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Sample records for routing phone routing

  1. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Combined Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St.JBEI Route Combined Routes and Schedules (On-SiteOff-Site) Scroll down or click here for schedule...

  2. Class network routing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  3. Railroad Routing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-05

    INTERLINE/PC is an interactive program designed to simulate the routing practices of the United States rail system. The rail industry is divided into a large number of independent competing companies. The INTERLINE data base represents these rail companies as 94 separate subnetworks. An additional two subnetworks represent navigable inland/intracoastal and deep draft marine routes. Interchange points between individual rail systems and waterway systems are also identified.

  4. Collective network routing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  5. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-10

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. Inmore » the model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.« less

  6. RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on "Strawman" Report: RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES Number Section Comment Response RTG-1-AAR SECTION II Safeguards Routing Regulations, Para. 2 The NRC has identified five types of route characteristics that receive special consideration when NRC staff review routes for approval pursuant to 10 CFR 73: (1) routes through highly populated areas; (2) routes that would place the shipment or escort vehicle in a significantly disadvantageous position (for example, tunnels

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a...

  8. Zone routing in a torus network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer

    2013-01-29

    A system for routing data in a network comprising a network logic device at a sending node for determining a path between the sending node and a receiving node, wherein the network logic device sets one or more selection bits and one or more hint bits within the data packet, a control register for storing one or more masks, wherein the network logic device uses the one or more selection bits to select a mask from the control register and the network logic device applies the selected mask to the hint bits to restrict routing of the data packet to one or more routing directions for the data packet within the network and selects one of the restricted routing directions from the one or more routing directions and sends the data packet along a link in the selected routing direction toward the receiving node.

  9. Westgate Alternate Routes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westgate Alternate Routes Avoid the white-knuckled commute and antacids for breakfast! If you take I-55 north to Lemont Road to enter through Westgate in the morning, you may want to consider taking an alternate route in order to avoid potential traffic safety risks. Three alternate routes are mapped out, and turn-by-turn directions are listed below. Alternate Route 1 If you're coming from the north: Head south on I-355, and take either the 75th Street exit heading east or the 87th Street

  10. Which route to coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nene, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    Two main methods for producing liquid fuels from coal are currently undergoing intensive evaluation. One, direct liquefaction (e.g., SRC-II, Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and H-Coal) produces liquid fuels directly from coal; the other, indirect liquefaction (e.g., Lurgi gasifier followed by Fischer-Tropsch, and Shell-Koppers gasifier followed by methanol synthesis and Mobil's MTG process) first gasifies coal and then converts the gaseous material into liquid products. This paper compares both routes basing its assessment on yields, thermal efficiencies, elemental balances, investment, complexity, and state of development. It is shown that direct liquefaction is more efficient and produces more product per investment dollar. Higher efficiency for direct liquefaction is verified bY stoichiometric and thermodynamic analysis. All approaches require about the same capital investment per unit of feed. Indirect liquefaction can be either more or less complex than direct liquefaction, depending upon the process. Direct liquefaction is least developed. 8 refs.

  11. New route toward integrating large nickel nanocrystals onto mesoporous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New route toward integrating large nickel nanocrystals onto mesoporous carbons This content will become publicly available on December 30, 2016 Title: New route toward integrating ...

  12. A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal-Organic Frameworks ... A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal-Organic Frameworks. ...

  13. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel ...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Route Identification Process TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process Route Identification Process Items Available for Download Routing Discussion Paper (April 1998) (71.87 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1998

  15. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  16. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will ...

  17. NIST cooperative laboratory for OSI routing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, D.

    1994-05-23

    This document is one of two reports on the Integrated ISIS protocol. Required by the IAB/IESG in order for an Internet routing protocol to advance to Draft Standard Status. Integrated ISIS is an Interior Gateway Protocol and is designed to carry both IP and ISO CLNP routing information. Integrated ISIS is currently designated as a Proposed Standard. The protocol was first published in RFC 1195. Internet Draft was published subsequently to RFC 1195 and documents the current version of the protocol. This report documents experience with Integrated ISIS. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience and the current state of Integrated ISIS implementations. It also presents a summary of the Integrated ISIS Management Information Base (MIB), and a summary of the Integrated ISIS authentication mechanism.

  18. Charting a New Carbon Route to Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.beta.undp.orgcontentundpenhomeourworkenvironmentandenergyfo Cost: Free Language: English Charting a New Carbon Route to Development Screenshot "UNDP recognizes the...

  19. DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. The shuttle bus departure and arrival times may be impacted by traffic, weather, or other logistical interruptions.

  20. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, PE

    2003-09-18

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is used to calculate highway, rail, or waterway routes within the United States. TRAGIS is a client-server application with the user interface and map data files residing on the user's personal computer and the routing engine and network data files on a network server. The user's manual provides documentation on installation and the use of the many features of the model.

  1. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Type Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC ...

  2. Bolivia-Brazil gas line route detailed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that state oil companies of Brazil and Bolivia have signed an agreement outlining the route for a 2,270 km pipeline system to deliver natural gas from Bolivian fields to Southeast Brazil. The two sides currently are negotiating details about construction costs as well as contract volumes and prices. Capacity is projected at 283-565 MMcfd. No official details are available, but Roberto Y. Hukai, a director of the Sao Paulo engineering company Jaako Poyry/Technoplan, estimates transportation cost of the Bolivian gas at 90 cents/MMBTU. That would be competitive with the price of gas delivered to the Sao Paulo gas utility Comgas, he the. Brazil's Petroleos Brasileiro SA estimates construction of the pipeline on the Brazilian side alone with cost $1.2-1.4 billion. Bolivia's Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos (YPFB) is negotiating with private domestic and foreign investors for construction of the Bolivian portion of the project.

  3. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary (101.72 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January - February 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  4. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  5. A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating Previous Next List Zhangwen Wei, Weigang Lu, Hai-Long Jiang, and Hong-Cai Zhou, Inorg. Chem., 2013, 52 (3), pp ...

  6. System for Import/Export Routing and Recovery Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ImportExport Routing and Recovery Analysis content top Network Optimization Models (RNAS and ATOM) Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Many critical...

  7. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be ... available nanoparticles over multiple length scales, ranging from the nano to the macro. ...

  8. Route-Based Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Today's hybrid electric vehicle controls cannot always provide maximum fuel savings over all drive cycles. Route-based controls could improve HEV fuel efficiency by 2%-4% and help save nearly 6.5 million gallons of fuel annually.

  9. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important...

  10. NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE (NNSS) DRIVERS ROUTE/SHIPMENT INFORMATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSS) DRIVERS ROUTE/SHIPMENT INFORMATION (12/2014 Log No. 2014-229) NOTE: THIS FORM IS TWO (2) PAGES - YOU MUST COMPLETE BOTH PAGES NNSS SHIPMENT NUMBER: CARRIER NAME: TRACTOR NO.: TRAILER NO.: AT ORIGIN AT NNSS Main Gate NNSS OFFICE USE ONLY DEPARTURE DATE: ARRIVAL DATE: DESTINATION AREA: Area 5 DEPARTURE TIME: ARRIVAL TIME: NNSS DEPARTURE TIME: LOCATION: HELD OVER? No Yes REASON: ROUTE INFORMATION REVIEWED BY: ONSITE SHIPMENT (MAP NOT APPLICABLE) DROP YARD; LEAVE THIS FORM WITH SHIPPING

  11. Microsoft Word - Final Temp Route _9_23_08_

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bobby St. John Washington TRU Solutions (575) 234-7348 www.wipp.energy.gov For Immediate Release Temporary Transportation Route Established for WIPP Shipments CARLSBAD, N.M., September 23, 2008 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), in conjunction with Texas and New Mexico departments of transportation, has identified a temporary transportation route for waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), due to roadwork in Texas. Currently, transuranic, or

  12. Systems for the Intermodal Routing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K; Liu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The safe and secure movement of spent nuclear fuel from shutdown and active reactor facilities to intermediate or long term storage sites may, in some instances, require the use of several modes of transportation to accomplish the move. To that end, a fully operable multi-modal routing system is being developed within Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System). This study aims to provide an overview of multi-modal routing, the existing state of the TRAGIS networks, the source data needs, and the requirements for developing structural relationships between various modes to create a suitable system for modeling the transport of spent nuclear fuel via a multimodal network. Modern transportation systems are comprised of interconnected, yet separate, modal networks. Efficient transportation networks rely upon the smooth transfer of cargoes at junction points that serve as connectors between modes. A key logistical impediment to the shipment of spent nuclear fuel is the absence of identified or designated transfer locations between transport modes. Understanding the potential network impacts on intermodal transportation of spent nuclear fuel is vital for planning transportation routes from origin to destination. By identifying key locations where modes intersect, routing decisions can be made to prioritize cost savings, optimize transport times and minimize potential risks to the population and environment. In order to facilitate such a process, ORNL began the development of a base intermodal network and associated routing code. The network was developed using previous intermodal networks and information from publicly available data sources to construct a database of potential intermodal transfer locations with likely capability to handle spent nuclear fuel casks. The coding development focused on modifying the existing WebTRAGIS routing code to accommodate intermodal transfers and the selection of

  13. The fuel efficient missile combat crew routing network. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, E.O. Jr.; Woolley, M.G.

    1980-06-01

    Missile combat crew vehicles are the highest mileage accumulators within SAC and, in the interest of energy conservation, Vice CINCSAC has initiated a long-term study examining utilization of more fuel efficient crew vehicles. This thesis extends the SAC study by determining if alternate dispatch procedures and routes of travel, using currently assigned vehicles, would result in fuel conservation. A network routing model is used to determine the routes of travel for three deployment strategies and five vehicle types at the Minot AFB, ND test base. Fuel efficiency for these fifteen alternatives, measured as gallons of fuel consumed per passenger, is compared with the existing missile combat crew routing network. This study found that ten of the fifteen vehicle/deployment strategy combinations, when employed over the shortest authorized routes of travel that were developed, provided improvement over the fuel efficiency of the MCC routing system that was in effect as of 31 August 1979. The largest potential savings amounted to 52% or 26,255 gallons of fuel per year.

