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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

2

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

3

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

4

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

5

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

6

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

7

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

8

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

9

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

10

SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the hydrogen selected membrane have been experimentally demonstrated using a pilot-scale tubular membrane under a simulated WGS environment.

Paul K.T. Liu

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the first two years of this project, we focused on the membrane synthesis, characterization and optimization. In the past year, we have concentrated on the product development for improving the efficiency of hydrogen recovery from coal gasifier off-gas via water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction. A mathematical simulation study has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed rector for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the hydrogen selected membrane have been experimentally demonstrated using a pilot-scale tubular membrane under a simulated WGS environment. For the remaining period of this project, we will conduct experimental study using the hydrogen selective membrane to verify the performance projected by the mathematical simulation.

Paul K.T. Liu

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

The evaluation of environmental effects in toughened ceramics for advanced heat engines investigation of selected SiC and Si sub 3 N sub 4 ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary focus of this project is an investigation of the effects of environment on the mechanical behavior of commercially available ceramic materials being considered for use in heat engines. Based on results from an earlier study, three materials, two Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and one SiC, were selected for further characterization and evaluation. Microstructure, chemistry, physical characteristics, and mechanical properties at 25{degree}C and 1450{degree}C were investigated. 25 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs.

Hecht, N.L.; Graves, G.A.; McCullum, D.E.; Berens, A.P.; Goodrich, S.; Wolf, J.D.; Hoenigman, J.R.; Yaney, P.; Grant, D.; Hilton, S. (Dayton Univ., OH (USA). Research Inst.)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; " " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

14

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square...

15

Discontinuous phase formation and selective attack of SiC materials exposed to low oxygen partial pressure environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three SiC materials were exposed to gas mixtures containing N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO at 1000-1300C, 1-740 torr for a few to 1000 h. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that CO is the predominant oxidizing species. A variety of corrosion processes were observed, including surface and internal pit formation, needle growth, grain boundary attack, and attack of impurities and surrounding material. In the case of a siliconized SiC, impurities such as Ca, Al, and Fe diffused rapidly through the Si matrix forming complex calcium aluminosilicates on the surface, leaving behind internal voids. Evaluation of the mechanical properties, including fractography, revealed a variety of degradative phenomena. Efforts to identify causes of pit formation suggested that the overall process was complex. Pits formed during attack of grain boundaries and regions containing transition metal impurities. Studies of single crystals showed preferential attack near impurities and crystalline defects, indicating that damaged crystals or certain crystal orientations in the polycrystalline materials are susceptible to attack. In addition, under some conditions where pit formation was observed, the strength of certain materials increased apparently due to flaw healing. It is suggested that flaws can heal in the absence of mechanical stress due to their high surface energy. However, second phases observed within partially healed surface cracks suggest impurities also contribute to the flaw healing processes.

Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tressler, R.E.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

"Table A25. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" . Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Unit)" ,,,,," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(1000","LPG","Coal","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(kWh)","(gallon)","(gallon)","cu ft)","(gallon)","(short ton)","Factors"

17

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

18

"Table A40. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","Factors"...

19

" Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" 4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, Presence of" " General Technologies, and Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.3

20

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Conditional SIC-POVMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine a generalization of the symmetric informationally complete POVMs. SIC-POVMs are the optimal measurements for full quantum tomography, but if some parameters of the density matrix are known, then the optimal SIC POVM should be orthogonal to a subspace. This gives the concept of the conditional SIC-POVM. The existence is not known in general, but we give a result in the special cases when the diagonal is known of the density matrix.

D. Petz; L. Ruppert; A. Szanto

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Conditional SIC-POVMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine a generalization of the symmetric informationally complete POVMs. SIC-POVMs are the optimal measurements for full quantum tomography, but if some parameters of the density matrix are known, then the optimal SIC POVM should be orthogonal to a subspace. This gives the concept of the conditional SIC-POVM. The existence is not known in general, but we give a result in the special cases when the diagonal is known of the density matrix.

Petz, D; Szanto, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

" Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type of Supplier," Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type of Supplier," " Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (million kWh)",," (billion Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

24

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE",," " "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

25

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

26

"Table A7. Shell Storage Capacity of Selected Petroleum Products by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shell Storage Capacity of Selected Petroleum Products by Census" Shell Storage Capacity of Selected Petroleum Products by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" " "," "," "," "," ","Other","RSE" "SIC"," ","Motor","Residual"," ","Distillate","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Gasoline","Fuel Oil","Diesel","Fuel Oil","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1,0.9,1,1.1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",38,1448,306,531,12.1 2011," Meat Packing Plants",1,229,40,13,13.2

27

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

28

"Table A25 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,0.8,1,2.8,1,0.7 20,"Food and Kindred Products",15.789,2.854,6.064,2.697,7.596,1.433,4.5

29

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

30

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

31

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

32

" Generation, by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation, by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, 1994: Part 2" ,,,," Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs" ,,,,,"(1992 through 1994)" ,," " ,,,,,,"Federal, State, or" ,,"No Energy",,"Electric Utility",,"Local Government","Third Party","RSE" "SIC",,"Management","Any Type of","Sponsored","Self-Sponsored","Sponsored","Sponsored","Row" "Code(a)"," Industry Group and Industry","Program(b)","Sponsorship","Involvement","Involvement","Involvement","Involvement","Factors"

33

" Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs" ,,,,,"(1992 through 1994)" ,," " ,,,,,,"Federal, State, or" ,,"No Energy",,"Electric Utility",,"Local Government","Third Party","RSE" "SIC",,"Management","Any Type of","Sponsored","Self-Sponsored","Sponsored","Sponsored","Row"

34

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

35

"Table A40. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,,,,," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(1000","LPG","Coal","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(kWh)","(gallons)","(gallons)","cu ft)","(gallons)","(short tons)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1,1.3,0.8,1.6,0.8

36

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,,,,,"Census Division",,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,,,,,,"Middle","East North","West North","South","East South","West South",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","New England","Atlantic","Central","Central","Atlantic","Central","Central","Mountain","Pacific","Factors"

37

Rights-Of-Way (ROW) Environmental Management: New ROW Development and Existing ROW Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During October 27-29, 1997, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) sponsored a workshop to assess the need for a program of environmental research on Rights-of-Way (ROW) development and management, and to develop a research agenda. The workshop built on 1993 and 1996 EPRI meetings, and on the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Concerns in Rights-of-Way Management held in February, 1997. This document presents the proceedi...

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Two Row Mixed Integer Cuts Via Lifting?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2008 ... the two-row mixed integer infinite-group problem), and to develop lifting ..... The next lemma analyzes the standard triangles with each side ...

39

" Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS...

40

Update rows? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Update rows? Update rows? Home > Groups > Databus Is it possible to update an existing row in a table? I'm thinking of the case of a table holding metadata about sensors. If the location changes, for example, can that row be changed/deleted/updated? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 31 October, 2013 - 16:42 1 answer Points: 0 yes, it is done the same way you inserted the data, so just re-use your existing stuff and it will update. Deanhiller on 11 November, 2013 - 11:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (7) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Bradmin Hopcroft Vikasgoyal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Update rows? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Update rows? Update rows? Home > Groups > Databus Is it possible to update an existing row in a table? I'm thinking of the case of a table holding metadata about sensors. If the location changes, for example, can that row be changed/deleted/updated? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 31 October, 2013 - 16:42 1 answer Points: 0 yes, it is done the same way you inserted the data, so just re-use your existing stuff and it will update. Deanhiller on 11 November, 2013 - 11:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (6) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight

42

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Fact...

43

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","...

44

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE...

45

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

46

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

47

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

48

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

49

Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

Napolitano, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SiC Power Module  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 100 Entry R&D 100 Entry SiC Power Module 2 R&D 100 Entry SiC Power Module Submitting OrganizatiOn Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1033 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1033 USA Stanley Atcitty Phone: 505-284-2701 Fax: 505-844-2890 satcitt@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. _____________________________________ Stanley Atcitty JOint Entry Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc.; University of Arkansas; Rohm Co., LTD.; and the Department of Energy/ Energy Storage Program. 1. 1. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. 535 W. Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA Alexander B. Lostetter, President & CEO Phone: 479-443-5759

51

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" 2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat"," ",," "

53

Time-dependent Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and Generalized SIC-Slater approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simplification of the full "2 sets" Time dependent Self Interaction Correction (TD-SIC) method, applying the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) method. The new resulting scheme is called time-dependent "Generalized SIC-OEP". A straightforward approximation, using the spatial localization of one set of orbitals, leads to the "Generalized SIC-Slater" formalism. We show that it represents a great improvement compared to the traditional SIC-Slater/KLI formalisms.

Messud, J; Reinhard, P -G; Suraud, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Time-dependent Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and Generalized SIC-Slater approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simplification of the full "2 sets" Time dependent Self Interaction Correction (TD-SIC) method, applying the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) method. The new resulting scheme is called time-dependent "Generalized SIC-OEP". A straightforward approximation, using the spatial localization of one set of orbitals, leads to the "Generalized SIC-Slater" formalism. We show that it represents a great improvement compared to the traditional SIC-Slater/KLI formalisms.

J. Messud; P. M. Dinh; P. -G. Reinhard; E. Suraud

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tensile testing of SiC whiskers  

SciTech Connect

The room temperature tensile mechanical properties of SiC whiskers have been examined using a micro-tensile-test apparatus. SiC whiskers exhibit an average tensile strength of 8.4 GPa for a 5 mm tested length, and an average elastic modulus of 581 GPa. These results indicate that SiC whiskers possess significant potential as short-fiber reinforcement elements in ceramic matrix composites.

Petrovic, J.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Update on SIC-Based Inverter Technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a study of silicon carbide (SiC) technology which includes device characterization and modeling, inverter simulation, and test results for several prototype inverters. The static and dynamic characteristics of discrete devices and half bridge modules are presented. Test results of a 55 kW hybrid inverter with SiC Schottky diodes and an 18 kW all-SiC inverter using SiC JFETs and Schottky diodes are demonstrated.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Zhang, Hui [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Quantum State Tomography with Joint SIC POMs and Product SIC POMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce random matrix theory to study the tomographic efficiency of a wide class of measurements constructed out of weighted 2-designs, including symmetric informationally complete (SIC) probability operator measurements (POMs). In particular, we derive analytic formulae for the mean Hilbert-Schmidt distance and the mean trace distance between the estimator and the true state, which clearly show the difference between the scaling behaviors of the two error measures with the dimension of the Hilbert space. We then prove that the product SIC POMs---the multipartite analogue of the SIC POMs---are optimal among all product measurements in the same sense as the SIC POMs are optimal among all joint measurements. We further show that, for bipartite systems, there is only a marginal efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs over the product SIC POMs. In marked contrast, for multipartite systems, the efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs increases exponentially with the number of parties.

Zhu, Huangjun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Quantum State Tomography with Joint SIC POMs and Product SIC POMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce random matrix theory to study the tomographic efficiency of a wide class of measurements constructed out of weighted 2-designs, including symmetric informationally complete (SIC) probability operator measurements (POMs). In particular, we derive analytic formulae for the mean Hilbert-Schmidt distance and the mean trace distance between the estimator and the true state, which clearly show the difference between the scaling behaviors of the two error measures with the dimension of the Hilbert space. We then prove that the product SIC POMs---the multipartite analogue of the SIC POMs---are optimal among all product measurements in the same sense as the SIC POMs are optimal among all joint measurements. We further show that, for bipartite systems, there is only a marginal efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs over the product SIC POMs. In marked contrast, for multipartite systems, the efficiency advantage of the joint SIC POMs increases exponentially with the number of parties.

Huangjun Zhu; Berthold-Georg Englert

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

SIC-POVMs exist in all dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown that a SIC-POVM is equivalent to spherical 2-design with n=d^2 elements. We use existence results for spherical 2-designs to show that SIC-POVMs exist for all dimensions d>1.

Hall, Joanne L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

High Q SiC microresonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate photonic devices based on standard 3C SiC epitaxially grown on silicon. We achieve high optical confinement by taking advantage of the high stiffness of SiC and undercutting the underlying silicon substrate. We demonstrate a 20 um radius suspended microring resonator with Q of 18000 fabricated on commercially available SiC-on-silicon substrates.

Cardenas, Jaime; Phare, Christopher T; Shah, Shreyas Y; Poitras, Carl B; Lipson, Michal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

62

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > Industrial > Manufacturing > Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS Good-Bye, SIC - Hello, NAICS The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of the United States, Canada, and Mexico Featured topics are: What is NAICS? Why replace the SIC system? How is NAICS better than SIC? How can data series be adjusted from SIC to NAICS? How is NAICS structured? Is there a source for more information about NAICS? What is NAICS? A new classification system has arrived for manufacturing establishments, and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has incorporated this new

64

Notes on general SIC-POVMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An unavoidable task in quantum information processing is how to obtain data about the state of an individual system by suitable measurements. From this viewpoint, informationally complete measurements are relevant in quantum state tomography, quantum cryptography, quantum cloning, and other issues. Symmetric informationally complete measurements (SIC-POVMs) form an especially important class of such measurements. We formulate some novel properties and relations for general SIC-POVMs in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. It is known that general SIC-POVMs exist in all dimensions. For a given density matrix and any general SIC-POVM, the so-called index of coincidence of generated probability distribution is exactly calculated. Using this result, we obtain state-dependent entropic bounds for a single general SIC-POVM. Lower entropic bounds are derived in terms of the R\\'{e}nyi $\\alpha$-entropies for $\\alpha\\in[2;\\infty)$ and the Tsallis $\\alpha$-entropies for $\\alpha\\in(0;2]$. A lower bound on the min-entropy for a SIC-POVM is separately examined. For a pair of general SIC-POVMs, entropic uncertainty relations of the Maassen-Uffink type are considered.

Alexey E. Rastegin

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

EI Summary of SIC 39  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing products not classified in any other manufacturing major group. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 39 Source: Table 12 of this report.

66

EI Summary of SIC 35  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in manufacturing industrial and commercial machinery and equipment, and computers. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 35 Source: Table 12 of this report.

67

EI Summary of SIC 29  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refineries (29) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Refineries (29) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in petroleum refining, manufacturing paving and roofing materials, and compounding lubricating oils and greases from purchased materials. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 29

68

From SICs and MUBs to Eddington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a survey of some very old knowledge about Mutually Unbiased Bases (MUB) and Symmetric Informationally Complete POVMs (SIC). In prime dimensions the former are closely tied to an elliptic normal curve symmetric under the Heisenberg group, while the latter are believed to be orbits under the Heisenberg group in all dimensions. In dimensions 3 and 4 the SICs are understandable in terms of elliptic curves, but a general statement escapes us. The geometry of the SICs in 3 and 4 dimensions is discussed in some detail.

Bengtsson, Ingemar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

From SICs and MUBs to Eddington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a survey of some very old knowledge about Mutually Unbiased Bases (MUB) and Symmetric Informationally Complete POVMs (SIC). In prime dimensions the former are closely tied to an elliptic normal curve symmetric under the Heisenberg group, while the latter are believed to be orbits under the Heisenberg group in all dimensions. In dimensions 3 and 4 the SICs are understandable in terms of elliptic curves, but a general statement escapes us. The geometry of the SICs in 3 and 4 dimensions is discussed in some detail.

Ingemar Bengtsson

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

71

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

72

Review of selected areas of Yankee Rowe probabilistic safety study  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Safety Study has been reviewed in three specific areas. These areas are (1) treatment of initiating events, (2) treatment of human actions, and (3) treatment of the emergency ac and dc power systems. The results reported here are based on three individual and highly focused reviews. Therefore, the conclusions offered are based within the context of each individual review. 22 tabs.

Arrieta, L.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Spettell, C.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

74

Optimization Online - Simultaneous Column-and-Row Generation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 14, 2010 ... Simultaneous Column-and-Row Generation for Large-Scale Linear Programs with Column-Dependent- ... Entry Last Modified: 05/17/2012.

75

Globally Optimal Solutions for Large Single-Row Facility Layout ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 22, 2006 ... This paper is concerned with the single-row facility layout problem ..... A standard way to tighten linear or semidefinite relaxations of binary ...

76

Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

be conducted in 2010 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management...

77

System manual for the University of Pennsylvania retrofitted solar heated Philadelphia row home (SolaRow)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Pennsylvania SolaRow house, an urban row home retrofitted for comfort and domestic hot water heating, was extensively instrumented for performance monitoring and acquisition of weather and solar radiation data. This report describes the heating and instrumentation systems, provides the details for instrumentation, piping and valve identification, and specifies the operation and maintenance of the heating and data acquisition systems. The following are included: (1) system flow diagrams; (2) valve and cable identification tables; (3) wiring diagrams; and (4) start-up, normal operation, shut-down, maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures. It thus provides the necessary technical information to permit system operation and monitoring, overall system performance analysis and optimization, and acquisition of climatological data.

Zinnes, I.; Lior, N.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

79

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

80

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

82

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

83

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

84

Solving connected row convex constraints by variable elimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an algorithm for the class of connected row convex constraints. In this algorithm, we introduce a novel variable elimination method to solve the constraints. This method is simple and able to make use of the sparsity of the problem instances. ... Keywords: Connected row convex constraints, Constraint composition, Constraint satisfaction problems, Path consistency, Variable elimination

Yuanlin Zhang; Satyanarayana Marisetti

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

86

Advanced SiC Power Technology for Power Technology for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1200 V/20A SiC MOSFETs 7kW 750V DC link 3-Phase Solar Inverter (Fraunhofer Institute, Freiberg Germany) ... Collector SiC P-IGBT Structure Gate ...

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

On SIC-POVMs in Prime Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generalized Pauli group and its normalizer, the Clifford group, have a rich mathematical structure which is relevant to the problem of constructing symmetric informationally complete POVMs (SIC-POVMs). To date, almost every known SIC-POVM fiducial vector is an eigenstate of a "canonical" unitary in the Clifford group. I show that every canonical unitary in prime dimensions p > 3 lies in the same conjugacy class of the Clifford group and give a class representative for all such dimensions. It follows that if even one such SIC-POVM fiducial vector is an eigenvector of such a unitary, then all of them are (for a given such dimension). I also conjecture that in all dimensions d, the number of conjugacy classes is bounded above by 3 and depends only on d mod 9, and I support this claim with computer computations in all dimensions < 48.

Steven T. Flammia

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

SIC Manufature via Reactive Infiltration - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, SIC Manufature via Reactive ...

89

Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning ...  

DTEM – Team Members: Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning, Judy Kim, Michael Armstrong Back Row (left to right): Thomas LaGrange ...

90

Universal Converter Using SiC  

SciTech Connect

The grantee designed a high power (over 1MW) inverter for use in renewable and distributed energy systems, such as PV cells, fuel cells, variable speed wind turbines, micro turbines, variable speed gensets and various energy storage methods. The inverter uses 10,000V SiC power devices which enable the use of a straight-forward topology for medium voltage (4,160VAC) without the need to cascade devices or topologies as is done in all commercial, 4,160VAC inverters today. The use of medium voltage reduces the current by nearly an order of magnitude in all current carrying components of the energy system, thus reducing size and cost. The use of SiC not only enables medium voltage, but also the use of higher temperatures and switching frequencies, further reducing size and cost. In this project, the grantee addressed several technical issues that stand in the way of success. The two primary issues addressed are the determination of real heat losses in candidate SiC devices at elevated temperature and the development of high temperature packaging for SiC devices.

