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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Single Family Residential Stormwater Management Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stormwater general permit (permit) implements the federal Clean Water Act. The permit is administered by the Washington State Department of Ecology and requires stormwater management for new development and redevelopment projects (including Single Family

Single Family Residential

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Peoples Gas – Single Family Direct Install (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, and faucet aerators through...

3

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program Eligibility...

4

Monitoring conservative retrofits in single family buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study has provided detailed before-and-after information on the ambient and comfort conditions in nine single family buildings, and on the energy consumption of those buildings, for one or more energy conservation retrofits. The data were recorded in such a manner that as well as being able to determine the savings from the retrofits and the influence these retrofits have on the comfort conditions of the residence, the effects of the retrofits on time-of-day usage are also determinable. The following are included in appendices: a table of participant's names, site addresses and retrofit; significant dates and appropriate comments; a day of data and an annotated data set; pre-retrofit and post-retrofit audit data sheets; and usage history.

Richardson, C.S.

1992-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

North Shore Gas – Single Family Direct Install (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, and faucet aerators through...

6

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 10,000 for fully subsidized systems No maximum stated for partially subsidized systems Program Info Start Date 7/1/2009 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on participant's income level and California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program eligibility. (see below) Provider GRID Alternatives The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies through a variety of smaller sub-programs. Of

7

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2002; " " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit:...

8

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square...

9

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

10

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE...

11

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

12

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

13

Monitoring conservative retrofits in single family buildings. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This study has provided detailed before-and-after information on the ambient and comfort conditions in nine single family buildings, and on the energy consumption of those buildings, for one or more energy conservation retrofits. The data were recorded in such a manner that as well as being able to determine the savings from the retrofits and the influence these retrofits have on the comfort conditions of the residence, the effects of the retrofits on time-of-day usage are also determinable. The following are included in appendices: a table of participant`s names, site addresses and retrofit; significant dates and appropriate comments; a day of data and an annotated data set; pre-retrofit and post-retrofit audit data sheets; and usage history.

Richardson, C.S.

1992-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it`s true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area.

Rafferty, K.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

17

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

18

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

19

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

20

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A comparative study of condominium and single family house price appreciation in the Salt Lake Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines whether the form of ownership affects the appreciation rate of housing units. The specific test conducted is whether condominiums and single family homes in the Salt Lake Valley have appreciated at the ...

Billings, John D. (John David), 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A sub-systems approach to small lot single-family housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trends and preferences explored in this work indicate that the "American Dream" of a single-family detached house is still the preferred housing model. In-order to achieve this goal most home buyers will have to accept ...

Kühn, Heinrich, 1951-

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-size absorption chillers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research study is the development of radically new fluid systems, specifically tailored to the needs and requirements of solar-absorption cooling for single-family-size residences. Progress is reported.

Macriss, R.A.; Zawacki, T.S.; Kouo, M.T.; Sneed, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

26

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

27

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

28

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

29

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

30

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" 3. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

31

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

32

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

33

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

34

Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family 7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions? Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions? Why ventilate? What are the ultimate goals of ventilation requirements in codes and standards? What are the characteristics of an effective ventilation system in new vs. existing construction? What are the risks and solutions associated with ventilation in hot-humid climates? cq7_kitchen_ventilation_singer.pdf cq7_ventilation_lab_houses_rudd.pdf cq7_ventilation_hothumid_parker.pdf More Documents & Publications Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Critical Question #8: When are Heat Pump Water Heaters the Best Solution?

35

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the recommendations for achieving 15% above-code energy performance for single-family residences. The analysis was performed using a simulation model of an International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)- compliant, single family residence in Houston, Texas. To accomplish the 15% annual energy use reductions, twelve measures were considered, which include: tankless water heater, solar domestic hot water system, gas water heater without the standing pilot light, ducts in the conditioned space, improved duct sealing, increased air tightness, window shading and redistribution, improved window performance, improved heating and cooling system efficiency. After the total annual energy use was determined for each measure, they were then grouped to accomplish a 15% total annual energy use reduction.

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, J. B.; Yazdani, B.; Malhotra, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The earth-coupled heat pump: Utilizing innovative technology in single family rehabilitation strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study examines the feasibility of incorporating the use of earth-coupled heat pump technology in single-family housing rehabilitation projects, based on energy conservation attributes and financial considerations. Following evaluation of a theoretical model which indicated that installations of the heat pumps were feasible, the heat pumps were tested under actual conditions in five single family housing units which were part of the Urban Homesteading Program, and were matched with comparable units which did not receive special treatment. Energy consumption information was collected for all units for twelve months. Variables were identified, and the data was analyzed for individual housing units and compared with the results predicted by the theoretical model to determine the practicality of incorporating such technology in large scale rehabilitation projects. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Solar energy heating system design package for a single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a solar heating and hot water system for the New Castle Redevelopment Authority's single-family dwelling located at New Castle, Pennsylvania is described. Documentation submitted by the contractor for Government review of plans, specifications, cost trade studies and verification status for approval to commit the system to fabrication is presented. Also included are system integration drawings, major subsystems drawings, and architect's specifications and plans.

Not Available

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family Homes Title The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family Homes Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5714E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bourassa, Norman, Leo I. Rainer, Evan Mills, and Joan Glickman Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 05/2012 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA, USA Abstract In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated development of a new web-based computer tool and method for providing an energy asset rating of single-family homes. The resulting Home Energy Scoring Tool (http://homeenergyscore.lbl.gov) is a key component of the DOE's Home Energy Score Program (http://www.homeenergyscore.gov) for residential building energy labeling, a voluntary national asset rating method that uses a simplified and standardized energy assessment process. The Scoring Tool component of the program has been designed to support the existing energy analysis marketplace by providing a substantially lower-cost entry-level assessment method. This paper presents technical details of the Home Energy Scoring Tool itself, including the Scoring Tool's relationship to the Home Energy Saver building simulation engine, the Home Energy Score calculation methodology, and the web services feature that allows any qualified third-party software developer to integrate the Home Energy Score method into their own webbased applications and market delivery strategy.

39

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Identifying Inefficient Single-Family Homes With Utility Bill Analysis: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differentiating between energy-efficient and inefficient single-family homes on a community scale helps identify and prioritize candidates for energy-efficiency upgrades. Prescreening diagnostic procedures can further retrofit efforts by providing efficiency information before a site-visit is conducted. We applied the prescreening diagnostic to a simulated community of homes in Boulder, Colorado and analyzed energy consumption data to identify energy-inefficient homes.

Casey, S.; Krarti, M.; Bianchi, M.; Roberts, D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Title Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4830E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D., Renaldi, Alexander B. Lekov, Yining Qin, and Moya Melody Document Number LBNL-4830E Pagination 26 Date Published 05/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This report describes data regarding hot water draw patterns that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory obtained from 10 studies. The report describes our purposes in collecting the data; the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data; and the results of our data analysis. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We also found that the distributions of daily hot water use are not symmetrical normal distributions. Thus we used median, not average, values to characterize typical daily hot water use. This report presents summary information that illustrates the results of our data collection and some initial analysis.

42

Rights-Of-Way (ROW) Environmental Management: New ROW Development and Existing ROW Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During October 27-29, 1997, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) sponsored a workshop to assess the need for a program of environmental research on Rights-of-Way (ROW) development and management, and to develop a research agenda. The workshop built on 1993 and 1996 EPRI meetings, and on the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Concerns in Rights-of-Way Management held in February, 1997. This document presents the proceedi...

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Incremental densification auctions : A politically viable method of producing infill housing in existing single-family neighborhoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of convincing homeowners to accept new housing density in their neighborhoods. This paper proposes that densification that places additional housing units in preexisting single-family ...

Baker, Karl Phillip

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Two Row Mixed Integer Cuts Via Lifting?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2008 ... the two-row mixed integer infinite-group problem), and to develop lifting ..... The next lemma analyzes the standard triangles with each side ...

45

" Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS...

46

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

An analysis of International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant single-family residential energy use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, the Texas State Senate passed Senate Bill 5 to reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx that were not regulated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, including point sources (power plants), area sources (such as residential emissions), road mobile sources, and non-road mobile sources. For the building energy section, the Texas State Legislature adopted the 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code, as modified by the 2001 Supplement, as the state's building energy code. The 2000/2001 IECC is a comprehensive energy conservation code that establishes a standard for the insulation levels, glazing and cooling and heating system efficiencies through the use of prescriptive and performance-based provisions. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to improve the accuracy of a 2000/2001 IECCcompliant performance simulation using the DOE-2.1e simulation program to investigate the energy performance of a typical single-family house. To achieve this purpose, several objectives had to be accomplished, including: 1) the development of an IECC-compliant simulation model, 2) the development and testing of specific improvements to the existing code-traceable model, 3) the calibration and installation of sensors in a case-study house, 4) the validation of the improved simulation model with measured data from the case-study house, and 5) use the validated model to simulate the energy-conserving features of single-family residences that cannot be simulated with existing versions of the DOE-2.1e program. In order to create the code-traceable IECC-compliant simulation model, a base-case house simulation was created and the results calibrated with measured energy and environmental data from the case-study house. This was done in order to obtain an improved simulation model that would more accurately represent the case-study building. The calibrated model was then used to verify the accuracy of the improved simulation methods against previous models and measured data. After validation of the new simulation methodologies, the IECC simulation model was used to simulate different energy-conserving features for a single-family residence that could not be simulated with the previous version of the DOE-2 input file. Finally, areas for future work were identified in an effort to continue to improve the model.

Kim, Seongchan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Update rows? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Update rows? Update rows? Home > Groups > Databus Is it possible to update an existing row in a table? I'm thinking of the case of a table holding metadata about sensors. If the location changes, for example, can that row be changed/deleted/updated? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 31 October, 2013 - 16:42 1 answer Points: 0 yes, it is done the same way you inserted the data, so just re-use your existing stuff and it will update. Deanhiller on 11 November, 2013 - 11:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (6) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Hopcroft Vikasgoyal Ksearight

49

Update rows? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Update rows? Update rows? Home > Groups > Databus Is it possible to update an existing row in a table? I'm thinking of the case of a table holding metadata about sensors. If the location changes, for example, can that row be changed/deleted/updated? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 31 October, 2013 - 16:42 1 answer Points: 0 yes, it is done the same way you inserted the data, so just re-use your existing stuff and it will update. Deanhiller on 11 November, 2013 - 11:01 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Go to My Databus->Data Streams... yes, it is done the same way y... Update rows? How to use streaming chart? if you are an administrator, s... more Group members (7) Managers: Deanhiller Recent members: Bradmin Hopcroft Vikasgoyal

50

Installation guidelines for Solar Heating System, single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating System installer guidelines are provided for each subsystem and includes testing and filling the system. This single-family residential heating system is a solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air system with solar-assisted domestic water heating. It is composed of the following major components: liquid cooled flat plate collectors; water storage tank; passive solar-fired domestic water preheater; electric hot water heater; heat pump with electric backup; solar hot water coil unit; tube-and-shell heat exchanger, three pumps, and associated pipes and valving in an energy transport module; control system; and air-cooled heat purge unit. Information is also provided on the operating procedures, controls, caution requirements, and routine and schedule maintenance. Information consists of written procedures, schematics, detail drawings, pictures and manufacturer's component data.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Passive heating and cooling strategies for single family housing in Fresno, California: a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the integration of passive heating, cooling, and ventilating techniques for detached single family housing in Fresno, California. The energy use and patterns of energy use were simulated for a typical tract house in Fresno, and serves as a case study, to which energy saving strategies were applied and evaluated using Ener-Win software. The effectiveness of each strategy was assessed based on the annual savings, the initial cost, and a life-cycle cost analysis. Specific areas of evaluation include: shading, improving the R-value and infiltration rate of the building envelope, thermal mass, natural ventilation, and evaporative cooling. The optimum strategies selected utilize only traditional building techniques. Evaporative cooling used in conjunction with an air conditioner was the most effective energy reducing strategy, but a combination of purely passive strategies yield competitive results. Although the typical Fresno home is already energy efficient, small alterations provide energy savings up to 75% for space conditioning.

Winchester, Nathan James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single-family homes: An update of the BECA-B database  

SciTech Connect

The energy bill for US single-family households was over $77 billion in 1987 (excluding auto fuel purchases), accounting for approximately 20% of national energy expenditures. Large sums are spent on residential retrofits by individual homeowners, government agencies, and utilities. As of late 1987, over 21 million households indicated that they had added at least one energy-saving measure in the previous two years, while a recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study estimated that nearly 15 million residential customers have participated in some kind of demand-side management (DSM) program. Given the level of continuing investments in residential energy efficiency, accurate estimates of savings from various conservation measures are increasingly necessary, especially as new technologies become more sophisticated and incremental efficiency gains more difficult to achieve. This report provides a comparative analysis of measured data on the performance and cost-effectiveness of energy-saving measures in existing single-family homes, based on information in the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base. The initial BECA report on measured data for single-family retrofits was completed seven years ago. In updating the single-family database, we have added 135 data points, representing over 33,000 houses, to the original database of 145 retrofit projects. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides a summary of energy savings and costs of individual retrofit measures and strategies and results from federal/state low-income and utility weatherization programs. we also discuss measurement issues, predicted versus actual savings, trends in single-family retrofit programs, and implications for the next generation'' of cost-effective single-family retrofits. Volume 2 contains a written summary of each retrofit project and complete data tables. 87 refs., 20 figs., 16 tabs.

Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

54

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Financial Support for Activity;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ",,," Source of Financial Support for Activity",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Other","Don't Know","Factors"

55

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

56

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

57

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

58

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

59

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)","Factors"

60

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Fact...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","...

62

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

63

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

64

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

65

Energy Savings Resulting from Shading Devices on Single-Family Residences in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential annual energy savings resulting from window shading devices on three prototypical Austin, Texas, single-family residences were computed in this study. Savings were calculated for interior (shades, blinds, draperies, window film, and tinted windows) and exterior (solar screens, awnings, overhangs, and the effects of recessed windows and vegetation) shading devices. The analysis was conducted with the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. Nominal baseline cases (single glazing, gas heating, and nominal shading from eaves and neighboring buildings) were run for each prototype. Selected baseline variants (double glazing, all electric, and no eaves or neighbor shading) were run to test parameter sensitivity. Results are reported in terms of the annual heating and cooling energy use and energy cost, with each device in place, as compared to the baseline cases. The devices are ranked in term of energy savings and energy coat savings. Another significant result is the multiple-regression correlation of annual heating and cooling energy savings with Shading Coefficient and U-value that generalizes the performance of the shading devices.