  14. Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Joshi, Girish M. [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Raghupathy, Bala P.C., E-mail: balapraveen2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Research and Advanced Engineering Division (Materials), Renault Nissan Technology and Business Center India (P) Ltd., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeong, Soon Kwan, E-mail: jeongsk@kier.re.kr [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

  15. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by dynamically adjusting local routing strategies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-03-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Each node implements a respective routing strategy for routing data through the network, the routing strategies not necessarily being the same in every node. The routing strategies implemented in the nodes are dynamically adjusted during application execution to shift network workload as required. Preferably, adjustment of routing policies in selective nodes is performed at synchronization points. The network may be dynamically monitored, and routing strategies adjusted according to detected network conditions.

  16. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by routing through transporter nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a destination. Some packets are constrained to be routed through respective designated transporter nodes, the automated routing strategy determining a path from a respective source node to a respective transporter node, and from a respective transporter node to a respective destination node. Preferably, the source node chooses a routing policy from among multiple possible choices, and that policy is followed by all intermediate nodes. The use of transporter nodes allows greater flexibility in routing.

  17. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul; Luis, Martino

    2015-05-15

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time.

  18. The price of commitment in online stochastic vehicle routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers online stochastic multiple vehicle routing with time windows in which requests arrive dynamically and the goal is to maximize the number of serviced customers. Early work has focused on very flexible routing settings where the decision to assign a vehicle to a customer is delayed until a vehicle is actually deployed to the customer. Motivated by real applications that require stability in the decision making, this paper considers a setting where the decision to assign a customer request to a vehicle must be taken when that request is accepted. Experimental results suggest that this constraint severely degrades the performance of existing algorithms. However, the paper shows how the use of stochastic information for vehicle assignment and request acceptance improves decision quality considerably. Moreover, the use of resource augmentation quantifies precisely the cost of commitment in online vehicle routing.

  19. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and

  20. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a

  1. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES January 31, 2008 (11.6 KB) December 6, 2007 (11.96 KB) October 4, 2007 (16.46 KB) August 23, 2007 (26.38 KB) June 21, 2007 (41.02 KB) May 31, 2007 (31.04 KB) January 18, 2007 (93.16 KB) December 19, 2006 (28.83 KB) November 9, 2006 (19.84 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic

  2. The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool: A Web Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casson, William H. Jr.

    2012-08-02

    The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool is a type of Google maps for adversaries. It's a web-based Geospatial application similar to Google Maps. It helps the U.S. government plan operations that predict where an adversary might be. It's easily accessible and maintainble and it's simple to use without much training.

  3. Optimal routing of IP packets to multi-homed servers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    Multi-homing, or direct attachment to multiple networks, offers both performance and availability benefits for important servers on busy networks. Exploiting these benefits to their fullest requires a modicum of routing knowledge in the clients. Careful policy control must also be reflected in the routing used within the network to make best use of specialized and often scarce resources. While relatively straightforward in theory, this problem becomes much more difficult to solve in a real network containing often intractable implementations from a variety of vendors. This paper presents an analysis of the problem and proposes a useful solution for a typical campus network. Application of this solution at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is studied and the problems and pitfalls encountered are discussed, as are the workarounds used to make the system work in the real world.

  4. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials

  5. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 21, 2013 Gasification Mike Schultz, PhD., Project PI A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Goal A hybrid biorefinery design that enables the production of jet fuel and other hydrocarbon fuels from waste biomass System Integration, Optimization and Analysis Integration Gasification & Syngas Conditioning Fermentation & Alcohol Recovery Catalysis Catalysis Gasoline Jet Fuel Diesel Butadiene MEK EtOH 2,3BD Wood Stover Switchgrass Improve Economics and Process

  6. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  7. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  8. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  9. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  10. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  11. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  12. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  13. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  14. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  15. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  16. Holey Germanium - New Routes to Ordered Nanoporous Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holey Germanium - New Routes to Ordered Nanoporous Semiconductors Nanoporous or mesoporous inorganic materials with homogeneous pore sizes have found broad applications in separations, as supports for size selective catalysis, and as low dielectric materials. For all of these applications, it is the pore space that is important, and so the inorganic framework is generally formed from a simple material like silica or another oxide. In an effort to extend the range of potential applications for

  17. Polar Gas to pick route for Arctic Y Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-26

    Polar Gas Project is considering four possible Y line routes to move gas reserves from the Arctic Islands and the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea areas to southern Canada. All four routes are west of the single line route proposed by Polar Gas Ltd. in 1977 to run from the Arctic Islands to Longlac, Ontario, and would connect with existing pipelines at either Longlac, Winnipeg, Calgary, or Edmonton. Marketable reserves in the High Arctic Islands are estimated at 12.7 trillion cubic feet, not counting 3-6 trillion cubic feet probably contained in recent discoveries; the MacKenzie Delta reserves are estimated at 5.8 trillion cubic feet. The gas will be chilled to 0C for passage through permafrost regions, to prevent thawing of the soil, but the gas will be at higher temperatures in other areas, with various construction techniques used to protect the area of discontinuous permafrost from thawing. More than $70 million has been spent on project studies. An application will be filed in 1981, and the pipeline could be completed in 7-10 years.

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS Proposed Task Plan - Routing Topic Group (53.69 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2006

  19. Fabrication Routes for High Strength High Conductivity Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.; Sims, J.R.; Pantsyrnyi, V.I.; Shikov, A.; Bochvar, A.A.

    1998-10-01

    The development of suitable wires for magnet windings requires both the attainment of suitable combinations of properties (electrical conductivity and strength), the development of a production route capable of fabricating suitable quantity of wire of required dimension (5.2x7.6mm{sup 2} cross-section and 120 m in length) and a product with acceptable fabricability, joinability and service life. In this survey, the authors consider methods of producing suitable wire products by the codeformation of in-situ composites. This will include details of the quality control of the processing of Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb and the assessment of their detailed mechanical properties.

  20. Routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the various routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs, obtained through pumping an ultra-high Q-factor whispering-gallery mode resonator with a continuous-wave laser. The Lugiato–Lefever model is used to build bifurcation diagrams with regards to the parameters that are externally controllable, namely, the frequency and the power of the pumping laser. We show that the spatiotemporal chaos emerging from Turing patterns and solitons display distinctive dynamical features. Experimental spectra of chaotic Kerr combs are also presented for both cases, in excellent agreement with theoretical spectra.

  1. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Swapan Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr.

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  2. Vehicle routing for the last mile of power system restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Coffrin, Carleton; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2010-11-23

    This paper studied a novel problem in power system restoration: the Power Restoration Vehicle Routing Problem (PRVRP). The goal of PRVRPs is to decide how coordinate repair crews effectively in order to recover from blackouts as fast as possible after a disaster has occurred. PRVRPs are complex problems that combine vehicle routing and power restoration scheduling problems. The paper proposed a multi-stage optimization algorithm based on the idea of constraint injection that meets the aggressive runtime constraints necessary for disaster recovery. The algorithms were validated on benchmarks produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the infrastructure of the United States. The disaster scenarios were generated by state-of-the-art hurricane simulation tools similar to those used by the National Hurricane Center. Experimental results show that the constraint-injection algorithms can reduce the blackouts by 50% or more over field practices. Moreover, the results show that the constraint-injection algorithm using large neighborhood search over a blackbox simulator provide competitive quality and scales better than using a MIP solver on the subproblems.

  3. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  4. DOE_HQ_Shuttle_Bus_Route-and-Schedule (05-2016).docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May, 2016 DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific

  5. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials salvador.pdf (5.17 MB) More ...

  6. Synthesis of carbon micro-rods via a solvothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi Yuanzhu Hu Weibing; Dan Youmeng

    2009-04-02

    Novel carbon micro-rods with regular and uniform shape have been synthesized in high yield by magnesium acetate and n-butyl alcohol as the precursors via a solvothermal route. The resulting products were characterized by combined techniques including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The carbon micro-rods exhibit diameters ranging from 500 nm to 1 {mu}m and up to 5-10 {mu}m in length. We have found that the optimal reaction conditions for the growth of the carbon micro-rods were 500 deg. C and 12 h.

  7. Solvothermal routes for synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2005-03-01

    Control of the synthesis of nanomaterials to produce morphologies exhibiting quantized properties will enable device integration of several novel applications including biosensors, catalysis, and optical devices. In this work, solvothermal routes to produce zinc oxide nanorods are explored. Much previous work has relied on the addition of growth directing/inhibiting agents to control morphology. It was found in coarsening studies that zinc oxide nanodots will ripen to nanorod morphologies at temperatures of 90 to 120 C. The resulting nanorods have widths of 9-12 nm average dimension, which is smaller than current methods for nanorod synthesis. Use of nanodots as nuclei may be an approach that will allow for controlled growth of higher aspect ratio nanorods.

  8. Tuple spaces in hardware for accelerated implicit routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Zachary Kent; Tripp, Justin

    2010-12-01

    Organizing and optimizing data objects on networks with support for data migration and failing nodes is a complicated problem to handle as systems grow. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that high levels of speedup can be achieved by moving responsibility for finding, fetching, and staging data into an FPGA-based network card. We present a system for implicit routing of data via FPGA-based network cards. In this system, data structures are requested by name, and the network of FPGAs finds the data within the network and relays the structure to the requester. This is acheived through successive examination of hardware hash tables implemented in the FPGA. By avoiding software stacks between nodes, the data is quickly fetched entirely through FPGA-FPGA interaction. The performance of this system is orders of magnitude faster than software implementations due to the improved speed of the hash tables and lowered latency between the network nodes.