Dallas Marckx; Brian Ratliff; Amit Jain; Matthew Jones

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Design of Twin Structures in SiC Nanowires  

SciTech Connect

With covalent bonding, SiC has high mechanical strength and a large energy gap in electronic band structure. Nanoscale SiC, in the form of nanowires, has increased mechanical toughness and variable band gaps. Further, introduction of twin boundaries into cubic SiC nanowires can result in improvement in both mechanical and electronic properties. This review presents effects of twin boundaries on properties of cubic SiC nanowires, including mechanical and electronic properties. Further, this review presents recent developments in introducing twin boundaries into cubic SiC nanowires, controllably and uncontrollably.

Yongfeng Zhang; Hanchen Huang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Row-Action Inversion of the Barrick–Weber Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Barrick–Weber equations describe the interaction of radar signals with the dynamic ocean surface, and so provide a mathematical basis for oceanic remote sensing. This report considers the inversion of these equations with several of the row-...

J. J. Green; L. R. Wyatt

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Chooser-Picker 7-in-a-row-game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main objective of this paper is to relate Beck's conjecture for k-in-a-row games. The conjecture states that playing on the same board Picker is better off in a Chooser-Picker game than the second player in the Maker-Breaker version. It was shown that the 8-in-a-row game is a blocking draw that is a Breaker win. To give the outcome of 7-, or 6-in-a-row-games is hopeless, but these games are widely believed to be Breaker's win. If both conjectures hold, Picker must win the Chooser-Picker version of the 7-in-a-row game, and that is what we prove.

Csernenszky, András

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A competitive genetic algorithm for single row facility layout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 22, 2012 ... The single row facility layout is the NP-Hard problem of arranging facilities ..... with a user-specified probability p, the second fittest solution with ...

95

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

96

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

97

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

98

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

99

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

100

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

102

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

103

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" 3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

104

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

105

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

106

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

107

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

108

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

Sylvain, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ESK SIC GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ESK SIC GmbH ESK SIC GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name ESK-SIC GmbH Place Germany Zip D- 50226 Sector Solar Product Supplier of silicon carbide for wire saws, with some solar applications. References ESK-SIC GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. ESK-SIC GmbH is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "ESK-SIC GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ESK_SIC_GmbH&oldid=345133" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

110

Synthesis of SiC nanorods from bleached wood pulp  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unbleached and bleached soft wood pulps have been used as templates and carbon precursors to produce SiC nanorods. Hydrolyzed tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), Silicic acid was infiltrated into the pulps followed by a carbothermal reduction to form SiC nanorods at 1400oC in Ar. Residual carbon formed along with SiC was removed by gasification at 700oC in air. The SiC materials prepared from unbleached pulp were non-uniform SiC with a thick SiO2 coating, while the SiC nanorods prepared from the bleached pulp were uniform and straight with dimensions of 250 nm in diameter and 5.0 mm long. The formation of uniform camelback structure of SiC in the reaction between silica and bleached pulp is attributed to more silica deposited in the amorphous region of cellulose.

Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Chong M.; Samuels, William D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SIC~POVMs and Clifford groups in prime dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that in prime dimensions not equal to three, each group covariant symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measure (SIC~POVM) is covariant with respect to a unique Heisenberg--Weyl (HW) group. Moreover, the symmetry group of the SIC~POVM is a subgroup of the Clifford group. Hence, two SIC~POVMs covariant with respect to the HW group are unitarily or antiunitarily equivalent if and only if they are on the same orbit of the extended Clifford group. In dimension three, each group covariant SIC~POVM may be covariant with respect to three or nine HW groups, and the symmetry group of the SIC~POVM is a subgroup of at least one of the Clifford groups of these HW groups respectively. There may exist two or three orbits of equivalent SIC~POVMs for each group covariant SIC~POVM, depending on the order of its symmetry group. We then establish a complete equivalence relation among group covariant SIC~POVMs in dimension three, and classify inequivalent ones according to the geometric phases associated with fiducial vectors. Finally, we uncover additional SIC~POVMs by regrouping of the fiducial vectors from different SIC~POVMs which may or may not be on the same orbit of the extended Clifford group.

Huangjun Zhu

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

113

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

114

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens Thomas Taubner,1 * Dmitriy Korobkin,2 Yaroslav of the slab (4­6). In our experiment, we placed a SiC superlens (7) between the scan- ning probe tip-crystalline SiC membrane coated on both sides with 220-nm-thick SiO2 layers (7). The two surfaces of the sandwich

Shvets, Gennady

115

Microsoft Word - CX_Memo_SchultzROW.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Brandee Shoemaker Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Schultz-Raver No.1 Right-Of-Way (ROW) Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to survey and mark the northern boundary of its transmission line ROW for the Schultz-Raver No.1 and Schultz-Echo Lake No.1 transmission line corridor in Kittitas County, WA. Due to high development pressure, a lack of visible signage, and incomplete county records, encroachments into the ROW have occurred in the

116

BPD Conversion in a Thin SiC Buffer Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion. Presentation Title, BPD Conversion in a Thin SiC Buffer ...

117

Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites. Author(s), David L Poerschke, Carlos G Levi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), David L

118

Infrared Spectra of Meteoritic SiC Grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here the first infrared spectra of meteoritic SiC grains. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of meteoritic SiC grains isolated from the Murchison meteorite were measured in the wavelength range 2.5--16.5 micron, in order to make available the optical properties of presolar SiC grains. These grains are most likely stellar condensates with an origin predominately in carbon stars. Measurements were performed on two different extractions of presolar SiC from the Murchison meteorite. The two samples show very different spectral appearance due to different grain size distributions. The spectral feature of the smaller meteoritic SiC grains is a relatively broad absorption band found between the longitudinal and transverse lattice vibration modes around 11.3 micron, supporting the current interpretation about the presence of SiC grains in carbon stars. In contrast to this, the spectral feature of the large (> 5 micron) grains has an extinction minimum around 10 micron. The obtained spectra are compared with commercially available SiC grains and the differences are discussed. This comparison shows that the crystal structure (e.g., beta-SiC versus alpha-SiC) of SiC grains plays a minor role on the optical signature of SiC grains compared to e.g. grain size.

A. C. Andersen; C. Jager; H. Mutschke; A. Braatz; C. Clement; Th. Henning; U. G. Jorgensen; U. Ott

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Preparation of single- and few-layer graphene sheets using co deposition on SiC substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single- and few-layer graphene sheets were fabricated by selective chemical reactions between Co film and SiC substrate. A rapid cooling process was employed. The number of layers and crystallinity of graphene sheets were controlled by process parameters. ...

Cun Li; Dandan Li; Jingjing Yang; Xiaopeng Zeng; Wenxia Yuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

122

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

123

Development of Continuous SiC Fiber Reinforced HfB 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Development of Continuous SiC Fiber Reinforced HfB2-SiC Composites for Aerospace Applications.

124

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

125

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

126

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

127

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

128

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

129

Ten Weirdest Computers By DUNCAN GRAHAM-ROWE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten Weirdest Computers By DUNCAN GRAHAM-ROWE April 15, 2008 -- Today's computers use pulses, weirder, ways& 1. Optical computing There's nothing weird about encoding data in light global computations is still not practical. Optical computers are a worthwhile goal because using light could increase

Braun, Paul

130

On SIC-POVMs and MUBs in Dimension 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a partial solution to the problem of constructing mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and symmetric informationally complete POVMs (SIC-POVMs) in non-prime-power dimensions. An algebraic description of a SIC-POVM in dimension six is given. Furthermore it is shown that several sets of three mutually unbiased bases in dimension six are maximal, i.e., cannot be extended.

Markus Grassl

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES A Thesis Submitted April 1995 #12;PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES by Xiangwei Zhao Abstract The steady and time-dependentbehavior of a single-row heat exchanger with water and air in the in

Sen, Mihir

132

High Energy-Efficiency Retrofits to Baltimore's Row Homes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project is to develop high-perfommnce, energy-eflicient retrofits of existing row homes in Baltimore, Maryland. These efficiency enhancements are to optimize building envelope improvements, mechanical equipment improvements and operational improvements to the highest cost-effective level. Furthermore, this project is to investigate and demonstrate the impact of high-performance energy-efficiency retrofit improvements on row homes in the Historic East area of Baltimore. Three homes awaiting renovation are planned to receive building envelope, mechanical system, and electrical system improvements that will improve their energy petiormance. An incremental additional cost ceiling of $4000 for the energy eftlciency improvements, beyond those normally installed, has been set by the project.

Chalk, J.; Johnson, A.L.; Lipscomb, L.; Wendt, R.

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Supernova Reverse Shocks and SiC Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new mechanisms by which the isotopic compositions of X-type grains of presolar SiC are altered by reverse shocks in Type II supernovae. We address three epochs of reverse shocks: pressure wave from the H envelope near t = 10$^6$s; reverse shock from the presupernova wind near 10$^8-10^9$s; reverse shock from the ISM near 10$^{10}$s. Using 1-D hydrodynamics we show that the first creates a dense shell of Si and C atoms near 10$^6$s in which the SiC surely condenses. The second reverse shock causes precondensed grains to move rapidly forward through decelerated gas of different isotopic composition, during which implantation, sputtering and further condensation occur simultaneously. The third reverse shock causes only further ion implantation and sputtering, which may affect trace element isotopic compositions. Using a 25M$_{\\odot}$ supernova model we propose solutions to the following unsolved questions: where does SiC condense?; why does SiC condense in preference to graphite?; why is condensed SiC $^{28}$Si-rich?; why is O richness no obstacle to SiC condensation?; how many atoms of each isotope are impacted by a grain that condenses at time t$_0$ at radial coordinate r$_0$? These many considerations are put forward as a road map for interpreting SiC X grains found in meteorites and their meaning for supernova physics.

E. A. -N. Deneault; D. D. Clayton; A. Heger

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Supernova Reverse Shocks and SiC Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new mechanisms by which the isotopic compositions of X-type grains of presolar SiC are altered by reverse shocks in Type II supernovae. We address three epochs of reverse shocks: pressure wave from the H envelope near t = 10 6 s; reverse shock from the presupernova wind near 10 8-10 9 s; reverse shock from the ISM near 10 10 s. Using 1-D hydrodynamics we show that the first creates a dense shell of Si and C atoms near 10 6 s in which the SiC surely condenses. The second reverse shock causes precondensed grains to move rapidly forward through decelerated gas of different isotopic composition, during which implantation, sputtering and further condensation occur simultaneously. The third reverse shock causes only further ion implantation and sputtering, which may affect trace element isotopic compositions. Using a 25M ? supernova model we propose solutions to the following unsolved questions: where does SiC condense?; why does SiC condense in preference to graphite?; why is condensed SiC 28 Si-rich?; why is O richness no obstacle to SiC condensation?; how many atoms of each isotope are impacted by a grain that condenses at time t0 at radial coordinate r0? These many considerations are put forward as a road map for interpreting SiC X grains found in meteorites and their meaning for supernova physics. Subject headings: —supernova remnants —dust extinction —infrared:stars —astrochemistry 1.

Ethan A. -n. Deneault; Donald D. Clayton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SIC-POVMs and Clifford groups in prime dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that in prime dimensions not equal to 3, each group covariant symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measure (SIC-POVM) is covariant with respect to a unique Heisenberg-Weyl (HW) group. Moreover, the symmetry group of the SIC-POVM is a subgroup of the Clifford group. And two SIC-POVMs covariant with respect to the HW group are unitary or antiunitary equivalent if and only if they are on the same orbit of the extended Clifford group. In dimension 3, each group covariant SIC-POVM may be covariant with respect to 3 or 9 HW groups, and the symmetry group of the SIC-POVM is a subgroup of at least one of the Clifford groups of these HW groups respectively. There may exist 2 or 3 equivalent orbits for each group covariant SIC-POVM. We also establish a complete equivalence relationship of group covariant SIC-POVMs in dimension 3, and classify all inequivalent ones according to the geometric phases associated with fiducial vectors.

Zhu, Huangjun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

137

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

138

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

139

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

140

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

142

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

143

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

144

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

145

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

146

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

147

Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead  

SciTech Connect

The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

H Tunison

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling of C stars with core/mantle grains: Amorphous carbon + SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of 45 dust envelopes of carbon stars has been modeled. Among them, 34 were selected according to their dust envelope class (as suggested by Sloan, Little-Marenin & Price, 1998) and 11 are extreme carbon stars. The models were performed using a code that describes the radiative transfer in dust envelopes considering core/mantle grains composed by an alpha-SiC core and an amorphous carbon (A.C.) mantle. In addition, we have also computed models with a code that considers two kinds of grains - alpha-SiC and A.C. - simultaneously. Core-mantle grains seem to fit dust envelopes of evolved carbon stars, while two homogeneous grains are more able to reproduce thinner dust envelopes. Our results suggest that there exists an evolution of dust grains in the carbon star sequence. In the beginning of the sequence, grains are mainly composed of SiC and amorphous carbon; with dust envelope evolution, carbon grains are coated in SiC. This phenomena could perhaps explain the small quantity of SiC grains observed in the interstellar medium. However, in this work we consider only alpha-SiC grains, and the inclusion of beta-SiC grains can perhaps change some of there results.

S. Lorenz-Martins; F. X. de Araujo; S. J. Codina Landaberry; W. G. de Almeida; R. V. de Nader

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Characterization of SiC Nanostructure Formation and Growth Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies showed the formation of SiC nanocones from the reaction between SiO and carbon shells with encapsulated iron at 1300°C in an inert ...

150

Length of separable states and symmetrical informationally complete (SIC) POVM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This short note reviews the notion and fundamental properties of SIC-POVM and its connection with the length of separable states. We also review the t-design.

Lin Chen

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

152

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

153

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

154

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

155

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

156

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

157

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

158

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

159

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS"

160

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type and End Use," Type and End Use," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

162

Burnup Credit -- Contribution to the Analysis of the Yankee Rowe Radiochemical Assays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a methodology for validation of the isotopic contents of spent light water reactor fuel for actinide-only burnup credit with additional high-quality radiochemistry assay (RCA) data obtained from the Yankee Rowe pressurized water reactor. The additional Yankee Rowe RCA data were not included in previous isotopic validation studies for burnup credit due to the difficulty of accurately modeling the complex Yankee Rowe fuel assembly design using the SAS2H one-dimensional sequence of the ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Two-stage sintering inhibits abnormal grain growth during beta to alpha transformation in SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in polycrystalline SiC: I. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. , 1978, 61,in polycrystalline SiC: II. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. , 1978, 61,? transformation in polycrystalline SiC: III, the thickening

Kueck, Aaron M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Provably Near-Optimal Solutions for Very Large Single-Row Facility ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2009 ... This paper is concerned with the single-row facility ..... A standard way to tighten linear or semidefinite relaxations of integer optimization ...

165

Effects of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Annealing on the Thermal Conductivity/ Diffusivity of Monolithic SIC and SIC/SIC Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser flash thermal diffusivity measurements were made on high-purity monolithic CVD-SiC (impurity concentration layup made by the isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process and with either a “thick” 1.0 µm or a “thin” 0.11 µm PyC fiber coating) before and after irradiation in the HFIR reactor (250 to 800°C, 4-8 dpa-SiC) and after post-irradiation annealing composite samples to 1200°C. Thermal conductivity in SiC is controlled by phonon transport. Point defects introduced into SiC during neutron irradiation are effective scattering centers for phonons, and as a consequence the thermal conductivity is sharply reduced. For irradiation temperatures below ~800°C, the accumulation of point defects (in SiC mostly single or small clusters of interstitials and isolated vacancies) saturates when the interstitial-vacancy recombination rate equals the defect production rate. For saturation conditions, the relative reduction in the SiC thermal conductivity decreases in a manner similar to its swelling reduction with increasing irradiation temperature. Examination of SiC swelling data at various irradiation temperatures and doses indicates that saturation occurs for ~2 dpa-SiC at 200°C and decreases continuously to ~0.4 dpa-SiC at 800°C. Based on a model that assumes a uniform distribution of the phonon scattering defects, the calculated defect concentration for unirradiated CVD-SiC was less than 1 appm, which is consistent with the manufacturer’s value of <5 wppm impurities. The defect concentrations estimated for the irradiated CVD-SiC samples decreased continuously from ~25,000 to 940 appm as the irradiation temperature increased from 252 to 800°C. The small intrinsic defect concentration in comparison to the rather large extrinsic irradiation-induced defect concentrations illustrates why CVD-SiC makes an ideal irradiation damage monitor.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Oxidation Behavior of Arc Melted ZrB 2 -SiC Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional microstructure of ZrB2-SiC is particulate structure i.e. SiC forms a network that is interconnected in three dimensions. During the ...

167

Reactivity of Ti2AlC with SiC Fibers and Powders up to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein we investigated the reactivity of Ti2AlC [3ONE2] with SiC fibers [Avco Specialty Materials and Nippon Carbon Co.] and fine SiC powders [Superior ...

168

Three-fold diffraction symmetry in epitaxial graphene and the SiC substrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epitaxial Graphene and the SiC Substrate D.A. Siegel, 1, 2in graphene ?lms on 6H-SiC(0001) have been studied by lowgrown on the C face of SiC (which possesses azimuthal

Siegel, D A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SiC also has a very low chemical reactivity and doesn't react exothermically with the reactor cooling water. The radiation behavior of SiC has also been studied extensively as...

170

SIC-POVMs and MUBs: Geometrical Relationships in Prime Dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper concerns Weyl-Heisenberg covariant SIC-POVMs (symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures) and full sets of MUBs (mutually unbiased bases) in prime dimension. When represented as vectors in generalized Bloch space a SIC-POVM forms a d^2-1 dimensional regular simplex (d being the Hilbert space dimension). By contrast, the generalized Bloch vectors representing a full set of MUBs form d+1 mutually orthogonal d-1 dimensional regular simplices. In this paper we show that, in the Weyl-Heisenberg case, there are some simple geometrical relationships between the single SIC-POVM simplex and the d+1 MUB simplices. We go on to give geometrical interpretations of the minimum uncertainty states introduced by Wootters and Sussman, and by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs, and of the fiduciality condition given by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs.

D. M. Appleby

2009-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

SIC-POVMs and MUBs: Geometrical Relationships in Prime Dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper concerns Weyl-Heisenberg covariant SIC-POVMs (symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures) and full sets of MUBs (mutually unbiased bases) in prime dimension. When represented as vectors in generalized Bloch space a SIC-POVM forms a d^2-1 dimensional regular simplex (d being the Hilbert space dimension). By contrast, the generalized Bloch vectors representing a full set of MUBs form d+1 mutually orthogonal d-1 dimensional regular simplices. In this paper we show that, in the Weyl-Heisenberg case, there are some simple geometrical relationships between the single SIC-POVM simplex and the d+1 MUB simplices. We go on to give geometrical interpretations of the minimum uncertainty states introduced by Wootters and Sussman, and by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs, and of the fiduciality condition given by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs.