Pletzer, R. K.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Solar project description for Florida gas company's single family residence, Winter Springs, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Florida Gas Company solar energy system is installed in a 1548 square-foot, three bedroom single family dwelling located in Winter Springs, Florida. The system is designed to provide solar energy for space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating. Solar energy is collected by two banks of double glazed flat plate collectors with a gross area of 714 square feet. Solar energy is transferred from the collector array to a 1350 gallon underground storage tank. Water is used as the heat collection, transfer and storage medium. Freeze protection is provided by means of circulation of hot water from storage through the collectors. No anti-freeze additive is required. A 3-ton solar energy powered absorption cycle Water Chiller provides chilled water for circulation through the same air distribution system. A gas fired boiler provides supplemental thermal energy to the chiller when sufficient thermal energy is not available from storage. Original cost estimates for provisioning and installation of the Solar System are given.

Not Available

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single- family homes: An update of the BECA-B database  

SciTech Connect

These appendices are the companion volume to report number LBL--28147 Vol.1, with the same title. The summary data tables include physical characteristics, energy consumption, savings, and the retrofit measures installed and their costs for each retrofit project. Each existing single family residential building'' retrofit project in the BECA-B database is described. 99 refs. (BM)

Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)

Chobotov, V.; Siegel, B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

Napolitano, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Solar heating system design package for a single-family residence at William O'Brien State Park, Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell, Inc. has undertaken the design, fabrication, installation, and monitoring of a prototype solar heating and hot water system for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' single-family dwelling located at O'Brien State Park, 30 miles east of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Documentation submitted by Honeywell for government review of plans, specifications, cost trade studies and verification status in order to provide the contractor with approval to commit the system to fabrication are included.

Not Available

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" 2. Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat"," ",," "

74

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

" Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" 3. Number of Establishments by Usage of Energy-Saving Technologies for Specific Industries, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Industry-Specific Technologies within Selected NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1.3,0.5,1.5 , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",762,13727,2064,1.8 ," Microwave Drying",270,14143,2140,2.5

76

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Establishments" ,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "

77

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

79

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

80

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

82

Residential building design : comprehensive comparative guidelines for building single-family dwellings in Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy shortages, earthquakes, and hurricanes are environmental factors that challenge the home designers of Hawaii. The depletion of renewable natural resources and global warming trends foreshadow energy shortage and the ...

Nagata, Rochelle Morie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

84

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

85

Assessment of National Benefits from Retrofitting Existing Single-Family Homes with Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential national benefits of retrofitting U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GSHP systems at various penetration rates. The benefits considered include energy savings, reduced summer electrical peak demand, consumer utility bill savings, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The assessment relies heavily on energy consumption and other data obtained from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy s Energy Information Administration. It also considers relative differences in energy consumption between a state-of-the-art GSHP system and existing residential space-heating, space-cooling, and water-heating (SH SC WH) systems, which were determined with a well-established energy analysis program for residential SH SC WH systems. The impacts of various climate and geological conditions, as well as the efficiency and market share of existing residential SH SC WH systems, have been taken into account in the assessment.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase in construction costs over the eight-year period from 2002 through 2009. Using the Energy Systems Laboratory's International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) simulation tool, the annual statewide electricity savings in 2009 are estimated to be $161 million. The statewide peak electric demand reductions in 2009 are estimated to be 694 MW for the summer and 766 MW for the winter periods. Since 2002, the cumulative statewide electricity and electric demand savings over the eight year period from 2002 to 2009 are $1,803 million ($776 million from electricity savings and $1,027 million from electric demand savings) while the total increased costs are estimated to be $670 million.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation: May-August 1978. Florida Gas Company, Single Family Residence, Winter Springs, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description of the system, which provides thermal energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water heating for a one story single family dwelling, is given. A performance evaluation of the cooling subsystem is presented for the period May through August, 1978. A comparison of measured climatic data with long term average conditions for the vicinity is made. Subsystem performance, including collector array, storage, and space cooling systems, is discussed and design modifications that would improve the system's overall economic performance are considered. Space cooling is provided by an Arkla Model WF-35, 3-ton absorption cycle chiller. A comparison of the present system configuration with a vapor compression air conditioner is presented showing that net savings are realized when the present system is operated solely with solar supplied energy.

Lee, T.D.; McCumber, W.H.; Murphy, L.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Preliminary market potential indexing study of the United States for direct gain in new single-family residential construction  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the market potential for passive solar designs in residential new construction offers an attractive counterpart to the numerous market penetration assessments that have been performed over the last four years. Market penetration analyses have generally concerned themselves with the long run adoption of solar energy technologies, while Market Potential Indexing (MPI) addressed here examines the near-term attractiveness of solar. The MPI method is briefly reviewed, followed by specification of six attributes that may characterize the residential single-family new construction market. Raw attribute data for each of the six is presented for 220 regions within the United States. Attribute weighting functions are constructed from the perspective of consumers, producers or home builders, and the federal government. Preliminary results from these three perspectives are portrayed for a fixed sized direct gain design.

Robson, W.M.; Roach, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Optimization Online - Simultaneous Column-and-Row Generation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 14, 2010 ... Simultaneous Column-and-Row Generation for Large-Scale Linear Programs with Column-Dependent- ... Entry Last Modified: 05/17/2012.

90

Globally Optimal Solutions for Large Single-Row Facility Layout ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 22, 2006 ... This paper is concerned with the single-row facility layout problem ..... A standard way to tighten linear or semidefinite relaxations of binary ...

91

Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

be conducted in 2010 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management...

92

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet), Guidelines For Home Energy Professionals, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Specifications Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numer- ous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high- quality residential energy upgrades. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades is the first of three documents that will be published in 2012 and 2013 as part of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project. Specifications for manufactured housing and multifamily homes will also be available. DOE, NREL, and industry developed the Standard Work Specifications under the Weatherization Assistance Program, building on more than 30 years of experience

93

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

94

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

95

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

96

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

97

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

98

Solving connected row convex constraints by variable elimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an algorithm for the class of connected row convex constraints. In this algorithm, we introduce a novel variable elimination method to solve the constraints. This method is simple and able to make use of the sparsity of the problem instances. ... Keywords: Connected row convex constraints, Constraint composition, Constraint satisfaction problems, Path consistency, Variable elimination

Yuanlin Zhang; Satyanarayana Marisetti

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

System manual for the University of Pennsylvania retrofitted solar heated Philadelphia row home (SolaRow)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Pennsylvania SolaRow house, an urban row home retrofitted for comfort and domestic hot water heating, was extensively instrumented for performance monitoring and acquisition of weather and solar radiation data. This report describes the heating and instrumentation systems, provides the details for instrumentation, piping and valve identification, and specifies the operation and maintenance of the heating and data acquisition systems. The following are included: (1) system flow diagrams; (2) valve and cable identification tables; (3) wiring diagrams; and (4) start-up, normal operation, shut-down, maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures. It thus provides the necessary technical information to permit system operation and monitoring, overall system performance analysis and optimization, and acquisition of climatological data.

Zinnes, I.; Lior, N.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the energy cost savings to be achieved from 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) code-compliant, single-family residences in Texas compared to the pre-2009 IECC codes, including: the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, and the 2006 IECC w/ Houston amendments (w/ HA). A series of simulations were performed using an ESL simulation model (BDL version 4.01.07 of IC3) based on the DOE-2.1e simulation and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for three counties representing three 2009 IECC Climate Zones across Texas: Harris County for Climate Zone 2, Tarrant County for Climate Zone 3, and Potter County for Climate Zone 4. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) an electric/gas house (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) a heat pump house (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). The base-case building was assumed to be a 2,325 sq. ft., square-shape, one story, single-family, detached house with a floor-to-ceiling height of 8 feet. The house has an attic with a roof pitched at 23 degrees. The base-case building envelope and system characteristics were determined from the general characteristics and the climate-specific characteristics as specified in the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, the 2006 IECC w/HA, and the 2009 IECC. In addition, to facilitate a better comparison with the 2009 code, several modifications were applied to the pre-2009 IECC codes. As a result, the estimated annual energy cost savings per house associated with the 2009 IECC compared to the 2001 and 2006 IECC are: (a) an electric/gas house: $462/year and $206/year for Harris County, $432/year and $216/year for Tarrant County, and $576/year and $153/year for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: $490/year and $203/year for Harris County, $487/year and $226/year for Tarrant County, and $680/year and $155/year for Potter County. The corresponding % savings of total energy cost of a 2009 IECC code-compliant house are: (a) an electric/gas house: 22.7% and 10.1% for Harris County, 21.8% and 10.9% for Tarrant County, and 28.9% and 7.7% for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: 21.6% and 8.9% for Harris County, 20.9% and 9.7% for Tarrant County, and 25.7% and 5.8% for Potter County.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Monitoring and evaluation of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached houses in Austin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE initiated this project to evaluate the performance of an air conditioner retrofit program in Austin, Texas. The City's Austin's Resource Management Department pursued this project to quantify the retrofit effect of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached homes. If successfully implemented, this retrofit program could help defer construction of a new power plant which is a major goal of this department. The project compares data collected from 12 houses during two cooling seasons under pre-retrofit and then post-retrofit air conditioner units. The existing low-efficiency air conditioners were monitored during the 1987 cooling season, replaced during the 1987--88 heating season with new, smaller sized, high-efficiency units, and then monitored again during the 1988 cooling season. Results indicated that the air conditioner retrofits reduce the annual air conditioner electric consumption and peak electric demand by an average of 38%. When normalized to the nominal capacity of the air conditioner, average demand savings were 1.12 W/ft{sup 2} and estimated annual energy savings were 1.419 kWh/ft{sup 2}. Individual air conditioner power requirements were found to be a well defined function of outdoor temperature as expected. In the absence of detailed data, estimates of the peak demand reductions of new air conditioners can be made from the manufacturer's specifications. Air conditioner energy consumption proved to be strongly linear as a function of the outdoor temperature as expected when taken as an aggregate. No noticeable differences in the diversity factor of the air conditioner usage were found. Analysis of the retrofit effect using PRISM yields estimates of the reduction in normalized annual consumption (NAC) and annual cooling consumption of 12% and 30%. 2 refs., 11 figs., 17 tabs.

Burns, R.; Hough, R.E. (Fleming (W.S.) and Associates, Inc., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED RESIDENCES DESIGNED FOR OFF-GRID, OFF-PIPE OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the analysis of energy performance of single-family detached homes in three U.S. climates, in order to determine energy-efficiency measures for minimizing the loads and sizing requirements of renewable energy systems that are essential for its offgrid, off-pipe (i.e., utility-independent) operation. The analysis used a DOE-2.1e simulation model of a 2000/2001 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) standard house as a base case in three climate locations: Minneapolis, MN, Atlanta, GA, and Phoenix, AZ. This selection of measures and determination of loads for renewable energy systems were accomplished by analyzing the energy use using DOE-2.1e simulations and heating/cooling load components using the Manual J Average Load Procedure. The analysis showed several aspects of building energy performance during different times of the year in terms of available energy resources that are critical for the sizing, utilization, and cost effectiveness of renewable energy systems.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Haberl, Dr. Jeff S. [Texas A& M University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning ...  

DTEM – Team Members: Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning, Judy Kim, Michael Armstrong Back Row (left to right): Thomas LaGrange ...

104

Row-Action Inversion of the Barrick–Weber Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Barrick–Weber equations describe the interaction of radar signals with the dynamic ocean surface, and so provide a mathematical basis for oceanic remote sensing. This report considers the inversion of these equations with several of the row-...

J. J. Green; L. R. Wyatt

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Chooser-Picker 7-in-a-row-game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main objective of this paper is to relate Beck's conjecture for k-in-a-row games. The conjecture states that playing on the same board Picker is better off in a Chooser-Picker game than the second player in the Maker-Breaker version. It was shown that the 8-in-a-row game is a blocking draw that is a Breaker win. To give the outcome of 7-, or 6-in-a-row-games is hopeless, but these games are widely believed to be Breaker's win. If both conjectures hold, Picker must win the Chooser-Picker version of the 7-in-a-row game, and that is what we prove.

Csernenszky, András

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A competitive genetic algorithm for single row facility layout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 22, 2012 ... The single row facility layout is the NP-Hard problem of arranging facilities ..... with a user-specified probability p, the second fittest solution with ...

107

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

108

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

109

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

110

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

111

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

112

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

113

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning '(Facility HVAC)' excludes" "steam and hot water." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less than 0.5." "...

114

Microsoft Word - CX_Memo_SchultzROW.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Brandee Shoemaker Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Schultz-Raver No.1 Right-Of-Way (ROW) Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to survey and mark the northern boundary of its transmission line ROW for the Schultz-Raver No.1 and Schultz-Echo Lake No.1 transmission line corridor in Kittitas County, WA. Due to high development pressure, a lack of visible signage, and incomplete county records, encroachments into the ROW have occurred in the

115

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

116

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

117

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

118

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

119

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

120

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

122

Ten Weirdest Computers By DUNCAN GRAHAM-ROWE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten Weirdest Computers By DUNCAN GRAHAM-ROWE April 15, 2008 -- Today's computers use pulses, weirder, ways& 1. Optical computing There's nothing weird about encoding data in light global computations is still not practical. Optical computers are a worthwhile goal because using light could increase

Braun, Paul

123

Test for Modeling Windows in DOE 2.1E for Comparing the Window Library with the Shading Coefficient Method for a Single-Family Residence in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the difference of the window simulation test between the Shading Coefficient (SC) and the Window Library (WL) Methods on DOE 2.1E of the 2000 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) for single-family residences in Texas. The window simulation tests are performed using single-pane, double-pane, and low-e glass on two standard DOE 2.1E single-family house models: 1) the model which has the R-value for wall, roof and floor according to 2000 IECC (Quick Wall), and 2) the model which has the real wood frame wall and has the same R-value as the first one (Thermal Wall). The analysis showed different results according to the types of the glass, simulation method (Shading Coefficient or Window Library), and types of wall (quick wall and thermal wall). The saving of daily peak heating (kBtu/day) from single-pane to low-e glass on thermal mass and quick wall shows the most variation.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES A Thesis Submitted April 1995 #12;PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES by Xiangwei Zhao Abstract The steady and time-dependentbehavior of a single-row heat exchanger with water and air in the in

Sen, Mihir

125

High Energy-Efficiency Retrofits to Baltimore's Row Homes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project is to develop high-perfommnce, energy-eflicient retrofits of existing row homes in Baltimore, Maryland. These efficiency enhancements are to optimize building envelope improvements, mechanical equipment improvements and operational improvements to the highest cost-effective level. Furthermore, this project is to investigate and demonstrate the impact of high-performance energy-efficiency retrofit improvements on row homes in the Historic East area of Baltimore. Three homes awaiting renovation are planned to receive building envelope, mechanical system, and electrical system improvements that will improve their energy petiormance. An incremental additional cost ceiling of $4000 for the energy eftlciency improvements, beyond those normally installed, has been set by the project.

