf Hugelius, the CESM Land Model Working Group, and the Permafrost Carbon Network Thanks to DOE-BER support from Regional and Global Climate Modeling Program (BGC Feedbacks SFA), Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program (NGEE Arc?c), and Earth System Modeling Program (IMPACTS SFA) IPCC-AR5 (Ciais et al., 2013) Figure 6.22 | The

  5. Author for correspondence: Publications@ieee-pvsc.org

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-7148 C 38 th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012 Photovoltaic Prognostics and Heath Management using Learning Algorithms Daniel Riley 1 and Jay Johnson 1 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA ABSTRACT A novel model-based prognostics and health management (PHM) system has been designed to monitor the health of a photovoltaic (PV) system, measure degradation, and indicate maintenance schedules. Current state-of-the-art PV monitoring systems require

  6. Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy review results for Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects. The peer review results for each project will be available soon. GRED III Phase II Bernie Karl, Chena Hot Springs Resort Project Presentation | Peer Reviewer Comments Electrical Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Co-produced from Oil & Gas Bernie Karl, Chena Hot Springs Resort Project Presentation | Peer Reviewer Comments Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park Betty Riley,

  7. Okeelanta Cogeneration Project: Electricity and steam from sugar cane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaberg, D.

    1994-12-31

    The Okeelanta Cogeneration Project is a Bagasse- and wood chip-fired cogeneration project with a net electrical output of approximately 70MW, located at the Okeelanta Corporation`s sugar mill in South Bay, Florida. The Project is comprised of three stoker type boilers each capable of producing 440,000 lbs/hr of steam at 1455 psia, 955F, and a single extraction/condensing steam turbine with a gross output of 75 MW. The electrical output will be sold to Florida Power and Light under the terms of an executed power purchase agreement and delivered at 138kV.

  8. Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuttle, Kenneth L.

    1980-01-01

    A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

  9. Advanced Overfire Air system and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gene berkau

    2004-07-30

    The objective of the proposed project is to design, install and optimize a prototype advanced tangential OFA air system on two mass feed stoker boilers that can burn coal, biomass and a mixture of these fuels. The results will be used to develop a generalized methodology for retrofit designs and optimization of advanced OFA air systems. The advanced OFA system will reduce particulate and NOx emissions and improve overall efficiency by reducing carbon in the ash and excess oxygen. The advanced OFA will also provide capabilities for carrying full load and improved load following and transitional operations.

  10. Cofiring waste biofuels and coal for emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwer, J.; Owens, W.D.; Harding, N.S.

    1995-12-01

    Combustion tests have been performed in two pilot-scale combustion facilities to evaluate the emissions reduction possible while firing coal blended with several different biofuels. Two different boiler simulations, pulverized coal fired boilers and stoker coal fired boilers, were simulated. The pc-fired studies investigated the use of waste hardwood, softwood, and sludge as potential reburning fuels and compared the results with coal and natural gas. The results of this program showed that a reduction of 50-60% NO was obtained with approximately 10% wood heat input. Reburn stoichiometry was the most important variable. The reduction was strongly dependent on initial NO and only slightly dependent upon temperature. The stoker program investigated barriers to the successful blending of coal with waste railroad ties; parameters evaluated included blend firing rate, chip size, optimum feed location, overfire/underfire air ratio, and natural gas addition. The results of this study demonstrated that NO emissions could be reduced by more than 50% without any significant increase in CO or THC emissions by the proper use of zoned reburning. Both programs demonstrated several benefits of biofuel blends, including: (1) lower operating costs due to reduced fuel prices; (2) reduced waste disposal; (3) reduced maintenance costs; (4) reduced environmental costs, and (5) extension of the useful life of existing equipment.

  11. The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Jinwon

    2011-08-15

    The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

  12. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

  13. Building biomass into the utility fuel mix at NYSEG: System conversion and testing results for Greenidge Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, W.

    1996-12-31

    NYSEG is in the second phase of developing resources and systems for cofiring biomass with coal. In the first phase, stoker boilers were fired with biomass (typically wood waste products). Encouraged by positive results at the older stokers, NYSEG decided to develop the process for its pulverized coal boilers beginning with Greenidge Station, a 108-MW pulverized coal (PC) unit with a General Electric turbine generator and a 665,000-lb Combustion Engineering, tangentially fired boiler. Greenidge Station is in the center of New York, surrounded by farms, forests, vineyards, and orchards. The test bums at Greenidge Station demonstrated that a parallel fuel feed system can effectively provide wood products to a PC unit. Emission results were promising but inconclusive. Additional testing, for longer durations, at varied loads and with different woods needs to be conducted to clarify and establish relationships between the percent wood fired at varying moisture contents. Loads need to be varied to develop continuous emission monitor emission data that can be compared to coal-only data. Economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to further refine the equipment and systems. Refinements may include chipping and drying equipment, plus installation of fuel storage and feed systems with permanent boiler penetration. NYSEG will attempt to identify the problems associated with cofiring by direct injection, compared to cofiring a biomass/coal mixture through the existing fuel handling system. Specifically, an examination will be made of fuel size criteria and the system modifications necessary for minimal impacts on coal-fired operation.

  14. Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    change in cold regions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions Authors: Subin, Z. M. ; Koven, C. D. ; Riley, W. J. ; Torn, M. S. ; Lawrence, D. M. ; Swenson, S. C. Publication Date: 2012-10-15 OSTI Identifier: 1171497 Report Number(s): LBNL-6423E DOE Contract

  15. Engineering Ultra-Low Work Function of Graphene (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Engineering Ultra-Low Work Function of Graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering Ultra-Low Work Function of Graphene Authors: Yuan, Hongyuan ; Chang, Shuai ; Bargatin, Igor ; Wang, Ning C. ; Riley, Daniel C. ; Wang, Haotian ; Schwede, Jared W. ; Provine, J. ; Pop, Eric ; Shen, Zhi-Xun ; Pianetta, Piero A. ; Melosh, Nicholas A. ; Howe, Roger T. Publication Date: 2015-10-14 OSTI Identifier: 1243090 DOE Contract Number: FA9550-14-1-0251, AC02-76SF00515 Resource

  16. Modes of Occurrence of Trace and Minor Elements in Some Australian Coals

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Modes of Occurrence of Trace and Minor Elements in Some Australian Coals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modes of Occurrence of Trace and Minor Elements in Some Australian Coals Authors: Riley K. ; French, D ; Farrell, O ; Wood, R ; Huggins, F Publication Date: 2012-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1069931 Report Number(s): BNL--100503-2013-JA Journal ID: ISSN 0166-5162 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-98CH10886 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource

  17. On the influence of shrub height and expansion on boreal climate (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect On the influence of shrub height and expansion on boreal climate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the influence of shrub height and expansion on boreal climate Authors: Bonfils, C ; Phillips, T ; Lawrence, D ; Cameron-Smith, P ; Riley, W ; Subin, Z Publication Date: 2011-08-22 OSTI Identifier: 1113486 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-495260 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Environmental

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seasonal and Interannual Variability in 13C of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes from 2002-2009 Submitter: Torn, M. S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Torn MS, SC Biraud, CJ Still, WJ Riley, and JA Berry. 2011. "Seasonal and inter-annual variability in δ13C of net ecosystem carbon exchanges from 2002-2009 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains." Tellus, 63(2), 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2010.00519.x. Time

  19. Coupling MM5 with LSM1: Development, Testing, and Application - MM5_workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, Testing, and Applications W.J. Riley 1 , H.S. Cooley 1,2 , Y. He* 1 , M.S. Torn 1 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Energy and Resources Group, U.C. Berkeley, CA 1. INTRODUCTION Surface water and energy fluxes are tightly coupled with CO 2 exchanges between the ecosystem and atmosphere. Other surface-to- atmosphere trace-gas exchanges of interest in climate change research (e.g., N 2 O, CH 4 , C 18 OO, and H 2 18 O) are also strongly impacted

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2013 EVAN RILEY STANDARDS FOR ACCEPTANCE TESTING AND MODEL VALIDATION 2013 Sandia PV Performance Modeling Workshop Santa Clara, CA. May 1-2, 2013 Published by Sandia National Laboratories with the Permission of the Author * Founded in 1915 * Global workforce of more than 9,000 * More than 100 offices worldwide * Projects in more than 100 countries on 6 continents * $2.6 billion in annual revenues in 2012 * Employee-owned corporation * Engineering News-Record ranking: #2 - Top 20 in Power

  1. ARM_Science Team_42x48_poster_March21.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Land Surface Forcing in the Southern Great Plains during CLASIC and NACP intensives Torn, M.S. 1 , W.J. Riley 1 , M.L. Fischer 1 , T. J. Jackson 2 , R. Avissar 3 , S.C. Biraud 1 , D. Billesbach 4 , C. Sweeney 5 , P. Tans 5 , M. Lowenstein 6 , J. Lopez 6 , and J.A. Berry 7 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, mstorn@lbl.gov, 510-495-2223; 2 USDA-ARS, 3 Duke University, 4 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 5 NOAA-ESRL; 6 NASA AMES, 7 Carnegie Institution ABSTRACT In June 2007, a regional

  2. Two-Step Annealing Study of Cuprous Oxide for Photovoltaic Applications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Two-Step Annealing Study of Cuprous Oxide for Photovoltaic Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-Step Annealing Study of Cuprous Oxide for Photovoltaic Applications Authors: Lloyd, Michael A. ; Siah, Sin-Cheng ; Brandt, Riley E. ; Serdy, James ; Johnston, Steve W. ; Hofstetter, Jasmin ; Lee, Yun Seog ; McCandless, Brian ; Buonassisi, Tonio Publication Date: 2015-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1225337 Report Number(s): NREL/JA-5J00-65116

  3. X:\ARM_19~1\P355-365.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    h (1 g) ( , ; ) 1 ( ) 1 e / with 2 2 1 1 R NIP ( ) 1 2 R IP ( ') ( , ;| - '|) d ' -5/3 rs rs , rs , rs . Session Papers 363 (1) (2) (3) A Characteristic Scale in Radiation Fields of Fractal Clouds W. Wiscombe, R. Cahalan, A. Davis, and A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center Climate & Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine The location of the scale break is determined entirely stratocumulus

  4. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-09-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system. (4) Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data were used to elucidate ash-related problems during coal-biomass cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

  5. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system; and Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data will be collected, analyzed, and reported to elucidate ash-related problems during biomass-coal cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

  6. High Fidelity Simulations of Large-Scale Wireless Networks (Plus-Up)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onunkwo, Uzoma

    2015-11-01

    Sandia has built a strong reputation in scalable network simulation and emulation for cyber security studies to protect our nation’s critical information infrastructures. Georgia Tech has preeminent reputation in academia for excellence in scalable discrete event simulations, with strong emphasis on simulating cyber networks. Many of the experts in this field, such as Dr. Richard Fujimoto, Dr. George Riley, and Dr. Chris Carothers, have strong affiliations with Georgia Tech. The collaborative relationship that we intend to immediately pursue is in high fidelity simulations of practical large-scale wireless networks using ns-3 simulator via Dr. George Riley. This project will have mutual benefits in bolstering both institutions’ expertise and reputation in the field of scalable simulation for cyber-security studies. This project promises to address high fidelity simulations of large-scale wireless networks. This proposed collaboration is directly in line with Georgia Tech’s goals for developing and expanding the Communications Systems Center, the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute, and Georgia Tech Information Security Center along with its yearly Emerging Cyber Threats Report. At Sandia, this work benefits the defense systems and assessment area with promise for large-scale assessment of cyber security needs and vulnerabilities of our nation’s critical cyber infrastructures exposed to wireless communications.

  7. DISCOVERY OF AN EXTENDED X-RAY JET IN AP LIBRAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Tibolla, O.

    2013-10-20

    Chandra observations of the low-energy-peaked BL Lac object (LBL) AP Librae (AP Lib) revealed the clear discovery of a non-thermal X-ray jet. AP Lib is the first LBL with an extended non-thermal X-ray jet that shows emission into the very high energy range. The X-ray jet has an extension of ?15''(? 14 kpc). The X-ray jet morphology is similar to the radio jet observed with Very Large Array at 1.36 GHz emerging in the southeast direction and bends by 50 at a distance of 12'' toward the northeast. The intensity profiles of the X-ray emission studied are consistent with those found in the radio range. The spectral analysis reveals that the X-ray spectra of the core and jet region are both inverse-Compton-(IC)-dominated. This adds to a still small sample of BL Lac objects whose X-ray jets are IC-dominated and thus more similar to the high-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley II sources than to the low-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley I objects, which are usually considered to be the parent population of BL Lac objects.

  8. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  9. Coal/D-RDF (densified refuse-derived fuel) co-firing project, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecklinger, R.S.; Rehm, F.R.

    1985-11-01

    A Research and Development Project was carried out to mix a densified refuse-derived fuel with coal at the fuel-receiving point and to co-fire the mixture in a spreader-stoker fired boiler. Two basic series of test runs were conducted. For the first series, coal was fired to establish a base line condition. For the second series, a mixture of coal and densified refuse-derived fuel was fired. The report describes the equipment used to densify refuse derived fuel, procedures used to prepare and handle the coal and densified refuse derived fuel mixture and the test results. The results include the effect of the coal and densified refuse derived fuel mixture on plant operations, boiler efficiency, stack emissions and EP toxicity.

  10. Municipal waste combustion assessment: Fossil fuel co-firing. Final report, October 1988-July 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landrum, V.J.; Barton, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    The report identifies refuse derived fuel (RDF) processing operations and various RDF types; describes such fossil fuel co-firing techniques as coal fired spreader stokers, pulverized coal wall fired boilers, pulverized coal tangentially fired boilers, and cyclone fired boilers; and describes the population of coal fired boilers that currently co-fire RDF, have previously co-fired RDF but have ceased to do so, and have been used in RDF co-firing demonstrations. (Fossil fuel co-firing, defined as the combustion of RDF with another fuel (usually coal) in a device designed primarily to burn the other fuel, is generally confined to commercial and utility boilers.) Model plants are developed and good combustion practices are recommended.

  11. ARCONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 Soli~h CASS A\ EWE. ARGONNE, I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ARCONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 Soli~h CASS A\ EWE. ARGONNE, I l l i d s 60439 ATTN: James K. Alexander, DOEIORO Kathleen Harer, DOEIORO Robert L. Rudolph, BNI Roger W . Ferenbaugh, LANLIH-8 Alan K. Stoker, LANLIH-8 W i l l i a m Crismon, DOEILAAO SUBJECT: REVISED A D M FOR A C I D I M I DDLE PUEBLO CANYON REMEDIAL ACTION Madam and S i r s : Enclosed i s a copy o f t h e ADM f o r t h e Acid/Mi ddle Pueblo Canyon remedial a c t i o n . Revisions have been made t o t h e d r a f t ADM o f

  12. Cofiring waste biofuels and coal for emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwer, J.; Owens, W.D.; Harding, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Combustion tests have been performed in two pilot-scale combustion facilities to evaluate the emissions reduction possible while firing coal blended with several different biofuels. Two different boiler simulations, pulverized coal fired boilers and stoker coal fired boilers, were simulated. The pc-fired studies investigated the use of waste hardwood, softwood and sludge as potential reburning fuels and compared the results with coal and natural gas. The use of these wood wastes is attractive because: wood contains little nitrogen and virtually no sulfur; wood is a regenerable biofuel; wood utilization results in a net reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions; and, since reburning accounts for 10-20% of the total heat input, large quantities of wood are not necessary. The results of this program showed that a reduction of 50-60% NO was obtained with approximately 10% wood heat input. Reburn stoichiometry was the most important variable. The reduction was strongly dependent upon initial NO and only slightly dependent upon temperature. The stoker program investigated barriers for the successful blending of coal with waste railroad ties. Parameters evaluated included blending firing rate, chip size, optimum feed location, overfire/underfire air ratio, and natural gas addition. The results of this study demonstrated that NO emissions can be reduced by more than 50% without any significant increase in CO or THC emissions by the proper use of zoned reburning. Both programs demonstrated several benefits of biofuel blends, including: (1) lower operating costs due to reduced fuel prices; (2) reduced waste disposal; (3) reduced maintenance costs; (4) reduced environmental costs; and (5) extension of the useful life of existing equipment.

  13. The fuels program for the Nucla AFBC plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellin, M.A.; Mahr, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Nucla Station originally consisted of three 1959 vintage, 36 (3 x 12) MWe, stoker-fired boilers. The plant was built under the Rural Electrification Administration program to service the scenic, western slope of Colorado. In 1988, the stokers were replaced by a new, dual combustor, 110 MWe AFBC boiler in EPRI`s fluidized bed demonstration program. A new 74 MWe topping steam turbine/generator, with extraction to the existing turbines, was installed at that time. The Nucla Plant was a key project in EPRI`s program to demonstrate the commercialization of AFBC technology. This program has been the subject of numerous reports and papers on fluidized bed combustion. The fuel used by the Nucla Station was a relatively good quality, bituminous coal. Nucla`s coal was trucked more than 100 miles to the plant from a mine in Colorado. In addition, some high sulfur coal was test burned in the plant. This coal was trucked to the plant from a mine located near Kayenta, Arizona. The primary purpose of the demonstration program was to scale-up the size of the combustor and examine parameters that affect fluidization, heat transfer, erosion, and other boiler related issues. Sulfur capture and the ability to utilize lower grade fuels was previously demonstrated in other, smaller scale programs. To utilize project funds efficiently, the 1988 AFBC retrofit was dedicated to adding the 110 MWe combustor and related equipment. The plant was revamped specifically for test purposes. To conserve funds, silo storage of coal for the AFBC unit was limited to an 8-hour supply. Existing plant auxiliaries, that could adequately perform during the demonstration, were not upgraded. These included the coal handling system.

  14. Seasonality of soil CO2 efflux in a temperate forest: Biophysical effects of snowpack and spring freezethaw cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuankuan; Han, Yi; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Xingchang; Zhang, Quanzhi; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-08-15

    Changes in characteristics of snowfall and spring freezethaw-cycle (FTC) events under the warming climate make it critical to understand biophysical controls on soil CO2 efflux (RS) in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. We conducted a snow removal experiment and took year-round continuous automated measurements of RS, soil temperature (T5) and soil volumetric water content at the 5 cm depth (W5) with a half-hour interval in a Chinese temperate forest in 20102011. Our objectives were to: (1) develop statistical models to describe the seasonality of RS in this forest; (2) quantify the contribution of seasonal RS to the annual budget; (3) examine biophysical effects of snowpack on RS; and (4) test the hypothesis that an FTC-induced enhancement of RS is jointly driven by biological and physical processes.

  15. Intensive Observation Period Projects Scheduled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Intensive Observation Period Projects Scheduled Several IOP projects have been scheduled for the SGP CART site this spring. These projects either have already begun or will begin shortly. Radiosondes The RS-90 Transition IOP is currently under way. The RS-90 model radiosonde is gradually replacing the older RS-80 model. Radiosondes are instrument packages attached to and launched by weather balloons. The instruments measure atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity as the

  16. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional

  17. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 9812 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  18. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SerRS in Vascular Development | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of SerRS in Vascular Development Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) have been essential enzymes for protein synthesis throughout evolution. As the tree of life was ascended, tRNA synthetases added new domains, which are generally dispensable for aminoacylation, in a progressive and accretive manner. The acquisitions were

  19. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  20. Romag Holdings plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Romag Holdings plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Romag Holdings plc Place: United Kingdom Zip: DH8 7RS Product: Developer of specialist transparent composites such as a...

  1. Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place: Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip: CF23 8RS Product: Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates:...

  2. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY RS-Weapons X-Rays PDF icon REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications...

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of SerRS in Vascular Development July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of...

  4. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... RH Relative humidity RLY Relay (for data logger) RS Responsivity SHD Shaded test ... SPA Solar position algorithm STD Standard (control) instrument SW Shortwave THM Thermistor ...

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide rs in cost...

  6. A deformation of quantum affine algebra in squashedWess-Zumino...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by computing the rs-matrices that satisfy the extended classical Yang-Baxter equation. Finally, two degenerate limits are discussed. Authors: Kawaguchi, Io ; Yoshida,...

  7. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Human TAS2 receptors (hTAS2Rs) perceive bitter tastants, but few studies have explored the structure-function relationships of these receptors. ...

  8. DE-RW0000005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modification 001 Contractor Name: USA-RS Contract Specialist: Daniel D. Burke Contracting Officer: Marc T. McCusker The purpose of this modification is to provide ...

  9. U

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... AS - Australia; CN - Canada; CL - Colombia; ID - Indonesia; PL - Poland; RS - Russia; VZ - Venezuela; OT - Other. | || |INSTRUCTIONS continued|For Column 'f' Coal Mine County Code, ...

  10. U

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... AS - Australia; CN - Canada; CL - Colombia; ID - Indonesia; PL - Poland; RS - Russia; VZ - Venezuela; OT - Other. 4 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... correction from string theory to the RS action, we would expect msub > msub . ... for directindirect dark matter detection experiments as well as dark matter ...

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of radiosondes launched during the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment. Dual-radiosonde launch of the Vaisala RS90 and Chilled Mirror radiosondes is pictured here....

  13. URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE NIOSH BOILER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb Jr.