  9. EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

  10. Behavior-dependent Routing: Responding to Anomalies with Automated Low-cost Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehmen, Christopher S.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Best, Daniel M.; Noonan, Christine F.; Thompson, Seth R.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Fink, Glenn A.; Peterson, Elena S.

    2015-10-12

    This is a conference paper submission describing research and software implementation of a cybersecurity concept that uses behavior models to trigger changes in routing of network traffic. As user behavior deviates more and more from baseline models, traffic is routed through more elevated layers of analysis and control.

  11. 3D Torus Routing Engine Module for OFA OpenSM v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-11-12

    This OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) OpenSM routing engine module provides credit-loop-free routing while supporting two quality of service (QoS) levels for an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. In addition it is able to route around multiple failed fabric links or a single failed fabric switch without introducing credit loops, and without changing path Service Level (SL) values granted before the failure.This OFA OpenSM routing engine module improves the operational characteristics of a parallel computermore » built using an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. By providing two QoS levels, it allows system administrators to prevent application interprocess communication and file system communication from impacting each other. By providing the capability to route traffic around failed fabric components, it enables repair of failed components without impacting jobs running on the computer system.« less

  12. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  13. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible to precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.

  14. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible tomore » precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.« less

  15. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbashev, Andrew R.; Plokhikh, Aleksandr V.; Barbash, Dmitri; Lofland, Samuel E.; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2015-10-01

    The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} and (001)LaAlO{sub 3} substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001)BiFeO{sub 3} phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001)LaAlO{sub 3} showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001)SrTiO{sub 3}. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  16. Evaluation of alternate routes for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.

    1998-12-31

    The use of coal-derived syngas to produce high value chemicals is an important means of upgrading this resource. One example of a chemical that can be produced from coal-derived syngas is methyl methacrylate (MMA). Poly-methyl methacrylate is widely used in coatings and in various industrial molded products. The most widely practiced commercial technology for the synthesis of MMA is the acetone cyanohydrin (ACH) process. This process requires handling of large quantities of toxic hydrogen cyanide and generates one mole of ammonium bisulfate waste per mole of MMA. This bisulfate must either be regenerated or discarded, either of which substantially increases the cost. The ACH technology is thus environmentally and economically untenable for any new MMA plant expansions that would be needed to meet increasing demand. The RTI-Eastman-Bechtel research team is developing an alternative, environmentally benign route to MMA consisting of three steps; (step 1) synthesis of a propionate from ethylene, carbon monoxide, and steam, (step 2) condensation of this propionate with formaldehyde, and (step 3) esterification of resulting methacrylic acid with methanol to form MMA. This paper describes the preliminary economics of the overall process compared to other emerging processes, and focuses on step 2, including long term testing of catalysts for the condensation of propionic acid with formaldehyde to form MAA.

  17. Connectivity-Enhanced Route Selection and Adaptive Control for the Chevrolet Volt: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Wood, E.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3% respectively. These represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  18. Connectivity-enhanced route selection and adaptive control for the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Wood, Eric; Rajagopalan, Sai

    2016-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3%, respectively. Furthermore, these represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  19. A survey of routing techniques in store-and-forward and wormhole interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, David Michael; Lee, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of algorithms for directing messages through networks of varying topology. These are commonly referred to as routing algorithms in the literature that is presented. In addition to providing background on networking terminology and router basics, the paper explains the issues of deadlock and livelock as they apply to routing. After this, there is a discussion of routing algorithms for both store-and-forward and wormhole-switched networks. The paper covers both algorithms that do and do not adapt to conditions in the network. Techniques targeting structured as well as irregular topologies are discussed. Following this, strategies for routing in the presence of faulty nodes and links in the network are described.

  20. Constraint-Based Routing Models for the Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a historic programmatic interest in the safe and secure routing, tracking, and transportation risk analysis of radiological materials in the United States. In order to address these program goals, DOE has funded the development of several tools and related systems designed to provide insight to planners and other professionals handling radioactive materials shipments. These systems include the WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) platform. WebTRAGIS is a browser-based routing application developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused primarily on the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel from US nuclear reactors via railway, highway, or waterway. It is also used for the transport planning of low-level radiological waste to depositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. One particular feature of WebTRAGIS is its coupling with high-resolution population data from ORNL s LandScan project. This allows users to obtain highly accurate population count and density information for use in route planning and risk analysis. To perform the routing and risk analysis WebTRAGIS incorporates a basic routing model methodology, with the additional application of various constraints designed to mimic US Department of Transportation (DOT), DOE, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Aside from the routing models available in WebTRAGIS, the system relies on detailed or specialized modal networks for the route solutions. These include a highly detailed network model of the US railroad system, the inland and coastal waterways, and a specialized highway network that focuses on the US interstate system and the designated hazardous materials and Highway Route Controlled Quantity (HRCQ) -designated roadways. The route constraints in WebTRAGIS rely upon a series of attributes assigned to the various components of the different modal networks. Routes are determined via a

  1. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by semi-randomly varying routing policies for different packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-23

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Nodes vary a choice of routing policy for routing data in the network in a semi-random manner, so that similarly situated packets are not always routed along the same path. Semi-random variation of the routing policy tends to avoid certain local hot spots of network activity, which might otherwise arise using more consistent routing determinations. Preferably, the originating node chooses a routing policy for a packet, and all intermediate nodes in the path route the packet according to that policy. Policies may be rotated on a round-robin basis, selected by generating a random number, or otherwise varied.

  2. A lower bound for routing on a completely connected optical communication parallel computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.A.; Jerrum, M.; MacKenzie, P.D.

    1993-08-03

    The task of routing a 2-relation on an n-processor completely connected optical communication parallel computer (OCPC) is considered. A lower bound is presented that applies to any randomized distributed algorithm for this task: specifically, it is shown that the expected number of steps required to route a 2-relation is {Omega}({radical} log log n) in the worst case. For comparison, the best upper bound known is O(log log n).

  3. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LanzaTech. All rights reserved. 1 A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas BETO's Project Peer Review, March 2015 Alexandria, VA Alice Havill Senior Process Engineer Project Principle Investigator Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Objective: develop a hybrid conversion technology for catalytic upgrading of biomass- derived syngas to jet fuel and chemicals while ensure the cost, quality and environmental requirements of the aviation industry are met System

  4. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utkin, A.V. Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-15

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf{sub 3}GeO{sub 8} by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds.

  5. INTERLINE 5. 0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. ); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. . Transportation Center)

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  6. Baseline requirements of the proposed action for the Transportation Management Division routing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important to shippers, carriers, and the general public. This is particularly true for shipments of radioactive material. The shippers are primarily concerned with safety, security, efficiency, and equipment requirements. The carriers are concerned with the potential impact that radioactive shipments may have on their operations--particularly if such materials are involved in an accident. The general public has also expressed concerns regarding the safety of transporting radioactive and other hazardous materials through their communities. Because transportation routes are a central concern in hazardous material transport, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward resolution of these issues. In response to these routing needs, several models have been developed over the past fifteen years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HIGHWAY routing model is used to predict routes for truck transportation, the INTERLINE routing model is used to predict both rail and barge routes, and the AIRPORT locator model is used to determine airports with specified criteria near a specific location. As part of the ongoing improvement of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Transportation Management Division`s (EM-261) computer systems and development efforts, a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models was held at ORNL on April 27, 1994. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the existing capabilities of the models and data bases and to review enhancements of the models and data bases to expand their usefulness. The results of the Baseline Requirements Assessment Section will be discussed in this report. The discussions pertaining to the different models are contained in separate sections.

  7. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a tributary subnetwork before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  8. L-connect routing of die surface pads to the die edge for stacking in a 3D array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated circuit chips and method of routing the interface pads from the face of the chip or die to one or more sidewall surfaces of the die. The interconnection is routed from the face of the die to one or more edges of the die, then routed over the edge of the die and onto the side surface. A new pad is then formed on the sidewall surface, which allows multiple die or chips to be stacked in a three-dimensional array, while enabling follow-on signal routing from the sidewall pads. The routing of the interconnects and formation of the sidewall pads can be carried out in an L-connect or L-shaped routing configuration, using a metalization process such as laser pantography.

  9. Kinetic, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Assessment of Associative and Dissociative Methanol Dehydration Routes in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew J.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-03

    Mechanistic interpretations of rates and in situ IR spectra combined with density functionals that account for van der Waals interactions of intermediates and transition states within confining voids show that associative routes mediate the formation of dimethyl ether from methanol on zeolitic acids at the temperatures and pressures of practical dehydration catalysis. Methoxy-mediated dissociative routes become prevalent at higher temperatures and lower pressures, because they involve smaller transition states with higher enthalpy, but also higher entropy, than those in associative routes. These enthalpyentropy trade-offs merely reflect the intervening role of temperature in activation free energies and the prevalence of more complex transition states at low temperatures and high pressures. This work provides a foundation for further inquiry into the contributions of H-bonded methanol and methoxy species in homologation and hydrocarbon synthesis reactions from methanol.

  10. Deadlock-free class routes for collective communications embedded in a multi-dimensional torus network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Heidelberger, Philip

    2013-01-29

    A computer implemented method and a system for routing data packets in a multi-dimensional computer network. The method comprises routing a data packet among nodes along one dimension towards a root node, each node having input and output communication links, said root node not having any outgoing uplinks, and determining at each node if the data packet has reached a predefined coordinate for the dimension or an edge of the subrectangle for the dimension, and if the data packet has reached the predefined coordinate for the dimension or the edge of the subrectangle for the dimension, determining if the data packet has reached the root node, and if the data packet has not reached the root node, routing the data packet among nodes along another dimension towards the root node.