Chalk, J.; Johnson, A.L.; Lipscomb, L.; Wendt, R.

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

127

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

128

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

129

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

130

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

131

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

132

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

133

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

134

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

135

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

136

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

137

Detailed Analysis of the Thermal Mass Credits in a Code-Traceable DOE-2 Simulation of the 2001 IECC for a Single-Family Residence in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study that investigates the thermal mass credits in the 2001 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) (ICC 1999, 2001) for a single-family residence in Texas using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. In this analysis seven different wall types were simulated, and each wall type was matched to the recommended overall U-value of a lightweight wall that meets the prescriptive specifications of the 2001 IECC. This paper presents an analysis of the total annual cooling and heating energy use for wall types with varying thermal mass, and thermostat settings, as well as recommendations concerning the most energy-efficient wall type, and includes input specification methods using the DOE-2 program

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

139

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

140

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

142

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

143

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

144

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

145

Burnup Credit -- Contribution to the Analysis of the Yankee Rowe Radiochemical Assays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a methodology for validation of the isotopic contents of spent light water reactor fuel for actinide-only burnup credit with additional high-quality radiochemistry assay (RCA) data obtained from the Yankee Rowe pressurized water reactor. The additional Yankee Rowe RCA data were not included in previous isotopic validation studies for burnup credit due to the difficulty of accurately modeling the complex Yankee Rowe fuel assembly design using the SAS2H one-dimensional sequence of the ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Provably Near-Optimal Solutions for Very Large Single-Row Facility ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2009 ... This paper is concerned with the single-row facility ..... A standard way to tighten linear or semidefinite relaxations of integer optimization ...

147

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28 50 36 15 0 29 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 W 7 14 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 210 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908

148

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

149

Energy Conservation Analysis of Three-Row-Hole Hollow Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, solid clay blocks have been forbidden in large and middle cities with the wall reformation policy issued in China. Many kinds of new wall materials have appeared in the market, but little research has been done on these new materials' energy conserving effects. The government of China adopted forcible energy conserving measures in the building industry in 2005. Because of this, more attention is being paid to the energy-conserving ability of the wall material. In this paper, we investigate the thermal properties of two different kinds of three-row-hole blocks through experiments, analyze their energy conserving index, and suggest ways to save energy based on the results of the investigation.

Chen, G.; Li, H.; Liu, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

151

Automatic expert system based on images for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an automatic expert system for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields based on images acquired from a vision system. Different applications in maize, particularly those based on site specific treatments, require the identification ... Keywords: Crop row detection in maize fields, Expert system, Image segmentation, Image thresholding, Linear regression, Machine vision, Theil-Sen estimator

J. M. Guerrero; M. Guijarro; M. Montalvo; J. Romeo; L. Emmi; A. Ribeiro; G. Pajares

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water (ML&W) oversees land use within the state and issues right of ways, easements or permit to use state

153

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statute Chapter 264 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 102 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 105 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

154

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures on Implementing Houston Amendments to Single-Family Buildings in Houston Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents detailed information about the analysis that was performed to calculate the energy saving potential for residential buildings in Houston. In this analysis the energy efficient measures were proposed by the building officials of the City of Houston. Along with the options proposed by the officials, additional measures were selected from the previously-conducted 15% above code energy analysis conducted by the Energy Systems Laboratory for residential houses across the State of Texas. A total of thirty measures were selected based on the energy savings above the base case. These measures were categorized into five groups: Renewable Power Options, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Fenestration, Envelope and Lighting and Domestic Hot Water (DHW) options. The analysis was performed using a simulation model of an International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant, single family residence in Houston, Texas. Four sets of simulations were considered based on the choice of heating fuel type and thermostat setback: a) natural gas (i.e., gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating) with thermostat setback, b) electricity (i.e., heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating) with thermostat setback, c) natural gas (i.e., gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating) without thermostat setback, and d) electricity (i.e., heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating) without thermostat setback. Individual measures were then categorized into four groups: 2 to 5%, 5 to 10%, and 10 to 15% and above 15% energy savings above base case. Ten grouped measures were then simulated from combining individual measures from the four categories whose combined savings are more than 15% above the base case. The cost of implementation of the individual as well as grouped measures was also calculated along with a simple payback period. The photovoltaic options presented the maximum savings in the approximate range of 15-40% for all base-case houses. The solar thermal option for domestic water heating presented energy savings above 15-20% for all of the base-case houses.

Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Malhotra, M.; Kota, S.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 979.3 10.3

156

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 28 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 12 11 W 11 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987 17 207 839 503 W 0 207 3115 Dairy Products 998 998 12 217 908 161 W 0 79 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

157

Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9 10.6 4.5 1000 and Over 1,415.5 5.7 2.5 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 311 FOOD Employment Size Under 50 1,266.8 8.3 3.2 50-99 1,587.4 9.3 3.6 100-249 931.9 3.6 1.5 250-499 1,313.1 6.3

158

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 45 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 104 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

159

Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2 50-99 832.0 4.9 2.3 100-249 1,313.4 6.2 2.8 250-499 1,905.2 7.4 3.6 500 and Over 4,225.4 7.5 3.1 Total 1,449.6 6.4 2.8 311 FOOD Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 576.6 5.9

160

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

162

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

163

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

164

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

165

GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW GRR/Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-NV-c - Encroachment Permit for NDOT ROW 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies NRS Chapter 405 Control and Preservation of Public Highways Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf 03NVCEncroachment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) grants permits for permanent installations within State rights-of-way and in areas maintained by the

166

Microsoft Word - CX-Pearl-Keeler_ROW_Marking_10June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rick Teiper Rick Teiper Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Pearl-Keeler Right-of-Way (ROW) Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Washington County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to survey and mark the Pearl-Keeler No. 1 transmission line ROW boundary in Washington County, Oregon. The installation of markers to demarcate BPA's ROW would prevent encroachment from homeowners and developers, ensure the safety of nearby residents, and allow for the continued safe maintenance and operation of BPA's transmission lines. The proposed Project would install yellow carsonite markers and monuments along an

167

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

169

Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Row Multi-Column Compact Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Row Multi-Column Compact Heat Exchanger Ashkan Motamedi1, Arturo of a compact heat exchanger to analyze the interaction between the fluid and its geometry. The overall as the inner-tube fluid. Two heat exchanger configurations, in which the tube arrangement is either in

Pacheco, Jose Rafael

170

ROW 2.0 - Right-of-Way Environmental Stewardship Bibliographic Database, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Right-of-Way Environmental Stewardship Bibliographic Database Version 2.0 (ROW 2.0) allows users to search in multiple ways for citations and retrieve summaries of published documents that focus on environmental concerns related to utility corridor design, siting, construction, or management.

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Shelley J. Row, P.E., PTOE Director, ITS Joint Program Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shelley J. Row, P.E., PTOE Director, ITS Joint Program Office Research and Innovative Technology of Transportation's Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office (JPO), a position she has held 1996, Shelley joined the ITS Joint Program Office as the ITS Travel Management Coordinator and later

Minnesota, University of

172

The removal and segmentation of the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major element of the reactor decommissioning of the Rowe Yankee reactor was the segmentation and packaging of the reactor internals. PCI Energy Services, specializing in remote cutting, machining, and welding, performed this work under contract to Yankee Atomic Electric Company. Removal techniques are described.

Child, C.; McGough, M.; Smith, G. [Power Cutting Inc., Lake Bluff, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Qualification of In-Service Examination of the Yankee Rowe Reactor Pressure Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective in-service examination of the reactor pressure vessel was an essential part of the restart program for the Yankee Atomic Power Company plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. This report describes development of an effective examination strategy, demonstration of performance of the examination procedures, and development of data on the distribution of flaws in reactor pressure vessels.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Outline of a qualitative analysis for the human motion in case of ergometer rowing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, there are numerous methods of quantitative analysis of the human movement. Basic quality of these methods is the high degree of accuracy and reliability of the obtained data. According to systematic approach human movement is qualified as a complex ... Keywords: fuzzification, human motion, qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, rowing

Ante Panjkota; Ivo Stan?ic; Tamara Šupuk

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Book Review: Thieves of Book Row: New York's Most Notorious Rare Book Ring and the Man Who Stopped It by Travis McDade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thieves of Book Row: New York'sMost Notorious Rare Book Ring and the Man Who Stopped It bypp. ISBN 0199922667. In Thieves of Book Row: New York’s Most

Montoya, Robert D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Accurate correlation consistent basis sets for molecular core-valence correlation effects: The second row atoms Al-Ar and the first row atoms B-Ne revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlation consistent basis sets for accurately describing core-core and core-valence correlation effects in atoms and molecules have been developed for the second row atoms Al - Ar. Two different optimization strategies were investigated, which led to two families of core-valence basis sets when the optimized functions were added to the standard correlation consistent basis sets (cc-pVnZ). In the first case, the exponents of the augmenting primitive Gaussian functions were optimized with respect to the difference between all-electron and valence-electron correlated calculations, i.e., for the core-core plus core-valence correlation energy. This yielded the cc-pCVnZ family of basis sets, which are analogous to the sets developed previously for the first row atoms[D.E. Woon and T.H. Dunning, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 4572 (1995)]. Although the cc-pCVnZ sets exhibit systematic convergence to the all-electron correlation energy at the complete basis set limit, the intershell (core-valence ) correlation energy converges more slowly than the intrashell (core-core) correlation energy. Since the effect of including the core electrons on the calculation of molecular properties tends to be dominated by core-valence correlation effects, a second scheme for determining the augmenting functions was investigated. In this approach, the exponents of the functions to be added to the cc-pVnZ sets were optimized with respect to just the core-valence (intershell) correlation energy, except that a small amount of core-core correlation energy was included in order to ensure systematic convergence to the complete basis set limit. These new sets, denoted weighted core-valence basis sets (cc-pwCVnZ), significantly improve the convergence of many molecular properties with n. Optimum cc-pwCVnZ sets for the first-row atoms were also developed and show similar advantages.

Peterson, Kirk A. (WASHINGTON STATE UNIV TC); Dunning, Thom H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Microsoft Word - CX-Rattlesnake-Garrison_ROW_Marking_06June2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum P. Hastings Project Manager - TERM-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Rattlesnake-Garrison Right-of-Way Marking Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance Location: Missoula County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to survey and mark the Rattlesnake- Garrison transmission line right-of-way (ROW) boundary in Missoula County, Montana. The installation of signs to mark BPA's ROW would prevent encroachment from homeowners and developers, ensure the safety of nearby residents, and allow for the continued safe maintenance and operation of BPA's transmission lines.

178

A Parallel Row-Based Algorithm For Standard Cell Placement With Integrated Error Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel approaches to control error in parallel cellplacement algorithms: (1) Heuristic Cell-Coloring; (2) Adaptive Sequence Length Control. 1. INTRODUCTION Simulated annealing is a general-purpose optimization method that has been successfully applied to solve a large variety of combinatorial optimization problems including many in VLSI design. Annealing is computationally very expensive, hence efforts to improve execution time has proceeded along two fronts: (1) accelerating the annealing schedule, and (2) parallelizing the annealing algorithm for execution on multiprocessors. Parallel implementations of annealing as applied to the cell placement application either attempt multiple cell moves in parallel [1-7], or distribute ...

Jeff S. Sargent; Prith Banerjee

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)"

180

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"," "

182

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

183

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

184

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

185

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

186

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"

187

Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1047-2008 DOE-STD-1047-2008 August 2008 DOE STANDARD Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1047-2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ....................................................................................................................... i 1. SCOPE AND PURPOSE .........................................................................................1 2. APPLICABILITY ....................................................................................................1 3. NORMATIVE REFERENCES................................................................................2

188

Qualification of in-service examination of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

Technical support was provided to assist the Yankee Atomic Electric Company with their restart effort for the Yankee plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. Demonstration of adequate margin during a postulated pressurized thermal shock accident was an important part of the justification for restarting the plant, and effective inservice examination of the critical inner surface of the vessel in the beltline region was a key objective and a significant component of the safety analysis. This report discussed this inservice inspection.

Ammirato, F.; Kietzman, K.; Becker, L.; Ashwin, P.; Selby, G.; Krzywosz, K.; Findlan, S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). Nondestructive Evaluation Center); Lance, J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

App Misc Easement ROW.pdf App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.54 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 4 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:36, 20 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:36, 20 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 4 pages (1.54 MB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

190

File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:02, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:02, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 14:00, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:00, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

191

File:Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Guidelines-for-leasing-row-tracts.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:06, 13 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:06, 13 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (23 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

192

File:03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:00, 3 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:00, 3 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (38 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 09:55, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:55, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (53 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 10:36, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:36, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs)

193

File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:03, 29 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:03, 29 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 12:06, 12 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:06, 12 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (82 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs) 15:45, 26 June 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:45, 26 June 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) June 26th version

194

DisClose: Discovering Colossal Closed Itemsets via a Memory Efficient Compact Row-Tree  

SciTech Connect

Itemset mining has recently focused on discovery of frequent itemsets from high-dimensional datasets with relatively few rows and a larger number of items. With exponentially in-creasing running time as average row length increases, mining such datasets renders most conventional algorithms impracti-cal. Unfortunately, large cardinality closed itemsets are likely to be more informative than small cardinality closed itemsets in this type of dataset. This paper proposes an approach, called DisClose, to extract large cardinality (colossal) closed itemsets from high-dimensional datasets. The approach relies on a memory-efficient Compact Row-Tree data structure to represent itemsets during the search process. The search strategy explores the transposed representation of the dataset. Large cardinality itemsets are enumerated first followed by smaller ones. In addition, we utilize a minimum cardinality threshold to further reduce the search space. Experimental result shows that DisClose can complete the extraction of colossal closed itemsets in the considered dataset, even for low support thresholds. The algorithm immediately discovers closed itemsets without needing to check if each new closed itemset has previously been found.