    2005-02-10

    Phase I of this project began by obtaining R&D variances for permits at the NIOSH boilerplant (NBP), Emery Tree Service (ETS) and the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC) for their portions of the project. Wood for the test burn was obtained from the JARC inventory (pallets), Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation (construction wood), and the Arlington Heights Housing Project (demolition wood). The wood was ground at ETS and JARC, delivered to the Three Rivers Terminal and blended with coal. Three one-day tests using wood/coal blends of 33% wood by volume (both construction wood and demolition wood) were conducted at the NBP. Blends using hammermilled wood were operationally successful. Emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx decreased and that of CO increased when compared with combusting coal alone. Mercury emissions were measured and evaluated. During the first year of Phase II the principal work focused upon searching for a replacement boilerplant and developing a commercial supply of demolition wood. The NBP withdrew from the project and a search began for another stoker boilerplant in Pennsylvania to replace it on the project. Three potential commercial demolition wood providers were contacted. Two were not be able to supply wood. At the end of the first year of Phase II, discussions were continuing with the third one, a commercial demolition wood provider from northern New Jersey. During the two-and-a-third years of the contract extension it was determined that the demolition wood from northern New Jersey was impractical for use in Pittsburgh, in another power plant in central New Jersey, and in a new wood gasifier being planned in Philadelphia. However, the project team did identify sufficient wood from other sources for the gasifier project. The Principal Investigator of this project assisted a feasibility study of wood gasification in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. As a result of the study, an independent power producer in the county has initiated a small wood gasification project at its site. Throughout much of this total project the Principal Investigator has counseled two small businesses in developing a waxed cardboard pellet business. A recent test burn of this biofuel appears successful and a purchase contract is anticipated soon. During the past two months a major tree-trimming firm has shown an active interest in entering the wood-chip fuel market in the Pittsburgh area and has contacted the NBP, among others, as potential customers. The NBP superintendent is currently in discussion with the facilities management of the Bruceton Research Center about resuming their interest in cofiring this renewable fuel to the stoker there.

  14. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  15. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF THE ROTARY COMBUSTOR FOR REFIRING PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray F. Abbott; Jamal B. Mereb; Simon P. Hanson; Michael J. Virr

    2000-11-01

    The Rotary Combustor is a novel concept for burning coal with low SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. It burns crushed coal in a fluid bed where the bed is maintained in a rotating drum by centripetal force. Since this force may be varied, the combustor may be very compact, and thus be a direct replacement for a p.c. burner on existing boilers. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate that a typical industrial boiler can be refired with the modified prototype Rotary Combustor to burn Ohio high-sulfur coal with low emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The primary problem that must be resolved to demonstrate sustained operations with coal is temperature control in the rotating fluid bed. The prototype Rotary Combustor was assembled and installed on the T-850P CNB boiler at the CONSOL Energy site in South Park, Pennsylvania. Several design improvements were investigated and implemented during the assembly to improve the prototype Rotary Combustor operations compared to prior tests at Detroit Stoker in Monroe, Michigan. An Operating Manual and Safety Review were completed. The shakedown test phase was initiated. Two major problems were initially encountered: binding of the rotating drum at operating temperatures, and reduced fluid-bed pressure drop after short periods of operation. Plating the brush seal rotary land ring with a chrome carbide plasma spray and lubricating the seal prior to each test sufficiently resolved these problems to permit a limited number of operations tests. Unlike previous tests at Detroit Stoker, sustained operation of the prototype Rotary Combustor was accomplished burning a high-Btu fuel, metallurgical coke. The prototype Rotary Combustor was operated with coke in gasifier mode on two occasions. Fluid-bed temperature spiking was minimized with manual control of the feeds (coke, air and steam), and no clinker formation problems were encountered in either test. Emission levels of NO{sub x} were measured at about 270 ppmv which were higher those targeted for the device which were 100 ppmv. This was assumed to be because of the aforementioned temperature spiking. The primary operating problem remains control of the fluid-bed temperature. Although improvements were made, steam flow control was manual, and very coarse. To accomplish this will require finer control of the steam flow to the rotary drum air plenum, and development of an algorithm for automatic control using the Moore APACS{trademark}. This is the recommended succeeding step in the development of the Rotary Combustor for industrial or utility use.

  16. NERSC.final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o f w eak lensing measurements ( e.g. m ul0fit) - Rapid a lgorithm d evelopment f or D ESC * 200 f ocal p lanes ( 1.2TB) i n 2 4 h rs * Once a m onth 2 00K C PU h rs x 3 c...

  17. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. The binding affinities of Fc?Rs were measured directly on macrophages. The nanoscale distributions of Fc?Rs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (Fc?R), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of Fc?Rs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of Fc?Rs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of Fc?Rs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the Fc?Rs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of Fc?Rs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of Fc?Rs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  18. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  19. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Commissioning and first operational experience with the biomass fired boiler at Sonderjyllands Hojspaendingsvaerk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsgaard-Nielsen, C.

    1998-07-01

    The biomass boiler plant at Sonderjyllands Hojspaendingsvaerk consists of a Benson type boiler with a screw stoker/vibration grate combustion system generating 120 t/h of steam at 200 bar and 470 C, which is finally superheated to 542 C in a separate wood chip fired superheater with a spreaderstoker/vibration grate combustion system. The biomass boiler is coupled to the 660 MW coal fired power plant Ensted 3 (EV3) on the water/steam side, and it generates 41 MW at a net electrical efficiency of 40%. Building of the biomass boiler plant at Sonderjyllands Hojspaendingsvaerk was decided by the ELSAM power pool in December 1994, and the erection of the plant was completed in the autumn 1997. Commissioning started in the summer of 1997. This paper describes the plant with focus on the biomass handling and combustion systems and the water/steam coupling to EV3. The plant description is followed by a description of the commissioning phases and the commissioning experience with fuel handling and combustion systems. Finally, the first operational experience is described.

  1. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-10-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels.

  2. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-07-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives.

  3. Garbage to hydrocarbon fuel conversion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, W.A.

    1986-07-15

    A garbage to hydrocarbon fuel conversion system is described which consists of: (a) a source of combustible garbage; (b) means for pulverizing the garbage; (c) a furnace to burn the garbage; (d) means for transporting the pulverized garbage to the furnace which comprises a motor operated worm feed automatic stoker; (e) a steam generating coil inside the furnace which supplies live steam to power a turbine which in turn powers an alternating current generator; and a condenser which returns remaining the steam to a liquid state for re-circulation through the steam generating coils; (f) means for collecting incompletely combusted waste gases from the furnace; precipitating out dust and light oil for re-combustion in the furnace; and, extracting hydrocarbon gas; where in the means for precipitating out dust and light oil for re-combustion in the furnace comprise a cottrell precipitator wherein oil from an external source is mixed with fine dust received from the exhaust port, wherein an electrostatic charge helps to precipitate the dust; a dust and light oil mixer which provides a homogeneous mixture; and, an oil burner mounted to the furnace whose heat output is supplied to the furnace to add energy thereto; and (g) means for burning trapped heavy gases and removing waste ash from the furnace for disposal.

  4. Combustion characteristics of refuse derived fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, W.; Macek, A.; Domalski, E.; Walker, J.A.; Charagundla, S.R.; Colbert, J.C.; Kirklin, D.R.; Ledford, A.E. Jr.; Decker, P.H.; Ryan, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the laboratory studies presented here is to furnish preliminary input to the technologists in the sense of providing relative rankings through comparisons of appropriate coal and MSW combustion related properties. Support for a future program of sub-scale (demonstration or pilot) experiments to expand on the concepts and quantify them for scale-up to industrial sizes should be provided. A complete plan for this second phase study is included as an appendix to this report. With respect to the actual experimental investigations; these consist of three main tasks. Specifically: (a) static measurements (calorimetry, proximates and ultimate analysis; (b) dynamic measurements using the full range of modern thermoanalytical instrumentation; and (c) combustion of particulates in a specially constructed laboratory furnace as well as studies on the entrainment properties of MSW. The first two tasks deal mainly with the chemical properties of municipal solid waste and is of general utility. The latter is more specifically orientated. The scale of laboratory instrumentation set definite to the limits particle size with respect to the intrainment and combustion studies. Thus the most straightforward application is to combustion in stokers, including semi-suspension units.

  5. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  6. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

    2001-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives.

  7. Progress at the interface of wave-function and density-functional theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.

    2011-04-15

    The Kohn-Sham (KS) potential of density-functional theory (DFT) emerges as the minimizing effective potential in a variational scheme that does not involve fixing the unknown single-electron density. Using Rayleigh Schroedinger (RS) perturbation theory (PT), we construct ab initio approximations for the energy difference, the minimization of which determines the KS potential directly - thereby bypassing DFT's traditional algorithm to search for the density that minimizes the total energy. From second-order RS PT, we obtain variationally stable energy differences to be minimized, solving the severe problem of variational collapse of orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functionals based on second-order RS PT.

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a dissociative anesthetic acting as a noncompetitive antagonist on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, it is also a potent inhibitor of neuronal nAChRs, and the sites of...

  9. Ritu Sahore > Graduate Student - Giannelis Group > Researchers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduate Student - Giannelis Group rs758@cornell.edu Ritu Sahore grew up in Punjab, India, and recieved her B.Tech.(Hons.) in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering from...

  10. Research Highlights | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Argonne National Laboratory >A Symmetric Organic - Based Nonaqueous Redox Flow Battery and Its State of Charge Diagnostics by FTIR (3-10-16) W. Duan, R.S. Vemuri, J.D. ...

  11. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software Development ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Currently, BEMOSS supports the following prevalent communication technologies: Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Serial (RS-485), ZigBee (IEEE 802.15.4) and Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11); and ...

  12. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about this research see the full Scientific Highlight R.S. Mathew-Fenn, R. Das, J.A. Silverman, P.A. Walker, P.A.B. Harbury, "A Molecular Ruler for Measuring Quantitative Distance...

  13. A Golden Ruler Used to Measure DNA Structure in Solution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    here for higher resolution image) Primary Citation: R.S. Mathew-Fenn, R. Das, J.A. Silverman, P.A. Walker, P.A.B. Harbury, "A Molecular Ruler for Measuring Quantitative Distance...

  14. Aleksandr Fridlyand | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iso-Octane Mixtures." J Propuls Power, 29, 732-43 (2013). (online) A. Fridlyand, P.T. Lynch, R.S. Tranter, K Brezinsky, "Single Pulse Shock Tube Study of Allyl Radical...

  15. A residual stress study in similar and dissimilar welds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Goldak, John A.; Aidun, Daryush K.; Coules, Harry E.; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Achuthan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Residual strain distributions in similar and dissimilar welds were measured using neutron diffraction (ND) method. Then, using three strain components, three-dimensional stress states were calculated. The results were used to determine the effect of the martensitic phase transformation and material properties on residual stress (RS) distribution. It was observed that smaller longitudinal RS was induced in the low carbon steel side of dissimilar weld when compared to its similar weld. Also, it was found that the transverse RS near and within the weld zone (WZ) in dissimilar weld exhibited a distinctive trend, with tensile mode reaching the yield strength ofmore » the base metal (BM). In order to characterize the WZ in dissimilar weld, we deployed optical microscopy, hardness, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). This study not only provides further insight into the RS state in similar and dissimilar welds; it also delivers important consequences of phase transformation in the latter case.« less

  16. BPA-2011-01701-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m+tre r"rnpl" and elrnamit: than tither utilitt ;lsra to . such as water r r natural gas. I'.lerrricils , flows from power pl ants. throug h trat tort ' rs and trtn c mrssion...

  17. Tss4U BV formerly Holecsol R S Renewable Energy Systems and Shell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tss4U BV formerly Holecsol R S Renewable Energy Systems and Shell Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tss4U BV (formerly Holecsol, R&S Renewable Energy Systems and Shell...

  18. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software (BEMOSS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other software used: ZeroMQ 6 BEMOSS I nteroperability CommunicaMon T echnologies q Ethernet ( IEEE 8 02.3) q Serial I nterface ( RS---485) q ZigBee ( IEEE 8 02.15.4) q ...

  19. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software (BEMOSS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... BEMOSS Interoperability Communication Technologies Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) Serial Interface (RS-485) ZigBee (IEEE 802.15.4) WiFi (IEEE 802.11) Data Exchange Protocols ...

  20. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...V-1 D.P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, F.P. Abegglen, G.J. Derrig, R.S. Olsen and W.H. Peeler Progress on ECR2...

  1. Emerging Edge Capital EEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edge Capital EEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Emerging Edge Capital (EEC) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1Y 4RS Sector: Renewable Energy Product: London-based company...

  2. BPA-2015-00632-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ex 6 Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2015 9:18 AM To: FOIA Cc: RS Bodwell Subject: Corona and Field Effects Program am interested in obtaining information on calculations and a...

  3. N.R.S. 278 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R.S. 278 (Redirected from NRS 278 - Planning and Zoning) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: N.R.S. 278Legal...

  4. Microsoft Word - RIGS_Users_Guide-2016_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... February 2016 of the followi Examples C 123456 I1A 59872, Smith Company, et er of characte d if a field val ny Data Reco s of the reco rs long - the e final data fie ny blank spac ...

  5. FZl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    R&l . <,,' .d "" ----"-"-----"--- aecIIuIlw ,I' .> nna ,Yi. lnc twmnmo: or the nnhticm of its concents in any nisflnpr to on fMMtbo&d rsO0 in...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM-FIRE Water Vapor Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were the airborne NASA LaRC LASE water vapor lidar and Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH), the ground-based Vaisala RS-80H (after application of corrections for time-lag, temperature...

  7. Paleomagnetic Measurements At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    paleomagnetic remanence directions to one another. References Pluhar, C.J.; Coe, R.S. ; Lewis, J.C.; Monastero, F.C. ; Glen, J.M.G (1 January 2006) Fault block kinematics at a...

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vaisala RS-80H Radiosonde Dry-Bias Correction Redux B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois S. J. Richardson Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction In previous studies (e.g., Lesht 1997, 1998, 1999; Lesht and Richardson 2001; Richardson et al. 2000) we examined the effects of dry bias in Vaisala RS-80H radiosonde humidity measurements on Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data. Some

  9. Information Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Systems Information Systems Condition Assessment Information System (CAIS) Inspection or assessment data is loaded into the Condition Assessment Information System (CAIS) Web database where it is costed using various RS Means Construction Cost Book data. RS Means is the predominant national cost estimating system. Currently CAIS Web contains over 53,000 line items dealing with building elements, components, and types and other structure and facilities, and infrastructure systems.

  10. Implementing Rational Surface Locations Measured From Thomson Scattering Into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implementing Rational Surface Locations Measured From Thomson Scattering Into MSTfit by Curtis A. Johnson Senior Thesis (Physics) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison 2014 i Abstract Measurements of rational surface (RS) locations in the Madison Symmetric Torus as measured by Thomson Scattering (TS) have been implemented in the equilibrium reconstruction program MSTfit. Possible correlated errors between diagnostics show a small impact on the equilibrium reconstruction done by MSTfit. TS RS

  11. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2003-04-01

    This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the twelfth quarter, January-March 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2--Oxygen Transport Membranes, Task 3--Economic Evaluation and Task 4--Program Management. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the third year. Pilot scale experiments conducted at the University of Utah explored both the effectiveness of oxygen addition and the best way to add oxygen with a scaled version of Riley Power's newest low NOx burner design. CFD modeling was done to compare the REI's modeling results for James River Unit 3 with the NOx and LOI results obtained during the demonstration program at that facility. Investigation of an alternative method of fabrication of PSO1d elements was conducted. OTM process development work has concluded with the completion of a long-term test of a PSO1d element Economic evaluation has confirmed the advantage of oxygen-enhanced combustion. Proposals have been submitted for two additional beta test sites. Commercial proposals have been submitted. Economic analysis of a beta site test performance was conducted.

  12. Improved energy efficiency in a specialty paper mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.D. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Energy costs at the James River KVP mill have increased sixfold since the 1973 oil embargo. The cost of energy now surpasses the cost of labor and is second only to that of pulp. Economic pressures thus provide a powerful incentive for efficient use of energy. The KVP mill is a nonintegrated mill that is capable of producing up to 450 tons/day of specialty papers. The mill is equipped with six paper machines, six parchment machines, three off-machine coaters, and related converting equipment. Energy is supplied by a central powerhouse that is equipped with: Two gas/oil-fired Combustion Engineering VU50 power boilers, each capable of producing 210,000 lb/h of 850-psig steam at 825/sup 0/F; One gas/oil-fired Riley water tube boiler capable of producing 150,000 lb/h of 220-psig steam at 525/sup 0/F; Two General Electric turbine generators. No. 5 condensing machine: throttle steam, 850 psig; high-pressure extraction, 220 psig; low-pressure extraction, 220 psig; low-pressure extraction, 38 psig; maximum generation, 9500 kW. No. 6 condensing machine: throttle steam, 850 psig; low-pressure extraction, 38 psig; maximum generation, 9500 kW.

  13. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  14. THE MISSING GOLIATH'S SLINGSHOT: MASSIVE BLACK HOLE RECOIL AT M83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dottori, Horacio; Diaz, Ruben J.; Facundo Albacete-Colombo, Juan

    2010-07-01

    The Fanaroff-Riley II radio source J133658.3-295105, which is also an X-ray source, appears to be projected onto the disk of the barred-spiral galaxy M83 at about 60'' from the galaxy's optical nucleus. J133658.3-295105 and its radio lobes are aligned with the optical nucleus of M 83 and two other radio sources, neither of which are supernova remnants or H II regions. Due to this peculiar on-the-sky projection, J133658.3-295105 was previously studied by Gemini+GMOS optical spectroscopy, which marginally revealed the presence of H{alpha} in emission receding at 130 km s{sup -1} with respect to the optical nucleus. In this Letter, we reanalyze the Chandra spectroscopy carried out in 2000. We show that J133658.3-295105 presents an Fe K{alpha} emission line at a redshift of z = 0.018. This redshift is compatible with a black hole at the distance of M 83. We discuss similarities to the recently reported micro-quasar in NGC 5408. This finding reinforces the kicked-off black hole scenario for J133658.3-295105.

  15. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

    2003-05-15

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

  16. A LOW COST AND HIGH QUALITY SOLID FUEL FROM BIOMASS AND COAL FINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John T. Kelly; George Miller; Mehdi Namazian

    2001-07-01

    Use of biomass wastes as fuels in existing boilers would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, SO2 and NOx emissions, while beneficially utilizing wastes. However, the use of biomass has been limited by its low energy content and density, high moisture content, inconsistent configuration and decay characteristics. If biomass is upgraded by conventional methods, the cost of the fuel becomes prohibitive. Altex has identified a process, called the Altex Fuel Pellet (AFP) process, that utilizes a mixture of biomass wastes, including municipal biosolids, and some coal fines, to produce a strong, high energy content, good burning and weather resistant fuel pellet, that is lower in cost than coal. This cost benefit is primarily derived from fees that are collected for accepting municipal biosolids. Besides low cost, the process is also flexible and can incorporate several biomass materials of interest The work reported on herein showed the technical and economic feasibility of the AFP process. Low-cost sawdust wood waste and light fractions of municipal wastes were selected as key biomass wastes to be combined with biosolids and coal fines to produce AFP pellets. The process combines steps of dewatering, pellet extrusion, drying and weatherizing. Prior to pilot-scale tests, bench-scale test equipment was used to produce limited quantities of pellets for characterization. These tests showed which pellet formulations had a high potential. Pilot-scale tests then showed that extremely robust pellets could be produced that have high energy content, good density and adequate weatherability. It was concluded that these pellets could be handled, stored and transported using equipment similar to that used for coal. Tests showed that AFP pellets have a high combustion rate when burned in a stoker type systems. While NOx emissions under stoker type firing conditions was high, a simple air staging approach reduced emissions to below that for coal. In pulverized-fuel-fired tests it was found that the ground pellets could be used as an effective NOx control agent for pulverized-coal-fired systems. NOx emissions reductions up to 63% were recorded, when using AFP as a NOx control agent. In addition to performance benefits, economic analyses showed the good economic benefits of AFP fuel. Using equipment manufacturer inputs, and reasonable values for biomass, biosolids and coal fines costs, it was determined that an AFP plant would have good profitability. For cases where biosolids contents were in the range of 50%, the after tax Internal Rates of Return were in the range of 40% to 50%. These are very attractive returns. Besides the baseline analysis for the various AFP formulations tested at pilot scale, sensitivity analysis showed the impact of important parameters on return. From results, it was clear that returns are excellent for a range of parameters that could be expected in practice. Importantly, these good returns are achieved even without incentives related to the emissions control benefits of biomass.

  17. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-30

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  18. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  19. Mobilizable RDF/d-RDF burning program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, K.; Campbell, J.