Appleby, D M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

High Power SiC Modules for HEVs and PHEVs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal management systems for the power electronics drivetrain in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wide band gap semiconductors including silicon carbide (SiC) have been identified as possibly being a partial solution. Research on SiC power electronics has shown their higher efficiency compared to Si power electronics due to significantly lower conduction and switching losses. This paper focuses on the development of a high power module based on SiC JFETs and Schottky diodes. Characterization of a single device, a module developed using the same device, and finally an inverter built using the modules is presented. When tested at moderate load levels compared to the inverter rating, an efficiency of 98.2% was achieved by the initial prototype.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Zhang, Hui [ORNL; Han, Jung H [ORNL; Barlow, Fred D. [University of Idaho; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

SiC Processing AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SiC Processing AG SiC Processing AG Jump to: navigation, search Name SiC Processing AG Place Hirschau, Germany Zip 92242 Sector Solar Product Offers management and recycling of slurry for solar and semiconductor industries. Coordinates 49.542793°, 11.943304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.542793,"lon":11.943304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

175

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

176

Energy Conservation Analysis of Three-Row-Hole Hollow Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, solid clay blocks have been forbidden in large and middle cities with the wall reformation policy issued in China. Many kinds of new wall materials have appeared in the market, but little research has been done on these new materials' energy conserving effects. The government of China adopted forcible energy conserving measures in the building industry in 2005. Because of this, more attention is being paid to the energy-conserving ability of the wall material. In this paper, we investigate the thermal properties of two different kinds of three-row-hole blocks through experiments, analyze their energy conserving index, and suggest ways to save energy based on the results of the investigation.

Chen, G.; Li, H.; Liu, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

EFFECT OF O2 ON SIC VOLATILIZATION RATE. R.A. Mendybaev1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

previous work on the volatilization rate of SiC in reducing gases [1, 2] was restricted to IW-2.8 and IW-6 us to estimate lifetimes of interstellar SiC grains (several months at 1200¡C) in a gas of solar lifetimes of inter- stellar SiC grains were significantly different from those we calculated previously

Grossman, Lawrence

178

MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND THERMAL ISSUES OF THE SiCf0SiC FLOW CHANNEL INSERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND THERMAL ISSUES OF THE SiCf0SiC FLOW CHANNEL INSERT S. SMOLENTSEV,* N. B) made of a silicon carbide composite (SiCf /SiC), which serves as electric and thermal insulator conductivity of the SiCf /SiC as pa- rameters. Under the DEMO reactor conditions, param- eters of the FCI have

Abdou, Mohamed

179

Topology of charge density and elastic properties of Ti3SiC2 polymorphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Structure models of Ti 3 SiC 2 . ? and ? refer to the twothe Brillouin zone of Ti 3 SiC 2 . c 400 MPa a 400 MPa c 400and elastic properties of Ti 3 SiC 2 polymorphs R. Yu, X. F.

Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao Feng; He, Lian Long; Ye, Heng Qiang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Quasi-Freestanding multilayer graphene films on the carbon face of SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Films on the Carbon Face of SiC D. A. Siegel, 1, 2 C. G.on the carbon face of SiC is studied by high-resolutiongrown on the Si-face of SiC to study the impact of the

Siegel, D. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Automatic expert system based on images for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an automatic expert system for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields based on images acquired from a vision system. Different applications in maize, particularly those based on site specific treatments, require the identification ... Keywords: Crop row detection in maize fields, Expert system, Image segmentation, Image thresholding, Linear regression, Machine vision, Theil-Sen estimator

J. M. Guerrero; M. Guijarro; M. Montalvo; J. Romeo; L. Emmi; A. Ribeiro; G. Pajares

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water (ML&W) oversees land use within the state and issues right of ways, easements or permit to use state

183

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statute Chapter 264 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 102 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 105 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

184

The Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and the Generalized SIC-Slater approximation (stationary and time-dependent cases)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a generalized formulation of the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) approach to the Self Interaction Correction (SIC) problem in Time Dependent (TD) Density Functional Theory (DFT). The formulation relies on the introduction of a double set of single electron orbitals. It allows the derivation of a generalized Slater approximation to the full OEP formulation, which extends the domain of validity of the standard Slater approximation. We discuss both formal aspects and practical applications of the new formalism and give illustrations in cluster and molecules. The new formalism provides a valuable ansatz to more elaborate (and computationally very demanding) full TD OEP and full TD SIC calculations especially in the linear domain.

Messud, J; Reinhard, P -G; ~Suraud, E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Generalized SIC-OEP formalism and the Generalized SIC-Slater approximation (stationary and time-dependent cases)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a generalized formulation of the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP) approach to the Self Interaction Correction (SIC) problem in Time Dependent (TD) Density Functional Theory (DFT). The formulation relies on the introduction of a double set of single electron orbitals. It allows the derivation of a generalized Slater approximation to the full OEP formulation, which extends the domain of validity of the standard Slater approximation. We discuss both formal aspects and practical applications of the new formalism and give illustrations in cluster and molecules. The new formalism provides a valuable ansatz to more elaborate (and computationally very demanding) full TD OEP and full TD SIC calculations especially in the linear domain.

J. Messud; P. M. Dinh; P. -G. Reinhard; E. ~Suraud

2010-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross-power Spectrum Phase)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2ch CSP ( ) 1 MU- SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross- power Spectrum Phase) [1, 2, 3, 4] [5, 6] [7, 8, 9, 10] [7] CSP CSP [8] [9] CSP [10] Estimation of talker's head orientation based (Kobe univ.) [11] 2ch CSP CSP CSP CSP 2 CSP GCC-PHAT (Generalized Cross- Correlation PHAse Transform

Takiguchi, Tetsuya

187

A unified approach to SIC-POVMs and MUBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified approach to (symmetric informationally complete) positive operator valued measures and mutually unbiased bases is developed in this article. The approach is based on the use of operator equivalents expanded in the enveloping algebra of SU(2). Emphasis is put on similarities and differences between SIC-POVMs and MUBs.

Albouy, O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A unified approach to SIC-POVMs and MUBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified approach to (symmetric informationally complete) positive operator valued measures and mutually unbiased bases is developed in this article. The approach is based on the use of operator equivalents expanded in the enveloping algebra of SU(2). Emphasis is put on similarities and differences between SIC-POVMs and MUBs.

O. Albouy; M. R. Kibler

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

190

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

191

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

192

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

193

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

194

SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

Unknown

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Experimental characterization of qutrits using SIC-POVMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized quantum measurements (also known as POVMs) are of great importance in quantum information and quantum foundations, but often difficult to perform. We present an experimental approach which can in principle be used to perform arbitrary POVMs in a linear-optical context. One of the most interesting POVMs, the SIC-POVM, is the most compact, set of measurements that can be used to fully describe a quantum state. We use our technique to carry out the first experimental characterization of the state of a qutrit using SIC-POVMs. Because of the highly symmetric nature of this measurement, such a representation has the unique property that it permits all other measurement outcomes to be predicted by a simple extension of the classical Bayesian sum rule, making no use of complex amplitudes or Hilbert-space operators. We demonstrate this approach on several qutrit states encoded in single photons.

Z. E. D. Medendorp; F. A. Torres-Ruiz; L. K. Shalm; G. N. M. Tabia; C. A. Fuchs; A. M. Steinberg

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

197

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

198

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

199

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

200

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

202

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

203

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

204

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

205

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ",,," Source of Financial Support for Activity",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Other","Don't Know","Factors"

206

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

207

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

208

Infrared Extinction by Aggregates of SiC Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle shape and aggregation have a strong influence on the spectral profiles of infrared phonon bands of solid dust grains. In this paper, we use a discrete dipole approximation, a cluster-of-spheres code following the Gerardy-Ausloos approach and a T-matrix method for calculating IR extinction spectra of aggregates of spherical silicon carbide (SiC) particles. We compare the results obtained with the three different methods and discuss differences in the band profiles.

Anja C. Andersen; Harald Mutschke; Thomas Posch

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Kochen-Specker inequality from a SIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yu and Oh [1] have given a state independent proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem in three dimensions using only 13 rays. The proof consists of showing that a non-contextual hidden variable theory necessarily leads to an inequality that is violated by quantum mechanics. We give a similar proof making use of 21 rays that constitute a SIC and four Mutually Unbiased Bases.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Kate Blanchfield; Adan Cabello

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

The SiC problem: astronomical and meteoritic evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-solar grains of silicon carbide found in meteorites and interpreted as having had an origin around carbon stars from their isotopic composition, have all been found to be of the beta-SiC polytype. Yet to date fits to the 11.3 microns SiC emission band of carbon stars had been obtained only for alpha-SiC grains. We present thin film infrared (IR) absorption spectra measured in a diamond anvil cell for both the alpha- and beta- polymorphs of synthetic SiC and compare the results with previously published spectra taken using the KBr matrix method. We find that our thin film spectra have positions nearly identical to those obtained previously from finely ground samples in KBr. Hence, we show that this discrepancy has arisen from inappropriate `KBr corrections' having been made to laboratory spectra of SiC particles dispersed in KBr matrices. We re-fit a sample of carbon star mid-IR spectra, using laboratory data with no KBr correction applied, and show that beta-SiC grains fit the observations, while alpha-SiC grains do not. The discrepancy between meteoritic and astronomical identifications of the SiC-type is therefore removed. This work shows that the diamond anvil cell thin film method can be used to produce mineral spectra applicable to cosmic environments without further manipulation.

A. K. Speck; A. M. Hofmeister; M. J. Barlow

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Synthesis of SiC ceramics by the carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the synthesis of SiC by the carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica in acidic condition. The biomorphic cellular SiC ceramics were prepared by controlling the amount of silica and the size of SiC nanoparticles. Up to 20wt% of SiO2 was mineralized into wood cellular structures and the hierarchical structures such as cells, lumen, and pits were mainly retained after the thermal treatment at 1400 C.

Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Chong M.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Synthesis, Structure and Mechanical Properties of AlN-Si3N4-SiC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Reactive sintered Si3N4-SiC ceramics have been widely used. However, the strength of these composites needs to be further improved.

213

Hot Corrosion of SiC Cermaic Matrix Composites in Marine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hot corrosion performance of monolithic SiC was characterized as a function of temperature (between 900° ... Hardware Materials in Carbonate Fuel Cell.

214

Irradiation Effects on Fission Product Behavior in PyC and SiC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Understanding the mechanism and quantifying the rate by which fission products diffuse through CVD ?-silicon carbide (SiC) is crucial to the ...

215

Atmospheric Plasma Processing of SiC: A Novel Method to Improve ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Innovative Processing and Synthesis of Ceramics, Glasses and Composites. Presentation Title, Atmospheric Plasma Processing of SiC: A Novel  ...

216

Origin of Tough Behavior in Short Carbon Fiber Dispersed SiC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Short carbon fiber-dispersed SiC matrix composites have been used for advanced ... Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy.

217

The effect of structural defects in SiC particles on the static & dynamic mechanical response of a 15 volume percent SiC/6061-Al matrix composite  

SciTech Connect

Static and Dynamic mechanical tests, and microstructural examinations performed on a SiC particle reinforced 6061-Al matrix composite indicated that particle cracking significantly affected the strength, strain hardening, and failure mechanism of the composite. Cracks were observed to nucleate and propagate on stacking faults and interfaces between the various phases within the reinforcing SiC particles. Planar defects were the predominant artifacts seen in the SiC particles. Partial dislocations were also observed bounding the stacking faults within the reinforcement phase.

Vaidya, R.U.; Song, S.G.; Zurek, A.K.; Gray, G.T. III

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sic et non en el Libro de buen amor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the concept of sic et non (the paradox of systematically acting in a way which contradicts one's beliefs or of simultaneously holding two contradictory beliefs) in the LBA and its cultural milieu, demonstrating how the author and his work reveal themselves to be products of their particular time and place. After setting forth the philosophical foundation of the concept, it goes on to show how sic et non permeates the society, demonstrating how the antagonism between the two-swords--the ecclesiastic and the civil authorities--has a profound effect on the way of life and on the beliefs of the intellectuals and of the ruling classes. Spain is shown to be just as European as the societies which produced Chaucer or Boccaccio. Special attention is devoted to the relations between the sexes, as this is pertinent to the study of the LBA. Sic et non manifests itself in a meaning not always easy to apprehend as well as in a literary form marked by a duality of significants which do not appear to always point to the same signifies. This instability--shifting reality--is a refection of the everyday reality observed by the writers. An analysis of that reality should explain the simultaneous preaching of been amor and appealing presentation of loco amor. The protagonist is not a hypocrite but, rather, one aware of what goes on around him. That awareness determines the form as well as the meaning, even if we cannot agree about what the latter is. In order for the audience to capture the subtleties of which the author warns (LBA 1988 65, 67, 68, 70), it, too, must share this awareness. Whether or not we identify him with the author, the protagonist is the conscious artist who values his art for its own sake.

Hinton, Melvin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Table 7.5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table 7.4 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 4 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"RSE" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(kWh)","(gallons)","(gallons)","(1000 cu ft)","(gallons)","(short tons)","Factors"

222

"Table E8.1. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 1. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"RSE" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(kWh)","(gallons)","(gallons)","(1000 cu ft)","(gallons)","(short tons)","Factors"

223

"Table E8.2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

224

CONTACT RESISTANCE AT A CVD-SIC/NI INTERFACE  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this task are: (1) to assess the properties and behavior of SiCf/SiC composites made from SiC fibers (with various SiC-type matrices, fiber coatings and architectures) before and after irradiation, and (2) to develop analytic models that describe these properties as a function of temperature and dose as well as composite architecture. In support of the U.S. dual-coolant lead-lithium (DCLL) fusion reactor blanket concept, recent efforts have focused on examining the electrical conductivity properties of SiCf/SiC composites considered for application in FCI-structures.

Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.

2011-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies NRS Chapter 405 Control and Preservation of Public Highways Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) grants permits for permanent installations within State rights-of-way and in areas maintained by the

226

Microsoft Word - CX-Pearl-Keeler_ROW_Marking_10June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rick Teiper Rick Teiper Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Pearl-Keeler Right-of-Way (ROW) Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Washington County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to survey and mark the Pearl-Keeler No. 1 transmission line ROW boundary in Washington County, Oregon. The installation of markers to demarcate BPA's ROW would prevent encroachment from homeowners and developers, ensure the safety of nearby residents, and allow for the continued safe maintenance and operation of BPA's transmission lines. The proposed Project would install yellow carsonite markers and monuments along an

227

MEASUREMENTS OF SPECIFIC ELECTRICAL CONTACT RESISTANCE BETWEEN SIC AND LEAD-LITHIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angeles, CA, 90095-1597, USA, morley@fusion.ucla.edu Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been proposed as a possible resistance of disks of high purity CVD SiC were measured with liquid lead-lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy melts at the SiC/LLE interface was not significant. The contact resistance during initial exposure did not behave

Abdou, Mohamed

228

Effect of a surface pre-treatment on graphene growth using a SiC substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports surface pre-treatment techniques for the formation of a high-quality graphene layer on a SiC surface. It is demonstrated that silicon passivation of SiC surface using a silane flow and subsequent sacrificial oxidation can significantly ... Keywords: Graphene, Sacrificial oxidation, Silane treatment, Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), Surface passivation

Jun-Ho Seo; Byung-Jin Kang; Jeong Hun Mun; Sung-Kyu Lim; Byung Jin Cho

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene on Carbon-face SiC{0001} Surfaces Formed in a Disilane Environment N. Srivastavaa , Guowei-face, graphene, interface structure, low energy electron microscopy, disilane Abstract. The formation of epitaxial graphene on SiC( 1000 ) in a disilane environment is studied. The higher graphitization

Feenstra, Randall

230

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

231

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

233

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

234

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

235

Handbook of SiC Properties for Fuel Performance Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The SiC layer integrity in the TRISO-coated gas-reactor fuel particle is critical to the performance, allowed burn-up, and hence intrinsic efficiency of high temperature gas cooled reactors. While there has been significant developmental work on manufacturing the fuel particles, detailed understanding of what effects the complex in-service stress state combined with realistic materials property data under irradiation has on fuel particle survival is not adequately understood. This fact particularly frustrates the modeling efforts that seek to improve fuel performance through basic understanding. In this work the properties of SiC in the non-irradiated and irradiated condition are reviewed and analyzed in terms of applicability to TRISO fuel modeling. In addition to a review of literature data, new data has been generated to fill-in holes in the existing database, specifically in the high-temperature irradiation regime. Another critical piece of information, the strength of the SiC/Pyrolytic carbon interface, is measured and a formalism for its analysis presented. Finally, recommended empirical treatments of the data are suggested.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Nozawa, Takashi [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Kondo, Sosuke [ORNL; Petti, David [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type" Type" " and End Use, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"Net Demand","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","for Electricity(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",3132,441,152,6141,99,1198,2.4

237

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,"Net Demand","Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"for Electri-","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code","End-Use Categories","city(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",2799,414,139,5506,105,1184,3 ,"Boiler Fuel",32,296,40,2098,18,859,3.6 ,"Total Process Uses",2244,109,34,2578,64,314,4.1

238

In situ toughened SiC ceramics with Al-B-C additions and oxide-coated SiC platelet/SiC composites  

SciTech Connect

This work aimed at fabrication and characterization of high toughness SiC ceramics through the applications of in situ toughening and SiC platelet reinforcement. The processing-microstructure-property relations of hot pressed SiC with Al, B, and C additions (designated as ABC-SiC) were investigated. Through a liquid phase sintering mechanism, dense SiC was obtained by hot pressing at a temperature as low as 1,700 C with 3 wt% Al, 0.6 wt% B, and 2 wt% C additions. These sintering aids also enhanced the {beta}-to-{alpha} (3C-to-4H) phase transformation, which promoted SiC grains to grow into plate-like shapes. Under optimal processing conditions, the microstructure exhibited high-aspect-ratio plate-shaped grains with a thin (< 1 nm) Al-containing amorphous grain boundary film. The mechanical properties of the toughened SiC and the composites were evaluated in comparison with a commercial Hexoloy SiC under identical test conditions. The C-curve behavior was examined using the strength-indentation load relationship and compared with that directly measured using precracked compact tension specimens. The in situ toughened ABC-SiC exhibited much improved flaw tolerance and a significantly rising R-curve behavior. A steady-state toughness in excess of 9 MPam{sup 1/2} was recorded for the ABC-SiC in comparison to a single valued toughness below 3 MPam{sup 1/2} for the Hexoloy. Toughening in the ABC-SiC was mainly attributed to grain bridging and subsequent pullout of the plate-shaped grains. The high toughness ABC-SiC exhibited a bend strength of 650 MPa with a Weibull modulus of 19; in comparison, the commercial SiC showed a bend strength of 400 MPa with a Weibull modulus of 6. Higher fracture toughness was also achieved by the reinforcement of SiC platelets, encapsulated with alumina, yttria, or silica, in a SiC matrix.