Zulkurnain, Nurul F.; Keane, John A.; Haglin, David J.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

196

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows form a magnetic rail. Levitation and lateral stability is provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets (SCM) mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. A multiphase propulsion system interconnects specific coils in a given magnetic rail and interacts with the SCM to produce a propulsion force to the vehicle.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chicagoland Single-Family Housing Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the PARR team identifies housing characteristics and energy use for fifteen housing types (groups) in the Chicagoland (Cook County, Illinois) region and specifies measure packages that provide an optimum level of energy savings based on a BEopt analysis. The analysis is based on assessor data and actual energy consumption data on 432,605 houses representing approximately 30% of the population.

Spanier, J.; Scheu, R.; Brand, L.; Yang, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

199

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

200

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

202

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

203

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

204

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

205

" Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" 1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and Source of Assistance;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,," Source of Assistance" "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","In-house","Utlity/Energy Suppler","Product/Service Provider","Federal Program","State/Local Program","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States"

206

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(f)"

207

Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

Weaver, Phyllis C

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Observations and comments on the turbine failure at Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary analysis is presented of the catastrophic disc failure in the low-pressure turbine at the Yankee Rowe nuclear reactor plant. The analysis is based on on-site inspection and documentation of fractured components. Heavily oxidized thumbnail cracks were observed on fractured surfaces of the first-stage generator-end disc, indicating stress corrosion cracking as the precursor to the catastrophic failure of this disc. No evidence of such cracks was seen on the corresponding fractured governor-end disc. We propose a number of alternative possible causes for the failures and for the differences observed between the two discs.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Short-term dynamics of soil carbon, microbial biomass, and soil enzyme activities as compared to longer-term effects of tillage in irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates by tillage and crop rotation: a global data analysis.of tillage in irrigated row crops Daniel Geisseler & Williamthe cropping season in all crop sequences D. Geisseler (*) :

Geisseler, Daniel; Horwath, William R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Coast Guard Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Federal Aviation Administration Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies 11 AAC 195.010: Anadromous Fish 17 AAC 15.021: Application for Utility Permit Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf

212

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

214

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

215

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

216

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 4,563 4,249 * 313 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 2,845 2,819 0 27 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2,396 2,370 0 27 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 951 951 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 268 268 0 * 3115 Dairy Products 44 31 * Q 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17 0 0 17 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 659 623 Q * 3121 Beverages 587 551 Q * 3122 Tobacco 72

217

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

218

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

219

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

220

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

222

On undrained test using Rowe's relation and Incremental Modelling: Generalisation of the notion of Characteristic State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is recalled that stress-strain incremental modelling is a common feature of most theoretical description of the mechanical behaviour of granular material. An other commonly accepted characteristics of the mechanical behaviour of granular material is the Rowe's relation which links the dilatancy K to the ratio B of vertical-to-lateral stress during a test at constant lateral stress, i.e. B =(1+M)(1+K). Using an incremental modelling, this law shall be interpreted as a pseudo-Poisson coefficient. We combine these two features to solve the problem of an axial compression under undrained condition. We demonstrate that the sample is submitted to a bifurcation of the transcritical type when it reaches the q=Mp line. This allows extending the notion of the characteristic state introduced by Luong to other situations and to anisotropic systems. We show also that these undrained tests are quite appropriate to study the characteristic-state behaviour.

P. Evesque

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods  

SciTech Connect

An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, ShannXi, 710049 (China); Yang, J.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Yitian Road, ShenZhen, GuangDong, 518026 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wednesday November 10, 4:01 AM Tokyo 3RD LD: Japan-EU row delays decision on nuke reactor site (EDS the location to host a global nuclear fusion project during the latest round of talks in Vienna with four other ministry's nuclear fusion development office, told reporters that neither Japan nor the EU is in a mood

226

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

227

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

228

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006; 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu Economic Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal Breeze Other(e) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 47 0 3 5 Q 20 1 17 20-49 112 7 Q 20 1 12 1 64 50-99 247 29 Q 26 88 33 * 68 100-249 313 28 1 97 12 48 43 85 250-499 297 * * 121 154 3 5 13 500 and Over 2,547 * * 130 2,043 301 6 66 Not Ascertained (f) 3,399 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,399 Total 6,962 64 17 398 2,299 417 56 3,711 Employment Size Under 50 161 4 Q 48 15 19 0 64 50-99 390 41 1 97 145 27 1 77 100-249

229

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,475 11,399 2,947 67 15 1,210 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 183 449 269 35 0 148 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 18 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 45 61 35 26 15 45 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125

230

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,139 367 23 45 535 14 21 3 131 20-49 1,122 333 13 19 530 8 93 5 122 50-99 1,309 349 22 17 549 10 157 8 197 100-249 2,443 607 25 19 994 11 263 10 512 250-499 2,092 413 53 13 633 4 244 3 730 500 and Over 7,551 781 115 17 2,271 31 240 344 3,752 Total 15,657 2,851 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 374 5,445 Employment Size Under 50 1,103 334 10 45 550 10

231

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value Economic per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Characteristic(a) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2 50-99 830.1 5.9 2.7 100-249 1,130.0 6.7 3.1 250-499 1,961.4 7.6 3.6 500 and Over 3,861.9 9.0 3.6 Total 1,278.4 6.9 3.1 Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3 7.7 3.6 500-999 2,328.9

232

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

233

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

234

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,109 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,149 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 144 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17 44 19 18 0 17 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 78 78 11 43 61 35 26 13 35 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 1,125 1,125 13 112 961 325 W 0 127 3115 Dairy Product 1,044 1,044 25 88 941 147 W 0 95

235

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Shipments Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Characteristic(a) Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,166 367 23 48 540 15 41 3 140 12 20-49 1,209 333 20 26 550 8 104 5 182 20 50-99 1,507 349 51 19 575 98 190 9 256 40 100-249 2,651 607 53 20 1,091 23 310 53 566 73 250-499 2,362 413 52 13 754 158 247 9 732 16 500 and Over

236

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1.4 Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Shipments NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and of Energy Sources Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal Breeze Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 151 2,494 10,376 4,061 64 7 1,668 W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 490 286 30 0 165 W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 26 50 36 15 0 29 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 73 73 3 36 67 13 11 7 15 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 987 987

237

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 28 28 0 20-49 307 227 80 50-99 2,218 1,673 545 100-249 2,647 1,437 1,210 250-499 3,736 2,271 1,464 500 and Over 10,814 5,665 5,149 Total 19,750 11,301 8,449 Employment Size Under 50 516 230 287 50-99 1,193 1,180 13 100-249 3,825 3,231 594 250-499 3,796 2,675 1,120 500-999 4,311 1,921 2,390

238

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood Economic Total Onsite and Characteristic(a) Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,447 450 Q Q 20-49 5,220 5,106 29 Q 50-99 3,784 3,579 29 Q 100-249 17,821 17,115 484 222 250-499 28,464 27,202 334 927 500 and Over 86,249 85,028 106 1,114 Total 142,986 138,480 1,030 3,476 Employment Size Under 50 2,193 1,177 Q Q 50-99 6,617 6,438 13 166 100-249 12,403 12,039 266 98 250-499

239

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

Sylvain, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the super conducting magnets on the vehicle.

He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system are disclosed comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the superconducting magnets on the vehicle. 12 figs.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

245

Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

247

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Final_Updated.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Future Challenges Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nathan Rowe Chris Pickett Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Users Annual Training Meeting May 20-23, 2013 St. Louis, Missouri 2 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Introduction * Changing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities * Nuclear Security Challenges * How to Respond? - Additional Protocol - State-Level Concept - Continuity of Knowledge * Conclusion 3 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Fuel Cycle Source: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Weapons Cycle Conversion

248

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis shows that the station electric distribution system has the capacity and capability to supply voltage to the Class 1E equipment with their design ratings for the worst case loading condition.

Selan, J.C.

1981-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Detailed Analysis of Thermal Mass Effects in a Code-Traceable DOE-2 Simulation of the 2000 IECC for a Single-Family Residence in Texas: A Project for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Nonattainment and Affected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the thermal mass effects in a code-traceable DOE-2 simulation of the 2000 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) for a single-family residence in Texas. This report is composed of two major simulations: 1) the simulation according to the location of the insulation of IECC2000, and 2) the simulation according to the types of real brick and block walls which are practically used at the residential house. In this study, the 2000 IECC was used to develop the base case simulation model in Houston, Texas. The DOE-2 energy simulation program was used to analyze changes to the annual energy use caused by changing various building materials. The best energy conservative material layout was then chosen that contained reduced annual energy use, peak cooling and heating loads, and peak day electricity use.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

252

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

253

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

254

ROW BY ROW METHODS FOR SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 28, 2009 ... Research supported in part by NSF Grant DMS. 06-06712, ONR Grant N00014- 08-1-1118 and DOE Grant DE-FG02-08ER58562. 1 ...

255

Conditioning analysis of incomplete Cholesky factorizations with orthogonal dropping  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of preconditioners based on incomplete Cholesky factorization in which the neglected (dropped) components are orthogonal to the approximations being kept is presented. General estimate for the condition number of the preconditioned system is given which only depends on the accuracy of individual approximations. The estimate is further improved if, for instance, only the newly computed rows of the factor are modified during each approximation step. In this latter case it is further shown to be sharp. The analysis is illustrated with some existing factorizations in the context of discretized elliptic partial differential equations.

Napov, Artem

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Energy Management DIY – Do-It-Yourself HERS – Homeare completed. Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Improvements. About oneand financial incentives for DIY improvements.    Flexible

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AHPwES - Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR AMI - Area Median Income APS - Arizona Public Service ARRA - American Reinvestment and Recovery Act ASEC - Annual Social and...

258

HECM Single Family Portfolio Snapshot | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the lender up to the maximum claim amount. The loan amount is based on borrower age, home value, and current interest rates. The HECM data files provide loan-level records...

259

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

260

Modeling contaminant exposure in a single-family house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New, stricter building codes for energy conservation mandates tighter building construction, which directly reduces the amount of available fresh air from infiltration. This decrease in fresh air is a subject of intensive ...

Huang, Jeffrey M., 1977-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC replacement, air sealing, duct sealing, additionaltoday – for example, air sealing and climate-appropriatesome combination of air sealing, insulation, lighting

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

in the U.S. Single Family Residential Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the Internal Revenue Code create and remove tax-induced trading constraints on homeowners. For example, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 replaced a one-time, post-55 capital gain exclusion with a larger gain exclusion option that could be exercised every two years. We develop a simple demand-based model of housing turnover and use it to determine whether the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 led to changes in the percentage of the existing housing stock that was sold in the U.S. and the four geographic regions defined by the U.S. Census Bureau (Northeast, Midwest, South and West). Preliminary results indicate that national and regional turnover measures began to rise immediately after the passage of the 1997 legislation. Given that housing supply is relatively inelastic, at least in the short-run, and that increased demand must drive up prices when supply is constrained, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 may have been one of the sources of the initial price appreciation that led to the Housing Bubble and the related Sub-Prime Mortgage Crisis. If so, the seeds of these unfortunate events were sown much earlier than is generally realized. The Impact of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 on Housing Turnover

Andrea J. Heuson; David Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Code manual for passive solar design single family residential construction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General information is presented on types of passive solar techniques and a method for estimating passive solar performance. Important codes and standards are described, each description listing the items in the code which could have a potential impact on a passive solar design and analyzing the effect of the code on the use of such techniques. State and local codes and code agencies are summarized. The local summary contains the name of a contact in the enforcement agency to whom specific questions may be addressed. The requirements to file for a building permit are given briefly. (LEW)

None

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE – Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program eligibility. (see below) The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies...

267

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

268

Vegetation Dynamics Along Utility Rights-of-Way Factors Affecting the Ability of Shrub and Herbaceous Communities to Resist Invasion by Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional vegetation management programs along utility rights-of-way (ROW) have been designed to prevent tree growth into transmission wire security zones. This study of vegetation dynamics describes factors affecting the ability of shrub and herbaceous communities to resist tree invasion. Such information will allow ecologists to identify the critical pressure points where intervention in natural ecological processes will prove most effective.

1999-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Conventional Boiler Use",3199,12,4,1271,2,11,5.6 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",3515,8,2,834,"*",23,3.8 "Direct Uses-Total Process",768929,10,7,2907,16,17...

270

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel",12979,7,3,2074,3,26 " Conventional Boiler Use",12979,3,1,712,1,3 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process","--",4,3,1362,2,23 "Direct Uses-Total Process",675152,4,9,2549,7,13 "...

271

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l",84,133,23,2119,8,547 " Conventional Boiler Use",84,71,17,1281,8,129 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",0,62,6,838,1,417 "Direct Uses-Total Process",2639,62,52,2788,39,412 "...

272

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Only","Other than","and","Any","from Only","Other than","and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Electricity(b)","Local Utility(c)","Local Utility(d)","Other Sources","Natural...

273

The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error Bars: ± 1 Standard Error(s) Row exclusion: 04-83/05-Error Bars: ± 1 Standard Error(s) Row exclusion: 05-120/06-± 1 Standard Error( s) Percent CFA Devoted to Wrist Row

Von dem Bussche, Mary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

276

Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

277

A second row Parking Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider two variations of the discrete car parking problem where at every vertex of the integers a car arrives with rate one, now allowing for parking in two lines. a) The car parks in the first line whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. It can reach the first line if it is not obstructed by cars already parked in the second line (screening). b) The car parks according to the same rules, but parking in the first line can not be obstructed by parked cars in the second line (no screening). In both models, a car that can not park in the first line will attempt to park in the second line. If it is obstructed in the second line as well, the attempt is discarded. We show that both models are solvable in terms of finite-dimensional ODEs. We compare numerically the limits of first and second line densities, with time going to infinity. While it is not surprising that model a) exhibits an increase of the density in the second line from the first line, more remarkably this is also true for model b), albeit in a less pronounced way.