    1982-03-01

    The Mobilizable RDF/d-RDF Burning Program was conceived to promote the utilization of refuse-derived fuels (RDF) as a supplement to existing fossil fuel sources in industrial-sized boilers. The program explores the design, development, and eventual construction of densified-RDF (d-RDF) for use in boiler combustion testing as a supplement to stoker coal or wood wastes. The equipment would be mounted on trailers and assembled and operated at preselected sites throughout the country where approximately 750 tons of RDF would be produced and test burned in a local boiler. The equipment, to include a transportable RDF boiler metering and feed system, would then be moved and operated at two to three test sites annually. The program is intended to encourage the construction of permanent resource recovery facilities by involving local waste handling groups in operating the equipment and producing fuel, and potential local fuel users in testing the fuel in their boilers. The Mobilizable Program was developed from two separate tasks. The first task developed the concept behind the program and defined its operational and organizational structure. The second task, a follow-up to the first, was intended principally to finalize test locations, develop equipment designs and specifications, and formalize a management program. This report summarizes the principal findings of both tasks. It identifies the criteria used to identify test locations, outlines the program's management structure, presents design and performance specifications for both the fuel production equipment and boiler fuel feed systems, and provides a detailed evaluation of the parameters involved in burning RDF in industrial-sized boilers. Final conclusions and recommendations identify problem areas encountered in the program, and discuss possible future directions for such a program.

  20. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. Previously it has been decided that corn starch would be used as binder and a roller-and-die mill would be used for pellet manufacture. A quality starch binder has been identified and tested. To potentially lower binder costs, a starch that costs about 50% of the high quality starch was tested. Results indicate that the lower cost starch will not lower binder cost because more is required to produce a comparable quality pellet. Also, a petroleum in water emulsion was evaluated as a potential binder. The compound seemed to have adhesive properties but was found to be a poor binder. Arrangements have been made to collect a waste slurry from the mine previously described.

  1. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  2. Spatial and kinematic distributions of transition populations in intermediate redshift galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Steven M.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: wirth@keck.hawaii.edu

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the spatial and velocity distributions of confirmed members in five massive clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift (0.5 < z < 0.9) to investigate the physical processes driving galaxy evolution. Based on spectral classifications derived from broad- and narrow-band photometry, we define four distinct galaxy populations representing different evolutionary stages: red sequence (RS) galaxies, blue cloud (BC) galaxies, green valley (GV) galaxies, and luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs). For each galaxy class, we derive the projected spatial and velocity distribution and characterize the degree of subclustering. We find that RS, BC, and GV galaxies in these clusters have similar velocity distributions, but that BC and GV galaxies tend to avoid the core of the two z ? 0.55 clusters. GV galaxies exhibit subclustering properties similar to RS galaxies, but their radial velocity distribution is significantly platykurtic compared to the RS galaxies. The absence of GV galaxies in the cluster cores may explain their somewhat prolonged star-formation history. The LCBGs appear to have recently fallen into the cluster based on their larger velocity dispersion, absence from the cores of the clusters, and different radial velocity distribution than the RS galaxies. Both LCBG and BC galaxies show a high degree of subclustering on the smallest scales, leading us to conclude that star formation is likely triggered by galaxy-galaxy interactions during infall into the cluster.

  3. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  4. Re

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re s pons e of a CSRM t o V arying M agnit ude s of Sh ort w av e M ont e Carl o Radiat iv e Trans f e r Nois e Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 3 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 4. Re s ul t s (TO GA/ COARE) 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.5 (SAM v 6.5) 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  5. Section 34

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x ' j N r'1 C xr j N s'1 A &1 rs N s (2 &2 x ) 2 ' C xx & j N r,s'1 C xr C xs A &1 rs F(x) ' exp(&x 2 / R 2 c ) % e < exp(&x 2 / R 2 n ) Session Papers 149 (1) (2) (3) Estimation of Errors in Objectively Analyzed Fields and Sensitivity to Number and Spacing of Stations M.J. Leach, J.J. Yio, and R.T. Cederwall Atmospheric Science Division Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Motivation Single-column models (SCMs) are designed to test param-

  6. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  7. Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Michael

    In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site with the goal of quantifying the relative performance of the RS92-SGP/MW31 and RS41-SG/MW41 radiosondes/systems. The June time period at SGP represents a springtime mid-latitude convective environment where the extensive remote sensing observations at the SGP site were used to further quantify the environment during the intercomparison. Over the course of five days (3 - 8 June) a total of 20 balloon launches were completed with efforts to sample the entire diurnal cycle and a variety of cloud conditions

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: EM News & Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EM News & Reports Electromagnetic Publications J.D. Kotulski, R.S. Coats, M.F. Pasik, M. Ulrickson, "Electromagnetic Analysis of Forces and Torques on the Baseline and Enhanced ITER Shield Modules due to Plasma Disruption", IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 38, NO. 4 April 2010. J.D. Kotulski, R.S. Coats, M.F. Pasik, "Electromagnetic Analysis of Transient Forces Due to Disrupted Plasma currents on the ITER Shield Modules", IEEE, July 2007. Larry Warne, William

  9. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin, E-mail: wenbin@ysu.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiangyi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Melnik, Roderick [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo25, 75 University Ave. West, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5 (Canada)] [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo25, 75 University Ave. West, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-4 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan and Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1, Lavyrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)] [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-4 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan and Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1, Lavyrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  10. Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael

    2015-03-06

    In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site with the goal of quantifying the relative performance of the RS92-SGP/MW31 and RS41-SG/MW41 radiosondes/systems. The June time period at SGP represents a springtime mid-latitude convective environment where the extensive remote sensing observations at the SGP site were used to further quantify the environment during the intercomparison. Over the course of five days (3 - 8 June) a total of 20 balloon launches were completed with efforts to sample the entire diurnal cycle and a variety of cloud conditions

  11. Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study Title: Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site with the goal of quantifying the relative performance of the RS92-SGP/MW31 and RS41-SG/MW41 radiosondes/systems. The June time period at SGP represents a springtime mid-latitude convective environment where the extensive remote sensing observations at the SGP site were

  12. Mission Support Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-7-1 ATTACHMENT J-7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS Mission Support Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 J-7-2 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS A. Mission Support Alliance, LLC NAICS Co d e De s c rip tio n o f NAICS S u b s e c to rs S DB Do lla rs P e rc e n ta g e * 531312 Nonresidential Property Managers $22,924,301 0.7 541614 Process, Physical Distribution and Logistics Consulting Services $22,953,821 0.8 541690 Scientific

  13. Implementation of Army privatization directives at Forscom installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, R.C.; Patwardhan, S.

    1997-06-01

    {open_quotes}Privatization{close_quotes} has become the buzzword of the 1990s not only here in the United States but throughout the world. Privatization has been traditionally defined as the sale/transfer of state-owned (i.e. federal, state, county, city or public) assets to the private sector. Although there are numerous reasons for the privatization of state-owned assets, the primary reasons include the generation of a significant amount of cash to the state (Great Britain`s sale of electric power industry); capitalization of the formerly state-owned utility (sale of the utilities within many countries of the former Soviet Union); and state policy goals of eliminating monopolies, encouraging competition, and restructuring (Chile). Several year ago, the Department of Defense (DoD) and specifically the Department of Army (DoA) initiated its own `Privatization Process`. Coupled with shrinking budgets, workforce and funding resources from the Government, the Army was faced with antiquated utility infrastructure in need of significant upgrades and in some cases total replacements. Recognizing that the provision of utility services was not a core mission of the Army, DoA has encouraged its Installations throughout the country to consider the privatization of the Government-owned utility systems. In compliance with DoA policy, Forces Command (FORSCOM) has been at the forefront of the privatization process. To date, FORSCOM has initiated the process of analyzing the potential privatization of over 30 utility systems at 12 FORSCOM Installations located throughout the country. The FORSCOM Installations include Fort Irwin, CA; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Bragg, NC; Fort McPherson, GA; Fort Hood, TX; Fort Polk, LA; Fort Lewis, WA; Fort Riley, KS; Fort Stewart, GA; Hunter Army Airfield, GA; Fort Carson, CO; Fort Devens, MA; Fort Dix, NJ; and Fort Gillem, GA.

  14. Jas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sh ort w av e Radiat iv e T rans f e r in t h e M ul t is cal e M ode l l ing Fram e w ork Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 4 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 St ony Brook Univ e rs it y 4 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 3. Re s ul t s 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.6.5 (SAM v 6.6.5) * 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  15. Eaton AF5000+Genesis Communication Driver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-25

    Communication driver allows the Genesis Control Series software to interact with Eaton AF5000+ frequency drives via RS-232 communications. All Eaton AF5000+ parameters that support communications are supported by the Genesis driver. Multidrop addressing to multiple units is available with the Genesis communication driver.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-induced phase transformation of BeO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, H. Y.; Duan, G.; Zu, X. T.; Weber, W. J.

    2011-05-05

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method has been used to study high pressure-induced phase transformation in BeO based on the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Both methods show that the wurtzite (WZ) and zinc blende (ZB) BeO transforms to the rocksalt (RS) structure smoothly at high pressure. The transition pressures obtained from the LDA method are about 40 GPa larger than the GGA result for both WZ ? RS and ZB ? RS phase transformations, and the phase transformation mechanisms revealed by the LDA and GGA methods are different. For WZ ? RS phase transformations both mechanisms obtained from the LDA and GGA methods are not comparable to the previous ab initio MD simulations of WZ BeO at 700 GPa based on the GGA method. It is suggested that the phase transformation mechanisms of BeO revealed by the ab initio MD simulations are affected remarkably by the exchangecorrelation functional employed and the way of applying pressure.

  17. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... C37 (1988) 2224 1988HI02 R.S. Hicks, J. Button-Shafer, B. Debebe, J. Dubach, A. Hotta, ... A350 (1994) 525 1994DE17 P.V. Degtyarenko, J. Button-Shafer, L. Elouadrhiri, R.A. ...

  18. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... ,i+,6?ec 02 *;"f zzr2 -L.. :., Lz saJ;y y:.; be incyecse:i, r&s r- . p"CGP,.Cld ... Lt.7 7-c >:...:i c+;-,k;ri TX r 7 7 s::L.:r. ...

  19. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    (gj' z,r' I 3 CEISTRAL F;LES O+ 2g I y * ,;r" x(-J,, r;:, i, :*.s- > , ;I'"( 1' . 5; y 0 3 1 10 tiC0 P .' y lT <-.--,r.:+s ; a 0 :.9fS .Yw (' t i...

  20. PAPERS PUBLISHED / 2005-2006 Progress in Research / Cyclotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Rev. Lett. 94, 082301 (2005). Texas A&M 14.5 and 6.4 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source, D.P. May, F.P. Abegglen, G.J. Derrig, and R.S. Olsen , Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, ...

  1. Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Requirements USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - arm2008.poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains. J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 1409-1426. RSMAS R O S EN STIEL S C H O O L O F M AR INE AN D A T M O S P H E R IC SCIEN C E * U N IV E RS ITY OF M IA M I * 3. Summary & Future...

  3. Outline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chris Scruton, as well as the contributions of our industrial partners including Mr. ... Cu rin g Ch am b e rs Co llat io n Pack ag in g Co at ing s D rye r Sep arat o r Tile M ac ...

  4. S

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... b y B EMOSS CommunicaLon T echnologies q Ethernet ( IEEE 8 02.3) q Serial I nterface ( RS---485) q ZigBee ( IEEE 8 02.15.4) q WiFi ( IEEE 8 02.11) Data E xchange P ...

  5. Papers Published - April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.W. Stankus, T.N. Thompson, R.S. Towell, R.E. Tribble, M.A. Vasiliev, Y.C. Wang, Z.F. Wang, J.C. Webb, J.L. Willis, D.K. Wise and G.R. Young (FNAL E866NuSea Collaboration)...

  6. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b trac ting fro m th e da ily a ve rag e hig h te m p e ra tu res fo r th e la st 10 y ea rs a n am o un t e qu al to tw ice a n estim ate o f the stan da rd de via tion for h igh...

  7. Condition Assessment Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-16

    CAIS2000 records, tracks and cost maintenance deficiencies associated with condition assessments of real property assets. Cost information is available for 39,000 items in the currenht RS Means, Facilities Construction Manual. These costs can, in turn, be rolled by by asset to produce the summary condition of an asset or site.

  8. SciFri AM: Mountain 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  9. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  10. Dark matter relic density in Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B., E-mail: Michael.Meehan@my.jcu.edu.au, E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, 1 James Cook Dr., Townsville 4811 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The relic density of symmetric and asymmetric dark matter in a Gauss-Bonnet (GB) modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) type II braneworld cosmology is investigated. The existing study of symmetric dark matter in a GB braneworld (Okada and Okada, 2009) found that the expansion rate was reduced compared to that in standard General Relativity (GR), thereby delaying particle freeze-out and resulting in relic abundances which are suppressed by up to O(10{sup ?2}). This is in direct contrast to the behaviour observed in RS braneworlds where the expansion rate is enhanced and the final relic abundance boosted. However, this finding that relic abundances are suppressed in a GB braneworld is based upon a highly contrived situation in which the GB era evolves directly into a standard GR era, rather than passing through a RS era as is the general situation. This collapse of the RS era requires equating the mass scale m{sub ?} of the GB modification and the mass scale m{sub ?} of the brane tension. However, if the GB contribution is to be considered as the lowest order correction from string theory to the RS action, we would expect m{sub ?} > m{sub ?}. We investigate the effect upon the relic abundance of choosing more realistic values for the ratio R{sub m} ? m{sub ?}/m{sub ?} and find that the relic abundance can be either enhanced or suppressed by more than two orders of magnitude. However, suppression only occurs for a small range of parameter choices and, overwhelmingly, the predominant situation is that of enhancement as we recover the usual Randall-Sundrum type behaviour in the limit R{sub m} >> 1. We use the latest observational bound ?{sub DM}h{sup 2}=0.11870.0017 to constrain the various model parameters and briefly discuss the implications for direct/indirect dark matter detection experiments as well as dark matter particle models.

  11. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serer, Mara I.; Bonomi, Hernn R.; Guimares, Beatriz G.; Rossi, Rolando C.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastin

    2014-05-01

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C{sub 3} symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.

  12. Local structure of Fe in Fe-doped misfit-layered calcium cobaltite: An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasoetsopha, Natkrita; Pinitsoontorn, Supree; Bootchanont, Atipong; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Srepusharawoot, Pornjuk; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2013-08-15

    Polycrystalline Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+?} ceramics (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05) were fabricated using a simple thermal hydro-decomposition method and a spark plasma sintering technique. Thermoelectric property measurements showed that increasing Fe concentration resulted in a decrease in electrical resistivity, thermopower and thermal conductivity, leading to an improvement in the dimensionless figure-of-merit, >35% for x=0.05 at 1073 K. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the local structure of Fe ions in the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+?} structure for the first time. By fitting data from the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra and analyzing the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra incorporated with first principle simulation, it was shown that Fe was substituted for Co in the the Ca{sub 2}CoO{sub 3} (rocksalt, RS) layer rather than in the CoO{sub 2} layer. Variation in the thermoelectric properties as a function of Fe concentration was attributed to charge transfer between the CoO{sub 2} and the RS layers. The origin of the preferential Fe substitution site was investigated considering the ionic radii of Co and Fe and the total energy of the system. - Graphical abstract: The Fe K-edge XANES spectra of: (a) experimental result in comparison to the simulated spectra when Fe atoms were substituted in the RS layer; (b) with magnetic moment; (c) without magnetic moment, and in the CoO{sub 2} layer; (d) with magnetic moment and (e) without magnetic moment. Highlights: Synthesis, structural studies, and thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+?}. Direct evidence for the local structure of the Fe ions in the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 9+?} using XAS analysis. EXAFS and XANES analysis showed that Fe was likely to be situated in the RS layer structure. Changes in TE property with Fe content was due to charge transfer between the CoO{sub 2} and the RS layers. Total energy calculation showed energetically favorable Fe substitution in the RS layer.

  13. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  14. On the interaction of the PKS B1358113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stawarz, ?.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K.; Szostek, A.; Kozie?-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Werner, N.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}?210{sup ?4} M-dot {sub Edd}?0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup 1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ? (1-6) 10{sup 3} L {sub Edd} ? (0.5-3) 10{sup 45} erg s{sup 1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as ?{sub j} ? 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ? (2-8) 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}?2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on a possible bias against detecting stronger jet-driven shocks in poorer environments, resulting from inefficient electron heating at the shock front, combined with a relatively long electron-ion temperature equilibration timescale.

  15. ULTRA STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES IN THE LOCKMAN HOLE: SERVS IDENTIFICATIONS AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION AT THE FAINTEST RADIO FLUXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonso, J.; Bizzocchi, L.; Grossi, M.; Messias, H.; Fernandes, C. A. C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Simpson, C.; Chapman, S.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Rottgering, H.; Norris, R. P.; Dunlop, J.; Best, P.; Pforr, J.; Vaccari, M.; Seymour, N.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; and others

    2011-12-20

    Ultra steep spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z {approx}> 2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 {mu}Jy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) are used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6]{sub AB} = 19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z = 0.1 to z = 2.8, peaking at z {approx} 0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m (typically [3.6] {approx}> 22-23 mag from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicates that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high-redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.

  16. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch powerful radio outflows. This result is consistent with the hypothesis of different formation processes and evolution histories in 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies: major mergers are likely to have created 'core' galaxies, while minor mergers were instrumental in the creation of 'power-law' galaxies.

  17. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in 9 of them. The high frequency of occurrence of X-ray jets in this complete sample suggests that they are a signature of a ubiquitous process in FRI jets. It appears that the FRI jets start out relativistically on parsec scales but decelerate on kiloparsec scales, with the X-ray emission revealing the sites of bulk deceleration and particle reacceleration.

  18. Advanced Fusion Power Plant Studies. Annual Report for 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greenfield, C.M.; Kinsey, J.E.; et al.

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress in physics understanding of the reversed shear advanced tokamak regime has been made since the last ARIES-RS study was completed in 1996. The 1999 study aimed at updating the physics design of ARIES-RS, which has been renamed ARIES-AT, using the improved understanding achieved in the last few years. The new study focused on: Improvement of beta-limit stability calculations to include important non-ideal effects such as resistive wall modes and neo-classical tearing modes; Use of physics based transport model for internal transport barrier (ITB) formation and sustainment; Comparison of current drive and rotational flow drive using fast wave, electron cyclotron wave and neutral particle beam; Improvement in heat and particle control; Integrated modeling of the optimized scenario with self-consistent current and transport profiles to study the robustness of the bootstrap alignment, ITB sustainment, and stable path to high beta and high bootstrap fraction operation.

  19. Development of Labview based data acquisition and multichannel analyzer software for radioactive particle tracking system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Abdullah, Jaafar B.; Hassan, Hearie B.

    2015-04-29

    A DAQ (data acquisition) software called RPTv2.0 has been developed for Radioactive Particle Tracking System in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. RPTv2.0 that features scanning control GUI, data acquisition from 12-channel counter via RS-232 interface, and multichannel analyzer (MCA). This software is fully developed on National Instruments Labview 8.6 platform. Ludlum Model 4612 Counter is used to count the signals from the scintillation detectors while a host computer is used to send control parameters, acquire and display data, and compute results. Each detector channel consists of independent high voltage control, threshold or sensitivity value and window settings. The counter is configured with a host board and twelve slave boards. The host board collects the counts from each slave board and communicates with the computer via RS-232 data interface.

  20. Electric field-induced magnetic switching in Mn:ZnO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, S. X.; Sun, G. W.; Zhao, J.; Dong, J. Y.; Zhao, X.; Chen, W.; Wei, Y.; Ma, Z. C.

    2014-06-09

    A large magnetic modulation, accompanied by stable bipolar resistive switching (RS) behavior, was observed in a Mn:ZnO film by applying a reversible electric field. A significant enhancement of the ferromagnetism of the film, to about five times larger than that in the initial (as-grown) state (IS), was obtained by switching the film into the low resistance state. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated the existence of abundant oxygen vacancies in the IS of the film. We suggest that this electric field-induced magnetic switching effect originates with the migration and redistribution of oxygen vacancies during RS. Our work indicates that electric switching is an effective and simple method to increase the ferromagnetism of diluted magnetic oxide films. This provides a promising direction for research in spintronic devices.

  1. An Analysis of the Temperature and Field Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of Nitrogen-Doped Niobium SRF Cavities with Respect to Existing Theoretical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, Charles E.; Palczewski, Ari D.; Xiao, Binping

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress with the reduction of rf surface resistance (Rs) of niobium SRF cavities via the use of high temperature surface doping by nitrogen has opened a new regime for energy efficient accelerator applications. For particular doping conditions one observes dramatic decreases in Rs with increasing surface magnetic fields. The observed variations as a function of temperature may be analyzed in the context of recent theoretical treatments in hopes of gaining insight into the underlying beneficial mechanism of the nitrogen treatment. Systematic data sets of Q0 vs. Eacc vs. temperature acquired during the high Q0 R&D work of the past year will be compared with theoretical model predictions.1, 2 1. B. P. Xiao, C. E. Reece and M. J. Kelley, Physica C: Superconductivity 490 (0), 26-31 (2013). 2. A. Gurevich, PRL 113 (8), 087001 (2014).