  11. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  12. On-chip electrically controlled routing of photons from a single quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentham, C.; Coles, R. J.; Royall, B.; O'Hara, J.; Prtljaga, N.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Wilson, L. R.; Itskevich, I. E.; Clarke, E.

    2015-06-01

    Electrical control of on-chip routing of photons emitted by a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot (SAQD) is demonstrated in a photonic crystal cavity-waveguide system. The SAQD is located inside an H1 cavity, which is coupled to two photonic crystal waveguides. The SAQD emission wavelength is electrically tunable by the quantum-confined Stark effect. When the SAQD emission is brought into resonance with one of two H1 cavity modes, it is preferentially routed to the waveguide to which that mode is selectively coupled. This proof of concept provides the basis for scalable, low-power, high-speed operation of single-photon routers for use in integrated quantum photonic circuits.

  13. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks | Department of Energy Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_willigan.pdf (494.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Cost-Effective Fabrication

  14. A novel solution-phase route for the synthesis of crystalline silver nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yang; Chu Ying . E-mail: chuying@nenu.edu.cn; Yang Likun; Han Dongxue; Lue Zhongxian

    2005-10-06

    A unique solution-phase route was devised to synthesize crystal Ag nanowires with high aspect-ratio (8-10 nm in diameter and length up to 10 {mu}m) by the reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with Vitamin C in SDS/ethanol solution. The resultant nanoproducts were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction (ED). A soft template mechanism was put forward to interpret the formation of metal Ag nanowires.

  15. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Deepak Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti Kumar, Niteen Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-08-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft.

  16. Transit Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  18. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  19. En Route to the Clinic: Diagnostic Sequencing Applications Using the Ion Torrent ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Muzny, Donna [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-03-22

    Donna Muzny on "En route to the clinic: Diagnostic sequencing applications using the Ion Torrent" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  20. EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue...

  1. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  2. Emerging patterns in intercontinental air linkages and implications for international route allocation policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oum, Tae Hoon; Taylor, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of deregulation, or liberalization of the domestic airline market, in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe have been described by many authors. It is generally acknowledged that deregulation fostored airline efficiency through the formation of domestic hub-and-spoke networks and established market conditions that encouraged the emergence of the mega-carriers (United, American, and Delta Airlines). Predictions have been made that similar effects will be observed in the intercontinental markets as liberalization is extended to these markets, and that globalized service networks will appear through strong alliances between major carriers based on different continents. These global service networks will be created by linking up the continental hubs of the partners` networks, in order to provide frequent and efficient services. A nation may be able to influence the formation of the global networks through the appropriate selection of policies for the industry structure and international route allocation. Sections of this paper review the important features of the imminent globalization of airline networks, and describe the emerging patterns of intercontinental linkages being adopted by some major carriers in the US and Europe. Later, alternative route allocation policies are defined, and the policies being followed by the US, Japan, Canada, and Korea are analyzed.

  3. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  4. A case study of pipeline route selection and design through discontinuous permafrost terrain in northwestern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiechnik, C.; Boivin, R.; Henderson, J.; Bowman, M.

    1996-12-31

    As the natural gas pipeline system in Western Canada expands northward, it traverses the discontinuous permafrost zone. As the ground temperature of the frozen soil in this zone is just below freezing, it can be expected that within the design life of a pipeline the permafrost adjacent to it will melt due to the disturbance of the insulating cover by construction activities. Differential settlement at the thawing frozen/unfrozen soil interfaces gives rise to pipeline strain. Based on the calculated settlement and resulting strain level, a cost effective mechanical or civil design solution can be selected to mitigate the differential settlement problem. Since these design solutions can be costly, it is desirable to combine them with a pipeline route that traverses the least amount of discontinuous permafrost terrain while minimizing the overall length of the pipeline. This paper will detail the framework utilized to select the routing for a package of pipeline projects in northwestern Alberta. It is believed that the increased front end effort will result in lower operating costs and an overall reduced life-cycle cost. This basic design methodology can be applied to any project that traverses discontinuous permafrost terrain.

  5. A Time-Slotted On-Demand Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Unmanned Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope Forsmann; Robert Hiromoto; John Svoboda

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of UAVs has increased dramatically because of their successful deployment in military operations, their ability to preserve human life, and the continual improvements in wireless communication that serves to increase their capabilities. We believe the usefulness of UAVs would be dramatically increased if formation flight were added to the list of capabilities. Currently, sustained formation flight with a cluster of UAVs has only been achieved with two nodes by the Multi-UAV Testbed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Park, 2004) Formation flight is a complex operation requiring the ability to adjust the flight patterns on the fly and correct for wind gusts, terrain, and differences in node equipment. All of which increases the amount of inner node communication. Since one of the problems with MANET communication is network congestion, we believe a first step towards formation flight can be made through improved inner node communication. We have investigated current communication routing protocols and developed an altered hybrid routing protocol in order to provide communication with less network congestion.

  6. Synthesis of Sol-Gel Matrices for Encapsulation of Enzymes Using an Aqueous Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, C.S.; Bhatia, R.B.; Brinker, C.J.; Harris, T.M.

    1998-11-23

    Sol-gel matrices are promising host materials for potential chemical and biosensor applications. Previous studies have focused on modified sol-gel routes using alkoxides for encapsulation of enzymes. However the formation of alcohol as a byproduct during hydrolysis and condensation reactions poses limitations. We report the immobilization of glucose oxidase and peroxidase in silica prepared by an aqueous route which may provide a more favorable environment for the biomolecules. A two step aqueous sol-gel procedure using sodium silicate as the precursor was developed to encapsulate the enzymes and the dye precursor, o-dianisidine. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to give gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Peroxidase then catalyzes the reaction of the dye precursor with hydrogen peroxide to produce a colored product. The kinetics of the coupled enzymatic reactions were monitored by optical spectroscopy and compared to those occurring in tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) derived silica matrices developed by Yamanaka. Enhanced kinetics in the aqueous silicate matrices were related to differences in the host microstructure as elucidated by microstructural comparisons of the corresponding aerogels.

  7. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanzo, D.; Kimura, C.Y.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1996-06-03

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  8. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  9. Factors affecting route selection and survival of steelhead kelts at Snake River dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison H. A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Green, Ethan D.

    2015-03-31

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a study that summarized the passage route proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged kelts. Kelts were also tagged with passive integrated transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems (JBS) and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that were related to forebay residence time, route of passage, and survival of steelhead kelts at FCRPS dams on the Snake River. Multiple approaches, including 3-D tracking, bivariate and multivariable regression modeling, and decision tree analyses were used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the greatest effect on forebay residence time, route of passage, and route-specific and overall dam passage survival probabilities for tagged kelts at Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams. In general, kelt behavior and discharge appeared to work independently to affect forebay residence times. Kelt behavior, primarily approach location, migration depth, and “searching” activities in the forebay, was found to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. The condition of kelts was the single most important factor affecting their survival. The information gathered in this study may be used by dam operators and fisheries managers to identify potential management actions to improve in-river survival of kelts or collection methods for kelt reconditioning programs to aid

  10. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by employing bandwidth shells at areas of overutilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-04-27

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a final destination. The default routing strategy is altered responsive to detection of overutilization of a particular path of one or more links, and at least some traffic is re-routed by distributing the traffic among multiple paths (which may include the default path). An alternative path may require a greater number of link traversals to reach the destination node.

  11. Allocating application to group of consecutive processors in fault-tolerant deadlock-free routing path defined by routers obeying same rules for path selection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Vitus J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Bender, Michael A.; Bunde, David P.

    2009-07-21

    In a multiple processor computing apparatus, directional routing restrictions and a logical channel construct permit fault tolerant, deadlock-free routing. Processor allocation can be performed by creating a linear ordering of the processors based on routing rules used for routing communications between the processors. The linear ordering can assume a loop configuration, and bin-packing is applied to this loop configuration. The interconnection of the processors can be conceptualized as a generally rectangular 3-dimensional grid, and the MC allocation algorithm is applied with respect to the 3-dimensional grid.

  12. A simple route to the synthesis of single crystalline copper metagermanate nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z.; Zhao, H.S.; Tan, W.; Yu, H.Y.; Chen, Y.W.; Zhang Qianfeng; Fan, C.G.

    2009-12-15

    Single crystalline copper metagermanate (CuGeO{sub 3}) nanowires with the diameter of 30-300 nm and length of longer than 100 {mu}m have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal deposition route. X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman analyses confirm that the nanowires are orthorhombic single crystals with a main growth direction along <101>. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a strong blue emission peak at 442 nm with a broad emission band. The blue emission may be ascribed to radiative recombination of oxygen vacancies and oxygen-germanium vacancies. The formation process of CuGeO{sub 3} nanowires is also discussed.

  13. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a metal-dielectric-metal lens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dennis, Brian S.; Czaplewski, David A.; Haftel, Michael I.; Lopez, Daniel; Blumberg, Girsh; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2015-08-12

    Passive optical elements can play key roles in photonic applications such as plasmonic integrated circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate passive gap-plasmon focusing and routing in two-dimensions. This is accomplished using a high numerical-aperture metal-dielectric-metal lens incorporated into a planar-waveguide device. Fabrication via metal sputtering, oxide deposition, electron- and focused-ion- beam lithography, and argon ion-milling is reported on in detail. Diffraction-limited focusing is optically characterized by sampling out-coupled light with a microscope. The measured focal distance and full-width-half-maximum spot size agree well with the calculated lens performance. The surface plasmon polariton propagation length is measured by sampling light from multiple out-couplermoreslits.less

  14. Apparatus and method for routing a transmission line through a downhole tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Reynolds, Jay

    2006-07-04

    A method for routing a transmission line through a tool joint having a primary and secondary shoulder, a central bore, and a longitudinal axis, includes drilling a straight channel, at a positive, nominal angle with respect to the longitudinal axis, through the tool joint from the secondary shoulder to a point proximate the inside wall of the centtral bore. The method further includes milling back, from within the central bore, a second channel to merge with the straight channel, thereby forming a continuous channel from the secondary shoulder to the central bore. In selected embodiments, drilling is accomplished by gun-drilling the straight channel. In other embodiments, the method includes tilting the tool joint before drilling to produce the positive, nominal angle. In selected embodiments, the positive, nominal angle is less than or equal to 15 degrees.