S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

A science based emission factor for particulate matter emitted from cotton harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poor regional air quality in some states across the US cotton belt has resulted in increased pressure on agricultural sources of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution regulators. Moreover, inaccurate emission factors used in the calculation of annual emissions inventories led to the identification of cotton harvesting as a significant source of PM10 in California and Arizona. As a result, cotton growers in these states are now required to obtain air quality permits and submit management practice plans detailing the actions taken by the producer to reduce fugitive PM emissions from field operations. The objective of this work was to develop accurate PM emission factors for cotton harvesting in terms of total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5. Two protocols were developed and used to develop PM emission factors from cotton harvesting operations on three farms in Texas during 2006 and 2007. Protocol one utilized TSP concentrations measured downwind of harvesting operations with meteorological data measured onsite in a dispersion model to back-calculate TSP emission flux values. Flux values, determined with the regulatory dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, were converted to emission factors and corrected with results from particle size distribution (PSD) analyses to report emission factors in terms of PM10 and PM2.5. Emission factors were developed for two-row (John Deere 9910) and sixrow (John Deere 9996) cotton pickers with protocol one. The uncertainty associated with the emission factors developed through protocol one resulted in no significant difference between the emission factors for the two machines. Under the second protocol, emission concentrations were measured onboard the six-row cotton picker as the machine harvested cotton. PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors were developed from TSP emission concentration measurements converted to emission rates using the results of PSD analysis. The total TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emission factors resulting from the source measurement protocol are 1.64 ± 0.37, 0.55 ± 0.12, and 1.58E- 03 ± 4.5E-04 kg/ha, respectively. These emission factors contain the lowest uncertainty and highest level of precision of any cotton harvesting PM emission factors ever developed. Thus, the emission factors developed through the source sampling protocol are recommended for regulatory use.

Wanjura, John David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Single family heating and cooling requirements: Assumptions, methods, and summary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research has created a data base of hourly building loads using a state-of-the-art building simulation code (DOE-2.ID) for 8 prototypes, representing pre-1940s to 1990s building practices, in 16 US climates. The report describes the assumed modeling inputs and building operations, defines the building prototypes and selection of base cities, compares the simulation results to both surveyed and measured data sources, and discusses the results. The full data base with hourly space conditioning, water heating, and non-HVAC electricity consumption is available from GRI. In addition, the estimated loads on a per square foot basis are included as well as the peak heating and cooling loads.

Ritschard, R.L.; Hanford, J.W.; Sezgen, A.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewablespace heaters, and solar water heaters, as well as other

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile Â… Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for purchase and installation. for purchase and installation. Building America's research is aimed at the goal of constructing high- performance homes and many of the Building America research teams have worked directly with builders to construct zero energy or zero energy-ready homes. Here are just a few examples. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, operated by Steven Winter Associates, worked with Preferred Builders, Inc., on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. Technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced." Closed-cell spray foam insulated the unvented attic and the interior of the foundation wall and wrapped the underside and sides of the slab while 1.5 inches of rigid foam sheathing covered the

282

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile Â… Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to purchase and install. to purchase and install. Much of Building America's research is aimed directly at the goal of constructing high-performance homes and many of the Building America research teams have been directly involved with builders who are constructing zero energy or zero energy-ready homes. Here are just a few examples. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, operated by Steven Winter Associates, worked with Preferred Builders, Inc., on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. Technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced." Closed-cell spray foam insulated the unvented attic and the interior of the foundation wall and wrapped the underside and sides of the slab while 1.5 inches of rigid foam sheathing covered the

283

Icon + expectation : exploring the evolution of the American single family home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To propose a new conceptualization of "home", it is necessary to explore the mechanisms that have created this revered icon. Since the industrial revolution, the commercial packaging of the home has continually reinforced ...

Wilcox, Michael E. (Michael Eaves), 1975-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Experimental Evaluation of Ventilation Systems in a Single-Family Dwelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The French regulation on residential building ventilation relies on an overall and continuous air renewal. The fresh air should enter the building through the "habitable rooms" while the polluted air is extracted in the service rooms. In this way, internal air is drained from the lowest polluted rooms to the highest polluted ones. However, internal pressure equilibrium and air movements in buildings result from the combined effects ventilation system and parameters such as wind, temperature difference or doors opening. This paper aims to analyse the influence of these parameters on pollutant transfer within buildings. In so doing, experiments are carried out using tracer gas release for representing pollution sources in an experimental house. Mechanical exhaust, balanced and natural ventilation systems are thus tested. Results show the followings: - For all cases, internal doors' opening causes the most important pollutant spread. - When doors are closed, the best performances are obtained with balanced venti...

Koffi, Juslin; Akoua, Jean-Jacques

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-sized absorption chillers. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the research reported is to develop and analyze new concepts for absorption cycles to improve the performance or reduce the cost of a 3-ton absorption chiller that can be used with solar collected heat. New refrigerant-absorbent pairs are investigated, as are additives to currently used refrigerant-absorbent pairs. Results are given of a literature search on those topics. An initial screening is reported to check the values of the heats of mixing of candidate refrigerants and adsorbents, and also to screen several candidate absorbents against water as a refrigerant. A modified apparatus and procedures for measurement of refrigerant-absorbent solubilities are described. Pressure-temperature-composition data for the R-22/E-181 pair were measured. Based on theory and the information found in the literature, a set of criteria and guidelines was developed that gives the desirable properties of the refrigerants, absorbents, and pairs. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numerical simulation value minus wind tunnel value, equationfor publication in The Journal of Wind Engineering andIndustrial Aerodynamics Wind-Induced Ground-Surface

Riley, W.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-sized absorption chillers. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research program is to develop and analyze new concepts for absorption cycles to improve the performance or reduce the cost (or both) of a 3-ton absorption chiller that can be used with solar-collected heat. New refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives to currently used refrigerant-absorbent pairs, and modifications to the cycle are being investigated. For the initial analyses the use of a fluid at 160 to 230/sup 0/F from a solar collector as a heating source is assumed. In the initial analyses the chiller is to provide chilled water at 45/sup 0/F at full load; alternatively, if a new refrigerant-absorbent pair appears to be amenable for direct cooling of the occupied space, the temperature of the evaporator is to be 45/sup 0/F. Both water cooling and air cooling of the absorber and the condenser are being studied. The use of ambient air at 95/sup 0/F dry bulb and 75/sup 0/F wet bulb temperatures is assumed. With the water-cooled cycles, the initial and operating costs of a properly sized cooling tower will be included. The research consists of five principal tasks: (a) acquisition of information for analysis, (b) definition of criteria for selection of promising refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives for currently used pairs, or cycle modifications, (c) preparation and analysis of conceptual designs, (d) comparison and selection of the promising new systems that warrant further study, and (e) recommendations for further research for each promising new system. Progress on each of these tasks is described. (WHK)

None

1978-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seds.html. USDOE. 2009. Residential Energy ConsumptionUSEPA) 2008. Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: FinalExperiences of residential consumers and utilities. Oak

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of a number of energy conservation measures for homes located in hot, humid climates was analyzed using the DOE-2.1B building simulation model. Measures having the greatest benefits to the homeowner are predicted to be the addition of ceiling insulation only if the house is not already insulated, weatherization, and reduction of the wall outer surface solar absorptance. The weatherization and solar absorptance reduction measures should be do-it-yourself installations to be cost-effective Replacement of an air-conditioning unit with a new high-efficiency unit was very effective in reducing peak demand and annual cooling energy. Unless the energy efficiency ratio of the existing unit is low (< 6), replacement is generally not cost-effective. The measures were predicted to result in slightly increased indoor humidities, but their effect on human comfort was predicted to be small. However, this conclusion should be considered preliminary since the simulation models used for these predictions have limitations. The amount of energy that can be saved by these measures is very dependent on the occupant's lifestyle, such as the degree to which the occupants will alter clothing to achieve comfort.

McLain, H. A.; MacDonald, J. M.; Goldenberg, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Micro-level return and volatility drivers in Boston's single family home market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developers and investors commonly target neighborhoods close to the urban core and with low median incomes as potential growth markets. Investments in these areas however are often perceived by private sector capital as ...

Valenta, Jay, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House  

SciTech Connect

Wind induces a ground-surface pressure field around a building that can substantially affect the flow of soil gas and thereby the entry of radon and other soil-gas contaminants into the building. To quantify the effect of the wind-induced groundsurface pressure field on contaminant entry rates, the mean ground-surface pressure field was experimentally measured in a wind tunnel for several incidence angles of the wind, two atmospheric boundary layers, and two house geometries. The experimentally measured ground-surface pressure fields are compared with those predicted by a k-e turbulence model. Despite the fundamental limitations in applying a k-e model to a system with flow separation, predictions from the numerical simulations were good for the two wind incidence angles tested.

Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for the Single-Family Residential House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the development of the duct model based on ASHRAE standard 152-2004 (ASHRAE, 2004) using the DOE-2.1e building energy simulation program. To accomplish this, FUNCTION commands for DOE-2 were used to develop the duct model and provide the improved predictions of the duct heat loss or gain from the unconditioned space as well as supply or return duct leakage. After applying the duct model to the DOE-2 base-case simulation model, simulation results were compared with the measurement from the case-study house for verification.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measured data on energy consumption in single family detached homes across the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Services Administration (CSA) sponsored, with the technical assistance of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), a national demonstration on energy conservation. Two hundred and twenty houses were selected in 14 cities across the country to be weatherized and evaluated. Infiltration rates, mechanical efficiencies, building dimensions, solar data and energy consumption data before and after weatherization were collected on each of these houses. The before weatherization data on 33 houses at Charleston, SC, Colorado Springs, CO, and Fargo, ND, are presented. Modified steady-state heat balance calculations which include solar data are also compared to the utility data of each of these houses.

Crenshaw, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water also is used by dishwashers and clothes washers. Hotand water efficient dishwashers and clothes washers. Thepeople clotheswasher dishwasher showers city state bathubs

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Qualification test procedures and results for Honeywell solar collector subsystem, single-family residence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedures and results are described in qualifying the Honeywell solar collector subsystem. Testing began in mid-August 1976, and was concluded in late February 1977. Testing was done in the following areas: pressure, service loads, hail, solar degradation, pollutants, thermal degradation, and outgassing. Results from these tests are summarized.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Damn the city, dam the suburbs : redefining the single family home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, we no longer realize public perception of home ownership in the United States is primarily shaped by government sponsored programs. In the 1940's, however, it was these programs that created a change in the options ...

Desmond, Marissa Grace

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Passive-solar-heating project for a single-family residence. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was a passive home heating system utilizing solar collectors that are part of the roof structure of a 15' x 30' greenhouse. The design utilized solar air collectors constructed on site that are actually part of the roof of the greenhouse. The flow of air is from the storage to the collectors then back to the storage. The storage bin consists of a 5' x 19' concrete insulated bin built into the floor of the greenhouse. The storage mass was gallon plastic jugs. The plastic jugs did not work properly, so they are being replaced by salt rods. This replacement will be an after the fact project by the owner. The concrete storage bin was insulated with 2'' plastic foam insulation, applied to the 8'' concrete wall. The ducts entering and leaving the storage bin have low voltage (12 volt) electric dampers. A cross flow system was used. The heated air circulates from the collectors to storage via ducts in the walls of the lean-to design. The removal of heat from the storage bin was from end to end via the ducts to the central air system for the house. In addition, the greenhouse is connected to the house with a doorway that can be opened to circulate air into the house, a shuttled exhaust fan 1/3H.P. motor has aided in the circulation of air from the storage bin to the collectors and back.

Starkey, V.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

303

The kaon semileptonic form factor with near physical domain wall quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new calculation of the K->pi semileptonic form factor at zero momentum transfer in domain wall lattice QCD with Nf=2+1 dynamical quark flavours. By using partially twisted boundary conditions we simulate directly at the phenomenologically relevant point of zero momentum transfer. We perform a joint analysis for all available ensembles which include three different lattice spacings (a=0.09-0.14fm), large physical volumes (m_pi*L>3.9) and pion masses as low as 171 MeV. The comprehensive set of simulation points allows for a detailed study of systematic effects leading to the prediction f+(0)=0.9670(20)(+18/-46), where the first error is statistical and the second error systematic. The result allows us to extract the CKM-matrix element |Vus|=0.2237(+13/-8) and confirm first-row CKM-unitarity in the Standard Model at the sub per mille level.

Peter A. Boyle; Jonathan M. Flynn; Nicolas Garron; Andreas Juttner; Chris T. Sachrajda; Karthee Sivalingam; James M. Zanotti

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

305

factor.mws - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... 0 "" {TEXT -1 61 "Be default \\+ factor factors over the field of rational numbers. ... {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 36 "alias(beta=RootOf(x^5+x^3+x^2+x+1));" } ...

306

Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

Cunha, Frank J. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

'2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption" "Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, Form EIA-810," "Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010." "Released: July 2013...

308

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

'2010 Manufacturing Energy" "Consumption Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics," "Form EIA-810, 'Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010." "Released: July 2013...

309

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sold and" "transferred out. It does not include electricity inputs from onsite" "cogeneration or generation from combustible fuels because that energy has" "already been...

310

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3314," Nonferrous Metals, except Aluminum",2522.1,5.7,2 331419," Primary Smelting and Refining of Nonferrous Metals, except Copper and Aluminum",8897.6,18.1,9.2 3315,"...

311

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"*","*",5,"*",4,"*",23 327420," Gypsum",85,1845,"*","*",74,"*",0,0,2 327993," Mineral Wool",50,3978,0,"*",33,"*",0,"*","*" 331,"Primary Metals",1910,133236,3,1,610,1,17,9,133...

312

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sidual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural...