  2. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide rs in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects Millions in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects Millions in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects LANL technology successfully optimized diaper manufacturing and manufacturing design, permitting Laboratory scientists to validate and expand the

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide rs in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects April 3, 2012 - 2 - Diaper manufacturing provides a key to millions in cost reductions Since the mid-1990s, The Procter and Gamble Company (P&G) and Los Alamos National Laboratory have collaborated on 17 projects touching upon physics simulations,

  4. STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION MISSOURI STATE OPERATING PERMIT In compliance with the Missouri Clean Water Law, (Chapter 644 R.S. Mo. as amended, hereinafter, the Law), and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500, 92 nd Congress) as amended, Permit No.: MO-0004863 Owner: United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Address: P.O. Box 410202, Kansas City, MO 64141-0202 Continuing Authority: United States Department of Energy

  5. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Human TAS2 receptors (hTAS2Rs) perceive bitter tastants, but few studies have explored the structure-function relationships of these receptors. In this paper, we report our trials on

  6. Microsoft Word - Press Release RECOMP 2-8-08 REV FINAL.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Press Release RECOMP 2-8-08 REV FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Press Release RECOMP 2-8-08 REV FINAL.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Press Release RECOMP 2-8-08 REV FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Energy Speech 082508 FINAL.doc USA RS Basic Contract - Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 Microsoft Word - AL-Consolidated Approps FY 2008 as of feb 21 2008 final

  7. HSPB1 Gene Polymorphisms Predict Risk of Mortality for US Patients After Radio(chemo)therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Ting; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas ; Wei Qingyi; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Madrileno de Oncologia Wang Lie; Liu Zhensheng; Gomez, Daniel; O'Reilly, Michael; Lin, Steven Hsesheng; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Mohan, Radhe; Zhou Honghao; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated potential associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and overall survival in US patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using available genomic DNA samples from 224 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy, we genotyped 2 SNPs of HSPB1 (NCBI SNP nos. rs2868370 and rs2868371). We used both Kaplan-Meier cumulative probability and Cox proportional hazards analyses to evaluate the effect of HSPB1 genotypes on survival. Results: Our cohort consisted of 117 men and 107 women, mostly white (79.5%), with a median age of 70 years. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 63-87.5 Gy), and 183 patients (82%) received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The most common genotype of the rs2868371 SNP was CC (61%). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that this genotype was associated with poorer survival than CG and GG genotypes (univariate hazard ratio [HR] = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.90; P=.037; multivariate HR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.01-1.92; P=.045). Conclusions: Our results showed that the CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with poorer overall survival in patients with NSCLC after radio(chemo)therapy, findings that contradict those of a previous study of Chinese patients. Validation of our findings with larger numbers of similar patients is needed, as are mechanical and clinical studies to determine the mechanism underlying these associations.

  8. World Watch Institute Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in more than a dozen languages. For more information, visitrs6.nettn.jsp?e0015oJsdoSs25oJPGv7ktJRWgX6GyQ98itsQ5wXa9eKtj6nN7ZSxBHVW5O2QwJEbFEUl8j0zopxW...

  9. CHARA/MIRC observations of two M supergiants in Perseus OB1: Temperature,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bayesian modeling, and compressed sensing imaging (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect CHARA/MIRC observations of two M supergiants in Perseus OB1: Temperature, bayesian modeling, and compressed sensing imaging Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CHARA/MIRC observations of two M supergiants in Perseus OB1: Temperature, bayesian modeling, and compressed sensing imaging Two red supergiants (RSGs) of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per, have been observed in the H band using the

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Chen, R., University of Maryland Wood, R., University of Washington Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Ferraro, R., NOAA/NESDIS, WWBG Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chen, R, R Wood, Z Li, R Ferraro, and F Chang. 2008. "Studying the vertical variation of

  11. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    f ro m t h e d a ily a v e ra g e h ig h te m p e ra tu re s f o r t h e la s t 1 0 y e a rs a n a m o u n t e q u a l to tw ic e a n e s t im a te o f th e s ta n d a rd d e v ia...

  12. DOE Deputy Secretary Memo on Conference-Related Activities and Spending

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 17, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR FRANKLIN M. ORR FROM: SUBJECT: UNDER SECRETARY FOR SCIENCE AND ENERGY FRANK KLOTZ UNDER SECRETARY FOR NUCLEAR SECURITY DAVID M. KLAUS DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEM ENT AND PERFORMANCE HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FIELD SITE M ANAG ERS LABORATORY DIRECTO RS ELIZABETH SHER WOOD-RANDALL~ Updated Guidance o n Conference-Related Activities and Spending In 2012, the Depa11ment of Energy (DOE) launched a comprehensive initiative to improve management of

  13. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Specialist Course Louisville Fire Department Fire Training Center Louisville, KY, March 4-8, 2013 J. Curt Pendergrass, PhD Supervisor, Radioactive Materials Section Kentucky Radiation Health Branch RS Course Instructors & Support Staff  Tom Clawson  Mark Linsley  Ken Keaton  Celeste Cusack  Major Ed Dunagan, Chief Training Officer, Louisville Fire Department  Kentucky Radiation Health Branch Staff NFPA 472: Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved Radiosonde Sensor Ready for Launch Bookmark and Share At the end of a string tied to the weather balloon, a small sensor package, called a radiosonde, contains the "brains" for measuring atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. As part of the Balloon Borne Sounding System, radiosondes launched at the the ARM Climate Research Facility sites are supplied by Vaisala, one of the market leaders of this technology. Vaisala began phasing out production of the RS90 radiosondes

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2007 [Facility News] Radiosonde Temperature Sensor Benefits from Stronger Structure Bookmark and Share The new temperature sensor (front and back shown above) for the RS92 radiosonde sports an integrated fiber-reinforced structure that improves durability while maintaining the needed measurement accuracy and response. Small sensor packages called radiosondes (or "sondes") are used to transmit atmospheric information from weather balloons as they rise through the air. Vaisala, the

  16. Resistive switching phenomena of tungsten nitride thin films with excellent CMOS compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Seok Man; Kim, Hee-Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: The resistive switching characteristics of WN{sub x} thin films. Excellent CMOS compatibility WN{sub x} films as a resistive switching material. Resistive switching mechanism revealed trap-controlled space charge limited conduction. Good endurance and retention properties over 10{sup 5} cycles, and 10{sup 5} s, respectively - Abstract: We report the resistive switching (RS) characteristics of tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films with excellent complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility. A Ti/WN{sub x}/Pt memory cell clearly shows bipolar RS behaviors at a low voltage of approximately 2.2 V. The dominant conduction mechanisms at low and high resistance states were verified by Ohmic behavior and trap-controlled space-charge-limited conduction, respectively. A conducting filament model by a redox reaction explains the RS behavior in WN{sub x} films. We also demonstrate the memory characteristics during pulse operation, including a high endurance over >10{sup 5} cycles and a long retention time of >10{sup 5} s.

  17. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  18. A HIGH-FREQUENCY TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURST ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 13 CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, K.-S.; Kim, R.-S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kwon, R.-Y.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-03-10

    We examine the relationship between the high-frequency (425 MHz) type II radio burst and the associated white-light coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 February 13. The radio burst had a drift rate of 2.5 MHz s{sup -1}, indicating a relatively high shock speed. From SDO/AIA observations we find that a loop-like erupting front sweeps across high-density coronal loops near the start time of the burst (17:34:17 UT). The deduced distance of shock formation (0.06 Rs) from the flare center and speed of the shock (1100 km s{sup -1}) using the measured density from SDO/AIA observations are comparable to the height (0.05 Rs, from the solar surface) and speed (700 km s{sup -1}) of the CME leading edge observed by STEREO/EUVI. We conclude that the type II burst originates even in the low corona (<59 Mm or 0.08 Rs, above the solar surface) due to the fast CME shock passing through high-density loops.

  19. MgB{sub 2} for Application to RF Cavities for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, T.; Canabal, A.; Zhao, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Moeckly, B.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.; Phillips, L.; Iwashita, Y.; Campisi, I.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2007-10-11

    Magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) has a transition temperature (T{sub c}) of {approx}40 K, i.e., about 4 times as high as that of niobium (Nb).We have been evaluating MgB{sub 2} as a candidate material for radio-frequency (RF) cavities for future particle accelerators. Studies in the last 3 years have shown that it could have about one order of magnitude less RF surface resistance (Rs) than Nb at 4 K. A power dependence test using a 6 GHz TE011 mode cavity has shown little power dependence up to {approx}12 mT (120 Oe), limited by available power, compared to other high-Tc materials such as YBCO. A recent study showed, however, that the power dependence of Rs is dependent on the coating method. A film made with on-axis pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has showed rapid increase in Rs compared to the film deposited by reactive evaporation method. This paper shows these results as well as future plans.

  20. RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

    2003-11-01

    In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

  1. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

  2. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  3. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore »of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  4. WE-D-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; Naqa, I El

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It has been realized that inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability is a multifactorial process involving dosimetric, clinical, and genetic factors. Therefore, we explore a new framework to integrate physical, clinical, and biological data denoted as radiogenomic modeling. In demonstrating the feasibility of this work, we investigate the association of genetic variants (copy number variations [CNVs] and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) with radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) while taking into account dosimetric and clinical variables in prostate cancer patients treated with curative irradiation. Methods: A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) was retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs25489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Dosevolume metrics were extracted from treatment plans of 54 patients who had complete dosimetric profiles. Treatment outcomes were considered to be a Result of functional mapping of radiogenomic input variables according to a logit transformation. Model orders were estimated using resampling by leave-one out cross-validation (LOO-CV). Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and LOO-CV. For continuous univariate dosimetric and clinical variables, Spearmans rank coefficients were calculated and p-values reported accordingly. In the case of binary variables, Chi-squared statistics and contingency table calculations were used. Results: Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ2=14.6 [p<0.001] and ED: χ2=4.88[p=0.0272]) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ2=0.278[p=0.599] and ED: χ2=0.112[p=0.732]). LOO-CV identified penile bulb D60 as the only significant QUANTEC predictor (rs=0.312 [p=0.0145]) for ED. Radiogenomic modeling yielded statistically significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (rs=0.243[p=0.0443], AUC=0.665) and ED (rs=0.276[p=0.0217], AUC=0.754). Conclusion: The radiogenomic modeling approach presented herein has been shown to identify NTCP models which have increased predictive power. Furthermore, CNVs appears to be useful genetic variants when added to dosimetric NTCP models. This work was partially supported by CIHR grant MOP-114910.

  5. microRNA Alterations Driving Acute and Late Stages of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Skin Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Brittany A.; Ly, David; Savage, Jason E.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dan, Tu D.; Ylaya, Kris; Shankavaram, Uma; Lim, Meng; Jin, Lianjin; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James B.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Although ionizing radiation is critical in treating cancer, radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) can have a devastating impact on patients' quality of life. The molecular changes leading to radiation-induced fibrosis must be elucidated so that novel treatments can be designed. Methods and Materials: To determine whether microRNAs (miRs) could be responsible for RIF, the fibrotic process was induced in the right hind legs of 9-week old CH3 mice by a single-fraction dose of irradiation to 35Gy, and the left leg served as an unirradiated control. Fibrosis was quantified by measurements of leg length compared with control leg length. By 120days after irradiation, the irradiated legs were 20% (P=.013) shorter on average than were the control legs. Results: Tissue analysis was done on muscle, skin, and subcutaneous tissue from irradiated and control legs. Fibrosis was noted on both gross and histologic examination by use of a pentachrome stain. Microarrays were performed at various times after irradiation, including 7days, 14days, 50days, 90days, and 120days after irradiation. miR-15a, miR-21, miR-30a, and miR-34a were the miRs with the most significant alteration by array with miR-34a, proving most significant on confirmation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, c-Met, a known effector of fibrosis and downstream molecule of miR-34a, was evaluated by use of 2cell lines: HCT116 and 1522. The cell lines were exposed to various stressors to induce miR changes, specifically ionizing radiation. Additionally, invitro transfections with pre-miRs and anti-miRs confirmed the relationship of miR-34a and c-Met. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate an inverse relationship with miR-34a and c-Met; the upregulation of miR-34a in RIF causes inhibition of c-Met production. miRs may play a role in RIF; in particular, miR-34a should be investigated as a potential target to prevent or treat this devastating side effect of irradiation.

  6. XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF THE FAST NOVA V2491 Cyg DURING THE SUPERSOFT SOURCE PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, J.-U.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Beardmore, A. P.; Dobrotka, A.; Drake, J. J.; Pinto, C.; Detmers, R. G.; Schwarz, G.; Bode, M. F.; Starrfield, S.; Hernanz, M.; Sala, G.; Krautter, J.; Woodward, C. E.

    2011-05-20

    Two XMM-Newton observations of the fast classical nova V2491 Cyg were carried out in short succession on days 39.93 and 49.62 after discovery, during the supersoft source (SSS) phase, yielding simultaneous X-ray and UV light curves and high-resolution X-ray spectra. The first X-ray light curve is highly variable, showing oscillations with a period of 37.2 minutes after an extended factor of three decline lasting {approx}3 hr, while the second X-ray light curve is less variable. The cause of the dip is currently unexplained and has most likely the same origin as similar events in the early SSS light curves of the novae V4743 Sgr and RS Oph, as it occurred on the same timescale. The oscillations are not present during the dip minimum and also not in the second observation. The UV light curves are variable but contain no dips and no period. High-resolution X-ray spectra are presented for four intervals of differing intensity. All spectra are atmospheric continua with deep absorption lines and absorption edges. Two interstellar lines of O I and N I are clearly seen at their rest wavelengths, while a large number of high-ionization absorption lines are found at blueshifts indicating an expansion velocity of 3000-3400 km s{sup -1}, which does not change significantly during the epochs of observation. Comparisons with the slower nova V4743 Sgr and the symbiotic recurrent nova RS Oph are presented. The SSS spectrum of V4743 Sgr is much softer with broader and more complex photospheric absorption lines. The ejecta are extended, allowing us to view a larger range of the radial velocity profile. Meanwhile, the absorption lines in RS Oph are as narrow as in V2491 Cyg, but they are less blueshifted. A remarkable similarity in the continua of V2491 Cyg and RS Oph is found. The only differences are smaller line shifts and additional emission lines in RS Oph that are related to the presence of a dense stellar wind from the evolved companion. Three unidentified absorption lines are present in the X-ray spectra of all three novae, with projected rest wavelengths 26.05 A, 29.45 A, and 30.0 A. No entirely satisfactory spectral model is currently available for the soft X-ray spectra of novae in outburst, and careful discussion of assumptions is required.

  7. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2‐microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi ; Chang, Xiuli; Rentschler, Gerda; Tian, Liting; Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao; Jin, Taiyi; Broberg, Karin

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 μg/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 μg/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 μg/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary β2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (β = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (β = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.018, 95% CI − 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ► The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ► A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ► Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ► The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  8. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  9. Current Dosing Paradigm for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases Needs to Be Optimized for Improved Local Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, Roshan; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos; Dhabaan, Anees; Hall, William; Raore, Bethwel; Olson, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter; Oyesiku, Nelson; Crocker, Ian

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of radiosurgery (RS) alone to the resection cavity after resection of brain metastases as an alternative to adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients with 64 cavities were treated with linear accelerator-based RS alone to the resection cavity after surgical removal of brain metastases between March 2007 and August 2010. Fifty-two patients (81%) had a gross total resection. Median cavity volume was 8.5 cm{sup 3}. Forty-four patients (71%) had a single metastasis. Median marginal and maximum doses were 18 Gy and 20.4 Gy, respectively. Sixty-one cavities (95%) had gross tumor volume to planning target volume expansion of {>=}1 mm. Results: Six-month and 1-year actuarial local recurrence rates were 14% and 22%, respectively, with a median follow-up period of 9.7 months. Six-month and 1-year actuarial distant brain recurrence, total intracranial recurrence, and freedom from WBRT rates were 31% and 51%, 41% and 63%, and 91% and 74%, respectively. The symptomatic cavity radiation necrosis rate was 8%, with 2 patients (3%) undergoing surgery. Of the 11 local failures, 8 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 2 were both (defined as in-field if {>=}90% of recurrence within the prescription isodose and marginal if {>=}90% outside of the prescription isodose). Conclusions: The high rate of in-field cavity failure suggests that geographic misses with highly conformal RS are not a major contributor to local recurrence. The current dosing regimen derived from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 90-05 should be optimized in this patient population before any direct comparison with WBRT.

  10. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-01

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  11. Association of genetic polymorphisms in GADD45A, MDM2, and p14{sup ARF} with the risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Pin; Zhang Zhongbin; Wan Junxiang; Zhao Naiqing; Jin Xipeng; Xia Zhaolin

    2009-10-01

    Benzene reactive metabolites can lead to DNA damage and trigger the p53-dependent defense responses to maintain genomic stability. We hypothesized that the p53-dependent genes may play a role in the development of chronic benzene poisoning (CBP). In a case-control study of 303 patients with benzene poisoning and 295 workers occupationally exposed to benzene in south China, we investigated associations between the risk of CBP and polymorphisms in three p53-dependent genes. Potential interactions of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors were also explored. We found p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 polymorphism was associated with risk of CBP (P = 0.014). Compared with those carrying the GG genotype, individuals carrying p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a reduced risk of CBP ([adjusted odds ratio (OR{sub adj}) = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.36-0.89]. Further analysis showed p14{sup ARF} TGA/TAG diplotype was associated with an increased risk of CBP (P = 0.0006), whereas p14{sup ARF} TGG/TAA diplotype was associated with a decreased risk of CBP (P = 0.0000001). In addition, we found individuals carrying both MDM2 Del1518 WW genotype and p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a lower risk of CBP (OR{sub adj} = 0.25; 95%CI = 0.10-0.62; P = 0.003). Although these results require confirmation and extension, our findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in p14{sup ARF} may have an impact on the risk of CBP in the study population.

  12. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ....... ~~ ~~ -""~ - - - =-.- ~- ~ ----- ---- --- - - ~ - Stephen A. Whipple Lynn H. Wellman and Bill J. Good A Publication of the Savannah River Plant National Environmental Research Park Program United States Department of Energy a Th is report was prepared a s a n ac count of work sponsored by th e United States Governme nt. Neither the Un ited Slate s nor the United Sta les D~ - par trncnt of Energy. nor any of th eir co ntrac tors. su bco ntrac to rs. or th eir e mployees. mak es

  13. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium over the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. This effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. Transport simulations were conducted using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges. The results presented in this study highlight the challenges in defining appropriate conditions for batch-type experiments used to extrapolate parameters for transport models, and also underline a gap in our ability to transfer batch results to transport simulations.

  14. Title:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A uttwr(s): submined to: NUCLEAR DATA FOR RADIOTHERAPY: PRESENTATION OF A NEW ICRU REPORT AND IAEA INITIATIVES M. B. Chadwick, T-2, MS-B283, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box D.T.L. Jones, National Accelerator Centre, Faure, South Africa H . H . Barschall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA R.S. Caswell, National Jnstitute of Standards and Technology, P.M. DeLuca Jr., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA J-P Meulders, Universite Catholique de Louvain, lowain-la-Neuve, Belgium

  15. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R. Jensen 2 , Ryan R. Jensen 3 , John Gladden 4 , Jody Waugh 5 and Mike Serrato 4 1 Department of Environmental Resources Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA 2

  16. NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I lY,.COMMISSION 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KlNG OF PRUSSIA. PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 GION I NOALE ROAD ENNSYLVANlA 194061415 MAY I5 1996 MAY I5 1996 Docket No. 040-07964 License No. SlJ (Rs Heyman Properties Attention: Mr. John S. Russo Facility Manager 333 Post Road West Westport, CT 06881 SUBJECT: INSPECTION NO. 040-07964/96-001 Dear Mr. Russo: On April 15, 1996, Todd J. Jackson of this office conducted a routine inspection at 737 Canal Street, Stamford, Connecticut of

  17. T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    d < - # . . "- r . , T h i s is c o p y L o f 10 c o p i e s . 1 This document c o n t a i n s 30 pages. - i A THEOREM ANG ITS APPLICATION TO FINITE TAA1PE;RS Fri ! 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

  18. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  19. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JF:RS:14-0023:UFC 1200.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 April 11, 2013 Eddy and Lea Country Residents: As we approach the end of another week of recovery operations at the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), our team continues making progress in our efforts to return the site to full disposal operations. We remain focused on sending additional teams into the underground facility to identify the location and source

  20. WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL REFZR m SYmOL1 LILCB .' .. .",I:, ' ,,:r:~' ., " " In aooordame with our telephone oonvorsation of-this date, there is transmitted herewith for 'your um a few of the prooessora and distributors of' refined source material. i. PRocESSoRS~ DISTRIBUTOBS CJI-'GB&& Chemical Co. Pbilliprrburg, Uew Jersey Haywood Chemloal Uorke "' Maymod, bw Jermy City Chesical Company 132 Ploet Z2nd Street Uw York, Ber York Eiimr

  1. Initial Evidence for Self-Organized Criticality in Electric Power System Blackouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B.A.; Dobson, I.; Newman, D.E.; Poole, A.B.

    2000-01-04

    We examine correlations in a time series of electric power system blackout sizes using scaled window variance analysis and R/S statistics. The data shows some evidence of long time correlations and has Hurst exponent near 0.7. Large blackouts tend to correlate with further large blackouts after a long time interval. Similar effects are also observed in many other complex systems exhibiting self-organized criticality. We discuss this initial evidence and possible explanations for self-organized criticality in power systems blackouts. Self-organized criticality, if fully confirmed in power systems, would suggest new approaches to understanding and possibly controlling blackouts.