Cao, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Row Multi-Column Compact Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Row Multi-Column Compact Heat Exchanger Ashkan Motamedi1, Arturo of a compact heat exchanger to analyze the interaction between the fluid and its geometry. The overall as the inner-tube fluid. Two heat exchanger configurations, in which the tube arrangement is either in

Pacheco, Jose Rafael

240

ROW 2.0 - Right-of-Way Environmental Stewardship Bibliographic Database, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Right-of-Way Environmental Stewardship Bibliographic Database Version 2.0 (ROW 2.0) allows users to search in multiple ways for citations and retrieve summaries of published documents that focus on environmental concerns related to utility corridor design, siting, construction, or management.

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Shelley J. Row, P.E., PTOE Director, ITS Joint Program Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shelley J. Row, P.E., PTOE Director, ITS Joint Program Office Research and Innovative Technology of Transportation's Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office (JPO), a position she has held 1996, Shelley joined the ITS Joint Program Office as the ITS Travel Management Coordinator and later

Minnesota, University of

242

The removal and segmentation of the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major element of the reactor decommissioning of the Rowe Yankee reactor was the segmentation and packaging of the reactor internals. PCI Energy Services, specializing in remote cutting, machining, and welding, performed this work under contract to Yankee Atomic Electric Company. Removal techniques are described.

Child, C.; McGough, M.; Smith, G. [Power Cutting Inc., Lake Bluff, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Qualification of In-Service Examination of the Yankee Rowe Reactor Pressure Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective in-service examination of the reactor pressure vessel was an essential part of the restart program for the Yankee Atomic Power Company plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. This report describes development of an effective examination strategy, demonstration of performance of the examination procedures, and development of data on the distribution of flaws in reactor pressure vessels.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Outline of a qualitative analysis for the human motion in case of ergometer rowing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, there are numerous methods of quantitative analysis of the human movement. Basic quality of these methods is the high degree of accuracy and reliability of the obtained data. According to systematic approach human movement is qualified as a complex ... Keywords: fuzzification, human motion, qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, rowing

Ante Panjkota; Ivo Stan?ic; Tamara Šupuk

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC  

SciTech Connect

The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85-1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weber, William J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC  

SciTech Connect

The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the nearsurface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85~1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in 2 SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhang, Yanwen; Snead, Lance L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The effect of stellar evolution on SiC dust grain sizes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) produce dust in their circumstellar shells. The nature of the dust-forming environment is influenced by the evolution of the stars, in terms of both chemistry and density, leading to an evolution in the nature of the dust that is produced. Carbon-rich AGB stars are known to produce silicon carbide (SiC). Furthermore, observations of the ~11um SiC feature show that the spectral features change in a sequence that correlates with stellar evolution. We present new infrared spectra of amorphous SiC and show that the ~9um feature seen in both emission and absorption, and correlated with trends in the ~11um feature, may be due to either amorphous SiC or to nano-crystalline diamond with a high proportion of Si substituting for C. Furthermore, we identify SiC absorption in three ISO spectra of extreme carbon stars, in addition to the four presented by Speck et al. (1997). An accurate description of the sequence in the IR spectra of carbon stars requires accounting for both SiC emission and absorption features. This level of detail is needed to infer the role of dust in evolution of carbon stars. Previous attempts to find a sequence in the infrared spectra of carbon stars considered SiC emission features, while neglecting SiC absorption features, leading to an interpretation of the sequence inadequately describes the role of dust. We show that the evolutionary sequence in carbon star spectra is consistent with a grain size evolution, such that dust grains get progressively smaller as the star evolves. The evolution of the grain sizes provides a natural explanation for the shift of the ~11um SiC feature in emission and in absorption. Further evidence for this scenario is seen in both post-AGB star spectra and in meteoritic studies of presolar grains.

Angela Speck; Grant Thompson; Anne Hofmeister

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC  

SciTech Connect

Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X. [IEMN, UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincare, P.O. Box 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin-BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J. [LCPM, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR CNRS 7614, 75231 Paris Cedex (France)

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Accurate correlation consistent basis sets for molecular core-valence correlation effects: The second row atoms Al-Ar and the first row atoms B-Ne revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlation consistent basis sets for accurately describing core-core and core-valence correlation effects in atoms and molecules have been developed for the second row atoms Al - Ar. Two different optimization strategies were investigated, which led to two families of core-valence basis sets when the optimized functions were added to the standard correlation consistent basis sets (cc-pVnZ). In the first case, the exponents of the augmenting primitive Gaussian functions were optimized with respect to the difference between all-electron and valence-electron correlated calculations, i.e., for the core-core plus core-valence correlation energy. This yielded the cc-pCVnZ family of basis sets, which are analogous to the sets developed previously for the first row atoms[D.E. Woon and T.H. Dunning, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 4572 (1995)]. Although the cc-pCVnZ sets exhibit systematic convergence to the all-electron correlation energy at the complete basis set limit, the intershell (core-valence ) correlation energy converges more slowly than the intrashell (core-core) correlation energy. Since the effect of including the core electrons on the calculation of molecular properties tends to be dominated by core-valence correlation effects, a second scheme for determining the augmenting functions was investigated. In this approach, the exponents of the functions to be added to the cc-pVnZ sets were optimized with respect to just the core-valence (intershell) correlation energy, except that a small amount of core-core correlation energy was included in order to ensure systematic convergence to the complete basis set limit. These new sets, denoted weighted core-valence basis sets (cc-pwCVnZ), significantly improve the convergence of many molecular properties with n. Optimum cc-pwCVnZ sets for the first-row atoms were also developed and show similar advantages.

Peterson, Kirk A. (WASHINGTON STATE UNIV TC); Dunning, Thom H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Book Review: Thieves of Book Row: New York's Most Notorious Rare Book Ring and the Man Who Stopped It by Travis McDade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thieves of Book Row: New York'sMost Notorious Rare Book Ring and the Man Who Stopped It bypp. ISBN 0199922667. In Thieves of Book Row: New York’s Most

Montoya, Robert D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

SiC Fiber Strengths after Oxidation in Wet and Dry Air, Steam, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Data for SiC fiber strengths after oxidation in wet and dry air, steam, and low pO2 are reviewed. Oxidation and scale crystallization kinetics are  ...

252

U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development A significant effort is being placed on silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC CMC) nuclear fuel cladding by Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. The intent of this work is to invest in a high-risk, high-reward technology that can be introduced in a relatively short time. The LWRS goal is to demonstrate successful advanced fuels technology that suitable for commercial development to support nuclear relicensing. Ceramic matrix composites are an established non-nuclear technology that utilizes ceramic fibers embedded in a ceramic matrix. A thin interfacial layer between the

253

Low Temperature Synthesis of Carbon-Free Si3N4/SiC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, we have investigated a possible method of synthesizing carbon-free, nano-silicon nitride-silicon carbide (Si3N4/SiC) powders for ...

254

In Situ X-ray Characterization of SiC Particle-reinforced Al Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we studied the correlation between the tensile behavior of SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy matrix composite (2080/SiCp) and its microstructures, ...

255

Controlled Volume Fraction Si 3 N 4 /SiC Composites from Polymer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is possible to form dense Si3N4/SiC composites with little to no liquid phase and grain sizes <100 nm. By tailoring the chemistry of the polymer precursor, the

256

Modification Research of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modification Research of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar Thermal Power Plant. Author(s), Meng Liu, ...

257

Grain boundary effects on defect production and mechanical properties of irradiated nanocrystalline SiC  

SciTech Connect

Grain boundaries (GBs) are known to play an important role in determining the mechanical and functional properties of nanocrystalline materials. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of damaged GBs on the mechanical properties of SiC that is irradiated by 10 keV Si atoms. The results reveal that irradiation promotes GB sliding and reduces the ability of GBs to block dislocations, which improves the deformation ability of nanocrystalline SiC. However, irradiation causes local rearrangements in disordered clusters and pinning of dislocations in the grain region, which restrains its deformation. These two mechanisms arise from the irradiation effects on GBs and grains, and these mechanisms compete in nanocrystalline SiC during irradiation. The irradiation effects on GBs dominate at low irradiation doses, and the effects on grains dominate at high doses; the result of these combined effects is a peak ductility of 0.09 dpa in nanocrystalline SiC.

Jin Enze; Niu Lisha; Lin Enqiang; Song Xiaoxiong [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

SiC APDs and arrays for UV and solar blind detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report advancements in APDs and arrays using 4H SiC. Novel structures, array designs and specialized read out integrated circuits have been developed towards the realization of UV and solar-blind detector arrays exhibiting ...

Shaw, Gary A.

259

Stressed and Unstressed Oxidation of SiC Fibers in Steam, Air, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oxidation kinetics of Hi-Nicalon-S SiC fibers have been measured in air, steam, and low pO2 environments at temperatures as low as 700°C ...

260

Atomistic Modeling of Fission Products Transport in SiC and ZrC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some studies have suggested the ZrC can provide improved fission product retention compared to SiC and ZrC is presently under consideration for use with,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microstructure Formation in Ti3SiC2-Cu Composites Produced by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under low-energy milling, (3-5) vol.%Ti3SiC2–Cu composite particles of platelet morphology formed, which could be easily SPS-ed to 92-95% relative density.

262

Breakthrough in Power Electronics from SiC: May 25, 2004 - May 31, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report explores the premise that silicon carbide (SiC) devices would reduce substantially the cost of energy of large wind turbines that need power electronics for variable speed generation systems.

Marckx, D. A.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Phosphorus doping of 4H SiC by liquid immersion excimer laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Phosphorus doping of 4H SiC is performed by KrF excimer laser irradiation of 4H SiC immersed in phosphoric acid. Phosphorus is incorporated to a depth of a few tens of nanometers at a concentration of over 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} without generating significant crystal defects. Formation of a pn junction diode with an ideality factor of 1.06 is demonstrated.

Ikeda, Akihiro; Nishi, Koji; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Falcon-Based Comparative Assessment of Prototype Zr-4 and SiC Fuel Rod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon carbide (SiC) has long been considered an attractive material for nuclear applications because of its excellent high-temperature strength and corrosion resistance. The use of SiC composite materials has also been proposed, more recently, as a replacement for zirconium alloy–based cladding or channel materials in the current generation of light water reactors (LWRs). Advancing this concept will not be without challenges, but it has several potential advantages, such as increasing the plant’s overa...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

" Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" 5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" " Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected" " Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Distillate Fuel Oil ",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

266

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" 3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,," Electricity Receipts",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-----------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal",,"RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coke and",,"Row" ,,"Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

267

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" 6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Residual Fuel Oil",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total",,"Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

268

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" 4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Billion Cubic Feet)" ,," Natural Gas",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

269

Microsoft Word - CX-Rattlesnake-Garrison_ROW_Marking_06June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum P. Hastings Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Rattlesnake-Garrison Right-of-Way Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Missoula County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to survey and mark the Rattlesnake- Garrison transmission line right-of-way (ROW) boundary in Missoula County, Montana. The installation of signs to mark BPA's ROW would prevent encroachment from homeowners and developers, ensure the safety of nearby residents, and allow for the continued safe maintenance and operation of BPA's transmission lines.

270

A Parallel Row-Based Algorithm For Standard Cell Placement With Integrated Error Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel approaches to control error in parallel cellplacement algorithms: (1) Heuristic Cell-Coloring; (2) Adaptive Sequence Length Control. 1. INTRODUCTION Simulated annealing is a general-purpose optimization method that has been successfully applied to solve a large variety of combinatorial optimization problems including many in VLSI design. Annealing is computationally very expensive, hence efforts to improve execution time has proceeded along two fronts: (1) accelerating the annealing schedule, and (2) parallelizing the annealing algorithm for execution on multiprocessors. Parallel implementations of annealing as applied to the cell placement application either attempt multiple cell moves in parallel [1-7], or distribute ...

Jeff S. Sargent; Prith Banerjee

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Group theoretic, Lie algebraic and Jordan algebraic formulations of the SIC existence problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SIC-POVMs, or SICs for short) have been constructed in every dimension $\\le 67$, a general existence proof remains elusive. The purpose of this paper is to show that the SIC-existence problem is equivalent to three other, on the face of it quite different problems. We hope that these reformulations of the problem will make it more tractable. We also believe that the fact that SICs have these connections to other areas of mathematics is of some intrinsic interest. Specifically, we reformulate the SIC problem in terms of (1) Lie Groups, (2) Lie Algebras and (3) Jordan Algebras (the second result being a greatly strengthened version of one previously obtained by Appleby, Flammia and Fuchs). The connection between these three reformulations is non-trivial: it is not easy to demonstrate their equivalence directly, without appealing to their common equivalence to SIC existence. In the course of our analysis we obtain a number of other results which may be of some independent interest.

D. M. Appleby; Christopher A. Fuchs; Huangjun Zhu

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Group theoretic, Lie algebraic and Jordan algebraic formulations of the SIC existence problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SIC POVMs, or SICs for short) have been constructed in every dimension up to 67, a general existence proof remains elusive. The purpose of this paper is to show that the SIC existence problem is equivalent to three other, on the face of it quite different problems. We hope that these reformulations of the problem will make it more tractable. We also believe that the fact that SICs have these connections to other areas of mathematics is of some intrinsic interest. Specifically, we reformulate the SIC problem in terms of (1) Lie groups, (2) Lie algebras and (3) Jordan algebras (the second result being a greatly strengthened version of one previously obtained by Appleby, Flammia and Fuchs). The connection between these three reformulations is non-trivial: It is not easy to demonstrate their equivalence directly, without appealing to their common equivalence to SIC existence. In the course of our analysis we obtain a number of other results which may be of some independent interest.

D. M. Appleby; Christopher A. Fuchs; Huangjun Zhu

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Stability of SiC and its Composites at High Neutron Fluence  

SciTech Connect

High purity chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) and near-stoichiometric SiC fiber, chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composite were evaluated following neutron irradiation to {approx}28 dpa at 300 and 650 C and to {approx}41 dpa at 800 C, respectively. The irradiated swelling, thermal conductivity, and elastic modulus indicated no additional changes in these properties at high fluences after saturation at low fluences. With a statistically meaningful sample population, no change in flexural strength of CVD SiC was observed after 300 C irradiation. A slight decrease in strength was observed after 650 C irradiation but was attributed to an experimental artifact; specifically, a reaction between samples and the capsule components. The Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, CVI SiC composite retained the pre-irradiation strength and the non-linear fracture mode. The electrical resistivity measurement revealed a relatively minor effect of irradiation. Overall, irradiation-insensitivity of the high purity SiC ceramics and composite to neutron irradiation to doses 30-40 dpa at temperatures 300-800 C was demonstrated.

Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Nozawa, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Ozawa, Kazumi [ORNL; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant effort is being placed on silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC CMC) nuclear fuel cladding by Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. The intent of this work is to invest in a high-risk, high-reward technology that can be introduced in a relatively short time. The LWRS goal is to demonstrate successful advanced fuels technology that suitable for commercial development to support nuclear relicensing. Ceramic matrix composites are an established non-nuclear technology that utilizes ceramic fibers embedded in a ceramic matrix. A thin interfacial layer between the fibers and the matrix allows for ductile behavior. The SiC CMC has relatively high strength at high reactor accident temperatures when compared to metallic cladding. SiC also has a very low chemical reactivity and doesn't react exothermically with the reactor cooling water. The radiation behavior of SiC has also been studied extensively as structural fusion system components. The SiC CMC technology is in the early stages of development and will need to mature before confidence in the developed designs can created. The advanced SiC CMC materials do offer the potential for greatly improved safety because of their high temperature strength, chemical stability and reduced hydrogen generation.

George W. Griffith

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

276

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

277

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

278

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

279

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

280

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

282

Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1047-2008 DOE-STD-1047-2008 August 2008 DOE STANDARD Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1047-2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ....................................................................................................................... i 1. SCOPE AND PURPOSE .........................................................................................1 2. APPLICABILITY ....................................................................................................1 3. NORMATIVE REFERENCES................................................................................2

283

Qualification of in-service examination of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

Technical support was provided to assist the Yankee Atomic Electric Company with their restart effort for the Yankee plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. Demonstration of adequate margin during a postulated pressurized thermal shock accident was an important part of the justification for restarting the plant, and effective inservice examination of the critical inner surface of the vessel in the beltline region was a key objective and a significant component of the safety analysis. This report discussed this inservice inspection.

Ammirato, F.; Kietzman, K.; Becker, L.; Ashwin, P.; Selby, G.; Krzywosz, K.; Findlan, S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). Nondestructive Evaluation Center); Lance, J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

285

File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

App Misc Easement ROW.pdf App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.54 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 4 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:36, 20 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:36, 20 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 4 pages (1.54 MB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

286

File:Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:06, 13 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:06, 13 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (23 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

287

File:03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:00, 3 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:00, 3 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (38 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 09:55, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:55, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (53 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 10:36, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:36, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs)

288

File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:03, 29 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:03, 29 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 12:06, 12 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:06, 12 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (82 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs) 15:45, 26 June 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:45, 26 June 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) June 26th version

289

DisClose: Discovering Colossal Closed Itemsets via a Memory Efficient Compact Row-Tree  

SciTech Connect

Itemset mining has recently focused on discovery of frequent itemsets from high-dimensional datasets with relatively few rows and a larger number of items. With exponentially in-creasing running time as average row length increases, mining such datasets renders most conventional algorithms impracti-cal. Unfortunately, large cardinality closed itemsets are likely to be more informative than small cardinality closed itemsets in this type of dataset. This paper proposes an approach, called DisClose, to extract large cardinality (colossal) closed itemsets from high-dimensional datasets. The approach relies on a memory-efficient Compact Row-Tree data structure to represent itemsets during the search process. The search strategy explores the transposed representation of the dataset. Large cardinality itemsets are enumerated first followed by smaller ones. In addition, we utilize a minimum cardinality threshold to further reduce the search space. Experimental result shows that DisClose can complete the extraction of colossal closed itemsets in the considered dataset, even for low support thresholds. The algorithm immediately discovers closed itemsets without needing to check if each new closed itemset has previously been found.

Zulkurnain, Nurul F.; Keane, John A.; Haglin, David J.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:02, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:02, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 14:00, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:00, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

291

SIC-POVMs and the Extended Clifford Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the structure of the extended Clifford Group (defined to be the group consisting of all operators, unitary and anti-unitary, which normalize the generalized Pauli group (or Weyl-Heisenberg group as it is often called)). We also obtain a number of results concerning the structure of the Clifford Group proper (i.e. the group consisting just of the unitary operators which normalize the generalized Pauli group). We then investigate the action of the extended Clifford group operators on symmetric informationally complete POVMs (or SIC-POVMs) covariant relative to the action of the generalized Pauli group. We show that each of the fiducial vectors which has been constructed so far (including all the vectors constructed numerically by Renes et al) is an eigenvector of one of a special class of order 3 Clifford unitaries. This suggests a strengthening of a conjuecture of Zauner's. We give a complete characterization of the orbits and stability groups in dimensions 2-7. Finally, we show that the problem of constructing fiducial vectors may be expected to simplify in the infinite sequence of dimensions 7, 13, 19, 21, 31,... . We illustrate this point by constructing exact expressions for fiducial vectors in dimensions 7 and 19.