313

The Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

314

1996-2004 Trends in the Single-Family Housing Market: Spatial Analysis of the Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed geographic analysis of two specific topics affecting the residential sector. First, we performed an analysis of new construction market trends using annual building permit data. We report summarized tables and national maps to help illustrate market conditions. Second, we performed a detailed geographic analysis of the housing finance market. We analyzed mortgage application data to provide citable statistics and detailed geographic summarization of the residential housing picture in the US for each year in the 1996-2004 period. The databases were linked to geographic information system tools to provide various map series detailing the results geographically. Looking at these results geographically may suggest potential new markets for TD programs addressing the residential sector that have not been considered previously. For example, we show which lenders affect which regions and which income or mortgage product classes. These results also highlight the issue of housing affordability. Energy efficiency R&D programs focused on developing new technology for the residential sector must be conscious of the costs of products resulting from research that will eventually impact the home owner or new home buyer. Results indicate that home values as a proportion of median family income in Building America communities are closely aligned with the national average of home value as a proportion of median income. Other key findings: • The share of home building and home buying activity continues to rise steadily in the Hot-Dry and Hot-Humid climate zones, while the Mixed-Humid and Cold climate zone shares continue to decline. Other zones remain relatively stable in terms of share of housing activity. • The proportion of home buyers having three times the median family income for their geography has been steadily increasing during the study period. • Growth in the Hispanic/Latino population and to a lesser degree in the Asian population has translated into proportional increases in share of home purchasing by both groups. White home buyers continue to decline as a proportion all home buyers. • Low interest rate climate resulted in lenders moving back to conventional financing, as opposed to government-backed financing, for cases that would be harder to financing in higher rate environments. Government loan products are one mechanism for affecting energy efficiency gains in the residential sector. • The rate environment and concurrent deregulation of the finance industry resulted unprecedented merger and acquisition activity among financial institutions during the study period. This study conducted a thorough accounting of this merger activity to inform the market share analysis provided. • The home finance industry quartiles feature 5 lenders making up the first quartile of home purchase loans, 18 lenders making up the second quartile, 111 lenders making up the third quartile, and the remaining nearly 8,000 lenders make up the fourth quartile.

Anderson, Dave M.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Social marketing, financial, and regulatory mechanisms for adoption of water conservation and stormwater management practices by single-family households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, water delivery and stormwater removal have been managed largely by engineering staff at water utilities, municipal departments and multi-jurisdiction authorities. In recent ...

Youngerman, Zach (Zach Reuben)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Capitalization of Transit Investments into Single-Family Home Prices: A Comparative Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the VancouverAdvancedLight Rail Transit System on Single-Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems John Lanchsof Five California Rail Transit Systems John Landis Subhra

Landis, John; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Zhang, Ming

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Changes in single family housing prices due to the planning and construction of Interstate 476 in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested in various studies that increasing accessibility to a transportation network would influence local property values and their pattern of change over time. This thesis examines the capitalization into ...

Komiyama, Noriko, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

319

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

320

FGF growth factor analogs  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Form factors and standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... with ? in, eg, Ångstroms; the "anomalous" scattering factor f? (depending on x-ray energy E and the ...

323

PQ Encyclopedia: Understanding Power Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ Encylopedia offers a thorough understanding of what power factor is, what factors affect it, and what to be aware of when attempting to improve it. In particular, efforts to remedy power factor can sometimes worsen harmonics.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national annual quantity-weighted average conversion factors for conventional, reformulated, and oxygenated motor gasolines (see Table A3). The factor ...

326

Many Factors Affect MPG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

327

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Stress Intensification Factors and Flexibility Factors for Unreinforced Branch Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the stress intensification factors and flexibility factors for branch connections. The report contains results of an investigation into the flexibility and stress intensification factors of unreinforced fabricated tees (and other similar configurations). It provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

Factor Separation in Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method is developed for computing the interactions among various factors influencing the atmospheric circulations. It is shown how numerical simulations can be utilized to obtain the pure contribution of any factor to any predicted field,...

U. Stein; P. Alpert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

332

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

333

T15a_asc - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Q = Data withheld either because the Relative Standard Error (RSE) ... multiply the corresponding column and row factors. · Because of rounding, ...

334

Design Factors That Influence Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Corrosion factors that can influence design considerations...Inhibitors Inspection Planned maintenance Source: Ref 25...

335

Comments on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Remarks on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Electromagnetic form factors of hadrons  

SciTech Connect

A vector meson dominance model of the electromagnetic form factors of hadrons is developed which is based on the use of unstable particle propagators. Least-square fits are made to the proton, neutron, pion and kaon form factor data in both the space and time-like regions. A good fit to the low-energy nucleon form factor data is obtained using only rho, $omega$, and phi dominance, and leads to a determination of the vector meson resonance parameters in good agreement with experiment. The nucleon-vector meson coupling constants obey simple sum rules indicating that there exists no hard core contribution to the form factors within theoretical uncertainties. The prediction for the electromagnetic radii of the proton is in reasonable agreement with recent experiments. The pion and kaon charge form factors as deduced from the nucleon form factors assuming vector meson universality are compared to the data. The pion form factor agrees with the data in both the space and time-like regions. The pion charge radius is in agreement with the recent Dubna result, but the isovector P-wave pion-pion phase shift calculated from the theory disagrees with experiment. A possible contribution to the form factors from a heavy rho meson is also evaluated. (auth)

Zidell, V.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Community Discovery via Metagraph Factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks through analysis of time-varying, multirelational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications such as search ... Keywords: MetaFac, community discovery, dynamic social network analysis, metagraph factorization, nonnegative tensor factorization, relational hypergraph

Yu-Ru Lin; Jimeng Sun; Hari Sundaram; Aisling Kelliher; Paul Castro; Ravi Konuru

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents Conversion factors for energy equivalents are derived from the following relations: ...

340

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Fermat factorization method revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the well known Fermat factorization method, we call the Fermat factorization equation the equation solved by it: P(x, y) = (x + 2R) 2 ? y 2 ? 4N = 0; where N = p q> 0 is a RSA modulus with primes p and q supposed of equal length. This equation is a bivariate integer polynomial equation and we propose to solve it directly using Coppersmith’s methods for bivariate integer polynomials. As we use them as a black box, our proofs will be brief. We show a first result: we can factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 5/18. Using the fact that the Newton polygon of P(x, y) is in fact a lower triangle we show a better result: we can indeed factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 1/3. We conclude with proposals for future works. 1

Robert Erra; Christophe Grenier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses.  Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen.  The software tracks and reports the ...

343

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

345

Common Risk Factors in Currency Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify a “slope” factor in exchange rates. High interest rate currencies load more on this slope factor than low interest rate currencies. This factor accounts for most of the cross-sectional variation in average ...

Roussano, Nikolai

346

Primeless factoring-based cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factoring-based public-key cryptosystems have an overall complexity which is dominated by the key-production algorithm, which requires the generation of prime numbers. This is most inconvenient in settings where the key-generation is not an one-off process, ...

Sonia Bogos, Ioana Boureanu, Serge Vaudenay

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Optimum utilization of site energy sources for all-season thermal comfort in new residential construction for single-family attached (rowhouse/townhouse) designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proposed design analysis is presented of a passive solar energy efficient system for a typical three-level, three bedroom, two story, garage-under townhouse. The design incorporates the best, most performance-proven and cost effective products, materials, processes, technologies, and sub-systems which are available today. Seven distinct categories recognized for analysis are identified as: the exterior environment; the interior environment; conservation of energy; natural energy utilization; auxiliary energy utilization; control and distribution systems; and occupant adaptation. Preliminary design features, fenestration sysems, the plenum-supply system, the thermal-storage party-fire walls, direct gain storage, the radiant comfort system, and direct passive cooling systems are briefly described. Features of the design under analysis and on which conclusions have not yet been formulated are: the energy reclamation system, auxiliary energy back-up systems, the distribution system and operating modes, the control systems, and non-comfort energy systems and inputs. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices provide supporting information on: properties of a chemical system for solar fired, air-cooled absorption equipment, air-side performance of a one-inch tube, absorber plate-fin coil, listings of the programs used for simulation and data reduction, and evaluation of the Carrier 3-ton chiller in an integrated heating and cooling system. (LEW)

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a hardware oriented project to demonstrate the feasibility of the solar fired, air cooled, absorption cooling of residential and commercial buildings. Beginning with design accuracy property data on a new chemical system applicable to air cooled absorption equipment, a breadboard machine was constructed in order to gain experience with system dynamics, chemical stability and overall performance. Employing heat transfer data and operating characteristics obtained from the breadboard an attempt was made to design and build a first generation prototype. A problem with the first heat transfer additive used caused the absorber to operate unsatisfactorily. A second, more refined, prototype was designed, constructed and tested incorporating the previous experience and heat transfer data as well as a new heat transfer additive. Although this prototype did not quite meet design capacity (85%), it surpassed design COP (0.75 vs 0.72) and performed stably without the signs of chemical degradation present in the previous prototype. Two more identical machines are being operated during field test in actual solar systems. After the successful operation of the 10 kW machine, it was decided to design and construct a larger scaled-up prototype for use in commercial applications. An appropriate size seemed to be about 70 kW. After considerable design effort a satisfactory size and design was achieved and constructed. In general, the 70 kW machine behaved much like the 10 kW, again producing about 80% of capacity but with varying COP's (probably due to the transient nature of the testing).

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heating energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combustion with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the heating energy performance of two levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation (R-11 and R-30) in combination with truss and horizontally installed radiant barriers. The tests, a continuation of work started in the summer of 1985, were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, during the winter of 1986-87. The measured results of the heating tests showed that a horizontal radiant barrier used with R-11 attic insulation reduced the house heating load by 9.3% compared with R-11 with no radiant barrier, while a truss barrier showed essentially no change in the heating load. Horizontal and truss barriers each reduced the heating load by 3.5% when added to R-30 attic insulation. Moisture condensed on the bottom of the horizontal barrier during cold early morning weather but usually dissipated in the warmer afternoon hours at Karns and left no accumulation in the insulation. Depending on the level of attic insulation, an annual heating and cooling HVAC savings ranging from $5 to $65 is estimated to be attainable when a radiant barrier is installed in the attic at Karns. 8 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income, Single-Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Audit Field Test Implementation and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four South Central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the programs benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. Average energy savings of the 20 retrofitted houses are likely (0.90 probability) to lie between 152 and 262 therms/year/house. The most likely value of the average savings is 207 therms/year/house. These savings are significantly (p < .05) smaller than the audit-predicted savings (286 therms/year/house). Measured savings of individual houses were significantly different than predicted savings for half of the houses. Each house received at least one retrofit. Thirteen of the 20 retrofitted houses received a new condensing furnace or blown-in wall insulation; all but two of the houses received one or more minor retrofits. The seven houses which received condensing furnaces saved, on average, about as much as predicted, but three of the seven houses had significantly more or less savings than predicted. The six houses which received wall insulation saved, on average, about half as much as predicted. The remaining houses which received only minor retrofits saved, on average, less than predicted, but the difference was not significant. Actual retrofit costs were close to expected costs. Overall measured energy savings averaged 15 therms/year per hundred retrofit dollars invested. Houses which received wall insulation or a condensing furnace did slightly better, and the houses which received only minor retrofits did poorly. When estimated program costs were included, average savings dropped to about 13 therms/year/per hundred dollars. The uncertainty associated with the energy savings means that these comparisons of savings and costs also have large uncertainties.

McCold, L.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Factorization of a 512-bit RSA modulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the factorization of the 512-bit number RSA-155 by the Number Field Sieve factoring method (NFS) and discusses the implications for RSA.

Stefania Cavallar; Bruce Dodson; Arjen K. Lenstra; Walter Lioen; Peter L. Montgomery; Brian Murphy; Herman Te Riele; Karen Aardal; Jeff Gilchrist; Gérard Guillerm; Paul Leyland; Joël Marchand; François Morain; Alec Muffett; Chris Putnam; Craig Putnam; Paul Zimmermann

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

355

Tabu search for the single row facility layout problem using ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 13, 2012 ... P&QM Area, IIM Ahmedabad, Vastrapur, Ahmedabad 380015, Gujarat, INDIA ...... 20 23 26 53 10 11 57 5 58 51 6 19 65 2 33 44 45 24 42 47 16.

356

Computing Globally Optimal Solutions for Single-Row Layout ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History: Accepted by Karen Aardal, Area Editor for Design and Analysis of Algorithms; ..... 7:51:58.2. 5. Conclusions. We demonstrated that the combination of a ...

357

Scatter search algorithms for the single row facility layout problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 22, 2012... for a SRFLP is an evolutionary technique which orients its exploration ..... flexible manufacturing systems, International Journal of Production ...

358

A Semidefinite Optimization Approach for the Single-Row Layout ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 28, 2005 ... angular facilities so as to minimize the total cost associated with the (known or projected) in- ... second area is concerned with extensions of the problem in order to account for additional ... power and important improvements in mathematical programming algorithms. ..... problems on computational grids.

359

Review of selected areas of Yankee Rowe probabilistic safety study  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Safety Study has been reviewed in three specific areas. These areas are (1) treatment of initiating events, (2) treatment of human actions, and (3) treatment of the emergency ac and dc power systems. The results reported here are based on three individual and highly focused reviews. Therefore, the conclusions offered are based within the context of each individual review. 22 tabs.

Arrieta, L.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Spettell, C.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Locavore Exploring the Sustainable Table: A Restaurant in Tobacco Row.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Locavore is a restaurant centered around the principles of sustainable agriculture: foodthat is organically, humanely, and sustainably raised from farms and cooperatives nofurther than 150… (more)

Oliver, Kathryn Mia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Solar Decathlon: Rice University: Transforming the Row House...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Houses Now? Arizona Cornell Illinois Iowa State Kentucky Minnesota Ohio State Penn State Puerto Rico Rice Team Alberta Team Boston Team California Team Germany Team Missouri Team...

362

Definition: Right-Of-Way (Row) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or license rights to construct and maintain lines.1 Related Terms Transmission Owner, transmission lines, transmission line References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability...

363

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

364

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for which payment was made in-kind. (c) 'Total Onsite Generation' includes cogeneration, generation by renewable energy sources, and conventional generation by combustible...

365

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 W 0 0 0 0 W 327410 Lime 4 0 W 0 4 0 0 W 327420 Gypsum 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 327993 Mineral Wool 9 0 W W 4 0 0 W 331 Primary Metals 299 W 5 59 64 35 30 153 331111 Iron and Steel Mills...