  2. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium overmore » the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. This effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. Transport simulations were conducted using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges. The results presented in this study highlight the challenges in defining appropriate conditions for batch-type experiments used to extrapolate parameters for transport models, and also underline a gap in our ability to transfer batch results to transport simulations.« less

  3. Statefinder hierarchy of bimetric and galileon models for concordance cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrzakulov, R.; Shahalam, M. E-mail: mdshahalam@ctp-jamia.res.in

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we use Statefinder hierarchy method to distinguish between bimetric theory of massive gravity, galileon modified gravity and DGP models applied to late time expansion of the universe. We also carry out comparison between bimetric and DGP models using Statefinder pairs (r,s) and (r,q). We show that statefinder diagnostic can differentiate between ?CDM and above mentioned cosmological models of dark energy, and finally show that Statefinder S{sub 2} is an excellent discriminant of ?CDM and modified gravity models.

  4. Staff > Researchers, Postdocs & Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cornell Researchers, Postdocs & Graduates Page 2 of 2 ⇐ Previous | Next ⇒ List Image Benjamin Richards Member - Hanrath Group btr22@cornell.edu List Image Gabriel Rodriguez-Calero Postdoc - Abruña Group gr235@cornell.edu List Image Ritu Sahore Graduate Student - Giannelis Group rs758@cornell.edu List Image Katharine Silberstein Graduate Student - Abruña group kes272@cornell.edu List Image Eva Smith Graduate Student - Fennie Group ehs73@cornell.edu List Image Mukul Tikekar Graduate

  5. untitled

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SURFACES, INTERFACES AND THIN FILMS MAGNETIC PROPERTIES AND MATERIALS Received 22 October 2014 Accepted 29 January 2015 Published 5 March 2015 Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to R.S. (r.streubel@ifw- dresden.de) or P.F. (pjfischer@lbl.gov) Manipulating Topological States by Imprinting Non-Collinear Spin Textures Robert Streubel1, Luyang Han1, Mi-Young lm2,3, Florian Kronast4, Ulrich K. Roller5, Florin Radu4, Radu Abrudan4,6, Gungun Lin1, Oliver G. Schmidt1,7, Peter

  6. Solid waste management in Kolkata, India: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Tumpa; Goel, Sudha

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of current solid waste management (SWM) practices in Kolkata, India and suggests solutions to some of the major problems. More than 2920 ton/d of solid waste are generated in the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) area and the budget allocation for 2007-2008 was Rs. 1590 million (US$40 million), which amounts to Rs. 265/cap-y (US$6.7/cap-d) on SWM. This expenditure is insufficient to provide adequate SWM services. Major deficiencies were found in all elements of SWM. Despite 70% of the SWM budget being allocated for collection, collection efficiency is around 60-70% for the registered residents and less than 20% for unregistered residents (slum dwellers). The collection process is deficient in terms of manpower and vehicle availability. Bin capacity provided is adequate but locations were found to be inappropriate, thus contributing to the inefficiency of the system. At this time, no treatment is provided to the waste and waste is dumped on open land at Dhapa after collection. Lack of suitable facilities (equipment and infrastructure) and underestimates of waste generation rates, inadequate management and technical skills, improper bin collection, and route planning are responsible for poor collection and transportation of municipal solid wastes.

  7. Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

  8. Phenomenology of reverse-shock emission in the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Japelj, J.; Kopa?, D.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska ulica 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R.; Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Guidorzi, C. [Physics Departments, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122, Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: jure.japelj@fmf.uni-lj.si, E-mail: andreja.gomboc@fmf.uni-lj.si [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock (RS) emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse-shock signatures: 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424, and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse- and forward-shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray, and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time (<1 ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity, and ?-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse-shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late times (>10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse-shock component show a high magnetization parameter R {sub B} = ?{sub B,r}/?{sub B,f} ? 2-10{sup 4}. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.

  9. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  10. Density functional study of CaN mono and bilayer on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahedifar, Maedeh; Hashemifar, S. Javad, E-mail: hashemifar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Density functional - pseudopotential calculations are performed to provide first-principles insights into magnetic behaviour of bulk CaN and CaN monolayers on Cu(001) in the rock-salt (RS) and zinc-blende (ZB) structures. Our results indicate that both RS- and ZB-CaN exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism originated from the incomplete 2p shell of the nitrogen ion. In contrast to the bulk CaN, the CaN monolayers on Cu(001) generally favor ZB structure. We argue that the more stable ZB-CaN thin films on Cu(001) are nonmagnetic, because of strong Cu-N bonding at the interface, while the less stable Ca terminated ZB-CaN thin films exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism. The transition path between the high energy ferromagnetic and the stable nonmagnetic configurations of the ZB-CaN monolayer on Cu(001) are studied by using the nudged elastic band method. We observe a two stages transition and an activation barrier of about 1.18 eV in the minimum energy path of this transition.

  11. Nanostructures of Liquid Crystal Phases in Mixtures of Bent-core and Rod-shaped Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Hong; R Verduzco; J Gleeson; S Sprunt; A Jakli

    2011-12-31

    We report small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of isotropic, nematic, and smectic mesophases formed by binary mixtures of bent-core (BC) and rod-shaped (RS) molecules. While optical studies indicate that the components are fully miscible, SAXS reveals fascinating structures that are consistent with segregation on a nanoscopic scale. We find that tilted smectic clusters, which have been previously reported in both the nematic and isotropic states of the pure BC materials, are also present in mixtures with up to 50 wt% of the RS compound; this is consistent with previous dielectric and flexoelectric studies on such mixtures. Unexpectedly in this concentration range the clusters are present in the isotropic and in the induced smectic phase range, as well as throughout the nematic phase. The results in the smectic phase also reveal complex layering phenomena, providing important insight into the interaction between bent and rod-shaped molecules. These studies will be crucial in the design of promising new functional nanomaterials.

  12. Nanostructures of liquid crystal phases in mixtures of bent-core and rod-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, S. H.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S.; Verduzco, R.; Jakli, A.

    2011-06-15

    We report small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of isotropic, nematic, and smectic mesophases formed by binary mixtures of bent-core (BC) and rod-shaped (RS) molecules. While optical studies indicate that the components are fully miscible, SAXS reveals fascinating structures that are consistent with segregation on a nanoscopic scale. We find that tilted smectic clusters, which have been previously reported in both the nematic and isotropic states of the pure BC materials, are also present in mixtures with up to 50 wt% of the RS compound; this is consistent with previous dielectric and flexoelectric studies on such mixtures. Unexpectedly in this concentration range the clusters are present in the isotropic and in the induced smectic phase range, as well as throughout the nematic phase. The results in the smectic phase also reveal complex layering phenomena, providing important insight into the interaction between bent and rod-shaped molecules. These studies will be crucial in the design of promising new functional nanomaterials.

  13. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more » and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  14. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmorethis range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.less

  15. Digitally synthesized high purity, high-voltage radio frequency drive electronics for mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R. T.; Mojarradi, M.; MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Shortt, B. J.

    2008-09-15

    Reported herein is development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer controller (MSC) with integrated radio frequency (rf) power supply and mass spectrometer drive electronics. Advances have been made in terms of the physical size and power consumption of the MSC, while simultaneously making improvements in frequency stability, total harmonic distortion, and spectral purity. The rf power supply portion of the MSC is based on a series-resonant LC tank, where the capacitive load is the mass spectrometer itself, and the inductor is a solenoid or toroid, with various core materials. The MSC drive electronics is based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA), with serial peripheral interface for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter support, and RS232/RS422 communications interfaces. The MSC offers spectral quality comparable to, or exceeding, that of conventional rf power supplies used in commercially available mass spectrometers; and as well an inherent flexibility, via the FPGA implementation, for a variety of tasks that includes proportional-integral derivative closed-loop feedback and control of rf, rf amplitude, and mass spectrometer sensitivity. Also provided are dc offsets and resonant dipole excitation for mass selective accumulation in applications involving quadrupole ion traps; rf phase locking and phase shifting for external loading of a quadrupole ion trap; and multichannel scaling of acquired mass spectra. The functionality of the MSC is task specific, and is easily modified by simply loading FPGA registers or reprogramming FPGA firmware.

  16. GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT IN THE 2014 JANUARY 6 SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Mkel, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-07-20

    We present a study of the 2014 January 6 solar energetic particle event which produced a small ground level enhancement (GLE), making it the second GLE of this unusual solar cycle 24. This event was primarily observed by the South Pole neutron monitors (increase of ?2.5%) while a few other neutron monitors recorded smaller increases. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME) originated behind the western limb and had a speed of 1960kms{sup 1}. The height of the CME at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst, which indicates the formation of a strong shock, was measured to be 1.61 Rs using a direct image from STEREO-A/EUVI. The CME height at the time of the GLE particle release (determined using the South Pole neutron monitor data) was directly measured as 2.96 Rs based on STEREO-A/COR1 white-light observations. These CME heights are consistent with those obtained for GLE71, the only other GLE of the current cycle, as well as cycle-23 GLEs derived using back-extrapolation. GLE72 is of special interest because it is one of only two GLEs of cycle 24, one of two behind-the-limb GLEs, and one of the two smallest GLEs of cycles 23 and 24.

  17. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  18. Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

    2005-12-05

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dewatering costs. Interestingly, the maximum feed moisture was found to be dependent to some extent on the binder type with molasses-containing blends being difficult to feed when the moisture content approached 12% while guar gum blends flowed consistently at moisture levels as high as 15% by weight. Due to the low ash and moisture contents of the coal-sawdust briquettes, a production increase of about 50 tons/hr would potentially be realized at a 1,400 ton/hr preparation plant. The overall capital cost of a 50 ton/hr flotation and briquetting addition was estimated to be around $8 million. Based on a conservative briquetting operating cost of $12/ton, the annual profit before taxes was approximated to be $4 million thereby indicating a return on investment in about 2 years. The internal rate of return based on a 10 year life was an attractive 43%.

  19. Peripheral Dose Heterogeneity Due to the Thread Effect in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Verneris, Michael R.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Wilke, Christopher T.; Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Hui, Susanta K.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials: Nine cases were divided into 2 groups based on patient size, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (>47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (eg, bones of the arm or femur), at the central axis (eg, vertebrae), and planning target volume (PTV), defined as the entire skeleton plus 1-cm margin. Results: Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95 and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (P=.016) and 16% (P=.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions: Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced.

  20. The non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor APS12-2 is a potent antagonist of skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandič, Marjana; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina; Benoit, Evelyne; Frangež, Robert

    2012-12-01

    APS12-2, a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is one of the synthetic analogs of polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. In the present work the effects of APS12-2 were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve–hemidiaphragm muscle preparations, using twitch tension measurements and electrophysiological recordings. APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner blocked nerve-evoked isometric muscle contraction (IC{sub 50} = 0.74 μM), without affecting directly-elicited twitch tension up to 2.72 μM. The compound (0.007–3.40 μM) decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials until a complete block by concentrations higher than 0.68 μM, without affecting their frequency. Full size endplate potentials, recorded after blocking voltage-gated muscle sodium channels, were inhibited by APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 0.36 μM) without significant change in the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibers up to 3.40 μM. The compound also blocked acetylcholine-evoked inward currents in Xenopus oocytes in which Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been incorporated (IC{sub 50} = 0.0005 μM), indicating a higher affinity of the compound for Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) than for the mouse (α1{sub 2}β1γε) nAChR. Our data show for the first time that APS12-2 blocks neuromuscular transmission by a non-depolarizing mechanism through an action on postsynaptic nAChRs of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. -- Highlights: ► APS12-2 produces concentration-dependent inhibition of nerve-evoked muscle contraction in vitro. ► APS12-2 blocks MEPPs and EPPs at the neuromuscular junction. APS12-2 blocks ACh-activated current in Xenopus oocytes incorporated with Torpedo nAChRs.

  1. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, W.J.

    1999-04-06

    A power controller device is disclosed which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the ``reset`` input of a R-S flip flop, while an ``0`` crossing detector controls the ``set`` input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the ``reset`` and ``set`` inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations. 9 figs.

  2. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Wallace J. (Boston Lake, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A power controller device which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the "reset" input of a R-S flip flop, while an "0" crossing detector controls the "set" input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the "reset" and "set" inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations.

  3. Disposition of Uranium -233 (sup 233U) in Plutonium Metal and Oxide at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiboth, Cameron J.; Gibbs, Frank E.

    2000-03-01

    This report documents the position that the concentration of Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) in plutonium metal and oxide currently stored at the DOE Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is well below the maximum permissible stabilization, packaging, shipping and storage limits. The {sup 233}U stabilization, packaging and storage limit is 0.5 weight percent (wt%), which is also the shipping limit maximum. These two plutonium products (metal and oxide) are scheduled for processing through the Building 371 Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (PuSPS). This justification is supported by written technical reports, personnel interviews, and nuclear material inventories, as compiled in the ''History of Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant In Support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program'' RS-090-056, April 1, 1999. Relevant data from this report is summarized for application to the PuSPS metal and oxide processing campaigns.

  4. Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

    1997-08-01

    A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

  5. Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Mary

    2013-03-31

    The goals of this program were to discover and implement a redox shuttle that is compatible with large format lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} (NMC) cathode material and to understand the mechanism of redox shuttle action. Many redox shuttles, both commercially available and experimental, were tested and much fundamental information regarding the mechanism of redox shuttle action was discovered. In particular, studies surrounding the mechanism of the reduction of the oxidized redox shuttle at the carbon anode surface were particularly revealing. The initial redox shuttle candidate, namely 2-(pentafluorophenyl)-tetrafluoro-1,3,2-benzodioxaborole (BDB) supplied by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL, Lemont, Illinois), did not effectively protect cells containing NMC cathodes from overcharge. The ANL-RS2 redox shuttle molecule, namely 1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)-2,5-di-tert-butyl-benzene, which is a derivative of the commercially successful redox shuttle 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB, 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota), is an effective redox shuttle for cells employing LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode material. The main advantage of ANL-RS2 over DDB is its larger solubility in electrolyte; however, ANL-RS2 is not as stable as DDB. This shuttle also may be effectively used to rebalance cells in strings that utilize LFP cathodes. The shuttle is compatible with both LTO and graphite anode materials although the cell with graphite degrades faster than the cell with LTO, possibly because of a reaction with the SEI layer. The degradation products of redox shuttle ANL-RS2 were positively identified. Commercially available redox shuttles Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} (Air Products, Allentown, Pennsylvania and Showa Denko, Japan) and DDB were evaluated and were found to be stable and effective redox shuttles at low C-rates. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} is suitable for lithium ion cells utilizing a high voltage cathode (potential that is higher than NMC) and the DDB is useful for lithium ion cells with LFP cathodes (potential that is lower than NMC). A 4.5 V class redox shuttle provided by Argonne National Laboratory was evaluated which provides a few cycles of overcharge protection for lithium ion cells containing NMC cathodes but it is not stable enough for consideration. Thus, a redox shuttle with an appropriate redox potential and sufficient chemical and electrochemical stability for commercial use in larger format lithium ion cells with NMC cathodes was not found. Molecular imprinting of the redox shuttle molecule during solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation likely contributes to the successful reduction of oxidized redox shuttle species at carbon anodes. This helps to understand how a carbon anode covered with an SEI layer, that is supposed to be electrically insulating, can reduce the oxidized form of a redox shuttle.

  6. ELECTRICAL PULSE COUNTER APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, W.M.; Jeeves, T.A.

    1962-09-01

    A progressive electrical pulse counter circuit rs designed for the counting of a chain of input pulses. The circuit employs a series of direct connected bistable counting stages simultaneously pulsed by each input pulse and a delay means connected between each of the stages. Each bistable stage has two d-c operative states, which stage, when in its initial state, prevents the next succeeding stage from changing its condition when the latter stage is pulsed. Since the delay circuits between the stages prevents the immediate decay of the d-c state of each stage when the stages are pulsed, only one stage will change its state for each input pulse, thereby providing progressive stage-by-stage counting. (AEC)

  7. Richard Gerber & Clayton Bagwell! NUG Business Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- 1 --- Allocations Summary * How t he N ERSC p ie i s d istributed - A l i'le h istory * DOE O ffices & P rograms * NERSC r eserves * The E RCAP p rocess * How u ser a ccounts a nd a llocaBons w ork * What h appens w hen u ser/repo r un o ut o f B me * Q & A --- 2 --- Allocations History 0 500000000 1E+09 1.5E+09 2E+09 2.5E+09 3E+09 3.5E+09 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 NERSC DOE P roducEon --- 3 --- 3 Billion Hrs 55 M illion H rs --- 4 --- 2017

  8. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

    2006-12-09

    Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

  9. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Binping; Reece, Charles E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  10. General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit Based High-Rate Rice Decompression and Reed-Solomon Decoding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2015-02-01

    As the volume of data acquired by space-based sensors increases, mission data compression/decompression and forward error correction code processing performance must likewise scale. This competency development effort was explored using the General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) to accomplish high-rate Rice Decompression and high-rate Reed-Solomon (RS) decoding at the satellite mission ground station. Each algorithm was implemented and benchmarked on a single GPGPU. Distributed processing across one to four GPGPUs was also investigated. The results show that the GPGPU has considerable potential for performing satellite communication Data Signal Processing, with three times or better performance improvements and up to ten times reduction in cost over custom hardware, at least in the case of Rice Decompression and Reed-Solomon Decoding.

  11. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castilla, Alejandro; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  12. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2014-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste. Within the UFDC, the components for a general system model of the degradation and subsequent transport of UNF is being developed to analyze the performance of disposal options [Sassani et al., 2012]. Two model components of the near-field part of the problem are the ANL Mixed Potential Model and the PNNL Radiolysis Model. This report is in response to the desire to integrate the two models as outlined in [Buck, E.C, J.L. Jerden, W.L. Ebert, R.S. Wittman, (2013) Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation, FCRD-UFD-2013-000290, M3FT-PN0806058

  13. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  14. A BLAS-3 version of the QR factorization with column pivoting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana-Orti, G.; Sun, X.; Bischof, C.H.

    1998-09-01

    The QR factorization with column pivoting (QRP), originally suggested by Golub is a popular approach to computing rank-revealing factorizations. Using Level 1 BLAS, it was implemented in LINPACK, and, using Level 2 BLAS, in LAPACK. While the Level 2 BLAS version delivers superior performance in general, it may result in worse performance for large matrix sizes due to cache effects. The authors introduce a modification of the QRP algorithm which allows the use of Level 3 BLAs kernels while maintaining the numerical behavior of the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations. Experimental comparisons of this approach with the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations on IBM RS/6000, SGI R8000, and DEC AXP platforms show considerable performance improvements.

  15. Using a flame ionization detector (FID) to continuously measure toxic organic vapors in a paint spray booth. Rept. for Jul 91-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, J.K.; Howe, G.B.; Pate, B.A.; Wander, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the demonstration of linear and similar responses of a Ratfisch RS-55CA flame ionization detector (FID) to a solvent mixture identical to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the coating and catalyst (NSN 8010-01-336-3036) and to the calibrating gas (propane) used in field calibrations of the FID. Sensitivity and linearity have been shown to extend from 715 to 45 mg/cu m, which brackets the calculated short-term exposure limit (STEL) and lower action thresholds. Monitoring is maintained constantly and, under field conditions, equilibration occurs rapidly (analysis and output transpire in milliseconds). As a trigger for fail-safe conversion from recirculation mode to a straight-through paint spray booth configuration, the FID may confidently be expected to initiate a corrective response before a transient elevation of VOC concentrations overexposes area personnel.

  16. Coordinated optical and ultraviolet observations of DH Leo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, J.S.; Buzasi, D.L.; Huenemoerder, D.P.; Ramsey, L.W.; Barden, S.C. Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ )

    1990-08-01

    Results are reported from contemporaneous KPNO optical spectroscopy, IUE UV spectroscopy, and KPNO R photometry of the DH Leo triple system in spring 1987. The data are presented in tables, graphs, and spectral phase images and discussed in detail. The H-alpha, H-beta, H-gamma, H-delta, and Ca II H and IRT lines are found to have excess emission, and the phase modulation in H-alpha, H-beta, and Ca II is well correlated with the photometric modulation. This result is attributed to the combination of (1) a small amount of global chromospheric emission and (2) emission from plagelike regions associated with cool starspots. The (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio is found to be significantly lower than that in longer-period RS CVn systems. 22 refs.