D. M. Appleby

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

STABILITY OF METALLIC Si-, Fe-RICH ALLOYS, SiC AND GRAPHITE IN MIXED SUPERNOVA EJECTA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STABILITY OF METALLIC Si-, Fe-RICH ALLOYS, SiC AND GRAPHITE IN MIXED SUPERNOVA EJECTA. L. Grossman1 the Murchison chondrite contain inclusions of TiC and Si-rich metal alloys but, in most cases, no SiC [1], while of TiC, SiC and a Si-rich metal alloy at a higher temperature than graphite when the expanding gas has

Grossman, Lawrence

293

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

294

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows form a magnetic rail. Levitation and lateral stability is provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets (SCM) mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. A multiphase propulsion system interconnects specific coils in a given magnetic rail and interacts with the SCM to produce a propulsion force to the vehicle.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Synthesis of SiC by direct reduction of SiO2 by using a methane gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Synthesis of SiC by direct reduction of ...

296

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

297

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

298

Complex function for SicA, a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion-associated chaperone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 that is essential for virulence. All type III secretion systems require the function of a family of low-molecularweight proteins that aid the secretion process by acting as partitioning factors and/or secretion pilots. One such protein is SicA, which is encoded immediately upstream of the type III secreted proteins SipB and SipC. We found that the absence of SicA results in the degradation of both SipB and SipC. Interestingly, in the absence of SipC, SipB was not only stable but also secreted at wild-type levels in a sicA mutant background, indicating that SicA is not required for SipB secretion. We also found that SicA is capable of binding both SipB and SipC. These results are consistent with a SicA role as a partitioning factor for SipB and SipC, thereby preventing their premature association and degradation. We also found that introduction of a sicA null mutation results in the lack of expression of SopE, another type III-secreted protein. Such an effect was shown to be transcriptional. Introduction of a loss-of-function sipC mutation into the sicA mutant background rescued sopE expression. These results indicate that the effect of sicA on sopE expression is indirect and most likely exerted through a regulatory factor(s) partitioned by SicA from SipC. These studies therefore describe a surprisingly complex function for the Salmonella enterica type III secretion-associated chaperone SicA. Salmonella spp., as well as other pathogenic gram-negative

Stephanie C. Tucker; Jorge; E. Galán

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

300

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

302

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

303

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

304

" Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Assistance;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States"

305

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

306

Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

Weaver, Phyllis C

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Observations and comments on the turbine failure at Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary analysis is presented of the catastrophic disc failure in the low-pressure turbine at the Yankee Rowe nuclear reactor plant. The analysis is based on on-site inspection and documentation of fractured components. Heavily oxidized thumbnail cracks were observed on fractured surfaces of the first-stage generator-end disc, indicating stress corrosion cracking as the precursor to the catastrophic failure of this disc. No evidence of such cracks was seen on the corresponding fractured governor-end disc. We propose a number of alternative possible causes for the failures and for the differences observed between the two discs.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Constraints on AGB models from the heavy-element composition of presolar SiC grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presolar SiC grains formed around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars during their carbon-rich phase and contain heavy elements in trace amounts showing the signature of the slow neutron capture process (s process). Thanks to recent advances in analysis techniques, SiC data now provide extremely precise information on neutron capture cross sections and AGB models. For example, high-precision data for Mo in single SiC grains indicate that a revision of the 95Mo neutron capture cross section is needed, while data for Zr indicates that the 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg reaction cannot be a dominant neutron source for the s process in AGB stars. We present model predictions for the composition of Fe-peak elements in AGB stars. These elements could be analysed in the near future thus providing further stringent constraints to our understanding of AGB stars.

M. Lugaro; A. M. Davis; R. Gallino; M. R. Savina; M. J. Pellin

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Investigation of structure, magnetic, and transport properties of Mn-doped SiC films  

SciTech Connect

Mn-doped SiC films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The structure, composition, and magnetic and transport properties of the films were investigated. The results show the films have the 3C-SiC crystal structure and the doped Mn atoms in the form of Mn{sup 2+} ions substitute for C sites in SiC lattice. All the films are ferromagnetic at 300 K, and the ferromagnetism in films arises from the doped Mn atoms and some extended defects. In addition, the saturation magnetization increases with the Mn-doped concentration increasing. The Mn doping does not change the semiconductor characteristics of the SiC films.

Sun Xianke [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo Ruisong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); An Yukai [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Liu Jiwen [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of irradiation on the mechanical behavior of twined SiC nanowires  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation is known to bring new features in one-dimensional nano materials. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the irradiation effects on twined SiC nanowires. Defects tend to accumulate from outside toward inside of the twined SiC nanowires with increasing irradiation dose, leading to a transition from brittle to ductile failure under tensile load. Atomic chains are formed in the ductile failure process. The first-principles calculations show that most of the atomic chains are metallic.

Jin Enze; Niu Lisha; Lin Enqiang; Duan Zheng [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Performance Comparison Study of SiC and Si Technology for an IPM Drive System  

SciTech Connect

The impact of the new SiC material based devices on a full system needs to be evaluated in order to assess the benefits of replacing Silicon (Si) devices with WBG devices. In this paper the results obtained with a full-system model simulated for an aggressive US06 drive cycle are presented. The system model includes a motor/generator model and inverter loss model developed using actual measured data. The results provide an insight to the difference in performance of a permanent magnet traction drive system using SiC versus Si devices.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Otaduy, Pedro J [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Short-term dynamics of soil carbon, microbial biomass, and soil enzyme activities as compared to longer-term effects of tillage in irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates by tillage and crop rotation: a global data analysis.of tillage in irrigated row crops Daniel Geisseler & Williamthe cropping season in all crop sequences D. Geisseler (*) :

Geisseler, Daniel; Horwath, William R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Coast Guard Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Federal Aviation Administration Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies 11 AAC 195.010: Anadromous Fish 17 AAC 15.021: Application for Utility Permit Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf

315

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Theoretical calculations of the primary defects induced by pions and protons in SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work, the bulk degradation of SiC in hadron (pion and proton) fields, in the energy range between 100 MeV and 10 GeV, is characterised theoretically by means of the concentration of primary defects per unit fluence. The results are compared to the similar ones corresponding to diamond, silicon and GaAs.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu; Emilio Borchi; Mara Bruzzi

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

CORROSION RESISTANT CERAMIC COATINGS: FORMATION OF MULLITE COATINGS ON SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: (865) 574-4559; Fax: (865) 574-6918 INTRODUCTION Advanced fossil energy processes have hostile limits the applicability of SiC ceramics for extended service in many fossil energy conversionC ceramics for use in fossil energy applications using concentrated, aqueous suspensions prepared via

318

Stability and charge transfer at the interface between SiC(0001) and epitaxial graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using density functional calculations, we address the energetics of the interface between the SiC(0001) substrate and the first covalently bonded epitaxial graphene layer. We consider a 63x63R30^o geometry showing the experimental periodicity, a simplified ... Keywords: Charge transfer, Energetic stability, Epitaxial graphene, Interfaces, Silicon carbide

Gabriele Sclauzero; Alfredo Pasquarello

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of SiC devices (as battery interface, motor controller, etc.) in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) will benefit from their high-temperature capability, high-power density, and high efficiency. Moreover, the light weight and small volume will affect the whole power train system in a HEV, and thus performance and cost. In this work, the performance of HEVs is analyzed using PSAT (powertrain system analysis tool, vehicle simulation software). Power loss models of a SiC inverter are incorporated into PSAT powertrain models in order to study the impact of SiC devices on HEVs. Two types of HEVs are considered. One is the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV, the other is a plug-in HEV (PHEV), whose powertrain architecture is the same as that of the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV. The vehicle-level benefits from the introduction of the SiC devices are demonstrated by simulations. Not only the power loss in the motor controller but also those in other components in the vehicle powertrain are reduced. As a result, the system efficiency is improved and the vehicles consume less energy and emit less harmful gases. It also makes it possible to improve the system compactness with simplified thermal management system. For the PHEV, the benefits are more distinct. Especially, the size of battery bank can be reduced for optimum design.

Zhang, Hui [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV, the other is a plug-in HEV (PHEV), whose powertrain architecture is the same as that of the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV. The vehicle-level benefits from the introduction of the SiC devices is the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV, which has a split powertrain architecture shown in Fig. 1. The other is a plug

Tolbert, Leon M.

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321

ISBN 91-7170-103-6 ISRN SICS D--8--SE Toward Scalable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computer Systems The Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden First Edition October 1992 Second and Computer Systems of Computer Science S-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden Box 1263 S-164 28 Kista, Sweden TRITA this together. SICS is sponsored by Asea Brown Boveri AB, NobelTech Systems AB, Ericsson AB, IBM Svenska AB

Hagersten, Erik

322

Layer Number Determination and Thickness-Dependent Properties of Graphene Grown on SiC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic properties of few-layer graphene grown on the carbon face of silicon carbide (SiC) are found to be strongly dependent on the number of layers. The carrier mobility is larger in thicker graphene because substrate-related scattering is reduced ...

Wenjuan Zhu; Christos Dimitrakopoulos; Marcus Freitag; Phaedon Avouris

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction.

Paul K.T. Liu

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Microstructure of TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment I: SiC Grain Size and Grain Boundary Character  

SciTech Connect

Pre-irradiation SiC microstructures in TRISO coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment were quantitatively characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From EBSD it was determined that only the cubic polymorph of as-deposited SiC was present and the SiC had a high fraction of CSL S3 grain boundaries. Additionally, the local area misorientation (LAM), which is a qualitative measurement of strain in the SiC lattice, was mapped for each fuel variant. The morphology of the SiC / IPyC interfaces were characterized by TEM following site-specific focused ion beam (FIB) specimen preparation. It was determined that the SiC layer had a heavily faulted microstructure typical of CVD deposited SiC and that the average grain diameter increased from the SiC/IPyC interface for all the fuel variants, except V3 that showed a constant grain size across the layer.

Rita Kirchhofer; John D, Hunn; Paul A. Demkowicz; James I. Cole; Brian P. Gorman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation of sintering effects on SiC incorporated UO2 kernels under Ar and Ar-4%H2 environments  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) is suggested as an oxygen getter in UO2 kernels used for TRISO particle fuels to lower oxygen potential and prevent kernel migration during irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry analyses performed on sintered kernels verified that internal gelation process can be used to incorporate SiC in urania fuel kernels. Sintering in either Ar or Ar-4%H2 at 1500 C lowered the SiC content in the UO2 kernels to some extent. Formation of UC was observed as the major chemical phase in the process, while other minor phases such as U3Si2C2, USi2, U3Si2, and UC2 were also identified. UC formation was presumed to be occurred by two reactions. The first was the SiC reaction with its protective SiO2 oxide layer on SiC grains to produce volatile SiO and free carbon that subsequently reacted with UO2 to form UC. The second process was direct UO2 reaction with SiC grains to form SiO, CO, and UC, especially in Ar-4%H2. A slightly higher density and UC content was observed in the sample sintered in Ar-4%H2, but the use of both atmospheres produced kernels with ~95% of theoretical density. It is suggested that incorporating CO in the sintering gas would prevent UC formation and preserve the initial SiC content.

Silva, Chinthaka M [ORNL] [ORNL; Lindemer, Terrence [Harbach Engineering and Solutions] [Harbach Engineering and Solutions; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL] [ORNL; Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

327

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

328

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

329

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

330

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

331

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

332

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

333

On undrained test using Rowe's relation and Incremental Modelling: Generalisation of the notion of Characteristic State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is recalled that stress-strain incremental modelling is a common feature of most theoretical description of the mechanical behaviour of granular material. An other commonly accepted characteristics of the mechanical behaviour of granular material is the Rowe's relation which links the dilatancy K to the ratio B of vertical-to-lateral stress during a test at constant lateral stress, i.e. B =(1+M)(1+K). Using an incremental modelling, this law shall be interpreted as a pseudo-Poisson coefficient. We combine these two features to solve the problem of an axial compression under undrained condition. We demonstrate that the sample is submitted to a bifurcation of the transcritical type when it reaches the q=Mp line. This allows extending the notion of the characteristic state introduced by Luong to other situations and to anisotropic systems. We show also that these undrained tests are quite appropriate to study the characteristic-state behaviour.

P. Evesque

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods  

SciTech Connect

An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, ShannXi, 710049 (China); Yang, J.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Yitian Road, ShenZhen, GuangDong, 518026 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

336

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

337

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor site (EDS the location to host a global nuclear fusion project during the latest round of talks in Vienna with four other ministry's nuclear fusion development office, told reporters that neither Japan nor the EU is in a mood

339

Fabrication and Evaluation of a High Performance SiC Inverter for Wireless Power Transfer Applications  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a high power density SiC high efficiency wireless power transfer converter system via inductive coupling has been designed and developed. The detailed power module design, cooling system design and power stage development are presented. The successful operation of rated power converter system demonstrates the feasible wireless charging plan. One of the most important part of this study is the wind bandgap devices packaged at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the in-house packaging technologies by employing the bare SiC dies acquired from CREE, which are rated at 50 A / 1200 V each. These packaged devices are also inhouse tested and characterized using ORNL s Device Characterization Facility. The successful operation of the proposed inverter is experimentally verified and the efficiency and operational characteristics of the inverter are also revealed.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ning, Puqi [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Interaction of ultrashort X-ray pulses with B4C, SiC and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction of 32.5 and 6 nm ultrashort X-ray pulses with the solid materials B4C, SiC and Si is simulated with a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) radiation transfer code. We study the ionization dynamics as function of depth in the material, modifications of the opacity during irradiation and estimate crater depth. Furthermore, we compare the estimated crater depth with experimental data, for fluences up to 2.2 J/cm2. Our results show that at 32.5 nm irradiation, the opacity changes with less than a factor of 2 for B4C and Si and a factor of 3 for SiC, for fluences up to 200 J/cm2. At a laser wavelength of 6 nm, the model predicts a dramatic decrease in opacity due to the weak inverse bremsstrahlung, increasing the crater depth for high fluences.

Bergh, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Scott, H A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welding of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is an alternative to their mechanical joining, since they are difficult to machine. Published literature in fusion welding of similar composites shows metallurgical problems. This study investigates the weldability of A359/SiC/10p aluminum SiC MMC. Statistical experiments were performed to identify the significant variables and their effects on the hardness, tensile and bending strengths, ductility, and microstructure of the weld. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used to predict the preheat temperature field across the weld and the weld pool temperature. Welding current, welding speed, and the preheat temperature (300-350??C) affected the weld quality significantly. It was seen that the fracture of the welded specimens was either in the base MMC or in the weld indicating a stronger interface between the weld and the base MMC. Oxides formation was controlled along the weld joint. Low heat inputs provided higher weld strengths and better weld integrity. It was found that the weld strengths were approximately 85% of the parent material strength. The weld region had higher extent of uniform mixing of base and filler metal when welded at low currents and high welding speeds. These adequate thermal conditions helped the SiC particles to stay in the central weld region. The interface reaction between the matrix and SiC particles was hindered due to controlled heat inputs and formation of harmful Al4C3 flakes was suppressed. The hardness values were found to be slightly higher in the base metal rich region. There was no significant loss in the hardness of the heat affected zone. The ductility of the weld was considerably increased to 6.0-7.0% due to the addition of Al-Si filler metal.

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High Precision CTE-Measurement of SiC-100 for Cryogenic Space-Telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of high precision measurements of the thermal expansion of the sintered SiC, SiC-100, intended for use in cryogenic space-telescopes, in which minimization of thermal deformation of the mirror is critical and precise information of the thermal expansion is needed for the telescope design. The temperature range of the measurements extends from room temperature down to $\\sim$ 10 K. Three samples, #1, #2, and #3 were manufactured from blocks of SiC produced in different lots. The thermal expansion of the samples was measured with a cryogenic dilatometer, consisting of a laser interferometer, a cryostat, and a mechanical cooler. The typical thermal expansion curve is presented using the 8th order polynomial of the temperature. For the three samples, the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), $\\bar{\\alpha}_{#1}$, $\\bar{\\alpha}_{#2}$, and $\\bar{\\alpha}_{#3}$ were derived for temperatures between 293 K and 10 K. The average and the dispersion (1 $\\sigma$ rms) of these three CTEs are 0.816 and 0.002 ($\\times 10^{-6}$/K), respectively. No significant difference was detected in the CTE of the three samples from the different lots. Neither inhomogeneity nor anisotropy of the CTE was observed. Based on the obtained CTE dispersion, we performed an finite-element-method (FEM) analysis of the thermal deformation of a 3.5 m diameter cryogenic mirror made of six SiC-100 segments. It was shown that the present CTE measurement has a sufficient accuracy well enough for the design of the 3.5 m cryogenic infrared telescope mission, the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA).

K. Enya; N. Yamada; T. Onaka; T. Nakagawa; H. Kaneda; M. Hirabayashi; Y. Toulemont; D. Castel; Y. Kanai; N. Fujishiro

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion induced defect recovery in SiC  

SciTech Connect

Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.

Backman, Marie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Toulemonde, Marcel [CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-University of Caen, FRANCE; Pakarinen, Olli H [University of Helsinki; Juslin, Niklas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Debelle, Aurelien [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Weber, William J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hollow Core-Shell Structured Porous Si-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Battery Anodes  

SciTech Connect

Hollow core-shell structured porous Si-C nanocomposites with void space up to tens of nanometers are designed to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation for high-performance Li-ion battery anodes. An initial capacity of {approx}760 mAh/g after formation cycles (based on the entire electrode weight) with {approx}86% capacity retention over 100 cycles is achieved at a current density of 1 A/g. Good rate performance is also demonstrated.

Li, Xiaolin; Meduri, Praveen; Chen, Xilin; Qi, Wen N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Xu, Wu; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

346

Report on the Fracture Analysis of HfB{sub 2}-SiC and ZrB{sub 2}-SiC Composites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hafnium diboride-silicon carbide (HS) and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide (ZS) composites are potential materials for high temperature, thermal shock applications such as for components on re-entry vehicles. In order to establish material constants necessary for evaluation of in situ fracture, bars fractured in four-point flexure were examined using fractographic principles. The fracture toughness was determined from measurements of the critical crack sizes and the strength values and the crack branching constants were established to use in forensic fractography for future in-flight tests. The fracture toughnesses range from about 13 MPam{sup 1/2} at room temperature to about 6 MPam{sup 1/2} at 1400 C for ZrB{sub 2}-Sic composites and from about 13 MPam{sup 1/2} at room temperature to about 4 MPam{sup 1/2} at 1400 C for HfB{sub 2}-SiC composites. Thus, the toughnesses of either the HS or ZS composites have the potential for use in thermal shock applications. Processing and manufacturing defects limited the strength of the test bars. However, examination of the microstructure on the fracture surfaces shows that the processing of these composites can be improved. There is potential for high toughness composites with high strength to be used in thermal shock conditions if the processing and handling are controlled.