366

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption of energy originally produced offsite, acquired as a result of a purchase or transfer and consumed onsite for the production of heat and power. This definition is...

367

Row-Reduced Column Generation for Degenerate Master Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 5, 2013 ... node of a search tree, and often produces strong dual bounds. ... In linear algebra terms, we work with a projection ... enter the current basis.

368

A Polyhedral Approach to the Single Row Facility Layout Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem of arranging facilities on a line, while minimizing a weighted sum of the ..... heuristic, are an essential component of branch-and-cut algorithms. We now.

369

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

370

Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1 ................... 14.3 5.3 2.9 5.9 0.3 10.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 11.0 4.0 2.4 4.4 0.3 11.4 2 or more .................................... 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.7 Q 30.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

371

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

372

Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0 Personal Computers 1 ................... 45.7 41.1 1.3 0.9 2.4 8.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 34.1 30.5 1.0 0.7 1.9 9.7 2 or more .................................... 7.4 7.0 Q Q 0.2 18.4 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

373

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

374

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

375

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

376

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

377

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

378

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.5 2.2 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.1 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 68.2 8.5 13.8 5.8 4.5 Personal Computers 1 ................... 60.0 46.4 4.1 6.8 2.7 5.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 34.4 3.3 5.2 2.2 6.3 2 or more .................................... 9.1 7.7 0.3 0.8 0.3 15.0 Number of Laptop PCs 1 .................................................. 12.0 9.4 0.8

379

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

380

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

382

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

383

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

384

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector. The operating hours of small and medium sized manufacturing facilities are analyzed to identify the most common operating hour or shift work patterns. About 75% of manufacturing facilities fall into expected operating hour patterns with operating hours near 40, 80, 120 and 168 hours/week. Two types of load factors, electrical and production are computed for each shift classification within major industry categories in the U.S. The load factor based on monthly billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand, the load factor based on production hours (PLF) shows an inverse trend, varying from about 1.4 for one shift operation to 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. When used as a diagnostic tool, if the PLF exceeds unity, then unnecessary energy consumption may be taking place. For plants operating at 40 hours per week, the ELF value was found to greater than the theoretical maximum, while the PLF value was greater than one, suggesting that these facilities may have significant energy usage outside production hours. The data for the PLF however, is more scattered for plants operating less than 80 hours per week, indicating that grouping PLF data based on operating hours may not be a reasonable approach to benchmarking energy use in industries. This analysis uses annual electricity consumption and demand along with operating hour data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The annual values are used because more desirable monthly data are not available. Monthly data are preferred as they capture the load profile of the facility more accurately. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers which employ university engineering students, faculty and staff to perform energy assessments for small to medium-sized manufacturing plants. The nation-wide IAC program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Sen, Tapajyoti

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alternative housing designs for changing life-styles in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to determine the factors affecting the transformation of user requirements for a single family detached house by analyzing changing technology and life-styles of the traditional and modern ...

Ryu, Yoshiko

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Form factors from lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

Dru Renner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

389

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

390

Definition: Distribution Factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Also Known As Transfer Distribution Factor Related Terms Interchange Transaction, transmission lines, facility, Interchange, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

391

Updating an LU Factorization with Pivoting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how to compute an LU factorization of a matrix when the factors of a leading principle submatrix are already known. The approach incorporates pivoting akin to partial pivoting, a strategy we call incremental pivoting. An implementation ... Keywords: LU factorization, linear systems, pivoting, updating

Enrique S. Quintana-Ortí; Robert A. Van De Geijn

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nonnegative matrix factorization with quadratic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) solves the following problem: find such nonnegative matrices A@?R"+^I^x^J and X@?R"+^J^x^K that Y@?AX, given only Y@?R^I^x^K and the assigned index J (K@?I>=J). Basically, the factorization is achieved by alternating ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Nonnegative matrix factorization, Quadratic programming

Rafal Zdunek; Andrzej Cichocki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Variational learning for rectified factor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear factor models with non-negativity constraints have received a great deal of interest in a number of problem domains. In existing approaches, positivity has often been associated with sparsity. In this paper we argue that sparsity of the factors ... Keywords: Positive factor analysis, Source separation, Variational Bayes

Markus Harva; Ata Kabán

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Appendix A Conversion Factors for Standard Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy, work, heat(a) joule J ... a utility-specific factor that has incorporated actual fuel mix ... Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

396

politics factors into climate bill, too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

06/2 - POLITICS FACTORS INTO CLIMATE BILL, TOO. In A 987-page bill, six committees with jurisdiction, a mammoth oil spill to consider, no bipartisan support, ...

397

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Factors associated with participation restriction in community ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 26, 2007 ... restriction, after adjusting for age and gender in a logistic regression analysis. Health and disability factors most strongly and independently ...

400

Mini-Conference on Factorization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The University of Iowa, Iowa City. Non-Atomic Unique Factorization. 3:00-3:45 PM Franz Halter-Koch, Karl

Coykendall, James

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401

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

402

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

403

Factors that Predict Quality Classroom Technology Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite technological advancements intended to enhance teaching and learning in the 21st century, numerous teacher and school factors continue to impede quality classroom technology use.… (more)

Hastings, Tricia A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

De-caf-einated : life without chromatin assembly factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTORS THAT ACTSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin- assembly factors thatSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin-assembly factors that act

Kats, Ellen Simona

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Distributed large-scale natural graph factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural graphs, such as social networks, email graphs, or instant messaging patterns, have become pervasive through the internet. These graphs are massive, often containing hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. While some theoretical models ... Keywords: asynchronous algorithms, distributed optimization, graph algorithms, graph factorization, large-scale machine learning, matrix factorization

Amr Ahmed, Nino Shervashidze, Shravan Narayanamurthy, Vanja Josifovski, Alexander J. Smola

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Jet acollinearity and quark form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamic corrections involving the emission of gluons which are both soft and collinear are discussed for both hadronic production of lepton pairs and e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. The result is an exponential, double logarithmic quark form factor. The effect of sub-leading corrections and the possible experimental observation of the form factor are discussed.

Stirling, W.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Jacobian factor in free energy simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of Jacobian factors in free energy simulations is described. They provide a simple interpretation of ‘‘moment of inertia correction’’ and ‘‘dynamic stretch free energy’’ terms in such simulations. Since the relevant Jacobian factors can often be evaluated analytically by use of the configurational partition function of a polyatomic molecule

Stefan Boresch; Martin Karplus

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Gradient based variable forgetting factor RLS algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate new variable forgetting factor recursive least-square adaptive algorithm is derived. An improved mean square behaviour analysis is presented, which shows that the theoretical analysis and the simulation results are close to each other. The ... Keywords: RLS algorithm, adaptive filters, variable forgetting factor

C. F. So; S. C. Ng; S. H. Leung

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

411

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Primary Consumption for All Purposes Inputs for Heat, Power, and Generation of Electricity Primary Consumption for Nonfuel Purposes RSE Row Factors LPG Distillate b...

412

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industry Primary Consumption for All Purposes Inputs for Heat, Power, and Generation of Electricity Primary Consumption for Nonfuel Purposes RSE Row Factors LPG Distillate b...

413

S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

b. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row...

414

Table 4. LPG Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may not sum to totals.

415

Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 percent." " NANot available." " Notes: To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the cell's" "corresponding RSE column and RSE row factors. Totals may not...

416

Table 3. Electricity Consumption and Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may ...

417

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may ...

418

Table 1. Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may not sum to totals.

419

Table 1. Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may ...

420

Table 5. Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may not sum to totals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

char_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9a. Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row...

422

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

423

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Billion Cubic Feet) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Natural Gas Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

424

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Thousand Short Tons) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Coal Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

425

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Residual Fuel Oil Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

426

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Estimates in Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry LPG Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

427

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Distillate Fuel Oil Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Consumed c Switchable Not Switchable Electricity...

428

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kilowatthours) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Electricity Receipts Alternative Types of Energy b RSE Row Factors Total Receipts c Switchable Not Switchable Natural Gas...

429

"Table A40. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","Factors"...

430

NIST: Triatomic - Special Units, ... and Useful Conver. Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5. Special Units, Fundamental Constants, and Useful Conversion Factors. 5.a. Special Units. ... 5.b. Fundamental Constants and Conversion Factors. ...

431

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

432

Factors Causing Unexpected Variations in Ada Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarks are often used to describe the performance of computer systems. This report considers factors that may cause Ada benchmarks to produce inaccurate results. Included are examples from the ongoing benchmarking efforts of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project using bare target computers with several Ada compilers. 1. Introduction One of the goals of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project is to assess the readiness of the Ada programming language and Ada tools for developing embedded systems. The benchmarking and instrumentation subgroup within the AEST Project is running various suites of Ada benchmarks to obtain data on the real-time performance of Ada on a number of different target systems. The purpose of this report is to categorize the factors which cause anomalous results to be produced by the benchmarks. Some of these factors have been observed, while others are more speculative in nature. All these factors should be understood if accurate, comparable,...

Neal Altman; Neal Altman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

434

CCG supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored ...

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne; Philipp Koehn

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Spatial Ontology in Factored Statistical Machine Translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a statistical phrase-based machine translation system which is enriched with semantic data coming from a spatial ontology. Paper presents the spatial ontology, how it is integrated in statistical machine translation system using factored ...

Raivis Skadi?š

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Definition: Capacity factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power)12 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The net capacity factor of a power plant is the ratio of its actual output over a period of time, to its potential output if...

437

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Gust Factors Applied to Hurricane Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important consideration in the design of structures is their response to extreme winds. This is especially true in regions affected by hurricanes. In this research, gust factors derived from hurricane wind-speed records are compared with those ...

William R. Krayer; Richard D. Marshall

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Faster Quantum Number Factoring via Circuit Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major obstacle to implementing Shor's quantum number-factoring algorithm is the large size of modular-exponentiation circuits. We reduce this bottleneck by customizing reversible circuits for modular multiplication to individual runs of Shor's algorithm. Our circuit-synthesis procedure exploits spectral properties of multiplication operators and constructs optimized circuits from the traces of the execution of an appropriate GCD algorithm. Empirically, gate counts are reduced by 4-5 times, and circuit latency is reduced by larger factors.

Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

IV Estimation of Panels with Factor Residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In microeconometric panels, the factor structure may capture different sources of unobserved individual-specific heterogeneity, the impact of which varies intertem- porally in an arbitrary way. For instance, in studies of production functions, the factor loadings may... supply, Euler equations for household consumption, and em- pirical growth models. In these models the coefficient of the lagged dependent variable captures inertia, habit formation and costs of adjustment and therefore it has structural significance (see...

Robertson, Donald; Sara dis, Vasilis

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Pricing Effect of Restaurant Industry Related Factors on Fama French Three Factor Model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of restaurant industry-related factors on the accuracy and explanatory power of the… (more)

Denizci, Basak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoFactor Inc EcoFactor Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoFactor Inc Place Millbrae, California Zip 94030 Product California-based home energy management service provider. Coordinates 37.60276°, -122.395444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60276,"lon":-122.395444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

444

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov Columbia University Abstract miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’UTR of mRNA, inducing either mRNA degradation or mRNA silencing. The most characteristic properties of miRNA are their multi-targeting potential (one miRNA may target many genes). This high information content of miRNAs makes them very important factors in cell reprogramming. Since these are small molecules which can potentially pass through gap junctions, it is logical to consider their role in cell to cell communication. We hypothesized that miRNA transfer between cells is likely to occur under stress conditions. To test this hypothesis we developed a system designed

445

Paramagnetic form factors from itinerant electron theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic neutron scattering experiments performed over the past two decades have provided accurate information about the magnetic form factors of paramagnetic transition metals. These measurements have traditionally been analyzed in terms of an atomic-like theory. There are, however, some cases where this procedure does not work, and there remains the overall conceptual problem of using an atomistic theory for systems where the unpaired-spin electrons are itinerant. We have recently developed computer codes for efficiently evaluating the induced magnetic form factors of fcc and bcc itinerant electron paramagnets. Results for the orbital and spin contributions have been obtained for Cr, Nb, V, Mo, Pd and Rh based on local density bands. By using calculated spin enhancement parameters, we find reasonable agreement between theory and neutron form factor data. In addition, these zero parameter calculations yield predictions for the bulk susceptibility on an absolute scale which are in reasonable agreement with experiment in all treated cases except palladium.

Cooke, J.F.; Liu, S.H.; Liu, A.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov 1 , M. Grad 2 , D. Attinger 2 and E.Hall 1 1 Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University DOE Grant: DEPS0208ER0820 Abstract: miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'UTR of mRNA, inducing either

447

Ccg supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored translation models allow the inclusion of supertags as a factor in the source or target language. We show that this results in an improvement in the quality of translation and that the value of syntactic supertags in flat structured phrase-based models is largely due to better local reorderings. 1

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Momentum compaction and phase slip factor  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

McCafferty, D.B.

1984-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Factorization studies in SIDIS at Jlab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data for positive and negative pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets are found to satisfy factorization tests in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, 0.2 < 0.45, W > 2 GeV, M{sub x} > 1.5 GeV, and 0.3 < 0.6.