  17. Departmenl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Departmenl of EnergY @k Ridgc OPcntlonr P.O. Box 2001 Ork Rkfge, Tcnnorrcc E7/Efl14723 Septcnrbcr 22, 1993 Dear l'1r. l'lahl : BETATR'* BurtDrrc - c'ltpLETr'lt 0F 'EcollTAllrtlATl'll - r*Allsl'llfiAl 0F PREttHrllARY l? I?,rri'riHurli'lrelllii"iliiu ii 6.ir'ter .t (6rs) ':o-"^il VERIFICATIOII ogical exPosure' Sinqerely, Dav{ d nJl-::.:*:.T:l'fli;, t on Enclosure tI-32 illi[t irlls-nistoratl on Dr. W. A Williams c: D. G. Adler (DOE-ORO) W. D. Cottrell (ORNL) R D. Foley (ORNL) G. L Palau

  18. Structural connectivity in schizophrenia and its impact on the dynamics of spontaneous functional networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, Joana; Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX ; Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience , Aarhus University, Aarhus ; James, Anthony C.; Highfield Unit, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX ; Deco, Gustavo; Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats , Barcelona 08010

    2013-12-15

    The neuropathology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Some insight has come from modern neuroimaging techniques, which offer an unparalleled opportunity to explore in vivo the structure and function of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, it has been found that the large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in schizophrenia — measured as the temporal correlations of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal — exhibit altered network topology, with lower small-world index. The origin of these rsFC alterations and link with the underlying structural connectivity remain unclear. In this work, we used a computational model of spontaneous large-scale brain activity to explore the role of the structural connectivity in the large-scale dynamics of the brain in health and schizophrenia. The structural connectomes from 15 adolescent patients with early-onset schizophrenia and 15 age- and gender-matched controls were built from diffusion tensor imaging data to detect the white matter tracts between 90 brain areas. Brain areas, simulated using a reduced dynamic mean-field model, receive excitatory input from other areas in proportion to the number of fibre tracts between them. The simulated mean field activity was transformed into BOLD signal, and the properties of the simulated functional networks were analyzed. Our results suggest that the functional alterations observed in schizophrenia are not directly linked to alterations in the structural topology. Instead, subtly randomized and less small-world functional networks appear when the brain operates with lower global coupling, which shifts the dynamics from the optimal healthy regime.

  19. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  20. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-29

    Our search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. We found that the search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' ? WZ and GRS ? WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* ? qW, q* ? qZ, W' ? WZ, GRS ? WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a bulk graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  1. Relationship Between HER2 Status and Prognosis in Women With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhiyuan; Marko, Nicholas F.; Chao, Sam T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze factors affecting outcomes in breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BM) and characterize the role of HER2 status. Methods and Materials: We identified 264 breast cancer patients treated between 1999 and 2008 for BM. HER2 status was known definitively for 172 patients and was used to define cohorts in which survival and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated improved mean overall survival (105.7 vs. 74.3 months, p < 0.02), survival after diagnosis of BM (neurologic survival, NS) (32.2 vs. 18.9 months, p < 0.01), and survival after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) (31.3 vs. 14.1, p < 0.01) in HER2+ patients relative to those with HER2- breast cancer. HER2+ status was an independent, positive prognostic factor for survival on univariate and multivariate hazard analysis (hazard ratio: overall survival = 0.66, 0.18; NS = 0.50, 0.34). Additionally, subgroup analysis suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery may be of particular benefit in patients with HER2+ tumors. Conclusions: Overall survival, NS, and RS are improved in patients with HER2+ tumors, relative to those with HER2- lesions, and HER2 amplification is independently associated with increased survival in patients with BM from breast cancer. Our findings suggest that the prognosis of HER2+ patients may be better than that of otherwise similar patients who are HER2- and that stereotactic radiosurgery may be beneficial for some patients with HER2+ lesions.

  2. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding [RS.1] and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum [RS.2]. Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  3. SNP in TXNRD2 Associated With Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: A Study of Genetic Variation in Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism and Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edvardsen, Hege; K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo ; Landmark-Hyvik, Hege; K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo ; Reinertsen, Kristin V.; Zhao, Xi; K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo ; Grenaker-Alns, Grethe Irene; Nebdal, Daniel; Syvnen, Ann-Christine; Rdningen, Olaug; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo ; Foss, Sophie D.; National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo ; Kristensen, Vessela N.; K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo; Department of Clinical Molecular Biology , Division of Medicine, Ahus University Hospital

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to identify noninvasive markers of treatment-induced side effects. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after irradiation, and genetic variation in genes related to ROS metabolism might influence the level of radiation-induced adverse effects (AEs). Methods and Materials: 92 breast cancer (BC) survivors previously treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy were assessed for the AEs subcutaneous atrophy and fibrosis, costal fractures, lung fibrosis, pleural thickening, and telangiectasias (median follow-up time 17.1 years). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 genes were analyzed for association to AE grade. SNPs associated with subcutaneous fibrosis were validated in an independent BC survivor material (n=283). The influence of the studied genetic variation on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression level of 18 genes previously associated with fibrosis was assessed in fibroblast cell lines from BC patients. Results: Subcutaneous fibrosis and atrophy had the highest correlation (r=0.76) of all assessed AEs. The nonsynonymous SNP rs1139793 in TXNRD2 was associated with grade of subcutaneous fibrosis, the reference T-allele being more prevalent in the group experiencing severe levels of fibrosis. This was confirmed in another sample cohort of 283 BC survivors, and rs1139793 was found significantly associated with mRNA expression level of TXNRD2 in blood. Genetic variation in 24 ROS-related genes, including EGFR, CENPE, APEX1, and GSTP1, was associated with mRNA expression of 14 genes previously linked to fibrosis (P?.005). Conclusion: Development of subcutaneous fibrosis can be associated with genetic variation in the mitochondrial enzyme TXNRD2, critically involved in removal of ROS, and maintenance of the intracellular redox balance.

  4. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dilepton and Diphoton Final States with 1 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amitabha; /Boston U.

    2007-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis is the search for Randall-Sundrum (RS) gravitons from an analysis of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The standard model has been a great success in explaining all experimental observations in particle physics. However, we also know that it has fundamental problems. One of these problems, called the hierarchy problem, is related to the large difference between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale. The model proposed by Randall and Sundrum presents a possible solution to the hierarchy problem by introducing physics beyond the standard model. Randall and Sundrum's theory postulates the existence of a 4th spatial dimension in addition to the conventional (3+1)-dimensional space. Gravity is localized on a 3+1 dimensional subspace, called a brane (Planck brane) that is separated in this new 4th spatial dimension from the standard model brane. As one moves away from this Planck brane, gravity is exponentially suppressed and this explains why gravity appears so weak at the standard model brane. In the simplest RS model, the only particles that propagate in the extra dimension are gravitons. The graviton manifests itself on the standard model brane as a series of excited states that couple to standard model particles with similar strength as the electroweak interaction. The ground state is the massless graviton and the order of magnitude of the mass of the lowest excited state is expected to be one TeV. The first excited mode of the graviton might be produced resonantly at the Tevatron. Gravitons can decay into fermion-antifermion or diboson pairs. Here I search for gravitons through their decay to e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} final states. These final states have similar signatures in our detector and can thus be treated together. After analyzing the data I do not find any excess over standard model expectations and set an upper limit on the production rate of such gravitons. I compare this limit to the production rate predicted by the theory for a range of possible couplings and set mass limits on the lowest excited gravitons state of up to 898 GeV.

  5. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of leading oxime therapies in guinea pigs exposed to organophosphorus chemical warfare agents or pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, Christina M.; Snider, Thomas H.; Babin, Michael C.; Jett, David A.

    2014-12-15

    The currently fielded pre-hospital therapeutic regimen for the treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in the United States (U.S.) is the administration of atropine in combination with an oxime antidote (2-PAM Cl) to reactivate inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Depending on clinical symptoms, an anticonvulsant, e.g., diazepam, may also be administered. Unfortunately, 2-PAM Cl does not offer sufficient protection across the range of OP threat agents, and there is some question as to whether it is the most effective oxime compound available. The objective of the present study is to identify an oxime antidote, under standardized and comparable conditions, that offers protection at the FDA approved human equivalent dose (HED) of 2-PAM Cl against tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), and VX, and the pesticides paraoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon, and phorate oxon. Male Hartley guinea pigs were subcutaneously challenged with a lethal level of OP and treated at approximately 1 min post challenge with atropine followed by equimolar oxime therapy (2-PAM Cl, HI-6 DMS, obidoxime Cl{sub 2}, TMB-4, MMB4-DMS, HLö-7 DMS, MINA, and RS194B) or therapeutic-index (TI) level therapy (HI-6 DMS, MMB4-DMS, MINA, and RS194B). Clinical signs of toxicity were observed for 24 h post challenge and blood cholinesterase [AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)] activity was analyzed utilizing a modified Ellman's method. When the oxime is standardized against the HED of 2-PAM Cl for guinea pigs, the evidence from clinical observations, lethality, quality of life (QOL) scores, and cholinesterase reactivation rates across all OPs indicated that MMB4 DMS and HLö-7 DMS were the two most consistently efficacious oximes. - Highlights: • First comprehensive evaluation of leading AChE oxime reactivators • All oximes are compared against current U.S. therapy 2-PAM Cl. • Relative therapeutic oxime efficacies against OP CWNA and pesticides • Contribution to more effective antidotes for civilian and military populations.

  6. NDT-COMP9 microcomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodd, C.V.; Cowan, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    An 8080-based microcomputer system, the NDT-COMP9, has been designed for instrumentation control and data analysis in eddy-current tests. The NDT-COMP9 represents a significantly more powerful computer system than the NDT-COMP8 microcomputer from which it was developed. The NDT-COMP9 system is contained on a 240- by 120-mm (9.5- by 4.8-in.) circuit board and will fit in a four-wide Nuclear Instrumentation Module (NIM) BIN with 26-pin edge connectors. In addition to the 8080-compatible central processing unit (CPU), an arithmetic processing unit (APU) is available to provide up to 32-bit fixed- or floating-point, basic or transcendental math functions. The 16K of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM), one serial input-output (I/O) port (RS-232-C at a maximum speed of 9600 baud), and 72 parallel I/O ports are available. The baud rate is under software control. A system monitor and math package are available for use with the microcomputer.

  7. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Csiszar, Susan A.; Fantke, Peter; Zhang, Xianming; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate daily intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.

  8. Portable measurement system for soil resistivity and application to Quaternary clayey sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Koichi; Morii, Takeo

    1999-07-01

    A simple device to measure electrical resistivity has been developed for field and laboratory use. The measurement system comprises a probe unit, current wave generator, amplified, A/D converter, data acquisition unit with RS-232C interface and notebook personal computer. The system is applicable to soils and soft rocks as long as the probe needles can pierce into them. Frequency range of the measurement system extends from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. The total error of the system is less than 5%. In situ measurements of the resistivity and shear resistance by means of pocket-sized penetrometer were applied to Pleistocene clayey beds. Some laboratory tests were also conducted to examine the interpretation of the in situ resistivity. Marine and non-marine clayey sediments are different in their resistivities of the stratum by in situ test and the clay suspension sampled from the strata. Physical and mechanical properties were compared with the resistivity and general relationships among them were explored to clarify the characteristics of inter-particle bonding. Some possible mechanism regarding the peculiar weathering of clayey sediment or mudstone beds is discussed from the viewpoint of physico-chemical process, which is conspicuous especially near the ground surface.

  9. Near IR Scanning Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy at Smooth Gold Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, Kristopher; Meyer, Matthew; Smith, Emily

    2012-04-13

    Total internal reflection (TIR) Raman and reflectivity spectra were collected for nonresonant analytes as a function of incident angle at sapphire or sapphire/smooth 50 nm gold interfaces using 785 nm excitation. For both interfaces, the Raman signal as a function of incident angle is well-modeled by the calculated interfacial mean square electric field (MSEF) relative to the incident field times the thickness of the layer being probed in the Raman measurement (D{sub RS}). The Raman scatter was reproducibly enhanced at the interface containing a gold film relative to the sapphire interface by a factor of 4.34.6 for aqueous pyridine or 2.23.7 for neat nitrobenzene, depending on the analyzed vibrational mode. The mechanism for the increased Raman signal is the enhanced MSEF at incident angles where propagating surface plasmons are excited in the metal film. The background from the TIR prism was reduced by 8995% with the addition of the gold film, and the percent relative uncertainty in peak area was reduced from 15 to 1.7% for the 1347 cm1 mode of nitrobenzene. Single monolayers of benzenethiol (S/N = 6.8) and 4-mercaptopyridine (S/N = 16.5) on gold films were measured by TIR Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation (210 mW) without resonant enhancement in 1 min.

  10. 1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marjorie B. Stockton

    1999-11-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998.

  11. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  12. Comparing the precision 2009 and 2012 light curves of the precontact W UMa binary V1001 Cassiopeia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samec, R. G. [Faculty Research Affiliate, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, One Pari Drive, Rosman, NC 28772 (United States); Koenke, S. S. [Physics and Engineering Dept., Bob Jones University, 1700 Wade Hampton Boulevard, Greenville, SC 29614 (United States); Faulkner, D. R. [University of South Carolina Lancaster, 476 Hubbard Drive, Lancaster SC 29720 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A 2012 follow up to the analysis of 2009 observations is presented for the very short period (?0.43 days) precontact W UMa binary (PCWB) V1001 Cassiopeia. Its short period, similar to the majority of W UMa binaries, and its distinct EA light curve make it a very rare and interesting system for continuing photometric investigation. Previous photometric VRI standard magnitudes give a K4 spectral type. Our solutions of light curves separated by some three years give approximately the same physical parameters. However, the spots have radically changed in temperature, area, and position. While only one dark spot was used to model the first curves, two hot spots are now needed. This affects the overall shape of the light curve, especially in the secondary eclipses in B and V. Additional eclipse timings now show that the orbital period is changing. We conclude that spots are very active on this solar-type dwarf system and that it may mimic its larger cousins, the RS CVn binaries. The conclusion is that analysis now needs to be directed at the continuous time evolution of PCWBs.

  13. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  14. Constraints on the progenitor system of the type Ia supernova 2014J from pre-explosion Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shen, Ken J.; Zheng, WeiKang; Graham, Melissa L.; Tucker, Brad E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Schaefer, Gail

    2014-07-20

    We constrain the properties of the progenitor system of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in Messier 82 (M82; d ? 3.5 Mpc). We determine the supernova (SN) location using Keck-II K-band adaptive optics images, and we find no evidence for flux from a progenitor system in pre-explosion near-ultraviolet through near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Our upper limits exclude systems having a bright red giant companion, including symbiotic novae with luminosities comparable to that of RS Ophiuchi. While the flux constraints are also inconsistent with predictions for comparatively cool He-donor systems (T ? 35,000 K), we cannot preclude a system similar to V445 Puppis. The progenitor constraints are robust across a wide range of R{sub V} and A{sub V} values, but significantly greater values than those inferred from the SN light curve and spectrum would yield proportionally brighter luminosity limits. The comparatively faint flux expected from a binary progenitor system consisting of white dwarf stars would not have been detected in the pre-explosion HST imaging. Infrared HST exposures yield more stringent constraints on the luminosities of very cool (T < 3000 K) companion stars than was possible in the case of SN Ia 2011fe.

  15. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Csiszar, Susan A.; Fantke, Peter; Zhang, Xianming; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate dailymore » intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.« less

  16. ChemLabBox for SnifferStars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-24

    The software entitled "ChemLabBox for SnifferStars" is used to collect, display, and save data from the Sandia National Laboratories chemical analysis system dubbed SnifferStar. Sensor data is streamed from a SnifferStar unit into a computer thru RS-232 in a manner that is not amendable to plotting. Also, there is no direct way to start and stop the unit as is. This software rearranges the data into something that can be easily plotted in real-time thenmore » saves the data into a text fild. In addition, this software provides the users a means to start and stop the hardware. This software was written specifically for SnifferStar. SnifferStar data is delivered at a very fast rate but for a short period of time. This software is written around that premise. It is written for Pentium or higher machines running Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000/XP. Lockheed Martin is interested in using it for testing SnifferStar units before deployment. To date they have not indicated their intent to deliver the code either in part or whole as part of their product.« less

  17. ChromPlot for MicroChemLab

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-12-19

    The software entitled "ChromPlot for MicroChemLab" is used to collect, display, and save data from the Sandia National Laboratories chemical analysis system dubbed MicroChemLab. Sensor data is streamed from a MicroChemLab unit into a computer thru RS-232 in a manner that is not amenable to plotting. Also, there is no direct way to start and stop the unit as is. This software rearranges the data into something that can be easily plotted in real-time thenmore » save the data into a text file. In addition, this software provides the users a means to start and stop the hardware. This software was written specifically for MicroChemLab. MicroChemLab data is delivered at 6- 7 pts/sec/channel in a two-channel system for 1-2 min. This code is written around that premise. It is written for Pentium or higher machines running Windows 9x/Me/NT/2000/XP. This software was not developed under the BMS CRADA; it is software we use in the lab for our own testing. Bristol Meyers Squibb (BMS) will use this software for testing an online process monitor based on MicroChemLab. They have not indicated their interest in marketing our device or the software.« less

  18. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  19. Estimates of Savings Achievable from Irrigation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Fuchs, Heidi; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

    2014-03-28

    This paper performs a literature review and meta-analysis of water savings from several types of advanced irrigation controllers: rain sensors (RS), weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC), and soil moisture sensors (SMS).The purpose of this work is to derive average water savings per controller type, based to the extent possible on all available data. After a preliminary data scrubbing, we utilized a series of analytical filters to develop our best estimate of average savings. We applied filters to remove data that might bias the sample such as data self-reported by manufacturers, data resulting from studies focusing on high-water users, or data presented in a non-comparable format such as based on total household water use instead of outdoor water use. Because the resulting number of studies was too small to be statistically significant when broken down by controller type, this paper represents a survey and synthesis of available data rather than a definitive statement regarding whether the estimated water savings are representative.

  20. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; Cleaves, II, H. James; Baddorf, Arthur P; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; et al

    2016-01-04

    The self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two ormore » more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. The resulting characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Moreover, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.« less

  1. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? ?r)/(?s ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  2. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system and method for solids hoppers and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.

    1994-01-01

    A real time ultrasonic surface contour mapping system is provided including a digitally controlled phased-array of transmitter/receiver (T/R) elements located in a fixed position above the surface to be mapped. The surface is divided into a predetermined number of pixels which are separately scanned by an arrangement of T/R elements by applying phase delayed signals thereto that produce ultrasonic tone bursts from each T/R that arrive at a point X in phase and at the same time relative to the leading edge of the tone burst pulse so that the acoustic energies from each T/R combine in a reinforcing manner at point X. The signals produced by the reception of the echo signals reflected from point X back to the T/Rs are also delayed appropriately so that they add in phase at the input of a signal combiner. This combined signal is then processed to determine the range to the point X using density-corrected sound velocity values. An autofocusing signal is developed from the computed average range for a complete scan of the surface pixels. A surface contour map is generated in real time form the range signals on a video monitor.

  3. Self-propelled in-tube shuttle and control system for automated measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H. ); Pidcoe, S.V. . Space Systems Div.); Zink, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    A magnetic field alignment gauge is used to measure the field angle as a function of axial position in each of the magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Present measurements are made by manually pushing the through the magnet bore tube and stopping at intervals to record field measurements. Gauge location is controlled through graduation marks and alignment pins on the push rods. Field measurements are recorded on a logging multimeter with tape output. Described is a computerized control system being developed to replace the manual procedure for field alignment measurements. The automated system employs a pneumatic walking device to move the measurement gauge through the bore tube. Movement of the device, called the Self-Propelled In-Tube Shuttle (SPITS), is accomplished through an integral, gas driven, double-acting cylinder. The motion of the SPITS is transferred to the bore tube by means of a pair of controlled, retractable support feet. Control of the SPITS is accomplished through an RS-422 interface from an IBM-compatible computer to a series of solenoid-actuated air valves. Direction of SPITS travel is determined by the air-valve sequence, and is managed through the control software. Precise axial position of the gauge within the magnet is returned to the control system through an optically-encoded digital position transducer attached to the shuttle. Discussed is the performance of the transport device and control system during preliminary testing of the first prototype shuttle. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  4. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  5. Integration of autonomous systems for remote control of data acquisition and diagnostics in the TJ-II device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, J.; Mollinedo, A.; Lopez, A.; Pacios, L.

    1997-01-01

    The data acquisition system for TJ-II will consist of a central computer, containing the data base of the device, and a set of independent systems (personal computers, embedded ones, workstations, minicomputers, PLCs, and microprocessor systems among others), controlling data collection, and automated diagnostics. Each autonomous system can be used to isolate and manage specific problems in the most efficient manner. These problems are related to data acquisition, hard ({mu}s{endash}ms) real time requirements, soft (ms{endash}s) real time requirements, remote control of diagnostics, etc. In the operation of TJ-II, the programming of systems will be carried out from the central computer. Coordination and synchronization will be performed by linking systems to local area networks. Several Ethernet segments and FDDI rings will be used for these purposes. Programmable logic controller devices (PLCs) used for diagnostic low level control will be linked among them through a fast serial link, the RS485 Profibus standard. One VME crate, running on the OS-9 real time operating system, will be assigned as a gateway, so as to connect the PLCs based systems with an Ethernet segment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Human interleukin 2 receptor. beta. -chain gene: Chromosomal localization and identification of 5 prime regulatory sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnarra, J.R.; Otani, Hiroki; Wang, M.G.; McBride, O.W.; Sharon, M.; Leonard, W.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) binds to and stimulates activated T cells through high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2Rs). Such receptors represent a complex consisting of at least two proteins, the 55-kDa IL-2R{alpha} chain and the 70-kDa IL-2R{beta} chain. The low-affinity, IL-2R{alpha} chain cannot by itself transduce a mitogenic signal, whereas IL-2 stimulates resting lymphocytes through the intermediate-affinity, IL-2R{beta} receptor. The authors report here identification of the genomic locus for IL-2R{beta}. The exons are contained on four EcoRI fragments of 1.1, 9.2, 7.2, and 13.7 kilobases. The 1.1-kilobase EcoRI fragment lies at the 5{prime}-most end of the genomic locus and contains promoter sequences. The promoter contains no TATA box-like elements but does contain the d(GT){sub n} class of middle repetitive elements, which may play an interesting regulatory role. The IL-2R{beta} gene is localized to chromosome 22q11.2-q12, a region that is the locus for several lymphoid neoplasias.