MECHOLSKY, JR. JOHN J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a high-temperature gas sensing system for the detection of combustion products under harsh conditions, such as an energy plant. The sensor, based on the wide band gap semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC), is a catalytic gate field-effect device (Pt–SiO2–SiC) that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high-temperature environments. The hydrogen response of the device in an industrially robust module was determined under both laboratory and industrial conditions (1000 sccm of 350 °C gas) from 52 ppm to 50% H2, with the sensor held at 620 °C. From our data we find that the hydrogen adsorption kinetics at the catalyst–oxide interface are well fitted by the linearized Langmuir adsorption isotherm. For hydrogen monitoring in a coal gasification application, we investigated the effect of common interferants on the device response to a 20% H2 gas stream. Within our signal to noise ratio, 40% CO and 5% CH4 had no measurable effect and a 2000 ppm pulse of H2S did not poison the Pt sensing film. We have demonstrated the long-term reliability of our SiC sensor and the robustness of the sensor packaging techniques, as all the data are from a single device, obtained during 5 days of industrial measurements in addition to 480 continuous hours of operation under laboratory conditions.

Loloee, R. (Michigan State Univ., E. Lansing, MI); Chorpening, B.T.; Beer, S.K.; Ghosh, R.N. (Michigan State Univ., E. Lansing, MI)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a high-temperature gas sensing system for the detection of combustion products under harsh conditions, such as an energy plant. The sensor, based on the wide band gap semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC), is a catalytic gate field-effect device (Pt–SiO2–SiC) that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high-temperature environments. The hydrogen response of the device in an industrially robust module was determined under both laboratory and industrial conditions (1000 sccm of 350 ?C gas) from 52 ppm to 50% H2, with the sensor held at 620 ?C. From our data we find that the hydrogen adsorption kinetics at the catalyst–oxide interface are well fitted by the linearized Langmuir adsorption isotherm. For hydrogen monitoring in a coal gasification application, we investigated the effect of common interferants on the device response to a 20% H2 gas stream. Within our signal to noise ratio, 40% CO and 5% CH4 had no measurable effect and a 2000 ppm pulse of H2S did not poison the Pt sensing film. We have demonstrated the long-term reliability of our SiC sensor and the robustness of the sensor packaging techniques, as all the data are from a single device, obtained during 5 days of industrial measurements in addition to ?480 continuous hours of operation under laboratory conditions.

Reza Loloee; Benjamin Chorpening; Steve Beer; Ruby N. Ghosha

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

350

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

351

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006; 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu Economic Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal Breeze Other(e) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 47 0 3 5 Q 20 1 17 20-49 112 7 Q 20 1 12 1 64 50-99 247 29 Q 26 88 33 * 68 100-249 313 28 1 97 12 48 43 85 250-499 297 * * 121 154 3 5 13 500 and Over 2,547 * * 130 2,043 301 6 66 Not Ascertained (f) 3,399 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,399 Total 6,962 64 17 398 2,299 417 56 3,711 Employment Size Under 50 161 4 Q 48 15 19 0 64 50-99 390 41 1 97 145 27 1 77 100-249

352

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

353

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,139 367 23 45 535 14 21 3 131 20-49 1,122 333 13 19 530 8 93 5 122 50-99 1,309 349 22 17 549 10 157 8 197 100-249 2,443 607 25 19 994 11 263 10 512 250-499 2,092 413 53 13 633 4 244 3 730 500 and Over 7,551 781 115 17 2,271 31 240 344 3,752 Total 15,657 2,851 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 374 5,445 Employment Size Under 50 1,103 334 10 45 550 10

354

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value Economic per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Characteristic(a) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9

355

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

356

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

357

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

358

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Shipments Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Characteristic(a) Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,166 367 23 48 540 15 41 3 140 12 20-49 1,209 333 20 26 550 8 104 5 182 20 50-99 1,507 349 51 19 575 98 190 9 256 40 100-249 2,651 607 53 20 1,091 23 310 53 566 73 250-499 2,362 413 52 13 754 158 247 9 732 16 500 and Over

359

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

360

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 28 28 0 20-49 307 227 80 50-99 2,218 1,673 545 100-249 2,647 1,437 1,210 250-499 3,736 2,271 1,464 500 and Over 10,814 5,665 5,149 Total 19,750 11,301 8,449 Employment Size Under 50 516 230 287 50-99 1,193 1,180 13 100-249 3,825 3,231 594 250-499 3,796 2,675 1,120 500-999 4,311 1,921 2,390

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361

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood Economic Total Onsite and Characteristic(a) Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,447 450 Q Q 20-49 5,220 5,106 29 Q 50-99 3,784 3,579 29 Q 100-249 17,821 17,115 484 222 250-499 28,464 27,202 334 927 500 and Over 86,249 85,028 106 1,114 Total 142,986 138,480 1,030 3,476 Employment Size Under 50 2,193 1,177 Q Q 50-99 6,617 6,438 13 166 100-249 12,403 12,039 266 98 250-499

362

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the super conducting magnets on the vehicle.

He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system are disclosed comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the superconducting magnets on the vehicle. 12 figs.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Selected References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.C. Fowler, Value Analysis in Materials Selection and Design, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

367

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

368

Formation of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC(0001) using Vacuum or Argon Environments Luxmi, N. Srivastava, and R. M. Feenstra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of disilane has demonstrated improved quality of the graphene films, at least for the (0001) face of SiC (the

Feenstra, Randall

369

Lifetime Response of a Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lifetime studies in four-point flexure were performed on a Hi-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite over a temperature range of 700 degrees to 1150 degrees C in air. The composite consisted of ~40 vol. % Hi-NicalonTM fiber (8-harness weave) with a 0.5 Mu-m BN fiber coating and a melt-infiltration SiC matrix wand was tested with as-machined surfaces. Lifetime results indicated that the composite exhibited a stress-dependent lifetime at stress levels above an apparent fatigue limit, similar to the trend observed in CG-NicalonTM fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. At less than or equal to 950 degrees C, the lifetimes of Hi-Nicalon/MI SiC composites decreased with increasing applied stress level and test temperature. However, the lifetimes were extended as test temperature increased from 950 degees to 1150 degrees C as a result of surface crack sealing due to glass formation by the oxidation of Mi SiC matrix. The lifetime governing processes were, in general, attributed to the progressive oxidation of BN fiber coating and formation of glassy phase, which formed a strong bond between fiber and matrix, resulting in embrittlement of the composite with time.

Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Singh, M.

1999-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Polariton Enhanced IR Reflection Spectra of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show ~10x polariton-enhanced infrared reflectivity of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC, in SiC's restrahlen band (8-10um). By fitting measurements to theory, we extract the thickness, N, in monolayers (ML), momentum scattering time, Fermi level position of graphene and estimate carrier mobility. By showing that 1/root(ns), the carrier concentration/ML, we argue that scattering is dominated by short-range interactions at the SiC/graphene interface. Polariton formation finds application in near-field optical devices such as superlenses.

Daas, B K; Sudarshan, T S; Chandrashekhar, M V S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hydrogenated Bilayer Wurtzite SiC Nanofilms: A Two-Dimensional Bipolar Magnetic Semiconductor Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, a new kind of spintronics materials, bipolar magnetic semiconductor (BMS), has been proposed. The spin polarization of BMS can be conveniently controlled by a gate voltage, which makes it very attractive in device engineering. Now, the main challenge is finding more BMS materials. In this article, we propose that hydrogenated wurtzite SiC nanofilm is a two-dimensional BMS material. Its BMS character is very robust under the effect of strain, substrate, or even a strong electric field. The proposed two-dimensional BMS material paves the way to use this promising new material in an integrated circuit.

Yuan, Long; Yang, Jinlong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Minimum tomography of two entangled qutrits using local measurements of one-qutrit SIC-POVM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental demonstration of two-qutrit state tomography via one-qutrit symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measure (SIC-POVM) is presented. A two-qutrit state is encoded in the transversal paths of a spontaneous parametric down-converted photon pair. A spatial light modulator allows to implement the necessary 81 POVM elements to reconstruct the state. The quality of the reconstruction is evaluated by comparing independent measurements with the predicted results calculated with the reconstructed state. Entanglement in the system is calculated via negativity and generalized robustness from the two-qutrit reconstructed density operator.

W. M. Pimenta; B. Marques; T. O. Maciel; R. O. Vianna; A. Delgado; C. Saavedra; S. Pádua

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

KeV Ion Beam Induced Surface Modification of SiC Hydrogen Sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon carbide, a wide-bandgap semiconductor, is currently used to fabricate an efficient high temperature hydrogen sensor. When a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of silicon carbide, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. Rather than applying a palladium film, we have implanted palladium ions into the silicon face of 6H, n-type Sic samples. The implantation energies and fluences, as well as the results obtained by monitoring the current through the sample in the presence of hydrogen are included in this paper.

Muntele, C.I.; Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

The screening of the 11.3 micron SiC feature by carbonaceous mantles in circumstellar shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon carbide, a refractory material, condenses near the photospheres of C-rich AGB stars, giving rise to a conspicuous emission feature at 11.3 mu. In the presence of a stellar wind, the SiC grains are carried outwards to colder regions, where less refractory carbonaceous material can condense, either by itself or in mantles upon SiC grains. Enough carbon can condense on the latter that their specific feature is completely veiled. Thus may be explained a) the coexistence of the SiC feature protruding above a carbonaceous continuum, with a range of contrasts, corresponding to various volume ratios of mantle to core; b) the ultimate disappearance of the 11.3-$\\mu$m feature from the interstellar medium, where the mantle has become completely opaque due to the much higher cosmic abundance of carbon.

Papoular, Renaud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The screening of the 11.3 micron SiC feature by carbonaceous mantles in circumstellar shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon carbide, a refractory material, condenses near the photospheres of C-rich AGB stars, giving rise to a conspicuous emission feature at 11.3 mu. In the presence of a stellar wind, the SiC grains are carried outwards to colder regions, where less refractory carbonaceous material can condense, either by itself or in mantles upon SiC grains. Enough carbon can condense on the latter that their specific feature is completely veiled. Thus may be explained a) the coexistence of the SiC feature protruding above a carbonaceous continuum, with a range of contrasts, corresponding to various volume ratios of mantle to core; b) the ultimate disappearance of the 11.3-$\\mu$m feature from the interstellar medium, where the mantle has become completely opaque due to the much higher cosmic abundance of carbon.

Renaud Papoular

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

A 55 kW Three-Phase Inverter With Si IGBT s and SiC Schottky Diodes  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices are expected to have an impact on power converter efficiency, weight, volume, and reliability. Currently, only SiC Schottky diodes are commercially available at relatively low current ratings. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has collaborated with Cree and Semikron to build a Si insulated-gate bipolar transistor-SiC Schottky diode hybrid 55-kW inverter by replacing the Si p-n diodes in Semikron's automotive inverter with Cree's made-to-order higher current SiC Schottky diodes. This paper presents the developed models of these diodes for circuit simulators, shows inverter test results, and compares the results with those of a similar all-Si inverter.

Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Kashyap, Avinash S [ORNL; Mantooth, Homer A [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A 55-kW Three-Phase Inverter with Si IGBTs and SiC Schottky Diodes  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices are expected to have an impact on power converter efficiency, weight, volume, and reliability. Currently, only SiC Schottky diodes are commercially available at relatively low current ratings. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has collaborated with Cree and Semikron to build a Si insulated-gate bipolar transistor-SiC Schottky diode hybrid 55-kW inverter by replacing the Si p-n diodes in Semikron's automotive inverter with Cree's made-to-order higher current SiC Schottky diodes. This paper presents the developed models of these diodes for circuit simulators, shows inverter test results, and compares the results with those of a similar all-Si inverter.

Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Mantooth, Homer A [ORNL; Kashyap, Avinash S [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

KINETICS AND VOLATILIZATION OF SiC AND SiO2: IMPLICATIONS FOR METAMORPHISM OF UNEQUILIBRATED ORDINARY CHONDRITES; R.A. Mendybaev1,3, J.R. Beckett3, L. Grossman1,2, and E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KINETICS AND VOLATILIZATION OF SiC AND SiO2: IMPLICATIONS FOR METAMORPHISM OF UNEQUILIBRATED the possibility of a more direct indicator based on the observation [1, 2] that abundances of diamond and SiC of volatilization experiments to lay the groundwork necessary to understand the processes by which SiC is destroyed

Grossman, Lawrence

379

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

380

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Final_Updated.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Future Challenges Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nathan Rowe Chris Pickett Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Users Annual Training Meeting May 20-23, 2013 St. Louis, Missouri 2 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Introduction * Changing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities * Nuclear Security Challenges * How to Respond? - Additional Protocol - State-Level Concept - Continuity of Knowledge * Conclusion 3 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Fuel Cycle Source: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Weapons Cycle Conversion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis shows that the station electric distribution system has the capacity and capability to supply voltage to the Class 1E equipment with their design ratings for the worst case loading condition.

Selan, J.C.

1981-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Placing the Sun in Galactic Chemical Evolution: Mainstream SiC Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the consequences and implications of the possibility that the best-fit $m$=4/3 line of the silicon isotopic ratios measured in mainstream SiC grains is identical or parallel to to the mean ISM evolution line of the silicon isotopes. Even though the mean ISM evolution proceeds along a line of unity slope when deviations are expressed in terms of the native representation (the mean ISM), the evolution line can become a slope 4/3 line in the solar representation, provided that the solar composition is displaced from the mean ISM evolution. During the course of this analysis, we introduce new methods for relating the solar composition to that of the mean ISM at the time of solar birth. These new developments offer a unique view on the meaning of the mainstream SiC particles, and affords a new way of quantitatively answering the question whether the sun has a special composition relative to the mean ISM at solar birth. If the correlation slope of the silicon isotopes in the mean ISM could be decisively established, then its value would quantify the difference between the solar and mean ISM silicon abundances. Our formalism details the transformations between the two representations, and applies not only to $^{29}$Si and $^{30}$Si, but to any two purely secondary isotopes of any element (O, Ne, Mg, and perhaps S). Both the advantages and disadvantages of this technique are critically reviewed.

F. X. Timmes; D. D. Clayton

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Author Select  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Author Select Last Name First Name search Type in a name, or the first few letters of a name, in one or both of appropriate search boxes above and select "Go". An attempt will be...

384

Vickers microindentation toughness of a sintered SiC in the median-crack regime  

SciTech Connect

The Vickers microindentation method for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics was investigated in the median crack regime for a sintered alpha SiC. The results are compared with fracture toughness measurements by conventional fracture mechanics technique and also with the reported indentation toughness for the low-load Palmqvist crack regime. Indentation toughnesses in the median crack regime vary widely depending on the choice of the specific equation which is applied. The indentation toughnesses are also load (crack length) dependent. A decreasing R-curve trend results, in contradiction to the flat R-curve that has been observed with conventional fracture mechanics techniques. It is concluded that the Vickers microindentation method is not a reliable technique for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics in the median crack regime.

Ghosh, Asish; Kobayashi, A.S. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Engineering); Li, Zhuang (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Henager, C.H. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Bradt, R.C. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Representation of quantum states as points in a probability simplex associated to a SIC-POVM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum state of a $d$-dimensional system can be represented by the $d^2$ probabilities corresponding to a SIC-POVM, and then this distribution of probability can be represented by a vector of $\\R^{d^2-1}$ in a simplex, we will call this set of vectors $\\mathcal{Q}$. Other way of represent a $d$-dimensional system is by the corresponding Bloch vector also in $\\R^{d^2-1}$, we will call this set of vectors $\\mathcal{B}$. In this paper it is proved that with the adequate scaling $\\mathcal{B}=\\mathcal{Q}$. Also we indicate some features of the shape of $\\mathcal{Q}$.

Jose Ignacio Rosado

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Investigation on the Parallel Operation of Discrete SiC BJTs and JFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of single discrete silicon carbide (SiC) JFET and BJT devices and their parallel operation. The static and dynamic characteristics of the devices were obtained over a wide range of temperature to study the scaling of device parameters. The static parameters like on-resistance, threshold voltage, current gains, transconductance, and leakage currents were extracted to show how these parameters would scale as the devices are paralleled. A detailed analysis of the dynamic current sharing between the paralleled devices during the switching transients and energy losses at different voltages and currents is also presented. The effect of the gate driver on the device transient behavior of the paralleled devices was studied, and it was shown that faster switching speeds of the devices could cause mismatches in current shared during transients.

Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Ning, Puqi [ORNL; Cui, Yutian [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Uncertainty relations for MUBs and SIC-POVMs in terms of generalized entropies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate novel uncertainty relations for mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete measurements in terms of the R\\'{e}nyi and Tsallis entropies. For arbitrary number of mutually unbiased bases in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, a family of Tsallis $\\alpha$-entropic bounds is derived for $\\alpha\\in(0;2]$. In terms of R\\'{e}nyi's entropies, lower bounds are given for $\\alpha\\in[2;\\infty)$. State-dependent and state-independent forms of such bounds are both given. Uncertainty relations in terms of the min-entropy are separately considered. We also obtain lower bounds in term of the so-called symmetrized entropies. The presented results for mutually unbiased bases are extensions of various entropic bounds previously derived in the literature. We further formulate new properties and relations for symmetric informationally complete measurements in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. For a given density matrix and arbitrary SIC-POVM, the so-called index of coincidence of generated probability distribution is exactly calculated. Using this result, we obtain state-dependent entropic uncertainty relations for a single SIC-POVM. Lower entropic bounds are derived in terms of the R\\'{e}nyi $\\alpha$-entropies for $\\alpha\\in[2;\\infty)$ and the Tsallis $\\alpha$-entropies for $\\alpha\\in(0;2]$. Uncertainty relations in terms of the min-entropy are also discussed. For a pair of symmetric informationally complete measurements, we further obtain an entropic bound of Maassen-Uffink type. Both the state-dependent and state-independent formulations are briefly discussed.

Alexey E. Rastegin

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Properties of the extended Clifford group with applications to SIC-POVMs and MUBs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a version of the extended Clifford Group which is defined in terms of a finite Galois field in odd prime power dimension. We show that Neuhauser's result, that with the appropriate choice of phases the standard (or metaplectic) representation of the discrete symplectic group is faithful also holds for the anti-unitary operators of the extended group. We also improve on Neuhauser's result by giving explicit formulae for the (anti-)unitary corresponding to an arbitrary (anti-)symplectic matrix. We then go on to find the eigenvalues and the order of an arbitrary (anti-)symplectic matrix. The fact that in prime power dimension the matrix elements belong to a field means that this can be done using the same techniques which are used to find the eigenvalues of a matrix defined over the reals-including the use of an extension field (the analogue of the complex numbers) when the eigenvalues are not in the base field. We then give an application of these results to SIC-POVMs (symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures). We show that in prime dimension our results can be used to find a natural basis for the eigenspace of the Zauner unitary in which SIC-fiducials are expected to lie. Finally, we apply our results to the MUB cycling problem. We show that in odd prime power dimension d, although there is no Clifford unitary, there is a Clifford anti-unitary which cycles through the full set of Wootters-Fields MUBs if d=3 (mod 4). Also, irrespective of whether d=1 or 3 (mod 4), the Wootters-Fields MUBs split into two groups of (d+1)/2 bases in such a way that there is a single Clifford unitary which cycles through each group separately.