Peter Bosted; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Tigran Navasardyan; Varden Tadevosyan

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Community discovery using nonnegative matrix factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex networks exist in a wide range of real world systems, such as social networks, technological networks, and biological networks. During the last decades, many researchers have concentrated on exploring some common things contained in those large ... Keywords: Community discovery, Nonnegative matrix factorization

Fei Wang; Tao Li; Xin Wang; Shenghuo Zhu; Chris Ding

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation  

SciTech Connect

The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

Karen S. Browning

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

454

Critical factors influencing employment of disabled persons in Malaysia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines key factors that affect opportunities for employment of disabled people in Malaysia. Four factors are covered by the study; these are namely,… (more)

Ramakrishnan, Prabha.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Definition: Generator-To-Load Distribution Factor | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on an identified transmission facility or Flowgate.1 Related Terms Load Shift Factor, transmission lines, Generator Shift Factor, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

456

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

457

Using Two-Factor RSA Token  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Two-Factor RSA Token Using Two-Factor RSA Token with VPN User Guide November 2013 Using Your RSA token with WebVPN 1. Establish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov 2. Users who are using their RSA Token for the first time should follow the steps below for PIN creation. Others who have already set up their PIN and used their RSA token previously should enter their six digit numeric username and passcode; this is the PIN + the RSA token code. The result of this successful login will be Step 8 below. 3. A login page similar to the picture below will be displayed. Enter your VPN Username (six-digit numeric ID) and your Password by typing your generated RSA Token code and then click the Login button. Example; your generated RSA token code is 032848 (from above). In the Password box, you will enter

458

Reliability based investigation of design factors  

SciTech Connect

Second-moment probabilistic techniques are used to formulate structural resistances and loads and to derive reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors for design. Existing concepts of the second-moment reliability theory have been extended to the practical case of multiple load combinations. This development consistently includes the stochastic character of loads and the unpredictable nature of their combinations. For this purpose, a new technique for the evaluation of load combinations is presented, whereby the moments of the extreme of combined loads is obtained in terms of the moments of individual loads and parameters describing their random fluctuations in time. Reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors are derived in terms of the acceptable level of risk, the coefficients of variation of the loads and resistance, uncertainties associated with errors in modeling and estimation, and a set of parameters describing the stochastic nature of loads and their combinations.

1978-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Infinite Dimensional VARs and Factor Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and any r 2 f1; ::;mg. ASSUMPTION 14 (Random factor loadings) isr = sr + #17;isr for s 2 f1; ::; kg , r 2 f1; ::;mg and any i 2 N, (69) where #17;isr #24; IID #0; 0; #27;2#17;sr #1; , isr does not change with N #21; i. #17;isr is independently... distributed of "r0t and ut for any s 2 f1; ::; kg ; r; r0 2 f1; ::;mg ; i 2 N and any t 2 Z. Furthermore, the third and the fourth moments of #17;isr are bounded. ASSUMPTION 15 (Non-random factor loadings) isr = O (1) for any i 2 N and any s 2 f1; ::; kg, r 2...

Chudik, Alexander; Pesaran, M Hashem

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Superintegrable Systems and Higher Rank Factorizations  

SciTech Connect

We consider a class of two-dimensional super-integrable systems that can be considered as the natural generalization of some well known one-dimensional factorized systems. Using standard methods to find the shape-invariant intertwining operators we find an so(6) dynamical algebra and its Hamiltonian hierarchies. In particular we consider those associated to unitary representations that can be displayed by means of three-dimensional polyhedral lattices.

Negro, Javier; Calzada, Juan A.; Olmo, Mariano A. del [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

462

GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

J. Wang

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fukushima Daiichi Accident -- Technical Causal Factor Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced a seismic event and subsequent tsunami. The accident and the ensuing mitigation and recovery activities occurred over several days, involved a number of incidents, and might provide several opportunities for lessons learned. The objective of this report is to determine the fundamental causative factors for the loss of critical systems at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors that resulted in core damage and subsequent radioactive release. ...

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

DETERMINATION OF RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NONPROLIFERATION FACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Methodologies to determine the proliferation resistance (PR) of nuclear facilities often rely on either expert elicitation, a resource-intensive approach without easily reproducible results, or numeric evaluations, which can fail to take into account the institutional knowledge and expert experience of the nonproliferation community. In an attempt to bridge the gap and bring the institutional knowledge into numeric evaluations of PR, a survey was conducted of 33 individuals to find the relative importance of a set of 62 nonproliferation factors, subsectioned into groups under the headings of Diversion, Transportation, Transformation, and Weaponization. One third of the respondents were self-described nonproliferation professionals, and the remaining two thirds were from secondary professions related to nonproliferation, such as industrial engineers or policy analysts. The factors were taken from previous work which used multi-attribute utility analysis with uniform weighting of attributes and did not include institutional knowledge. In both expert and non-expert groups, all four headings and the majority of factors had different relative importance at a confidence of 95% (p=0.05). This analysis and survey demonstrates that institutional knowledge can be brought into numeric evaluations of PR, if there is a sufficient investment of resources made prior to the evaluation.

Richard Metcalf

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Parametric Analysis of the Factors...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentary Geothermal Systems - Preliminary Results (Poster)...

466

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

467

Graphical technique for interpolating shape factors for peripheral waterflood systems  

SciTech Connect

A method of interpolating the shape factors between already known sets of data can be utilized in peripheral waterflood systems. This graphical technique should provide reasonably reliable shape factors without necessitating further flow pattern evaluation. A set of interpolated shape factors for the constant pressure difference case is tabulated. These factors were derived from the shape factors previously determined using variation of width technique. A comparison of the interpolated shape factors and the shape factors obtained by the circling-in techniques are also shown. Good agreement was obtained in this comparison.

Kantar, K.; Helander, D.P.

1967-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tropical Cyclogenesis Factors in a Warming Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the underlying causes of tropical cyclone formation is crucial to predicting tropical cyclone behavior in a warming environment, given the Earth's current warming trend. This study examines two sets of simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model version 3.1 (CAM3): one with aerosol forcings and one without. We looked at how four factors known to be important to tropical cyclone formation vary as carbon dioxde and the ensuing temperature changes increase to very high levels. These factors include Maximum Potential Intensity (MPI), mid-tropospheric moisture content, 200-850 mb vertical wind shear, and 850 mb absolute vorticity. We considered different representations of mid-tropospheric moisture by examining both relative humidity and chi, a non-dimensional measure of the saturation entropy deficit at 600 mb. We also looked at different combinations of these factors, including several variations of a Genesis Potential Index (GPI) and an incubation parameter, gamma, that is related to the length of time required to saturate the middle troposphere and aid tropical cyclogenesis. Higher MPI, lower saturation deficits and higher relative humidity, lower wind shear, and higher absolute vorticity all act to enhance the GPI and lower the incubation time, meaning larger environmental support for tropical cyclone development and intensification. In areas where tropical cyclone development is prevalent today, we found that shear generally decreased, but MPI decreased, absolute vorticity decreased, and the saturation deficit increases. Thus, in today's prevalent tropical cyclone regions, conditions become less favorable for development and intensification as the climate warms. On the other hand, genesis regions tend to push northward into the subtropics, as conditions become much more favorable for development up to ~40 degrees North due to both decreased wind shear and much higher MPI values.

Cathey, Stephen Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Survey of nucleon electromagnetic form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has been greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in compar- ison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at MIT-Bates, MAMI, and JLab. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed.

Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College; Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State U.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Physical Nucleon Form Factors from Lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors to the physical regime. We find that the lattice results can be reproduced using the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model by letting its parameters be analytic functions of the quark mass. We then use the model to extrapolate the lattice result to the physical value of the pion mass, thereby allowing us to study how the predicted zero in GE(Q2)/GM(Q2) for proton varies as a function of quark mass.

Matevosyan, Hrayr H. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Miller, Gerald A. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

471

Resources required for topological quantum factoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a hypothetical topological quantum computer composed of either Ising or Fibonacci anyons. For each case, we calculate the time and number of qubits (space) necessary to execute the most computationally expensive step of Shor's algorithm, modular exponentiation. For Ising anyons, we apply Bravyi's distillation method [S. Bravyi, Phys. Rev. A 73, 042313 (2006)] which combines topological and nontopological operations to allow for universal quantum computation. With reasonable restrictions on the physical parameters we find that factoring a 128-bit number requires approximately 10{sup 3} Fibonacci anyons versus at least 3x10{sup 9} Ising anyons. Other distillation algorithms could reduce the resources for Ising anyons substantially.

Baraban, M. [Department of Physics, Yale University, 217 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Bonesteel, N. E. [Department of Physics and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Simon, S. H. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Human factors engineering program review model  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Purcell, Deputy Director at Home This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series://eetd.lbl.gov/EAP/EMP/. The work described in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency

474

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income://middleincome.lbl.gov March 6, 2012 Scaling Energy Efficiency in the Heart of the Residential Market: Increasing Middle America's Access to Capital for Energy Improvements Middle income American households ­ broadly defined

475

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income households. This paper is part of the LBNL Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list in this Policy Brief was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

476

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income of the LBNL Clean Energy Program Policy Brief series. These working papers highlight emerging program models and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals

477

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Clean Energy Financing Policy Brief series. To join the email list to receive these policy briefs for Credit: Case Study on Clean Energy Works Oregon Launched as a Portland-based pilot in April 2010, Clean

478

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

480

Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control. If the operator makes a mistake and upsets the process, or fails to respond correctly to a process upset, the loss can exceed the possible savings of the advanced control. Further, the experience can result in the operator not using the control capability in the future. Display and man/machine interface techniques, based on an understanding of human factors and of an operator's typical analysis of a process, can be used to present information to the operator in a manner which will prevent confusion. This paper discusses techniques for selecting and displaying process and control information to the operator.

Shaw, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "row factors single-family" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Factor Structure in Groups Selected on Observed Scores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to item format ('minor' answer key and 'other' answer key). There are two quantitative factors,into the full sample answer key factors (2 and 3). The five

Muthen, Bengt O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model...

483

A New Approach to an Accurate Wind Chill Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter weather often shows a severity marked by low dry-bulb temperature combined with high wind speed. The wind chill factor is now a standard meteorological term to express this severity. This factor, or more appropriately the wind chill ...

Maurice Bluestein; Jack Zecher

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Shortwave Shape Factor Inversion of Earth Radiation Budget Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape factor technique is routinely used to invert wide-angle radiometric measurements at satellite altitude to flux at the top of the atmosphere. The derivation of a shortwave shape factor requires assumptions on both the viewed radiation ...

Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Factors Involved in Search Dog Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events of significant impact as recent as hurricane Ike yielded a consistent disturbing truth: we lack sufficient numbers of competent search dog [Canis familiaris] teams. This study was conceived to provide information in identifying factors involved in training competent search dogs. Obedience training methods, age training was initiated, previous handler canine training experience, and handler perception and emotional attachment to their search dog were examined through a sixty-six question survey. Achievement of a national certification was used as a measure of performance success. Association between factors and performance success was evaluated through Chi-Square testing. Surveys were announced through the National Search Dog Alliance (NSDA) and were available online; 177 were fully completed by respondents and used in the data analysis. Seventy-two percent of nationally certified canine team respondents preferred positive reinforcement methods. Several statistically significant associations were detected: (a) female handlers preferred positive reinforcement training methods [x^2 = 8.504, d.f.=1, P = 0.004], (b) as dogs matured use of active training equipment increased [x^2 = 54.043, d.f.= 2, P training each week had a higher proportion of national certifications [x^2 = 16.379, d.f. = 1, P less than 0.001]. The data also indicated a trend for handlers to have previous canine training experience equal to or greater than search dog training experience [x^2 = 118.36, d.f. = 9, P =0.05]. The results warrant further research on the effects of early training, the effects of training time investment, and the interaction between canine selection and handler understanding of canine learning theory.

Alexander, Michael B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program Summary Report: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI Human Factors Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program developed an array of intervention products that provide logical solutions to performance problems confronting nuclear power plant maintenance workers. These products, designed to reduce the incidence of errors and increase productivity, range from job performance cards to a software-based authoring system for training material.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

Factors Affecting the Dissolution of Resorbable Bioactive Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting dissolution are numerous: residual stress, composition, ... and manufacturing method on the dissolution behaviour of glasses with fixed overall ...

488

Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gene regulation by transcription factors and micrornas. Nat Rev Genet 8:93­103. 35. Sparrow D, Guillen

Quake, Stephen R.

489

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

490

Probability based load factors for design of concrete containment structures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for developing probability-based load combinations for the design of concrete containments. The proposed criteria are in a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. The load factors and resistance factors are derived for use in limit states design and are based on a target limit state probability. In this paper, the load factors for accident pressure and safe shutdown earthquake are derived for three target limit state probabilities. Other load factors are recommended on the basis of prior experience with probability-based design criteria for ordinary building construction. 6 refs.

Hwang, H.; Kagami, S.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

492

Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

The interpretation of screen-factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen-factor (SF) measurements are widely used in the petroleum industry to characterize polymer solutions. The measurements are easy to perform and provide information that is different from solution-viscosity measurements. However, there has been no quantitative explanation of what solution property is being measured by SF. The authors show that SF measures the elongational viscosity of a polymer solution. Experiments on a modified commercial screen viscometer show the relationship between SF measurements and elongational-flow measurements performed by Durst and coworkers. Durst has shown that the elongational flow field in a packed bed of spheres triggers a transition in the conformation of a flexible polymer molecule, such as polyacrylamide, from a coiled to a stretched state. This transition in conformation is accompanied by a jump in the resistance to flow by an order of magnitude. They show that conventional screen viscometers operate in the regime where the molecules are in the highly stretched state. On the basis of Durst's work, it is calculated that the SF measurement is sensitive to high-molecular-weight tails in the polymer molecular-weight distribution.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'homme, R.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

A review of electrochromic window performance factors  

SciTech Connect

The performance factors which will influence the market acceptance of electrochromic windows are reviewed. A set of data representing the optical properties of existing and foreseeable electrochromic window devices was generated. The issue of reflective versus absorbing electrochromics was explored. This data was used in the DOE 2.1 building energy model to calculate the expected energy savings compared to conventional glazings. The effects of several different control strategies were tested. Significant energy and peak electric demand benefits were obtained for some electrochromic types. Use of predictive control algorithms to optimize cooling control may result in greater energy savings. Initial economic results considering annual savings, cooling equipment cost savings, and electrochromic window costs are presented. Calculations of thermal and visual comfort show additional benefits from electrochromics but more work is needed to quantify their importance. The design freedom and aesthetic possibilities of these dynamic glazings should provide additional market benefits, but their impact is difficult to assess at this time. Ultimately, a full assessment of the market viability of electrochromics must consider the impacts of all of these issues.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubin, M.; Lee, E.S.; Sullivan, R.; Finlayson, E.; Hopkins, D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

ac_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total...

496

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE5-1e. Appliances1 Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 1997 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone2 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and --

497

Table CE1-1c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-1c. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and --

498

Table HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 | 0.5 | 1.5 | 1.3 | 1.9 |Factors ... Q = Data withheld either because the Relative Standard Error ...

499

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE4-1e. Water-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 1997 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD ...

500

Table E13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.9,1.5,0....