  7. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  8. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  9. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, W.; Aix-Marseille University, 58, Bd Charles Livon, 13284 Marseille ; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  10. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gellman, Andrew John; Sholl, David S.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Zaera, Francisco

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PIs has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PIs have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111) modified by a variety of chiral templates. Demonstrated enantioselective separation of racemic PO on chemically synthesized chiral gold nanoparticles. Discovery of zwitterionic adsorption states of amino acids on Pd(111). First structure determinations of adsorbed amino acids and identification of tetrameric chiral template structures. Exploration of the enantiospecific interaction of PO and R-3-MCHO adsorption on chirally modified Cu(100), Cu(110) and Cu(111). One-to-One Interactions Determination of cinchona orientation on Pt surfaces in situ at the solid-liquid interface using FT-IRAS. Systematic study of the influence of solution properties on the adsorption of modified cinchonas alkaloids onto Pt surfaces. Correlation of cinchona adsorption with catalytic activity, as affected by concentration, the nature of the solvent, and dissolved gases in the liquid phase. Measurement of enantioselective chemisorption on 1-(1-naphthyl) ethylamine (NEA) modified Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces. Imaging of chiral docking complexes between NEA and methyl pyruvate on Pd(111). Chiral Catalyst Synthesis Anchoring of cinchona alkaloid to surfaces Synthesis of chiral Au nanoparticles and demonstration of their enantiospecific interactions with R- and S-PO. Elucidation of the driving forces for chiral imprinting of Cu(100) by L- and D-lysine to form Cu(3,1,17)R&S facets.

  11. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 ?m to 0.50 ?m on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ? 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ? 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS cell pieces was observed that was not seen on BZO/glass, and a CdS/CIGS sample displayed a small darkening and then flaking feature. Additionally, standard AlNi grid contact was less stable than thin Ni grid contact at T/RH ? 70/70. The edge sealant and moisture-blocking films were effective to block moisture ingress, as evidenced by the good stability of most CIGS solar cells and device components at T/RH = 85/70 for 704 h, and by preservation of the initial blue color on the RH indicator strips. The SSADT experiment is ongoing to be completed at T/RH = 85/85.

  12. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the vadose zone by soil vapor extraction (SVE). (4) Volatilization of contaminants from portions of the affected aquifer that can be accessed from the former CCC/USDA property. The primary objective of the proposed removal action is removal of mass quantities of carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area, to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. This objective will be the basis for evaluating system performance. The scope of action outlined in the IMWP/D is limited to the five treatment zones defined by the LDB/SVE/AS locations. Surrounding soils and groundwater will benefit; however, remedial benefits to groundwater will be limited to the area of influence associated with the five treatment zones. While treatment should be aggressive in the vicinity of the LDB locations, the heterogeneity, clay content, and low permeability of the soils will place inherent limits on the area of influence.

  13. Guide to verification and validation of the SCALE-4 criticality safety software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmett, M.B.; Jordan, W.C.

    1996-12-01

    Whenever a decision is made to newly install the SCALE nuclear criticality safety software on a computer system, the user should run a set of verification and validation (V&V) test cases to demonstrate that the software is properly installed and functioning correctly. This report is intended to serve as a guide for this V&V in that it specifies test cases to run and gives expected results. The report describes the V&V that has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety software in a version of SCALE-4. The verification problems specified by the code developers have been run, and the results compare favorably with those in the SCALE 4.2 baseline. The results reported in this document are from the SCALE 4.2P version which was run on an IBM RS/6000 workstation. These results verify that the SCALE-4 nuclear criticality safety software has been correctly installed and is functioning properly. A validation has been performed for KENO V.a utilizing the CSAS25 criticality sequence and the SCALE 27-group cross-section library for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu fissile, systems in a broad range of geometries and fissile fuel forms. The experimental models used for the validation were taken from three previous validations of KENO V.a. A statistical analysis of the calculated results was used to determine the average calculational bias and a subcritical k{sub eff} criteria for each class of systems validated. Included the statistical analysis is a means of estimating the margin of subcriticality in k{sub eff}. This validation demonstrates that KENO V.a and the 27-group library may be used for nuclear criticality safety computations provided the system being analyzed falls within the range of the experiments used in the validation.

  14. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  15. Chronic treatment with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) during pregnancy and lactation in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colciago, A.; Casati, L.; Mornati, O.; Vergoni, A.V.; Santagostino, A.; Celotti, F. Negri-Cesi, P.

    2009-08-15

    The gender-specific expression pattern of aromatase and 5alpha-reductases (5alpha-R) during brain development provides neurons the right amount of estradiol and DHT to induce a dimorphic organization of the structure. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are endocrine disruptive pollutants; exposure to PCBs through placental transfer and breast-feeding may adversely affect the organizational action of sex steroid, resulting in long-term alteration of reproductive neuroendocrinology. The study was aimed at: a) evaluating the hypothalamic expression of aromatase, 5alpha-R1 and 5alpha-R2 in fetuses (GD20), infant (PN12), weaning (PN21) and young adult (PN60) male and female rats exposed to PCBs during development; b) correlating these parameters with the time of testicular descent, puberty onset, estrous cyclicity and copulatory behavior; c) evaluating possible alterations of some non reproductive behaviors (locomotion, learning and memory, depression/anxiety behavior). A reconstituted mixture of four indicator congeners (PCB 126, 138, 153 and 180) was injected subcutaneously to dams at the dose of 10 mg/kg daily from GD15 to GD19 and then twice a week till weanling. The results indicated that developmental PCB exposure produced important changes in the dimorphic hypothalamic expression of both aromatase and the 5alpha-Rs, which were still evident in adult animals. We observed that female puberty onset occurs earlier than in control animals without cycle irregularity, while testicular descent in males was delayed. A slight but significant impairment of sexual behavior and an important alteration in memory retention were also noted specifically in males. We conclude that PCBs might affect the dimorphic neuroendocrine control of reproductive system and of other neurobiological processes.

  16. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  17. A new development on measurement and control software of SANS BATAN spectrometer (SMARTer) in Serpong, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharoto,; Suparno, Nadi; Putra, Edy Giri Rachman

    2015-04-16

    In 2005, the main computer for data acquisition and control system of Small-angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) BATAN Spectrometer (SMARTer) was replaced since it halted to operate the spectrometer. According to this replacement, the new software for data acquisition and control system has been developed in-house. Visual Basic programming language is used in developing the software. In the last two years, many developments have been made both in the hardware and also the software to conduct the experiment is more effective and efficient. Lately, the previous motor controller card (ISA Card) was replaced with the programmable motor controller card (PCI Card) for driving one motor of position sensitive detector (PSD), eight motors of four collimators, and six motors of six pinhole discs. This new control system software makes all motors can be moved simultaneously, then it reduces significantly the consuming time of setting up the instrument before running the experiment. Along with that development, the new data acquisition software under MS Windows operating system is also developed to drive a beam stopper in X-Y directions as well as to read the equipment status such as position of the collimators and PSD, to acquire neutron counts on monitor and PSD detectors, and also to manage 12 samples position automatically. A timer object which is set in one second to read the equipment status via serial port of the computer (RS232C), and general purpose interface board (GPIB) for reading the total counts of each pixel of the PSD from histogram memory was used in this new software. The experiment result displayed in real time on the main window, and the data is saved in the special format for further data reduction and analysis. The new software has been implemented and performed for experiment using a preset count or preset time mode for absolute scattering intensity method.

  18. Selected test results from the neosonic polymer Li-ion battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-07-01

    The performance of the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery was measured using a number of tests including capacity, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, hybrid pulsed power test, utility partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycle test, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the polymer Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery technology can provide power levels up to the 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h (1C) discharge rate. Two of the three cells used in the utility PSOC pulsed cycle test completed about 12,000 cycles with only a gradual loss in capacity of 10 and 13%. The third cell experienced a 40% loss in capacity at about 11,000 cycles. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were increases in impedance after cycling, especially for the third cell. Cell No.3 impedance Rs increased significantly along with extensive ballooning of the foil pouch. Finally, at a 1C (10 A) charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test with cell confinement similar to a multi cell string resulted in the cell venting hot gases at about 45 C 45 minutes into the test. At 104 minutes into the test the cell voltage spiked to the 12 volt limit and continued out to the end of the test at 151 minutes. In summary, the Neosonic cells performed as expected with good cycle-life and safety.

  19. CPS and the Fermilab farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fausey, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Cooperative Processes Software (CPS) is a parallel programming toolkit developed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It is the most recent product in an evolution of systems aimed at finding a cost-effective solution to the enormous computing requirements in experimental high energy physics. Parallel programs written with CPS are large-grained, which means that the parallelism occurs at the subroutine level, rather than at the traditional single line of code level. This fits the requirements of high energy physics applications, such as event reconstruction, or detector simulations, quite well. It also satisfies the requirements of applications in many other fields. One example is in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of computational chemistry, the process of drug design may be accelerated with this approach. CPS programs run as a collection of processes distributed over many computers. CPS currently supports a mixture of heterogeneous UNIX-based workstations which communicate over networks with TCP/IR CPS is most suited for jobs with relatively low I/O requirements compared to CPU. The CPS toolkit supports message passing remote subroutine calls, process synchronization, bulk data transfers, and a mechanism called process queues, by which one process can find another which has reached a particular state. The CPS software supports both batch processing and computer center operations. The system is currently running in production mode on two farms of processors at Fermilab. One farm consists of approximately 90 IBM RS/6000 model 320 workstations, and the other has 85 Silicon Graphics 4D/35 workstations. This paper first briefly describes the history of parallel processing at Fermilab which lead to the development of CPS. Then the CPS software and the CPS Batch queueing system are described. Finally, the experiences of using CPS in production on the Fermilab processor farms are described.

  20. Environmental continuous air monitor for ambient transuranic particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Moore, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have constructed a working prototype of an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) for outdoor applications. The ECAM device is designed to continuously monitor the presence of transuranic contaminant aerosol below a size of 10 mm aerodynamic diameter. In remote operation, the ECAM can transmit radiological and meteorological data to a central processing location, where we have implemented geographical mapping and GPS capabilities into an integrated software package. The Canberra Alpha Sentry Monitor, a commercially available continuous air monitor (CAM) for indoor room applications, was used as the basic building block for the prototype. We increased the sample air flow to 4 cubic feet per minute (CFM) compared to the design air flow rate of 2 CFM. We also added a spread-spectrum radio data link between the CAM RS-232 serial port and a distant radio receiver that enables remote monitoring. In order to avoid collecting the large diameter particle fraction containing most of the inert mass that causes sample burial and alpha spectrum degradation, a Model 254 PM10 size-fractionating Wet from Graseby-Andersen was fitted to the Alpha Sentry Monitor. We removed the top cover of the CAM unit, and routed openings in the top surface of the CAM inlet. This allows air to flow into the inlet, down a collection tube, and then vertically into the CAM without the elbow and horizontal transition piece of the present in-line adapter. The air flows through a 47 mm filter, and the transuranic contamination is counted by a solid state alpha radiation detector, which is placed at a distance of 5 mm above the filter. The increased air flow significantly improves CAM alarm sensitivity and response time to an estimated level of 3.8x10-12 mCi/ml for an integration period 30 minutes. At the same time, the fractionating inlet removes a substantial amount of inert dust and thus enables extended monitoring without frequent maintenance.

  1. Preliminary process simulation and analysis of GMODS: Processing of plutonium surplus materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Welch, T.D.; Giardina, J.L.; Forsberg, C.W.; Maliyekkel, A.T.

    1996-01-02

    To address growing concerns in the areas of arms control, control of fissile materials, waste management, and environment and health, the US Department of Energy is studying and evaluating various options for the control and disposal of surplus fissile materials (SFMs). One of the options under consideration is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) which directly converts plutonium-bearing materials such as metals, ceramics, and organics into a durable-high-quality glass for long-term storage or a waste form for disposal. This study undertook the development of a computer simulation of the GMODS process using FLOW. That computer simulation was used to perform an assessment of how GMODS would handle the treatment of plutonium, rich scrap (RS) and lead scrap (LS), and identify critical process parameters. Among the key process parameters affecting the glass formation were processing temperatures, additives, and the effects of varying them on the final product. This assessment looked at the quantity of glass produced, the quality of the final glass form, and the effect of blending different groups of the feed streams on the glass produced. The model also provided a way to study the current process assumptions and determine in which areas more experimental studies are required. The simulation showed that the glass chemistry postulated in the models is workable. It is expected that the glass chemistry assumed during the modeling process can be verified by the results of the laboratory experiments that are currently being conducted relating to the GMODS process.Further waste characterization, especially of the SFM waste streams not studied in this report, will provide more nearly accurate results and give a more detailed evaluation of the GMODS process.

  2. RTAP evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cupps, K.; Elko, S.; Folta, P.

    1995-01-23

    An in-depth analysis of the RTAP product was undertaken within the CNC associate program to determine the feasibility of utilizing it to replace the current Supervisory Control System that supports the AVLIS program. This document contains the results of that evaluation. With some fundamental redesign the current Supervisory Control system could meet the needs described above. The redesign would require a large amount of software rewriting and would be very time consuming. The higher level functionality (alarming, automation, etc.) would have to wait until its completion. Our current understanding and preliminary testing indicate that using commercial software is the best way to get these new features at the minimum cost to the program. Additional savings will be obtained by moving the maintenance costs of the basic control system from in-house to commercial industry and allowing our developers to concentrate on the unique control areas that require customization. Our current operating system, VMS, has become a hindrance. The UNIX operating system has become the choice for most scientific and engineering systems and we should follow suit. As a result of the commercial system survey referenced above we selected RTAP, a SCADA product developed by Hewlett Packard (HP), as the most favorable product to replace the current supervisory system in AVLIS. It is an extremely open system, with a large, well defined Application Programming Interface (API). This will allow the seamless integration of unique front end devices in the laser area (e.g. Optical Device Controller). RTAP also possesses various functionality that is lacking in our current system: integrated alarming, real-time configurable database, system scalability, and a Sequence Control Language (SQL developed by CPU, an RTAP Channel Partner) that will facilitate the automation necessary to bring the AVLIS process to plant-line operation. It runs on HP-9000, DEC-Alpha, IBM-RS6000 and Sun Workstations.

  3. Investigation of nanocrystalline zinc chromite obtained by two soft chemical routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingasu, Dana; Mindru, Ioana; Culita, Daniela C.; Patron, Luminita; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Preda, Silviu; Oprea, Ovidiu; Osiceanu, Petre; Morena Pineda, Eufemio

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two soft chemical routes to synthesize zinc chromites are described. • Glycine is used as chelating agent (precursor method) and fuel (solution combustion method). • The synthesized chromites have crystallite size in the range of 18–27 nm. • An antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition is observed at about T{sub N} ∼ 18 K. - Abstract: Zinc chromite (ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanocrystalline powders were obtained by two different chemical routes: the precursor method and the solution combustion method involving glycine-nitrates. The complex compound precursors, [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 8}]·9H{sub 2}O and [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 4.5}]·(NO{sub 3}){sub 8}·6H{sub 2}O, were characterized by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and thermal analysis. The structure, morphology, surface chemistry and magnetic properties of ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared and Raman spectroscopy (RS), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the chromite spinel phase with good crystallinity and an average crystallite size of approximately 18–27 nm. The band gap values ranged between 3.31 and 3.33 eV. The magnetic measurements indicated an antiferromagnetic transition at T{sub N} ∼ 17.5/18 K.

  4. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  5. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  6. Microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2017A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, M.M.Z.; Wynne, B.P.; Rainforth, W.M.; Threadgill, P.L.

    2012-02-15

    In this study a thick section (20 mm) friction stir welded AA2017A-T451 has been characterized in terms of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties. For microstructural analysis both optical and scanning electron microscopes have been used. A detailed crystallographic texture analysis has been carried out using the electron back scattering diffraction technique. Crystallographic texture has been examined in both shoulder and probe affected regions of the weld NG. An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region which is mainly explained by the effect of the sequential multi pass deformation experienced by both tool probe and tool shoulder. The texture in the probe dominated region at the AS side of the weld is relatively weak but still assembles the simple shear texture of FCC metals with B/B{sup Macron} and C components existing across the whole map. However, the texture is stronger at the RS than at the AS of the weld, mainly dominated byB/B{sup Macron} components and with C component almost absent across the map. An alternating bands between (B) components and (B{sup Macron }) component are observed only at the AS side of the weld. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed investigation of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grain size is varied from the top to the bottom of the NG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The texture in the probe affected region is dominated by simple shear texture.

  7. V405 ANDROMEDA REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, T.; Kafka, S.

    2011-10-15

    We present a multi-epoch time-resolved high-resolution optical spectroscopy study of the short-period (P{sub orb} = 11.2 hr) eclipsing M0V+M5V RS CVn binary V405 Andromeda. By means of indirect imaging techniques, namely Doppler imaging, we study the surface activity features of the M0V component of the system. A modified version of a Doppler imaging code, which takes into account the tidal distortion of the surface of the star, is applied to the multi-epoch data set in order to provide indirect images of the stellar surface. The multi-epoch surface brightness distributions show a low intensity 'belt' of spots at latitudes {+-}40{sup 0} and a noticeable absence of high latitude features or polar spots on the primary star of V405 Andromeda. They also reveal slow evolution of the spot distribution over {approx}4 yr. An entropy landscape procedure is used in order to find the set of binary parameters that lead to the smoothest surface brightness distributions. As a result, we find M{sub 1} = 0.51 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}, M{sub 2} = 0.21 {+-} 0.01 M{sub sun}, R{sub 1} = 0.71 {+-} 0.01 R{sub sun}, and an inclination i = 65{sup 0} {+-} 1{sup 0}. The resulting systemic velocity is distinct for different epochs, raising the possibility of the existence of a third body in the system.

  8. TEDANN: Turbine engine diagnostic artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, L.J.; Greitzer, F.L.; Illi, O.J. Jr.

    1994-03-17

    The initial focus of TEDANN is on AGT-1500 fuel flow dynamics: that is, fuel flow faults detectable in the signals from the Electronic Control Unit`s (ECU) diagnostic connector. These voltage signals represent the status of the Electro-Mechanical Fuel System (EMFS) in response to ECU commands. The EMFS is a fuel metering device that delivers fuel to the turbine engine under the management of the ECU. The ECU is an analog computer whose fuel flow algorithm is dependent upon throttle position, ambient air and turbine inlet temperatures, and compressor and turbine speeds. Each of these variables has a representative voltage signal available at the ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector, which is accessed via the Automatic Breakout Box (ABOB). The ABOB is a firmware program capable of converting 128 separate analog data signals into digital format. The ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector provides 32 analog signals to the ABOB. The ABOB contains a 128 to 1 multiplexer and an analog-to-digital converter, CP both operated by an 8-bit embedded controller. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and published the hardware specifications as well as the micro-code for the ABOB Intel EPROM processor and the internal code for the multiplexer driver subroutine. Once the ECU analog readings are converted into a digital format, the data stream will be input directly into TEDANN via the serial RS-232 port of the Contact Test Set (CTS) computer. The CTS computer is an IBM compatible personal computer designed and constructed for tactical use on the battlefield. The CTS has a 50MHz 32-bit Intel 80486DX processor. It has a 200MB hard drive and 8MB RAM. The CTS also has serial, parallel and SCSI interface ports. The CTS will also host a frame-based expert system for diagnosing turbine engine faults (referred to as TED; not shown in Figure 1).

  9. South Atlantic summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.; Wiese, J.D.

    1983-12-01

    To date, four Federal offshore oil-and-gas leasing actions have occurred in the South Atlantic Region. Two additional South Atlantic lease offerings remain on the July 1982 final 5-year OCS oil-and-gas leasing schedule before June 1987. The South Atlantic Region consists of three major sedimentary basins: the Carolina Trough, the Blake Plateau, and the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Lease Sale 43, the first in the South Atlantic Region, featured blocks for exploration in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Offshore operators drilled a total of six exploratory wells on blocks leased in Lease Sale 43. All were dry. The 43 leases from Lease Sale 43 have now expired, some blocks were relinquished earlier by their lease-holders. In the recent Lease Sales 56 and RS-2, and in the South Atlantic Lease Offering (July 1983), blocks leased were largely concentrated in the Carolina Trough Basin. Exploration of these blocks may begin anew in early 1984. The blocks are in deep water and will require careful, long-range planning before drilling can commence. As of July 1983, all 66 leases from the above three sales are active. Two plans of exploration have been approved by Minerals Management Service for exploration on blocks leased in Lease Sale 56. The plans are for Russell Area, Blocks 709 and 710, and Manteo Area, Block 510. Blocks 709 and 710 are held by ARCO, and Block 510 is held by Chevron. Based on current plans of exploration, operations will begin in 1984, first by Chevron, and sometime later by ARCO. Operations will be supported by a temporary service base to be established at Morehead City, North Carolina. 6 references, 4 figures.