D. M. Appleby

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

390

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

391

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

392

Table A23. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" 3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ,," -------------------------",," -------------------------",," ---------------------------------------",,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

393

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel Purposes by" Nonfuel Purposes by" " Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000 ","Other(d)","Row"

394

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

395

"Table A17. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," 7. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.4,1.2

396

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

397

Electrical Energy Conservation Analyses of the Wood Products (SIC24) Industry in the BPA Service Sistrict : Mill Summary Report : Champion International Corporation, Roseburg, Oregon.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the partial results of a study conducted by Trans Energy Systems Industrial Division of URS Company for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under contract AC79-84BP18946. The objective of this effort was an electrical energy conservation analysis of the Wood Products Industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 24) in the BPA service district. The analysis was conducted by selecting five representative mills in the BPA service area and performing electrical energy conservation surveys and analyses of these mills. This report presents the results of data gathering and analysis at the Champion International Corporation plywood mill in Roseburg, Oregon, which produces exterior, interior, sanded and tongue and groove/shiplap softwood plywood. The plant produces 170 million square feet of 3/8-inch basis plywood annually. Species processed include Douglas fir and hemlock. This report summarizes the mill data collected, the technical and economic analyses performed, the strategy used in ranking the individual electrical energy conservation opportunities found in each mill, the recommended energy conservation measures (ECM), the projected cost benefits of each ECM and the estimated impacts of each ECM on plant production and operation.

TransEnergy Systems, Inc.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ROW BY ROW METHODS FOR SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 28, 2009 ... Research supported in part by NSF Grant DMS. 06-06712, ONR Grant N00014- 08-1-1118 and DOE Grant DE-FG02-08ER58562. 1 ...

399

SiC MOSFETs with thermally oxidized Ta2Si stacked on SiO2 as high-k gate insulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare the electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors and lateral MOSFETs with oxidized Ta"2Si (O-Ta"2Si) as a high-k dielectric on silicon carbide or stacked on thermally grown SiO"2 on SiC. MOS capacitors are used to determine ... Keywords: High-k dielectric, MOSFET, Oxidation, SiC, Ta2Si, Tantalum silicide

A. Pérez-Tomás; M. R. Jennings; P. M. Gammon; G. J. Roberts; P. A. Mawby; J. Millán; P. Godignon; J. Montserrat; N. Mestres

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Power Transistors: 15 kV SiC IGBT Power Modules for Grid Scale Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Cree is developing silicon carbide (SiC) power transistors that are 50% more energy efficient than traditional transistors. Transistors act like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon semiconductors to conduct electricity. However, transistors with SiC semiconductors operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than their silicon counterparts. SiC-based transistors are also smaller and require less cooling than those made with traditional silicon power technology. Cree's SiC transistors will enable electrical circuits to handle higher power levels more efficiently, and they will result in much smaller and lighter electrical devices and power converters. Cree, an established leader in SiC technology, has already released a commercially available SiC transistor that can operate at up to 1,200 volts. The company has also demonstrated a utility-scale SiC transistor that operates at up to 15,000 volts.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solid-State Lighting Issue 10: Selected Business & Technology News (July -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS 0: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (July - Mid-October, 2001) A selection of news appears in this section. Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News · BCC to issue market research report on compound semiconductors in December. · Cermet and Isonics to jointly develop pure zinc-64 oxides for blue LED substrates. · Color Kinetics among fastest growing companies in New England. · Color Kinetics issued patent on intelligent power technology. · Cree introduces first UV LED (InGaN on SiC) for illumination market (405/395 nm versions). · Cree introduces 3-inch off-axis n-type SiC wafers.

402

" and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," 3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " "," ","Pulping Liquor",," ","Wood Harvested","and Byproducts","and","RSE" "SIC"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Directly","from","Paper-Related","Row"

403

Optical investigations techniques used for stacking faults characterization in SiC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stacking Faults (SFs) are important crystal defects in 4H-SiC [1]. They can be electrically active and, in this case, behave as deep quantum well (QW) traps for electrons [2]. This leads to the degradation of high voltage bipolar diodes [3]. The basic origin of SFs in SiC is the small total energy difference between two different polytypes. The net consequence is that they can appear spontaneously, during the growth or after any mechanical or electrically stress. In 4H or 6H-SiC they manifest as a stable lamella of a different polytype, in most cases 3C-SiC [1, 4-5]. 8H-SiC has also been identified [6] but, mainly, for in-grown SFs in 4H-SiC. Whatever is the faulted polytype, a SF is always associated with a finite thickness and a finite lateral extension in the basal plane. Since the faulted polytype has a smaller bandgap than the one of the host material, they behave like thin natural type-II quantum wells (QWs) embedded in the 4H-SiC matrix. The binding mechanism comes from the difference in intrinsic band offsets and (internal) lattice polarization between the well and barriers [1, 6]. The difference in internal polarization not only participates in the binding mechanism, it also induces an

S. Juillaguet; T. Robert; J. Camassel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mechanical characteristics of SiC coating layer in TRISO fuel particles  

SciTech Connect

Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles are considered as advanced fuel forms for a variety of fission platforms. While these fuel structures have been tested and deployed in reactors, the mechanical properties of these structures as a function of production parameters need to be investigated in order to ensure their reliability during service. Nanoindentation techniques, indentation crack testing, and half sphere crush testing were utilized in order to evaluate the integrity of the SiC coating layer that is meant to prevent fission product release in the coated particle fuel form. The results are complimented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the grain structure that is subject to change as a function of processing parameters and can alter the mechanical properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness and fracture strength. Through utilization of these advanced techniques, subtle differences in mechanical properties that can be important for in-pile fuel performance can be distinguished and optimized in iteration with processing science of coated fuel particle production.

Hosemann, Peter [ORNL] [ORNL; Martos, J. N. [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Frazer, D. [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul [ORNL] [ORNL; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL] [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Okuniewski, Maria A. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Irradiation of SiC Clad Fuel Rods in the HFIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2009 and- 2010, new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was developed that allows testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding under prototypic light-water-reactor (LWR) operating conditions (i.e., cladding and fuel temperatures, fuel average linear heat generation rates, and cladding fluence). For the initial experiments for this test program, ORNL teamed with commercial fuel/cladding vendors who have developed an advanced composite-wound SiC cladding material for possible use in LWRs. The first experiment, containing SiC-clad UN fuel, was inserted in HFIR in June 2010, and the second experiment, containing SiC-clad UO2 fuel, was inserted in October 2010. Two capsules (one containing UN fuel and the other UO2) were withdrawn from their respective assemblies in November 2011 at an estimated fuel burnup of approximately 10 GWd/MTHM; and two capsules (one containing UN fuel and the other UO2) were withdrawn from their respective assemblies in February 2013 at an estimated fuel burnup of approximately 20 GWd/MTHM. These capsules are currently awaiting PIE. This paper will describe the experiment, as-run operating conditions for these capsules, and current PIE plans and status.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Electrical resistance measurements of highly inhibited SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of oxidation damage at 900'C of highly inhibited, SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates on shear modulus, mass loss, and electrical resistance are studied. The approach taken enabled the interpretation of the shear modulus and electrical resistance values to the mass loss. In-situ electrical resistance measurements are taken at 900'C and shear modulus measurements are obtained at room temperature prior to and following oxidation. Initial oxidation damage is incurred preferentially along both transverse and longitudinal fiber bundles as well as creating some matrix cracks. Mass loss results revealed that the oxidation reaction is diffusion controlled at this temperature. The shear modulus decreased whereas the electrical resistance increased with increasing exposure time. Electrical resistance calculations based on the experimental results showed that the electrical resistance is a matrix dominated property. The analytical simulations used in conjunction with experimental data provided the relationships between shear modulus, electrical resistance, and mass loss. Examples are given which show the correlation of mass loss to both the electrical resistance and the shear modulus. Analytical predictions from the electrical resistance simulations are shown to predict the shear modulus for different oxidation times within 5% of experimental values.

Parker, Paul Albert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reactive Separations via a Hydrothermally Stable Hydrogen Selective Membrane. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this SBIR Phase I program, we have successfully completed the fabrication of SiC-based hydrogen selective membranes suitable for use as a membrane reactor for steam-methane reforming applications. Hydrothermal stability was performed for selected membrane to demonstrate their stability for appx. 50 hours under the proposed reforming condition. In addition, several mechanistic study was conducted to elucidate the SiC membrane formation mechanism. This understanding will facilitate membrane optimization work to be proposed for the Phase II study. The reaction study was postponed to the Phase II study.

Ciora, R. J.; Liu, P. KT.

2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Creep performance of candidate SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials for land-based, gas turbine engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tensile creep-rupture of a commercial gas pressure sintered Si3N4 and a sintered SiC is examined at 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. These 2 ceramics are candidates for nozzles and combustor tiles that are to be retrofitted in land-based gas turbine engines, and there is interest in their high temperature performance over service times {ge} 10,000 h (14 months). For this long lifetime, a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038/1150 C and 125 Mpa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded for Si3N4; for SiC, the corresponding numbers are 300 Mpa at 1038 C, 250 MPa at 1150 C, and 180 MPa at 1350 C. Creep-stress exponents for Si3N4 are 33, 17, and 8 for 1038, 1150, 1350 C; fatigue- stress exponents are equivalent to creep exponents, suggesting that the fatigue mechanism causing fracture is related to the creep mechanism. Little success was obtained in producing failure in SiC after several decades of time through exposure to appropriate tensile stress; if failure did not occur on loading, then the SiC specimens most often did not creep-rupture. Creep-stress exponents for the SiC were determined to be 57, 27, and 11 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. For SiC, the fatigue-stress exponents did not correlate as well with creep-stress exponents. Failures that occurred in the SiC were a result of slow crack growth that initiated from the surface.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Select Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dosanjh » Select Dosanjh » Select Publications Select Publications Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux, X. Sharon Hu, Justin Luitjens, Steven G. Parker, John Shalf, Li Tang, "On the Role of Co-design in High Performance Computing", Transition of HPC Towards Exascale Computing, E.H. D'Hollander et. al (Eds.), IOS Press, 2013, ( November 1, 2013) Download File: Codesign-Paper.pdf (pdf: 867 KB) Rolf Riesen, Sudip Dosanjh, Larry Kaplan, "The ExaChallenge Symposium", IBM Research Paper, August 26, 2013, Download File: ExaChallenge2012.pdf (pdf: 1.4 MB) S. Dosanjh, R. Barrett, D. Doerfler, S. Hammond, K. Hemmert, M. Heroux, P. Lin, K. Pedretti, A. Rodrigues, T. Trucano, J.Juitjens, "Exascale Design

410

FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Formation of SiC Grains in Pulsation-Enhanced Dust-Driven Wind Around Carbon Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (C-rich AGB) stars in order to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process; one is the LTE case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters $T_{\\rm v}$ is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which $T_{\\rm v}$ is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass $M_{\\ast}$=1.0 $M_{\\odot}$, luminosity $L_{\\ast}$=10$^{4}$ $L_{\\odot}$, effective temperature $T_{\\rm eff}$=2600 K, C/O ratio=1.4, and pulsation period $P$=650 days show the followings: In the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of $\\sim$ 10$^{-8}$ is too small to reproduce the ...

Yasuda, Yuki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Tungsten isotopic compositions in stardust SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite: Constraints on the s-process in the Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes 182W, 183W, 184W, 186W and 179Hf, 180Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (=solar) composition in the 182W/184W and 183W/184W ratios, with deficits in 182W and 183W with respect to 184W. The 186W/184W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar 182W/184W, 183W/184W, and 186W/184W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match...

Ávila, J N; Ireland, T R; Gyngard, F; Zinner, E; Cristallo, S; Holden, P; Buntain, J; Amari, S; Karakas, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

414

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

415

Table A39. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type, Census" " Region, and End Use, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding","RSE" ,"for","Residual","and",,,"Coal Coke","Row" "End-Use Categories","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6

416

Table A13. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 3. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type," " Census Region, Census Division, and End Use, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" ,"Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row"

417

Could SiC A+B grains have originated in a post-AGB thermal pulse?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios of pre-solar SiC grains of type A+B suggest a proton-limited nucleosynthetic process as encountered, for instance, during the very late thermal pulse of post-AGB stars. We study the nuclear processes during this phase and find carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios which can reproduce those of A+B grains. These results are still preliminary because they depend on uncertain factors such as the details of mixing during the post-AGB thermal pulse, the rates of some nuclear reactions, and the assumptions on mixing during the progenitor AGB phase.

Falk Herwig; Sachiko Amari; Maria Lugaro; Ernst Zinner

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Conventional Boiler Use",3199,12,4,1271,2,11,5.6 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",3515,8,2,834,"*",23,3.8 "Direct Uses-Total Process",768929,10,7,2907,16,17...

419

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel",12979,7,3,2074,3,26 " Conventional Boiler Use",12979,3,1,712,1,3 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process","--",4,3,1362,2,23 "Direct Uses-Total Process",675152,4,9,2549,7,13 "...

420

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l",84,133,23,2119,8,547 " Conventional Boiler Use",84,71,17,1281,8,129 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",0,62,6,838,1,417 "Direct Uses-Total Process",2639,62,52,2788,39,412 "...

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421

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Only","Other than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

422

TUNGSTEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM THE MURCHISON METEORITE: CONSTRAINTS ON THE s-PROCESS IN THE Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os REGION  

SciTech Connect

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes {sup 182,183,184,186}W and {sup 179,180}Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (= solar) composition in the {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W ratios, with deficits in {sup 182}W and {sup 183}W with respect to {sup 184}W. The {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match the SiC data regarding their {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 179}Hf/{sup 180}Hf isotopic compositions, although a small adjustment in the s-process production of {sup 183}W is needed in order to have a better agreement between the SiC data and model predictions. The models cannot explain the {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios observed in the SiC grains, even when the current {sup 185}W neutron-capture cross section is increased by a factor of two. Further study is required to better assess how model uncertainties (e.g., the formation of the {sup 13}C neutron source, the mass-loss law, the modeling of the third dredge-up, and the efficiency of the {sup 22}Ne neutron source) may affect current s-process predictions.

Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria; Buntain, Joelene [Centre for Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Amari, Sachiko [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Karakas, Amanda, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

424

Surface characterization and manipulation of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC powders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thorough characterization of some commercially available Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC powders is undertaken. Physical characteristics, such as state of agglomeration, particle size, are determined by means of scanning electron microscopy and high voltage electron microscopy. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the existence of a 5 to 15 nm thick amorphous surface layer present on both types of powders. The surface layer chemical composition was determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, the data indicate the existence of a range of silicon oxynitrides Si/sub x/N/sub y/O/sub z/. For SiC, the 'oxide layer' has a composition very close to SiO/sub 2/. In order to eliminate the surface oxide, two chemical treatments were carried out. Both of them were effective, but the oxide layer was never completely reduced. The HF-treatments caused the formation. This work insists on the need for cleaner processing procedures, since native oxide layers are extremely difficult to eliminate and have damaging effects on either sintering kinetics or high temperature mechanical properties.

Boiteux, Y.P.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Auger line shape and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis of amorphous, microcrystalline, and. beta. -SiC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) line shape analysis of the Si-{ital L}{sub 23}{ital VV} and C-{ital KLL} peaks has been performed in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) on Hg-sensitized photodeposited amorphous and microcyrstalline SiC films. Mixtures of SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3} and SiH{sub 4}/(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SiH{sub 2} with helium or hydrogen dilution were used for the depositions. AES line shape and EELS analyses were also performed on {beta}-SiC for comparison. Quantitative bulk compositional analysis to determine the Si and C concentrations in these films was performed with an electron microprobe (EMPA) using x-ray wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). AES and EELS results reveal the predominant Si--C bonding and relative crystallinity in the films as a function of deposition parameters, which includes the gas mixture, pressure, and H{sub 2}/He dilution. These parameters determine the H radical flux during growth, which leads to changes in the film structure.

Nelson, A.J.; Mason, A.R.; Swartzlander, A.B.; Kazmerski, L.L. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, CO (USA)); Saxena, N.; Fortmann, C.M.; Russell, T.W.F. (Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Europium s-process signature at close-to-solar metallicity in stardust SiC grains from AGB stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe - Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP-RG) for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of 1.5 to 3 Msun carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The 151Eu fractions [fr(151Eu) = 151Eu/(151Eu+153Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr(151Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr(151Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. B...

Avila, Janaina N; Lugaro, Maria; Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Cristallo, Sergio; Holden, Peter; Rauscher, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

DEVELOPMENT OF SiC DEVICES FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND CONTROL OF COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN ENERGY PLANT ENVIRONMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. The response of these metal/insulator/SiC (MISiC) devices to reducing gases has been assumed to be due to the reduction in the metal work function at the metal/oxide interface that shifts the capacitance to lower voltages. From in-situ capacitance-voltage measurements taken under sensor operating conditions we have discovered that two independent mechanisms are responsible for the sensor response to hydrogen and oxygen. We present a model of the device response based on the chemically induced shift of the metal/semiconductor barrier height as well as the passivation and creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. The latter mechanism is much slower than the barrier height shift. Preliminary photoemission experiments have been performed to independently monitor the contribution of the two phenomena. We discuss in detail the effect of these results on sensor design and the choice of operating point for high temperature operation.

Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Gate-Recessed InAlN/GaN HEMTs on SiC Substrate With Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] Passivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied submicrometer (L[subscript G] = 0.15-0.25 à ¿m) gate-recessed InAlN/AlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on SiC substrates with 25-nm Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] passivation. The combination of ...

Guo, Shiping

429

On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

912 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 47, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL 2011 Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and weight and the vehicle's fuel economy. Two types of HEVs are considered. One is the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV Prius HEV. The vehicle-level benefits from the introduction of SiC devices are demonstrated://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TIA.2010.2102734 Fig. 1. Powertrain architecture of 2004 Toyota Prius

Tolbert, Leon M.