  15. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  16. Production of high quality steels using the scrap/electric arc furnace route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houpert, C.; Lanteri, V.; Jolivet, J.M.; Guttmann, M.; Birat, J.P.; Jallon, M.; Confente, M.

    1996-12-31

    Europe, after North America, is increasing the share of electric arc furnace steelmaking at the expense of integrated steel production and the trend appears to be long term. The driving forces for this change are strong: availability of scrap, social pressure to recycle materials and economic benefits to be reaped from the small structure associated with this short and slim production route. The increasing use of scrap does raise some problems however, in terms of the tramp element build up within the scrap deposit over time. Scrap pretreatment, which aims at separating steel from non-ferrous material during preparation, is thus attracting a lot of attention. The purpose of the present work was to investigate quantitatively the potential problems related to increased levels in tramp elements, with two objectives: identify, on a case by case basis, the currently existing practical limits and devise countermeasures to further extend these limits by better controlling process parameters for instance.

  17. Investigation of nanocrystalline zinc chromite obtained by two soft chemical routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingasu, Dana; Mindru, Ioana; Culita, Daniela C.; Patron, Luminita; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Preda, Silviu; Oprea, Ovidiu; Osiceanu, Petre; Morena Pineda, Eufemio

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two soft chemical routes to synthesize zinc chromites are described. • Glycine is used as chelating agent (precursor method) and fuel (solution combustion method). • The synthesized chromites have crystallite size in the range of 18–27 nm. • An antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition is observed at about T{sub N} ∼ 18 K. - Abstract: Zinc chromite (ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanocrystalline powders were obtained by two different chemical routes: the precursor method and the solution combustion method involving glycine-nitrates. The complex compound precursors, [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 8}]·9H{sub 2}O and [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 4.5}]·(NO{sub 3}){sub 8}·6H{sub 2}O, were characterized by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and thermal analysis. The structure, morphology, surface chemistry and magnetic properties of ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared and Raman spectroscopy (RS), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the chromite spinel phase with good crystallinity and an average crystallite size of approximately 18–27 nm. The band gap values ranged between 3.31 and 3.33 eV. The magnetic measurements indicated an antiferromagnetic transition at T{sub N} ∼ 17.5/18 K.

  18. A novel process route for the production of spherical SLS polymer powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Jochen; Sachs, Marius; Blümel, Christina; Winzer, Bettina; Toni, Franziska; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-05-22

    Currently, rapid prototyping gradually is transferred to additive manufacturing opening new applications. Especially selective laser sintering (SLS) is promising. One drawback is the limited choice of polymer materials available as optimized powders. Powders produced by cryogenic grinding show poor powder flowability resulting in poor device quality. Within this account we present a novel process route for the production of spherical polymer micron-sized particles of good flowability. The feasibility of the process chain is demonstrated for polystyrene e. In a first step polymer microparticles are produced by a wet grinding method. By this approach the mean particle size and the particle size distribution can be tuned between a few microns and several 10 microns. The applicability of this method will be discussed for different polymers and the dependencies of product particle size distribution on stressing conditions and process temperature will be outlined. The comminution products consist of microparticles of irregular shape and poor powder flowability. An improvement of flowability of the ground particles is achieved by changing their shape: they are rounded using a heated downer reactor. The influence of temperature profile and residence time on the product properties will be addressed applying a viscous-flow sintering model. To further improve the flowability of the cohesive spherical polymer particles nanoparticles are adhered onto the microparticles’ surface. The improvement of flowability is remarkable: rounded and dry-coated powders exhibit a strongly reduced tensile strength as compared to the comminution product. The improved polymer powders obtained by the process route proposed open new possibilities in SLS processing including the usage of much smaller polymer beads.

  19. Generalized chemical route to develop fatty acid capped highly dispersed semiconducting metal sulphide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Jayesh D.; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Mighri, Frej; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Ajji, Abdellah; Chemical Engineering Department, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville Montreal, QC, H3C 3A7

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Chemical route for the synthesis of OA-capped CdS, ZnS and PbS at low temperature. ► Synthesized nanocrystals via thermolysis of their metal–oleate complexes. ► Size quantized nanocrystals were highly dispersed and stable at room temperature. -- Abstract: This work deals with the synthesis of highly dispersed semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) of cadmium sulphide (CdS), zinc sulphide (ZnS) and lead sulphide (PbS) through a simple and generalized process using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. To synthesize these NCs, metal–oleate (M–O) complexes were obtained from the reaction at 140 °C between metal acetates and OA in hexanes media. Subsequently, M–O complexes were sulphurized using thioacetamide at the same temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations show that the synthesized products are of nanoscale-size with highly crystalline cubic phase. The optical absorption of OA-capped metal sulphide NCs confirms that their size quantization induced a large shift towards visible region. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CdS NCs shows a broad band-edge emission with shallow and deep-trap emissions, while PL spectrum of ZnS NCs reveals a broad emission due to defects states on the surface. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that fatty acid monolayers were bound strongly on the nanocrystal surface as a carboxylate and the two oxygen atoms of the carboxylate were coordinated symmetrically to the surface of the NCs. The strong binding between the fatty acid and the NCs surface enhances the stability of NCs colloids. In general, this generalized route has a great potential in developing nanoscale metal sulphides for opto-electronic devices.

  20. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R.

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  1. Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-12-15

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and

  2. Ion-assisted phase separation in compound films: An alternate route to ordered nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Scott A.

    2013-11-28

    In recent years, observations of highly ordered, hexagonal arrays of self-organized nanostructures on binary or impurity-laced targets under normal-incidence ion irradiation have excited interest in this phenomenon as a potential route to high-throughput, low-cost manufacture of nanoscale devices or nanostructured coatings. The currently prominent explanation for these structures is a morphological instability driven by ion erosion discovered by Bradley and Shipman; however, recent parameter estimates via molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this erosive instability may not be active for the representative GaSb system in which hexagonal structures were first observed. Motivated by recent experimental and numerical evidence suggesting the likely importance of phase separation during thin-film processing, we here generalize the Bradley-Shipman theory to include the effect of ion-assisted phase separation. The resulting system admits a chemically driven finite-wavelength instability that can explain the order of observed patterns even when the erosive Bradley-Shipman instability is inactive. In a relevant simplifying limit, it also provides an intuitive instability criterion similar to results in thin-film deposition, as well as predictions on pattern wavelengths that agree qualitatively with experimental observations. Finally, we identify a characteristic experimental signature that distinguishes the chemical and morphological instabilities and highlights the need for specific additional experimental data on the GaSb system.

  3. Simple route for the synthesis of supercapacitive Co-Ni mixed hydroxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubal, D.P.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 ; Jagadale, A.D.; Patil, S.V.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel method for deposition of Co-Ni mixed hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle network of Co-Ni hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High specific capacitance of 672 F g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High discharge/charge rates. -- Abstract: Facile synthesis of Co-Ni mixed hydroxides films with interconnected nanoparticles networks through two step route is successfully established. These films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared technique (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wettability test. Co-Ni film formation is confirmed from XRD and FTIR study. SEM shows that the surface of Co-Ni films is composed of interconnected nanoparticles. Contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilic nature of films which is feasible for the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the film is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, and constant-current charge/discharge cycling techniques. Specific capacitance of the Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode achieved 672 F g{sup -1}. Impedance analysis shows that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode provides less resistance for the intercalation and de-intercalation of ions. The Co-Ni mixed electrode exhibited good charge/discharge rate at different current densities. The results demonstrated that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide composite is very promising for the next generation high performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

  4. Functionalization of SBA-15 mesoporous silica by Cu-phosphonate units: Probing of synthesis route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskowski, Lukasz; Laskowska, Magdalena

    2014-12-15

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 containing propyl-copper phosphonate units was investigated. The structure of mesoporous samples was tested by N{sub 2} isothermal sorption (BET and BHJ analysis), TEM microscopy and X-Ray scattering. Quantitative analysis EDX has given information about proportions between component atoms in the sample. Quantitative elemental analysis has been carried out to support EDX. To examine bounding between copper atoms and phosphonic units the Raman spectroscopy was carried out. As a support of Raman scattering, the theoretical calculations were made based on density functional theory, with the B3LYP method. By comparison of the calculated vibrational spectra of the molecule with experimental results, distribution of the active units inside silica matrix has been determined. - Graphical abstract: The present study is devoted to mesoporous silica SBA-15 containing propyl-copper phosphonate units. The species were investigated to confirm of synthesis procedure correctness by the micro-Raman technique combined with DFT numerical simulations. Complementary research was carried out to test the structure of mesoporous samples. - Highlights: • SBA-15 silica functionalized with propyl-copper phosphonate units was synthesized. • Synthesis efficiency probed by Raman study supported with DFT simulations. • Homogenous distribution of active units was proved. • Synthesis route enables precise control of distance between copper ions.