  10. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  11. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  12. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  13. Test and evaluation plan for Project W-314 tank farm restoration and safe operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-06-25

    The ``Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations`` (TFRSO), Project W-314 will restore and/or upgrade existing Hanford Tank Farm facilities and systems to ensure that the Tank Farm infrastructure will be able to support near term TWRS Privatization`s waste feed delivery and disposal system and continue safe management of tank waste. The capital improvements provided by this project will increase the margin of safety for Tank Farms operations, and will aid in aligning affected Tank Farm systems with compliance requirements from applicable state, Federal, and local regulations. Secondary benefits will be realized subsequent to project completion in the form of reduced equipment down-time, reduced health and safety risks to workers, reduced operating and maintenance costs, and minimization of radioactive and/or hazardous material releases to the environment. The original regulatory (e.g., Executive Orders, WACS, CFRS, permit requirements, required engineering standards, etc.) and institutional (e.g., DOE Orders, Hanford procedures, etc.) requirements for Project W-314 were extracted from the TWRS S/RIDs during the development of the Functions and Requirements (F and Rs). The entire family of requirements were then validated for TWRS and Project W-314. This information was contained in the RDD-100 database and used to establish the original CDR. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team recognizes that safety, quality, and cost effectiveness in the Test and Evaluation (T and E) program is achieved through a planned systematic approach to T and E activities. It is to this end that the Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) is created. The TEP for the TFRSO Project, was developed based on the guidance in HNF-IP-0842, and the Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-005, ``Test and Evaluation,`` which is derived from DOE Order 430.1, ``Life Cycle Asset Management.`` It describes the Test and Evaluation program for the TFRSO project starting with the definitive design phase and ending with operational testing and turn-over of the upgraded systems to Tank Farm Operations. The TEP will be updated as required to reflect the appropriate test acceptance and startup requirements to support design, construction, turnover and initial operations.

  14. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 gene is related to circulating PCB118 levels in a population-based sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, Lars; Penell, Johanna; Syvänen, Anne-Christine; Axelsson, Tomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Morris, Andrew P.; Lindgren, Cecilia; Salihovic, Samira; Bavel, Bert van; Lind, P. Monica

    2014-08-15

    Several of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), i.e. the dioxin-like PCBs, are known to induce the P450 enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah)-receptor. We evaluated if circulating levels of PCBs in a population sample were related to genetic variation in the genes encoding these CYPs. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), 21 SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes were genotyped. Sixteen PCB congeners were analysed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ HRMS). Of the investigated relationships between SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 and six PCBs (congeners 118, 126, 156, 169, 170 and 206) that captures >80% of the variation of all PCBs measured, only the relationship between CYP1A1 rs2470893 was significantly related to PCB118 levels following strict adjustment for multiple testing (p=0.00011). However, there were several additional SNPs in the CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that showed nominally significant associations with PCB118 levels (p-values in the 0.003–0.05 range). Further, several SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were related to both PCB156 and PCB206 with p-values in the 0.005–0.05 range. Very few associations with p<0.05 were seen for PCB126, PCB169 or PCB170. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 was related to circulating PCB118 levels in the general elderly population. Genetic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 might also be associated with other PCBs. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between PCBs and the genetic variation in the CYP genes. • Cross sectional data from a cohort of elderly were analysed. • The PCB levels were evaluated versus 21 SNPs in three CYP genes. • PCB 118 was related to variation in the CYP1A1 gene.

  15. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT SNPs. • The at-risk genotypes of AS3MT SNPs were positively related to urinary MMA%.

  16. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different phantoms can contribute different backscatter for identical exposure parameters. Research supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems and NIH Grants R43FD0158401, R44FD0158402 and R01EB002873.

  17. SU-E-I-71: KVp Dependence of Transmitted Exposure for a Radiography Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Y; Lynch, D; So, J; Dutta, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the kVp dependence of the transmitted exposure for a radiography x-ray unit. Methods: The study used a GE DiscoveryTM XR656 DR unit, a 30 (L) 30 (W) 25 cm thick Lucite phantom, two anthropomorphic phantoms (an Alderson RS-310 chest phantom and a 3M skull phantom), an Unfors detector, and a Radcal 10x9-6 ion chamber. We measured the entrance exposure and transmitted exposure of each phantom at 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120 kVp for mAs range from 2.5 to 200 mAs, without any additional filter. The FOV is 3030 cm for the Lucite and chest phantom (AP view), and 2020 cm for skull phantom (Lateral view). The transmitted exposure was measured at the phantom center of the x-ray exit side. For chest phantom, the transmitted exposures at 3 inch upper right and upper left from the center were also measured. We also checked the reproducibility and accuracy of the DR unit. Results: For each phantom, at every kVp and mAs setting, the transmitted exposure per mAs was calculated and normalized by the relative entrance exposure; the averaged transmitted exposure per mAs at each specific kVp was then determined. For chest phantom, the mean transmitted exposure per mAs was the average of three exit locations. The averaged transmitted exposure per mAs was fit as a power function of kVp. The result showed the transmitted exposure per mAs was approximately proportional to third power of the kVp for two anthropomorphic phantoms and forth power of the kVp for the Lucite phantom. Conclusion: The traditional assumption of fifth power kVp dependence to the transmitted exposure is inaccurate. At the normal radiography kVp range, the transmitted exposure is approximately proportional to third power of the kVp for a typical patient and up to forth power of the kVp for a large patient.

  18. Assessing Potential Exposure from Truck Transport of Low-level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Miller; D. Shafer; K. Gray; B. Church; S.Campbell; B. Holz

    2005-08-15

    This study has shown that, based upon measurements from industry standard radiation detection instruments, such as the RS model RSS-131 PICs in a controlled configuration, a person may be exposed to gamma radiation above background when in close proximity to some LLW trucks. However, in approximately half (47.7 percent) the population of trucks measured in this study, a person would receive no exposure above background at a distance of 1.0 m (3.3 ft) away from a LLW truck. An additional 206 trucks had net exposures greater than zero, but equal to or less than 1 {micro}R/h. Finally, nearly 80 percent of the population of trucks (802 of 1,012) had net exposures less than or equal to 10 {micro}R/h. Although there are no shipping or exposure standards at 1.0 m (3.3 ft) distance, one relevant point of comparison is the DOT shipping standard of 10 mrem/h at 2.0 m (6.6 ft) distance. Assuming a one-to-one correspondence between Roentgens and Rems, then 903 trucks (89.2 percent of the trucks measured) were no greater than one percent of the DOT standard at 1.0 m (3.3 ft). Had the distance at which the trucks been measured increased to 2.0 m (6.6 ft), the net exposure would be even less because of the increase in distance between the truck and the receptor. However, based on the empirical data from this study, the rate of decrease may be slower than for either a point or line source as was done for previous studies (Gertz, 2001; Davis et al., 2001). The highest net exposure value at 1.0 m (3.3 ft) distance, 11.9 mR/h, came from the only truck with a value greater than 10 mR/h at 1.0 m (3.3 ft) distance.

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H. )

    1990-08-15

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis.

  20. Brachytherapy Improves Biochemical Failure–Free Survival in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Compared With Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Graham D.; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Cury, Fabio L.; Morris, Jim; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu; Warner, Andrew; Yang, Ying; Rodrigues, George

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and overall survival (OS) in low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients who received brachytherapy (BT) (either low-dose-rate brachytherapy [LDR-BT] or high-dose-rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy [HDR-BT+EBRT]) versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) alone. Methods and Materials: Patient data were obtained from the ProCaRS database, which contains 7974 prostate cancer patients treated with primary radiation therapy at four Canadian cancer institutions from 1994 to 2010. Propensity score matching was used to obtain the following 3 matched cohorts with balanced baseline prognostic factors: (1) low-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; (2) intermediate-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; and (3) intermediate-risk HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare differences in bFFS (primary endpoint) and OS in the 3 matched groups. Results: Propensity score matching created acceptable balance in the baseline prognostic factors in all matches. Final matches included 2 1:1 matches in the intermediate-risk cohorts, LDR-BT versus EBRT (total n=254) and HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT (total n=388), and one 4:1 match in the low-risk cohort (LDR-BT:EBRT, total n=400). Median follow-up ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 years for the 3 matched cohorts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that all BT treatment options were associated with statistically significant improvements in bFFS when compared with EBRT in all cohorts (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT hazard ratio [HR] 4.58, P=.001; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 2.08, P=.007; low-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 2.90, P=.004). No significant difference in OS was found in all comparisons (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 1.27, P=.687; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 1.55, P=.470; low-risk LDR-BT vs EBRT HR 1.41, P=.500). Conclusions: Propensity score matched analysis showed that BT options led to statistically significant improvements in bFFS in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patient populations.

  1. Structural, magnetic and catalytic properties of cobalt chromite obtained through precursor method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingasu, Dana; Mindru, Ioana; Culita, Daniela C.; Patron, Luminita; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Osiceanu, Petre; Preda, Silviu; Oprea, Ovidiu; Parvulescu, Viorica; Teodorescu, Valentin; Walsh, James P.S.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized through the tartarate and gluconate precursor routes. • Both routes led to the formation of the single-phase CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. • The crystallite size was in the range of 14–21 nm. • CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples presented ferrimagnetic ordering below Currie temperature T{sub c} = 97 K. • CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples presented catalytic performance in the total oxidation of CH{sub 4}. - Abstract: Cobalt chromite (CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was synthesized through the precursor method. The precursors: (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[CoCr{sub 2}(C{sub 4}O{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 3}]·4H{sub 2}O, (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[CoCr{sub 2}(C{sub 6}O{sub 7}H{sub 10}){sub 4}(C{sub 6}O{sub 7}H{sub 9})]·5H{sub 2}O were characterized by elemental chemical analysis, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The final oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), UV–vis, IR, Raman spectroscopy (RS), magnetic measurements, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD confirmed the cubic CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase only and determined average crystallite sizes between 14 and 21 nm. Electron microscopy revealed morphology corresponding to the complete crystallization into cubic CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. All the samples presented ferrimagnetic ordering below the Currie temperature (T{sub c}), and a phase transition at T{sub s} ∼26 K attributed to the onset of long-range spiral magnetic order. The CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles generated through the gluconate route following calcination at 700 °C for 1 h were found to have the best catalytic activity in the total oxidation of methane.

  2. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. {alpha}1 and {alpha}3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers' blood is pro-fibrogenic, through actions on hHSCs expressed nAChRs. Therefore, CS, via its nicotine content, may worsen liver fibrosis. Moreover, nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents.

  3. Enhanced vector borne disease surveillance of California Culex mosquito populations reveals spatial and species-specific barriers of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Curtis, Deanna Joy; Koh, Chung-Yan; Brodsky, Benjamin H; Lane, Todd

    2014-08-01

    Monitor i ng in f ectio n s in v ect o rs su c h as m osquit o es, s a nd fl i es, tsetse fl i es, a nd ticks to i denti f y hu m a n path o gens m a y s e r v e as a n ear l y w arn i ng det e ction system t o dir e ct loc a l g o v er n ment dise a se pr e v en t i v e m easu r e s . One major hurdle i n de t ection is the abi l i t y to scre e n l arge n u mbers of v e c t ors for h uman patho g ens w i thout t h e u s e of ge n o t y pe - s p ecific m o lecu l ar tec h nique s . N e x t genera t ion s equ e nc i ng (NG S ) pr o v i des a n unbi a sed p latfo r m capab l e of identi f y i ng k n o w n a n d unk n o w n p ath o ge n s circula t ing w i thin a v e ctor p opul a tion, but utili z ing t h is te c h nolo g y i s tim e - con s u ming a n d cos t l y for v ecto r -b o rne disease su r v e illan c e pr o gra m s. T o addr e s s this w e d e v e lop e d cos t -eff e ct i v e Ilumina(r) R NA- S eq l i bra r y p r epara t ion m e thodol o gies i n con j u n ction w i t h an automa t ed c ompu t at i onal a n a l y sis pipel i n e to ch a racter i ze t h e microbial popula t ions c ircula t i n g in Cu l e x m o squit o e s (Cul e x qui n quef a s c iatu s , C ul e x quinq u efasc i atus / pip i ens co m pl e x h y bri d s, and C u l e x ta r salis ) t hroug h out Californ i a. W e assembled 2 0 n o vel a n d w e l l -do c ume n ted a r b o v i ruses repres e nting mem b e rs of B u n y a v ir i da e , F l a v i virid a e, If a virida e , Meson i v i rida e , Nid o v iri d ae, O rtho m y x o virid a e, Pa r v o v iri d ae, Re o virid a e, R h a b d o v i rid a e, T y m o v iri d ae, a s w ell as s e v e r al u n assi g n e d v irus e s . In addit i o n, w e m app e d mRNA s pecies to d i vergent s peci e s of t r y panos o ma a nd pl a s modium eu k a r yotic parasit e s and cha r a c terized t he p r oka r yot i c microb i al c o mposit i on to i d enti f y bacteri a l tran s c r ipts der i v ed from wolba c hia, clo s tridi u m, m y c oplas m a, fusoba c terium and c am p y l o bacter bac t er i al spec i e s . W e utilized the s e mic r obial transcri p tomes pre s e nt in g e ogra p hical l y defined Cul e x po p ul a tions to defi n e spatial and m osqui t o specie s -spec i fic ba r r iers of i n fecti o n. T he v i r ome and microbi o me c o mpos i tion id e ntified in e ach mosqui t o p o ol pr o v i ded suf f icient resolut i on to dete r m i ne both the mosq u ito species and the g e o graphic regi o n in Californ i a w h e re t h e mosqui t o po o l orig i n ated. T his d a ta pr o v i des ins i ght in t o the compl e x i t y of microb i al spec i es cir c ulati n g in med i cal l y i mport a nt Culex mosqui t oes a nd t h eir potent i al im p act o n t he tran s missi o n of v ector-b o rne human / veter i na r y p a t hogens in C a liforn i a.

  4. UNIQUE FEATURES IN MAGNET DESIGNS FOR R AND D ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MENG,W.; JAIN, A.; GANETIS, G.; KAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LONGO, C.; MAHLER, G.; POZDEYEV, E.; TUOZZOLO, J.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we describe the unique features and analysis techniques used on the magnets for a R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) [1] under construction at the Collider Accelerator Department at BNL. The R&D ERL serves as a test-bed for future BNL ERLs, such as an electron-cooler-ERL at RHIC [2] and a future 20 GeV ERL electron-hadron at eRHIC [3]. Here we present select designs of various dipole and quadruple magnets which are used in Z-bend merging systems [4] and the returning loop, 3-D simulations of the fields in aforementioned magnets, particle tracking analysis, and the magnet's influence on beam parameters. We discuss an unconventional method of setting requirements on the quality of magnetic field and transferring them into measurable parameters as well as into manufacturing tolerances. We compare selected simulation with results of magnetic measurements. A 20 MeV R&D ERL (Fig. 1) is in an advanced phase of construction at the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL, with commissioning planned for early 2009. In the R&D ERL, an electron beam is generated in a 2 MeV superconducting RF photo-gun, next is accelerated to 20 MeV in a 5 cell SRF linac, subsequently passed through a return loop, then decelerated to 2 MeV in the SRF linac, and finally is sent to a beam dump. The lattice of the R&D ERL is designed with a large degree of flexibility to enable the covering of a vast operational parameter space: from non-achromatic lattices to achromatic with positive, zero and negative R56 parameter. It also allows for large range tunability of Rlz and lattice RS4 parameters (which are important for transverse beam-break-up instability). Further details of the R&D ERL can be found elsewhere in these proceedings [5]. The return loop magnets are of traditional design with the following exceptions: (a) The bending radius of the 60{sup o} dipole magnets is 20 cm, which is rather small. We use 15{sup o} edges on both sides of the dipoles to split very strong focusing evenly between the horizontal and vertical planes (so-called chevron-magnet). (b) The requirements on field quality of the loop's quadrupoles had been determined by the requirement to preserve a very low normalized transverse slice emittance of electron beam ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1 mm-mrad). We used direct tracking of a sample electron beam to verify a high degree of the emittance preservation. (c) Each quadrupole is equipped with a dipole trim coil, which can be also used to excite a sextupole component, if required, for emittance preservation of e-beam with a large energy spread. One of the unique features of all ERLs is the necessity for merging low and high energy electron beams. In the R&D ERL, 2 MeV from the SRF gun merges with the 20 MeV electron beam coming around the return loop into the same trajectory at a position within the SRF linac. In the linac, injected bunch is accelerated to 20 MeV, while the returned or ''used'' bunch is decelerated to 2 MeV. The challenge for a merger design is to provide conditions for emittance compensation [5] and also for achromatic conditions of a low energy, space-charge dominated-e-beam [4,6]. The scheme which satisfies these requirements (called 2-bend [4]) is used on the R&D ERL. The Z-bend is approximately 4-meter long. It bends the beam trajectory in the vertical plane. It is comprised of four dipole magnets designed to be equally focusing in both planes, with bending radius {approx} 60 cm, and bending angles of: +15{sup o}, -30{sup o}, +30{sup o} and -15{sup o}. The beam dynamics in the Z-bend results in a large-size (centimeters) near-laminar electron beam [7]. The large beam size and very low slice emittance of the e-beam dictates the tolerances on the magnetic field to be very tight. The integrated nonlinear kicks should not exceed {approx} 20 micro-radian per magnet at a typical radius {approx} 1 cm. The magnets in the Z-bend are rather short (15 cm effective length for the 15{sup o} magnet) and have a rather large aperture of 6 cm. Analysis predicts that the influence of various field components on the emittance growth are complicated by the fact that the beam trajectory bends significantly in the Einge fields. Hence, we decided to use direct tracking in the calculated fields extracted from Opera3d of test beam to evaluate and to minimize influence of magnetic field on the beam emittance. In addition, we used predictions of Opera3d and compared them with results of magnetic measurements for the return loop dipole and quadrupole. One of the features of the loop magnets is that they are fabricated with a very high geometric tolerance, allowing them to be an excellent test bed for bench-marking our predictions. Agreement with the prediction provides us with sufficient confidence that Z-bend magnets will preserve beam emittance.

  5. Sandia Infrared Analysis Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-05-11

    SandIR is a sophisticated Windows2000/WindowsXP program for the capture and analysis of thermal images in real time. It is a 32-bit, 5 thread C++ OOP application that rests on Microsoft’s MFC and DirectDraw libraries, the DT3152LS driver functions and the LabEngine link libraries of Origin 4.1 for full functionality. Images may be loaded in from saved files or viewed live by connection to a FLIR (Inframetrics) 600 or 760 IR camera or a video cassettemore » recorder playing tapes recorded from a FLIR (Inframetrlcs) 600 or 760 IR camera- At this time, no other IR camera formats are supported. The raw radiosity data used by SandiR is derived from the 8-bit, 256 level, RS-170 (grayscale) NTSC camera signal. The FLIR camera images contain 175x131 pixels of real IR data. SandIR displays these data in a 604x410 image. The maximum matrix size is 640x452 Including VIR and grayscale. Live IR images can be frozen and then stored to computer disk. An incrementing save command makes It easy to save a sequence of images with a series of related file names. These files can then be loaded into SandIR at a later time for anatysis by a number of predefined tools or data probes. Multiple pseudo-color palettes containing 64 colors are available as well as a 256 level grayscale palette for image colorizing. SandtR always processes all the data in the ROt for each acquired image; so a complete temperature matrix is always available for any frozen image. SandIR performs nearly 7 million temperature calculations per second and updates the image display through Direct Draw over the PCI bus at frequencies of 30 Hz. 3-d surface plots, projections, wire maps or contour plots of absolute temperatures are also updated at 20 to 30 Hz which approaches the real-time acquisition rate of the camera, These plots may be viewed full-screen or frozen in separate windows for comparison to later images. The full set of both 2-d and 3-d Origin plotting tools can be used to manipulate the attached plots. M plots can be manually rescaled. As, Origin script window can be used to send text commands directly to the Origin graphics server. This allows any of the SandIR plots to be formatted using the full power and capabilities of Origin. A section tool is provided to dissector cleave the surface plots. The options button in the Origin 3-d toolbar can be used to enhance the plotting resolution, which defaults to 24x16 when In surveillance mode, Note, higher resolutions slow the plot update rate and are best used for frozen images. The program provides an extensive range of tools, which can be applied to static images loaded from disk as well as live images. Tools used on live images display and update in real time with temperature data overlaid on the image itself. Active spot and area tools may be selected for temporal plotting using acquisition time intervals in the range of 33 ms to 1 hour. Temporal data are plotted on a scrolling strlpchart and can be recorded to an ascii or Excel file. Analysis tools include: Spot temperature tools to display the temperature at a set point in the image; Cursor probe to display the temperature under the tip of the mouse Line tools to be used as graphic objects or rulers, or to display the temperature profile along the line in a separate xy graphic window; On-screen profile tools, which superimpose the display of a temperature profile over the image itself; Rectangle, ellipse and polygon tools to be used as graphic objects, to display the maximum, minimum and mean temperatures within the region; Annotation tool to identify points in the image and make notations on the Image; Selector tool used to move or delete one of the above analysis tools.« less