431

Formation of Graphene on SiC( 1000 ) Surfaces in Disilane and Neon Environments Guowei He, N. Srivastava, R. M. Feenstra*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Formation of Graphene on SiC( 1000 ) Surfaces in Disilane and Neon Environments Guowei He, N, utilizing both disilane and neon environments. In both cases, the interface between the graphene and the Si. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 30, 04E102 (2012). #12;2 either disilane11 at a pressure of 10-4 Torr

Feenstra, Randall

432

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

433

Creep performance of candidate SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials for land-based, gas turbine engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tensile creep-rupture performance of a commercially available gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and a sintered silicon carbide (SiC) is examined at 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. These two ceramic materials are candidates for nozzles and combustor tiles that are to be retrofitted in land-based gas turbine engines, and interest exists to investigate their high-temperature mechanical performance over service times up to, and in excess of, 10,000 hours ({approx}14 months). To achieve lifetimes approaching 10,000 hours for the candidate Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic, it was found (or it was estimated based on ongoing test data) that a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038 and 1150 C, and a stress of 125 MPa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded. For the SiC ceramic, it was estimated from ongoing test data that a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038 C, 250 MPa at 1150 C, and 180 MPa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded. The creep-stress exponents for this Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were determined to be 33, 17, and 8 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C, respectively. The fatigue-stress exponents for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were found to be equivalent to the creep exponents, suggesting that the fatigue mechanism that ultimately causes fracture is controlled and related to the creep mechanisms. Little success was experienced at generating failures in the SiC after several decades of time through exposure to appropriate tensile stress; it was typically observed that if failure did not occur on loading, then the SiC specimens most often did not creep-rupture. However, creep-stress exponents for the SiC were determined to be 57, 27, and 11 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C, respectively. For SiC, the fatigue-stress exponents did not correlate as well with creep-stress exponents. Failures that occurred in the SiC were a result of slow crack growth that was initiated from the specimen`s surface.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EUROPIUM s-PROCESS SIGNATURE AT CLOSE-TO-SOLAR METALLICITY IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS  

SciTech Connect

Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of {approx}1.5-3 M{sub Sun} carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The {sup 151}Eu fractions [fr({sup 151}Eu) = {sup 151}Eu/({sup 151}Eu+{sup 153}Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. Because of the low Eu abundances in the SiC grains, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements show large uncertainties, in most cases being larger than the difference between solar and predicted fr({sup 151}Eu) values. The SiC aggregate yields a fr({sup 151}Eu) value within the range observed in the single grains and provides a more precise result (fr({sup 151}Eu) = 0.54 {+-} 0.03, 95% conf.), but is approximately 12% higher than current s-process predictions. The AGB models can match the SiC data if we use an improved formalism to evaluate the contribution of excited nuclear states in the calculation of the {sup 151}Sm(n, {gamma}) stellar reaction rate.

Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, via Maggini snc, Teramo I-64100 (Italy); Rauscher, Thomas, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Joining of SiC Fiber-Bonded Ceramics using Silver, Copper, Nickel, Palladium, and Silicon-Based Alloy Interlayers  

SciTech Connect

SiC fiber-bonded ceramics, SA-Tyrannohex, (SA-THX) with perpendicular and parallel fiber orientations were brazed using Ag-, Ni- and Pd-base brazes, and four Si X (X: Ti, Cr, Y, Ta) eutectics. Outcomes were variable, ranging from bonded joints through partially bonded to un-bonded joints. Prominent Ti- and Si-rich interfaces developed with Cusil-ABA, Ticusil, and Copper-ABA and Ni- and Si-rich layers with MBF-20. Stress rupture tests at 650 and 750 C on Cusil-ABA-bonded joints revealed a temperature-dependent behavior for the perpendicular joints but not for the parallel joints with failure occurring at brazed interface. Higher-use temperatures can be targeted with eutectic Si Ti and Si Cr alloys.

Asthana, Rajiv [University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie; Singh, Mrityunjay [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Matsunaga, Kenji [Ube Industries, Ltd.; Ishikawa, Toshihiro [Ube Industries, Ltd.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ASNOM mapping of SiC epi-layer doping profile and of surface phonon polariton waveguiding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The apertureless SNOM mapping of the slightly-doped 4H-SiC epitaxial layer grown on a heavily-doped 4H-SiC substrate was performed with a cleaved edge geometry. ASNOM images taken at the light frequencies of a $C^{13}O_{2}^{16}$ laser show a clear contrast between the substrate and the epitaxial layer. The contrast vanishes at the laser frequency of $884cm^{-1}$, and gets clearer at higher frequencies $(923cm^{-1})$. This can be explained by changes in the local polarizability of SiC caused by the carrier concentration, which are more pronounced at higher frequencies. Since the light frequency is tuned up further ($935cm^{-1}$), a transversal mode structure appears in the ASNOM map, indicating a waveguide-like confinement of a surface phonon polariton wave inside the strip of an epi-layer outcrop.

Kazantsev, Dmitry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

/select/modify/life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, /select/modify/life, OOF home. Prev, ... select/modify/life. /select ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Billion Cubic Feet) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Natural Gas Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

439

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Thousand Short Tons) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Coal Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

440

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Residual Fuel Oil Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Estimates in Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry LPG Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

442

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Distillate Fuel Oil Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

443

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kilowatthours) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Electricity Receipts Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Receipts c Switchable Not Switchable Natural Gas...

444

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

445

Etching characteristics and mechanisms of SiC thin films in inductively-coupled HBr-Ar, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Etch characteristics and mechanisms of SiC thin films in HBr-Ar, HBr-N{sub 2}, and HBr-O{sub 2} inductively-coupled plasmas were studied using a combination of experimental and modeling methods. The etch rates of SiC thin films were measured as functions of the additive gas fraction in the range of 0-100% for Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} at a fixed gas pressure (6 mTorr), input power (700 W), bias power (200 W), and total gas flow rate (40 sccm). The plasma chemistry was analyzed using Langmuir probe diagnostics and a global (zero-dimensional) plasma model. The good agreement between the behaviors of the SiC etch rate and the H atom flux could suggest that a chemical etch pathway is rather controlled by the gasification of carbon through the CH{sub x} or CH{sub x}Br{sub y} compounds.

Efremov, Alexander; Kang, Sungchil; Kwon, Kwang-Ho; Seok Choi, Won [Department of Electronic Devices and Materials Technology, State University of Chemistry and Technology, 7 F. Engels St., 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

" by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" 3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (kWh)",," (million Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

447

"Table A7. Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace" Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace" " by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994" ,,"Approximate",,"Average" ,,"Enclosed",,"Enclosed"," Conditioned(c) Floorspace" ,,"Floorspace of All",,"Floorspace per"," of All Buildings Onsite",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Buildings Onsite","Establishments(b)","Establishment",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million sq ft)","(counts)","(1000 sq ft)","(million sq ft)","(percents)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

448

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "

449

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

450

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

451

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

452

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

453

"Table A38. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" 8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

454

"Table A46. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-","RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"

455

"Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

456

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

457

"Table A27. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.6,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",6962,6754,90,118,11.2

458

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

459

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

460

Effect of gaseous corrosion on the strength of SiC and Si sub 3 N sub 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of gaseous corrosion on the room-temperature flexural strength of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were investigated. Sintered {alpha}-SiC and hot-pressed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to flowing H{sub 2} or Ar at 1400{degrees}C for 10 h. The explored variables, water vapor pressure in the H{sub 2} or oxygen partial pressure in the Ar, were found to significantly affect the corrosion of these materials. Reductions in room-temperature strength were observed when weight loss resulted from active oxidation, except for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} exposed in Ar containing O{sub 2}. Large pits that formed during exposure were responsible for the strength reductions. When the P{sub H{sub 2}O} in H{sub 2} or P{sub O{sub 2}} in Ar was high enough to form a thin oxide layer on the sample surface, the observed strength increased, ultimately to values greater than that of the as-polished material. However, under conditions in which a much thicker oxide layer was formed, the strengths were unaffected or decreased slightly, the latter being attributed to the generation of new flaws such as bubbles or cracks in the oxide layer. 34 refs., 8 figs.

Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electronic structure and the local electroneutrality level of SiC polytypes from quasiparticle calculations within the GW approximation  

SciTech Connect

The most important interband transitions and the local charge neutrality level (CNL) in silicon carbide polytypes 3C-SiC and nH-SiC (n = 2-8) are calculated using the GW approximation for the self energy of quasiparticles. The calculated values of band gap E{sub g} for various polytypes fall in the range 2.38 eV (3C-SiC)-3.33 eV (2H-SiC) and are very close to the experimental data (2.42-3.33 eV). The quasiparticle corrections to E{sub g} determined by DFT-LDA calculations (about 1.1 eV) are almost independent of the crystal structure of a polytype. The positions of CNL in various polytypes are found to be almost the same, and the change in CNL correlates weakly with the change in E{sub g}, which increases with the hexagonality of SiC. The calculated value of CNL varies from 1.74 eV in polytype 3C-SiC to 1.81 eV in 4H-SiC.

Brudnyi, V. N., E-mail: brudnyi@mail.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Kosobutsky, A. V. [Kemerovo State University (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Source Selection Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide More Documents & Publications Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection...

463

Source Selection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Source SelectionSource Selection Boards Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Monthly Status Reporting Requirement (pdf) Source Evaluation Board (SEB)...

464

Strength and corrosion behavior of a SiC particulate reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite in hot coal combustion environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, a SiC particulate reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale caombustors. Results show increased corrosive attack with temperature and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

Breder, K.; Parten, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Canon, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report. [SiC, SiN, whisker-reinforced SiN, ZrO-toughened aluminas, zirconias, joints  

SciTech Connect

Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solar selective coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The definition, fabrication, and specification of solar selective absorber surfaces are discussed. Also, the nature of solar radiation and thermal radiation in relation to selective surfaces is considered. (WHK)

Mattox, D. M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Effects of pressure, temperature, and hydrogen during graphene growth on SiC(0001) using propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Graphene growth from a propane flow in a hydrogen environment (propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD)) on SiC differentiates from other growth methods in that it offers the possibility to obtain various graphene structures on the Si-face depending on growth conditions. The different structures include the (6{radical}3 Multiplication-Sign 6{radical}3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstruction of the graphene/SiC interface, which is commonly observed on the Si-face, but also the rotational disorder which is generally observed on the C-face. In this work, growth mechanisms leading to the formation of the different structures are studied and discussed. For that purpose, we have grown graphene on SiC(0001) (Si-face) using propane-hydrogen CVD at various pressure and temperature and studied these samples extensively by means of low energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Pressure and temperature conditions leading to the formation of the different structures are identified and plotted in a pressure-temperature diagram. This diagram, together with other characterizations (X-ray photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy), is the basis of further discussions on the carbon supply mechanisms and on the kinetics effects. The entire work underlines the important role of hydrogen during growth and its effects on the final graphene structure.

Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Roudon, E.; Lefebvre, D.; Portail, M. [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)] [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T. [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)] [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Solid-State Lighting Issue 15: Selected Business & Technology News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/2002 9/2002 | Table of Contents | Abstracts | Credit and Disclaimer | ISSUE 15: BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS (September - November 2002) A selection of news appears in this section. A. Developer News B. New Products C. Research Results D. Government Activities and Funding News E. Overview Articles Where possible, links to full-text articles and press releases have been included in the abstracts. Click on the links in the table below to go directly to the abstract. Table of Contents: Business and Technology News A. Developer News · Amtech Lighting Services will provide LED traffic signals for City of Dallas, TX. · ATMI received a $9.46 million ONR grant to develop AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on 4-inch GaN and SiC substrates, part of DARPA’s Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Technology Initiative.

470

Salt Selected (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive

471

A second row Parking Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider two variations of the discrete car parking problem where at every vertex of the integers a car arrives with rate one, now allowing for parking in two lines. a) The car parks in the first line whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. It can reach the first line if it is not obstructed by cars already parked in the second line (screening). b) The car parks according to the same rules, but parking in the first line can not be obstructed by parked cars in the second line (no screening). In both models, a car that can not park in the first line will attempt to park in the second line. If it is obstructed in the second line as well, the attempt is discarded. We show that both models are solvable in terms of finite-dimensional ODEs. We compare numerically the limits of first and second line densities, with time going to infinity. While it is not surprising that model a) exhibits an increase of the density in the second line from the first line, more remarkably this is also true for model b), albeit in a less pronounced way.

S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

472

RISQ - Query Selection Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure 2 - RISQ Search. ... Selected Taxonomy Terms. Threat Analysis. ... To define a custom keyword: Enter the keyword in text form in the box to the left. ...

473

2008 present Publications (selection)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mathias Wegner, Kiel Professor Stefan Michel, Lausanne Patent applications (selection) Media Cosmopolitan http://scentoflove.com/i/file/media/cosmopolitan_0710.pdf http://www.trendhunter.com

Wegner, Mathias

474

Baldrige Examiner Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Examiner SelectionWhat Do Examiners Do? ... leadership; strategic planning; customer service, human resource, and ... a board member does not meet ...

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

475

Report on the deuterium retention in CVD coated W on SiC in support of the Ultramet Company’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project: SOW DE-FG02-07ER84941  

SciTech Connect

A tungsten (W) coated (0.0005-inch thickness) silicon carbide (SiC) (1.0-inch diameter and 0.19-inch thickness) sample was exposed to a divertor relevant high-flux (~1022 m-2s-1) deuterium plasma at 200 and 400°C in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), and the total deuterium retention was subsequently measured via the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method. The deuterium retentions were 6.4x1019 m-2 and 1.7x1020 m-2, for 200 and 400°C exposure, respectively. The Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to analyze the measured TDS spectrum to investigate the deuterium behavior in the W coated SiC, and the results indicated that most of the deuterium was trapped in the W coated layer even at 400°C. This thin W layer (0.0005-inch ~ 13µm thickness) prevented deuterium ions from bombarding directly into the SiC substrate, minimizing erosion of SiC and damage creation via ion bombardment. The shift in the D desorption peak in the TDS spectra from 200 C to 400°C can be attributed to D migration to the bulk material. This unexpectedly low deuterium retention and short migration might be due to the porous nature of the tungsten coating, which can decrease the solution concentration of deuterium atoms.

Masashi Shimada

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Selectable fragmentation warhead  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a selectable fragmentation warhead which is capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

Bryan, C.S.; Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Base fluid and temperature effects on the heat transfer characteristics of SiC in ethylene glycol/H2O and H2O nanofluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS 109, 014914 JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS 109, 014914 (2011) Base fluid and temperature effects on the heat transfer characteristics of SiC in ethylene glycol/H 2 O and H 2 O nanofluids Elena V. Timofeeva, 1,a) Wenhua Yu, 1 David M. France, 2 Dileep Singh, 3 and Jules L. Routbort 1 1 Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 W. Taylor St. (m/c 251), Chicago, Illinois 60607-7022, USA 3 Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA (Received 27 July 2010; accepted 30 October 2010; published online 11 January 2011) Experimental data are presented for the thermal conductivity, viscosity, and turbulent flow

478

Thermodynamic analysis and kinetic implications of chemical vapor deposition of SiC from Si-C-Cl-H gas systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results compiled from the literature were compared to thermodynamic calculations of the most stable proportion of condensed phases to deposit from gas mixtures of Si-C-Cl-H. The calculations indicated that the predominant gas molecules participating in a deposition process are chlorides and chlorosilanes for silicon and methane and acetylene for carbon. The mismatch of the calculated and experimentally determined phase boundaries at 1473 and 1600 K led to the conclusion that silicon deposition occurs faster than carbon deposition in proportion to their partial pressures. The probable reason is that silicon-bearing gas molecules have a greater sticking probability on polar Si and SiC surfaces because of their asymmetric geometries. 18 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

Fischman, G.S.; Petuskey, W.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

ESS 2012 Peer Review - 15 kV Phase Leg Power Modules with SiC Devices - Ranbir Singh, GeneSiC Semiconductor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Click to edit Master title style 15 kV Phase Leg Power Modules with SiC MIDSJT Devices Ranbir Singh and Siddarth Sundaresan GeneSiC Semiconductor Inc. ranbir.singh@genesicsemi.com +1 703 996 8200 43670 Trade Center Pl #155; Dulles VA 20166 September 27, 2012 Acknowledgement: The authors thank Dr. Imre Gyuk for funding this work and Dr. Stan Atcitty for technical supervision Sandia National Laboratories is a multi- program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DOE SBIR HV DC Link Grant #SC0008240 2 Phase Leg forms fundamental building block for AC/DC AND DC/AC Conversion

480

SOAJ Search : Your Selections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Your Selections Back To Previous Page Selections - of First Page Previous Page Next Page Last Page Back To Previous Page You have 0 selections. Click the checkboxes clipping.addClipping on the results or alert results pages to add to your selections. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website Policies/Important Links Science Accelerator science.gov WorldWideScience.org U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Email Results Use this form to email your search results * Email this to: * Your Name: Comments: URL only?: Number of results: 10 20 50 100 200 All Email Format: HTML TEXT * Required field Print Results Use this form to print results. The page of currently displayed results. The entire list of clipped results. The first

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row selected sic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Supplier Selection Management Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

482

Science Accelerator : Your Selections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Selections Back To Previous Page Selections - of First Page Previous Page Next Page Last Page Back To Previous Page You have 0 selections. Click the checkboxes clipping.addClipping on the results or alert results pages to add to your selections. Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site. U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website Policies/Important Links Science Accelerator science.gov WorldWideScience.org Deep Web Technologies Email Results Use this form to email your search results * Email this to: * Your Name: Comments: URL only?: Number of results: 10 20 50 100 200 All Email Format: HTML TEXT * Required field Print Results

483

TAC KBP Entity Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A few terms related to Entity Selection tend to overlap in ... that you want to search for, and hit enter. The search will result in a list of documents that ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

484

Solar selective absorption coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Solar selective absorption coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Spectrally selective glazings  

SciTech Connect

Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Source Selection Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Overview This chapter provides guidance to the acquisition team on conducting source selection in accordance with Part 15 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). Background The mid 1990's was a time of significant change in many areas of procurement, particularly in the introduction of new tools and processes that help the procurement professional better meet the needs of demanding customers. The passage of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act in 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act in 1995 , coupled with Government-wide and Department of Energy (DOE) contract reform efforts not only changed traditional procurement processes but also changed the role of the procurement professional. No longer are procurement

488

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

Lucian A. Lucia

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

490

Generic selections of subexpressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tools for computer languages need position information: compilers for providing better error messages, structure editors for mapping between structural and textual views, and debuggers for navigating through a term, for instance. Manually adding position ... Keywords: datatype-generic programming, haskell, selections

Martijn Van Steenbergen; José Pedro Magalhães; Johan Jeuring

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Industrial Carbon Capture Project SelectionsSeptember 2, 2010These projects have been selected for negotiation of awards; final award amounts may vary.

492

SPECIAL FEATURE Selection Studies in Ecology: Concepts, Methods, and Directions1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\lrs. Virginia JohnsLOn, Dean Stimsou, i\\lrs. Kay Bell, ;\\lorton !Iiller. Jay Jeppson , Pmres~or Berman. Row two

Agrawal, Anurag

493

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 156 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

494

Selected State Legislation and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook U. S. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 173 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Ba sis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories. Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 9.8 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking. b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEET for central air conditioners and heat

495

Glove Selection Guideline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glove Selection Guideline Glove Selection Guideline Skin contact is a potential source of exposure to toxic materials; it is important that the proper steps be taken to prevent such contact. Most accidents involving hands and arms can be classified under four main hazard categories: chemicals, abrasions, cutting, and heat. There are gloves available that can protect workers from any of these individual hazards or any combination thereof. Gloves should be replaced periodically, depending on frequency of use and permeability to the substance(s) handled. Gloves overtly contaminated should be rinsed and then carefully removed after use. Gloves should also be worn whenever it is necessary to handle rough or sharp-edged objects, and very hot or very cold materials. The type of glove materials to be used in these situations include leather, welderÂ’s gloves,