  5. Computational Investigations of Trichoderma Reesei Cel7A Suggest New Routes for Enzyme Activity Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, G. T.; Payne, C. M.; Bu, L.; Taylor, C. B.; McCabe, C.; Chu, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellulase (Cel7A) is a key industrial enzyme in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. It is a multi-modular enzyme with a Family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, a flexible O-glycosylated linker, and a large catalytic domain. We have used simulation to elucidate new functions for the 3 sub-domains, which suggests new routes to increase the activity of this central enzyme. These findings include new roles for glycosylation, which we have shown can be used to tune the binding affinity. We have also examined the structures of the catalytically-active complex of Cel7A and its non-processive counterpart, Cel7B, engaged on cellulose, which suggests allosteric mechanisms involved in chain binding when these cellulases are complexed on cellulose. Our computational results also suggest that product inhibition varies significantly between Cel7A and Cel7B, and we offer a molecular-level explanation for this observation. Finally, we discuss simulations of the absolute and relative binding free energy of cellulose ligands and various mutations along the CD tunnel, which will affect processivity and the ability of Cel7A (and related enzymes) to digest cellulose. These results highlight new considerations in protein engineering for processive and non-processive cellulases for production of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  6. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore » result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  7. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embeddedmore » precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.« less

  8. Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the processing route for grain-oriented electrical steels using strip casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Yao, Sheng-Jie; Sun, Yu; Gao, Fei; Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Guo-Huai; Li, Lei; Geng, Dian-Qiao; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2015-08-15

    In the present work, a regular grade GO sheet was produced successively by strip casting, hot rolling, normalizing annealing, two-stage cold rolling with intermediate annealing, primary recrystallization annealing, secondary recrystallization annealing and purification. The aim of this paper was to characterize the evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the new processing route by comprehensive utilization of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that a fine microstructure with the ferrite grain size range of 7–12 μm could be obtained in the primary recrystallization annealed sheet though a very coarse microstructure was produced in the initial as-cast strip. The main finding was that the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture started on the through-thickness intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling, which was not similar to the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture starting on the surface layers of the hot rolled strip in the conventional production route. As a result, the origin of Goss nuclei capable of secondary recrystallization lied in the grains already presented in Goss orientation in the intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling. Another finding was that fine and dispersive inhibitors (mainly AlN) were easy to be produced in the primary recrystallization microstructure due to the initial rapid solidification during strip casting and the subsequent rapid cooling, and the very high temperature reheating usually used before hot rolling in the conventional production route could be avoided. - Highlights: • A regular grade grain-oriented electrical steel was produced. • Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor was characterized. • Origin of Goss nuclei lied in the intermediate annealed strip. • A fine primary recrystallization microstructure could be produced. • Effective inhibitors were easy to be obtained in the new processing route.

  9. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. It possesses high acidity and

  10. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payette, R.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the present work, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined. State Route 83 in Cumberland, Ohio has been damaged by a slow moving slide which has forced the Ohio Department of Transportation to repair the roadway several times. In the most recent repair FGD by-products obtained from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant were used to construct a wall through the failure plane to prevent further slippage. In order to evaluate the utility of using coal combustion by-products in this type of highway project the site was divided into three test sections. In the first repair section, natural soil removed form the slide area was recompacted and replaced according to standard ODOT construction practices. In the second section the natural soil was field mixed with the Tidd PFBC ash in approximately equal proportions. The third section was all Tidd ash. The three test sections were capped by a layer of compacted Tidd ash or crushed stone to provide a wearing surface to allow ODOT to open the roadway before applying a permanent asphalt surface. Measurement of slope movement as well as water levels and quality have begun at the site in order to evaluate long term project performance. The completion of this project should lead to increased acceptance of FGD materials in construction projects. Monetary savings will be realized in avoiding some of the disposal costs for the waste, as well as in the reduced reliance on alternative engineering materials.

  11. Route to polarization switching induced by optical injection in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sciamanna, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2006-02-15

    We perform a theoretical investigation of the polarization dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the injected field has a linear polarization (LP) orthogonal to that of the free-running VCSEL. In agreement with previous experiments [Z. G. Pan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 2999 (1993)], an increase of the injection strength may lead to a polarization switching accompanied by an injection locking. We find that this route to polarization switching is typically accompanied by a cascade of bifurcations to wave-mixing dynamics and time-periodic and possibly chaotic regimes. A detailed mapping of the polarization dynamics in the plane of the injection parameters (detuning, injection strength) unveils a large richness of dynamical scenarios. Of particular interest is the existence of another injection-locked solution for which the two LP modes both lock to the master laser frequency, i.e., an elliptically polarized injection-locked (EPIL) steady state. Modern continuation techniques allow us to unveil an unfolding mechanism of the EPIL solution as the detuning varies and also to link the existence of the EPIL solution to a resonance condition between the master laser frequency and the free-running frequency of the normally depressed LP mode in the slave laser. We furthermore report an additional case of bistability, in which the EPIL solution may coexist with the second injection-locked solution (the one being locked to the master polarization). This case of bistability is a result of the interaction between optical injection and the two-polarization-mode characteristics of VCSEL devices.

  12. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Collins, A. M.; Mann, S.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{sup −} ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm{sup −1} and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm{sup −1}. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm{sup −1} and 1709 cm{sup −1} respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the (−110), (001), (−201), (−111), (200), (−211), (210), (120) and (111) according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  13. Facile route to hierarchical silver microstructures with high catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Sasa; Wang, Wei Tan, Fatang; Gu, Jian; Qiao, Xueliang; Chen, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile route was developed to prepare hierarchical silver microstructures. • The shape and size of secondary units can be tailed by varying reaction conditions. • Hierarchical silver microstructures have excellent catalytic activity. • The morphology and crystallinity of silver particles affect the catalytic activity. - Abstract: A facile, cost-effective and environmentally friendly route was developed to synthesize hierarchical silver microstructures consisting of different shaped secondary units through reducing concentrated silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in the absence of any surfactant. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The investigation on the morphology evolution revealed that the molar ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate was critical to control the shape of secondary structures. The length of plate-like secondary structures which composed hierarchical silver particles could be controlled by changing the reactant concentrations, and it had a key relationship with the catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol by NaBH{sub 4}. The catalytic activity of these surfactant-free silver microstructures was about ten times higher than that of silver nanoparticles, and even comparable to that of gold nanoplates, which indicates that the as-obtained silver microstructures are very promising candidates for the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol due to the simple synthesis route and high catalytic activity.

  14. Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feister, Uwe; Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

  15. An aqueous route to [Ta6O19]8- and solid-state studies of isostructural niobium and tantalum oxide complexes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May D.; Anderson, Travis Mark; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Joel N. Bixler; Francois Bonhomme

    2007-10-01

    Tantalate materials play a vital role in our high technology society: tantalum capacitors are found in virtually every cell phone. Furthermore, electronic characteristics and the incredibly inert nature of tantalates renders them ideal for applications such as biomedical implants, nuclear waste forms, ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, photocatalysts and optical coatings. The inert and insoluble nature of tantalates is not fundamentally understood; and furthermore poor solubility renders fabrication of novel or optimized tantalates very difficult. We have developed a soft chemical route to water-soluble tantalum oxide clusters that can serve as both precursors for novel tantalate materials and ideal models for experimental and computational approaches to understanding the unusually inert behavior of tantalates. The water soluble cluster, [Ta6O19]8- is small, highly symmetric, and contains the representative oxygen types of a metal oxide surface, and thus ideally mimics a complex tantalate surface in a simplistic form that can be studied unambiguously. Furthermore; in aqueous solution, these highly charged and super-basic clusters orchestrate surprising acid-base behavior that most likely plays an important role in the inertness of related oxide surfaces. Our unique synthetic approach to the [Ta6O19]8- cluster allowed for unprecedented enrichment with isotopic labels (17O), enabling detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies of the behavior of cluster oxygens, as well as their acid-base behavior. This SAND report is a collection of two publications that resulted from these efforts.

  16. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by dynamic global mapping of contended links

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2011-10-04

    A massively parallel nodal computer system periodically collects and broadcasts usage data for an internal communications network. A node sending data over the network makes a global routing determination using the network usage data. Preferably, network usage data comprises an N-bit usage value for each output buffer associated with a network link. An optimum routing is determined by summing the N-bit values associated with each link through which a data packet must pass, and comparing the sums associated with different possible routes.

  17. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 1. Pacific coast. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the Pacific Coast to determine whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  18. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 2. Atlantic and Florida Gulf coasts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the east coast and Florida Gulf Coast. It discusses whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  19. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via OH dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the OH bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form OH bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  20. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, Jos Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ? Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ? Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ? Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mssbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  1. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  2. Preparation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Mo nanocomposite powder via chemical route and spray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, M.; Cheng, F.; Wei, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    A route to prepare nanometer-sized Mo particulates in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was attempted by a combination of solution reactions in molecular scale and forcing precipitation by a spray-drying technique. MoO{sub 3} was first dissolved in ammonia water and then added in the slurry with high purity, submicrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Mixed suspension was spray-dried, and then the dried granules were reduced by hydrogen gas and further hot-pressing to a bulky composite at various temperatures. Dissolution of Mo oxide, adsorption reactions on alumina surface, and surface potential of alumina particles in homogeneous ammonia suspension were studied. Characterization of the granules, including compactability, flowing properties, surface morphology, grain growth of Mo and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and mixing homogeneity, were examined. Homogeneity of the spray-dried granules was determined by the calculation of mixing index and the observation of the microstructure of sintered body. The existence of intergranular, intragranular, and nanosized Mo particulates within Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). All the evidences revealed that homogeneous composites with nanometer-sized Mo had been successfully prepared by this attempt with the proposed chemical route and following spray-drying process. {copyright}{ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  3. Structural and optical properties of ZnO: K synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krithiga, R. Sankar, S.; Subhashree, G.; Bharathi, R. Niruban

    2015-06-24

    The structural and optical behavior of ZnO and ZnO doped with K synthesized by solution combustion route is reported in this article. The XRD patterns confirm the substitution of K atoms into ZnO lattice. There are no secondary peaks observed in the XRD patterns. The band gap of the K doped samples show a red shift on comparison with the bandgap of ZnO. The photoluminescence spectral study discloses the quenching behavior of UV emission and the aggrandizing blue emission when K content increases. The rich presence of defects is confirmed from the optical analysis and a practical mechanism, involving Zn{sub i} for the origin of the blue emission in ZnO is discussed here.

  4. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred; Halstead, Robert J.; Ballard, James D.

    2013-07-01

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous

  5. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  6. A sol-gel route for the development of rare-earth aluminum borate nanopowders and transparent thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maia, Lauro J.Q. Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Hernandes, Antonio C.

    2007-02-15

    A new sol-gel route was applied to obtain Y{sub 0.9}Er{sub 0.1}Al{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} crystalline powders and amorphous thin films by using Al(acac){sub 3}, B(OPr {sup i}){sub 3}, Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O, and Er(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O as starting materials dissolved in propionic acid and ethyl alcohol mixtures. Our study shows that propionic acid acts as good chelant agent for yttrium and erbium ions while ethyl alcohol allows to dissolve Al(acac){sub 3}. This process makes the resulting sols very stable to obtain homogeneous gels and transparent amorphous thin films. In addition, the propionic acid prevents the sol precipitation, making easy porous- and crack-free thin film depositions. Chemical reactions involved in the complexation were discussed. As-prepared powders and films are amorphous and present a good thermal stability due to their high glass transition (746 deg. C) and crystallization temperatures (830 deg. C). This new sol-gel route showed to be adequate to obtain dense and crack-free thin films free of organic and hydroxyl groups that can be considered as promising materials to be used in integrated optical systems. - Graphical abstract: SEM micrograph of Y{sub 0.9}Er{sub 0.1}Al{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} powders calcined at 400 and 700 deg. C during 24 h and heat-treated at 1150 deg. C.

  7. Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-04

    This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

  8. Azine bridged silver coordination polymers: Powder X-ray diffraction route to crystal structure determination of silver benzotriazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajeswaran, Manju . E-mail: manju.rajeswaran@kodak.com; Blanton, Thomas N.; Giesen, David J.; Whitcomb, David R.; Zumbulyadis, Nicholas; Antalek, Brian J.; Neumann, Marcus M.; Misture, Scott T.

    2006-04-15

    In continuation of our interest in solid-state structures of silver complexes of photographic importance, the structure for silver benzotriazole (AgBZT), has now been obtained. The preferred method for solving crystal structures is via single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, for some materials, growing single crystals of appropriate size and quality is often difficult or even impossible. AgBZT is an example of such a silver complex with poor solubility. The usual routes to preparing single crystals using recrystallization from a cooperating solvent resulted in polycrystalline powder samples. We propose a crystal structure for AgBZT, solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, using a direct-space Monte Carlo simulated annealing approach. AgBZT crystals are monoclinic (P2{sub 1} /c), with unit cell dimensions, a=14.8052(3) A, b=3.7498(4) A, c=12.3495(12) A, and {beta}=114.200(6){sup o}. The AgBZT complex is constructed from all three of the Benzotriazole (BZT) nitrogens bonding to a separate silver atom. As a consequence of this bonding mode, the structure is a highly cross-linked, coordination polymer.

  9. Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

    2013-07-31

    This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

  10. Phase stability, mechanical properties, hardness, and possible reactive routing of chromium triboride from first-principle investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Kuang, Xiao-Yu Wang, Zhen-Hua; Shao, Peng; Ding, Li-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Fen

    2013-12-21

    The first-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features and relative stability, mechanical and electronic properties, and possible reactive route for chromium triboride. The predicted new phase of CrB{sub 3} belongs to the rhombohedral phase with R-3m symmetry and it transforms into a hexagonal phase with P-6m2 symmetry at 64 GPa. The mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities of CrB{sub 3} are verified by the calculated elastic constants and formation enthalpies. Also, the full phonon dispersion calculations confirm the dynamic stability of predicted CrB{sub 3}. Considering the role of metallic contributions, the calculated hardness values from our semiempirical method for rhombohedral and hexagonal phases are 23.8 GPa and 22.1 GPa, respectively. In addition, the large shear moduli, Young's moduli, low Poisson's ratios, and small B/G ratios indicate that they are potential hard materials. Relative enthalpy calculations with respect to possible constituents are also investigated to assess the prospects for phase formation and an attempt at high-pressure synthesis is suggested to obtain chromium triboride.

  11. Facile synthesis of Ba1-xKxFe?As? superconductors via hydride route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikina, Julia V. [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Batuk, Maria [Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Abakumov, Artem M. [Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kauzlarich, Susan M. [Univ. of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-12-03

    We have developed a fast, easy, and scalable synthesis method for Ba1-xKxFe?As? (0 ? x ? 1) superconductors using hydrides BaH? and KH as a source of barium and potassium metals. Synthesis from hydrides provides better mixing and easier handling of the starting materials, consequently leading to faster reactions and/or lower synthesis temperatures. The reducing atmosphere provided by the evolved hydrogen facilitates preparation of oxygen-free powders. By a combination of methods we have shown that Ba1-xKxFe?As? obtained via hydride route has the same characteristics as when it is prepared by traditional solid-state synthesis. Refinement from synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data confirms a linear dependence of unit cell parameters upon K content as well as the tetragonal to orthorhombic transition at low temperatures for compositions with x < 0.2. Magnetic measurements revealed dome-like dependence of superconducting transition temperature Tc upon K content with a maximum of 38 K for x close to 0.4. Electron diffraction and high-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy indicates an absence of Ba/K ordering, while local inhomogeneity in the Ba/K distribution takes place at a scale of several angstroms along [110] crystallographic direction.

  12. New sol-gel synthetic route to transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels using inorganic salt precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A E; Tillotson, T M; Satcher Jr, J H; Hrubesh, L W; Simpson, R L

    2000-09-12

    We have developed a new sol-gel route to synthesize several transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels. The approach is straightforward, inexpensive, versatile, and it produces monolithic microporous materials with high surface areas. Specifically, we report the use of epoxides as gelation agents for the sol-gel synthesis of chromia aerogels and xerogels from simple Cr(III) inorganic salts. The dependence of both gel formation and its rate was studied by varying the solvent used, the Cr(III) precursor salt, the epoxide/Cr(III) ratio, as well as the type of epoxide employed. All of these variables were shown to affect the rate of gel formation and provide a convenient control of this parameter. Dried chromia aerogels were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses, results of which will be presented. Our studies have shown that rigid monolithic gels can be prepared from many different metal ions salts, provided the formal oxidation state of the metal ion is greater than or equal to +3. Conversely, when di-valent transition metal salts are used precipitated solids are the products.

  13. The Microscopic Magnetic Properties of W-type Hexaferrite Powder Prepared by A Sol-Gel Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jotania, Rajshree; Chauhan, Chetna; Sharma, Pooja

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic particles of W-type barium-calcium hexaferrite (BaCa{sub 2}Fe{sub 16}O{sub 27}) have been synthesized using a Stearic acid gel route. The gel precursors were dried at 100 deg. C for 2 hrs and then calcinated at 650 deg. C, 750 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C for 4 hrs in a furnace and slowly cooled to room temperature in order to obtain barium-calcium hexaferrite particles. The microscopic magnetic properties of prepared samples studying using Moessbauer spectroscopy. Moessbauer spectra of all samples were recorded at room temperature. Mossbauer parameters like Isomer shift, Quadruple splitting etc. were calculated with respect to iron foil. Barium calcium hexaferrite samples heated at 650 deg. C, 750 deg. C, 850 deg. C show relaxation type Moessbauer spectra along with paramagnetic doublet. The intensity of paramagnetic doublet increases with temperature confirm the presence of ferrous ions in the samples, where as sample calcinated at 950 deg. C confirm the presence of ferrimagnetic phase with partial super paramagnetic nature of prepared hexaferrite sample.

  14. Tracking a defined route for O[subscript 2] migration in a dioxygen-activating diiron enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Woon Ju; Gucinski, Grant; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Lippard, Stephen J. (MIT); (Pomona)

    2011-09-08

    For numerous enzymes reactive toward small gaseous compounds, growing evidence indicates that these substrates diffuse into active site pockets through defined pathways in the protein matrix. Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase is a dioxygen-activating enzyme. Structural analysis suggests two possible pathways for dioxygen access through the {alpha}-subunit to the diiron center: a channel or a series of hydrophobic cavities. To distinguish which is utilized as the O{sub 2} migration pathway, the dimensions of the cavities and the channel were independently varied by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The rate constants for dioxygen access to the diiron center were derived from the formation rates of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, generated upon treatment of the diiron(II) enzyme with O2. This reaction depends on the concentration of dioxygen to the first order. Altering the dimensions of the cavities, but not the channel, changed the rate of dioxygen reactivity with the enzyme. These results strongly suggest that voids comprising the cavities in toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase are not artifacts of protein packing/folding, but rather programmed routes for dioxygen migration through the protein matrix. Because the cavities are not fully connected into the diiron active center in the enzyme resting state, conformational changes will be required to facilitate dioxygen access to the diiron center. We propose that such temporary opening and closing of the cavities may occur in all bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases to control O{sub 2} consumption for efficient catalysis. Our findings suggest that other gas-utilizing enzymes may employ similar structural features to effect substrate passage through a protein matrix.

  15. Route Type Determination Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Stone

    2011-09-01

    According to the 2009 National Household Travel Survey 44.4 percent of all miles travelled by Americans in 2009 (including airplanes, trains, boats, golf carts, subways, bikes, etc.) were travelled in cars. If vans, SUV's and pickup trucks are included, that level increases to 86 percent. We do a lot of travelling on the road in personal vehicles - it's important to be able to understand how we get there and how to rate the fuel economy of our trips. An essential part of this is knowing how to decide if a trip is a city or highway trip.

  16. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UC Campus, Downtown Berkeley BART, and Rockridge BART stations. Shuttles offer free wifi onboard. Riders are asked to adhere to riding instructions. Active shuttle stops are...

  17. Electron beam induced structural evolution in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} particles: A new route to obtain movable core structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Baoliang; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yuhan; Low Carbon Conversion Center, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres with movable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores were obtained by exposing the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} particles to the electron beam of TEM. It is a new route to obtain movable core nanostructures. Research highlights: {yields} SiO{sub 2} hollow particles with movable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores were obtained. {yields} Irradiation of electron beam induced the structural evolution. {yields} A new route to obtain hollow particles with movable core. -- Abstract: SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres with movable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core were obtained by exposing the pre-synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} particles (with an adsorption interlayer of ethylene glycol) under the irradiation of electron beam inside transmission electron micrograph (TEM). In the formation process, the evaporation of adsorbed ethylene glycol and the evolution of amorphous SiO{sub 2} layer played important roles, and that should be attributed to the high temperature and trapped charges induced by the irradiation of electron beam. This work provided a new route to obtain particles with movable core structure and extended the applications of electron beam.

  18. Lambda network having 2.sup.m-1 nodes in each of m stages with each node coupled to four other nodes for bidirectional routing of data packets between nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napolitano, Jr., Leonard M.

    1995-01-01

    The Lambda network is a single stage, packet-switched interprocessor communication network for a distributed memory, parallel processor computer. Its design arises from the desired network characteristics of minimizing mean and maximum packet transfer time, local routing, expandability, deadlock avoidance, and fault tolerance. The network is based on fixed degree nodes and has mean and maximum packet transfer distances where n is the number of processors. The routing method is detailed, as are methods for expandability, deadlock avoidance, and fault tolerance.

  19. A new continuous two-step molecular precursor route to rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Crom, N.

    2012-07-15

    A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway is designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu). This new route involves a first oxidation step leading to the rare-earth oxysulfate Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which is subsequently reduced to the rare-earth oxysulfide Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S by switching to a H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere. The whole process occurs at a temperature significantly lower than usual solid state synthesis (T{<=}650 Degree-Sign C) and avoids the use of dangerous sulfur-based gases, providing a convenient route to the synthesis of the entire series of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. The molecular precursors consist in heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(phen)] and [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(bipy)] (Et{sub 2}dtc=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) and were synthesized by a new high yield and high purity synthesis route. The nature of the molecular precursor determines the minimum synthesis temperature and influences therefore the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase. - Graphical abstract: A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway was designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu), starting from heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes. The influence of the nature of the molecular precursor on the minimum synthesis temperature and on the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase is discussed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new high yield and high purity synthesis route of rare earth dithiocarbamates is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are used as precursors in a continuous process leading to rare-earth oxysulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxysulfides are obtained under much more moderate conditions than previously described.

  20. Low-field magnetoresistance up to 400 K in double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} synthesized by a citrate route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnagea, L.; Jurca, B.; Berthet, P.

    2014-03-15

    A wet-chemistry technique, namely the citrate route, has been used to prepare high-quality polycrystalline samples of double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}. We report on the evolution of magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the synthesized samples as a function of three parameters (i) the pH of the starting solution, (ii) the decomposition temperature of the citrate precursors and (iii) the sintering conditions. The low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) value of our best samples is as high as 5% at room temperature for an applied magnetic field of 1 kOe. Additionally, the distinguishing feature of these samples is the persistence of LFMR, with a reasonably large value, up to 400 K which is a crucial parameter for any practical application. Our study indicates that the enhancement of LFMR observed is due to a good compromise between the grain size distribution and their magnetic polarization. -- Graphical abstract: The microstructure (left panel) and corresponding low-field magnetoresistance of one of the Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} samples synthesized in the course of this work. Highlights: Samples of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} are prepared using a citrate route under varying conditions. Magnetoresistive properties are improved and optimized. Low-field magnetoresitence values as large as 5% at 300 K/1 kOe are reported. Persistence of low-field magnetoresistance up to 400 K.

  1. A facile gel-combustion route for fine particle synthesis of spinel ferrichromite: X-ray and Mssbauer study on effect of Mg and Ni content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vader, V.T.; Achary, S.N.; Meena, S.S.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: A novel and facile synthesis route. Transformation of system from random to inverse spinel. Appearance of superparamagnetism phase. - Abstract: A novel nitratecitrate gel combustion route was used to prepare fine particle of a series Mg{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}FeCrO{sub 4} (0.0 ? x ? 1.0) and its structural properties were investigated. The in situ oxidizing environment provided by the nitrate ions in the gel increases the rate of oxidation and lowers the decomposition temperature of component. All the samples after sintering were characterized at room temperature by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and Mssbauer spectroscopy techniques. The X-ray and Mssbauer studies confirmed the single phase cubic spinel structure with all Fe ions in 3+ charge state. XRD and Mssbauer studies revealed that the samples of x = 0.0, and 0.2 are random spinel and show rather broad lines, while x = 0.41.0 are inverse spinel.

  2. An anion substitution route to low loss colossal dielectric CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Andrew E.; Calvarese, T.G.; Sleight, A.W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2009-02-15

    An anion substitution route was utilized for lowering the dielectric loss in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine. This substitution reduced the dielectric loss, and retained a high dielectric constant that was essentially temperature independent from 25 to 200 deg. C. In particular, CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 11.7}F{sub 0.3} exhibited a giant dielectric constant over 6000 and low dielectric loss below 0.075 at 100 kHz within a temperature range of 25-200 deg. C. Fluorine analysis confirmed the presence of fluorine in all samples measured. - Grapical Abstract: An anion substitution route was utilized for lowering the dielectric loss in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine. This substitution, confirmed by fluorine analysis, reduced tan {delta}, and retained a high dielectric constant that was essentially temperature independent from 25 to 200 deg. C at 100 kHz.

  3. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at

  4. Controlled synthesis of highly ordered LaFeO{sub 3} nanowires using a citrate-based sol-gel route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Zhi; Huang Yi; Dong Bin; Li Hulin . E-mail: lihl@lzu.edu.cn

    2006-02-02

    Highly ordered LaFeO{sub 3} nanowires of complex oxide were controlled synthesized with a porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by a citrate-based sol-gel route. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the LaFeO{sub 3} nanowires formed a uniform length and diameter, which were determined by the thickness and the pore diameter of the AAO template, respectively. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) indicated that the LaFeO{sub 3} nanowires had a perovskite-type crystal structure. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that stoichiometric LaFeO{sub 3} was formed.

  5. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, Vance

    1994-01-01

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

  6. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  7. Systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a service representative

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Scott H.; Johnson, Joel A.; Neiswanger, Jeffery R.; Twitchell, Kevin E.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention includes systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a customer service representative. In one embodiment of the invention, a system configured to distribute a telephone call within a network includes a distributor adapted to connect with a telephone system, the distributor being configured to connect a telephone call using the telephone system and output the telephone call and associated data of the telephone call; and a plurality of customer service representative terminals connected with the distributor and a selected customer service representative terminal being configured to receive the telephone call and the associated data, the distributor and the selected customer service representative terminal being configured to synchronize, application of the telephone call and associated data from the distributor to the selected customer service representative terminal.

  8. Dielectric studies of BaTi{sub 0.96}Co{sub 0.04}O{sub 3} prepared via solid state route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Ashutosh Mishra, Niyati Jarabana, Kanaka Mahalakshmi Bisen, Supriya

    2014-04-24

    The synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped barium titanate; BaTi{sub 0.96}Co{sub 0.04}O{sub 3} was investigated with a view to understand its structural and dielectric properties. A finest possible sample of Cobalt doped micro particles of BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) with possible cubic structure via a solid-state route was prepared. Prepared samples were structural characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The dielectric constant measurements of the sample above and below the Curie temperature were carried out at various frequencies. The Transition temperature is found shifted towards lower side from that of pure BaTiO{sub 3}.

  9. Lambda network having 2{sup m{minus}1} nodes in each of m stages with each node coupled to four other nodes for bidirectional routing of data packets between nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napolitano, L.M. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    The Lambda network is a single stage, packet-switched interprocessor communication network for a distributed memory, parallel processor computer. Its design arises from the desired network characteristics of minimizing mean and maximum packet transfer time, local routing, expandability, deadlock avoidance, and fault tolerance. The network is based on fixed degree nodes and has mean and maximum packet transfer distances where n is the number of processors. The routing method is detailed, as are methods for expandability, deadlock avoidance, and fault tolerance. 14 figs.

  10. Influence of crystalline phase and defects in the ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by thermal plasma route on its photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nawale, Ashok B.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S.V.; Mathe, V.L.; Das, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Thermal plasma synthesized nanophase zirconia showing the blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase as found from the photoabsorption spectroscopy was found to be the dominant parameter for the enhancement in its photocatalytic activity. The existence of different defect states and their concentration in as synthesized samples also inferred from the photoabsorption measurements were also found to be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the samples. Highlights: ? Phase controlled structural formation of nanophase ZrO{sub 2} by thermal plasma route. ? Enhanced photocatalytic degradation rate of methylene blue dye. ? The blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase of nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}. ? Existence of different defect states in the as synthesized nano phase ZrO{sub 2}. ? Several competing processes which controls the photocatalytic degradation rate. -- Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of pure ZrO{sub 2} samples, prepared by a thermal plasma route, and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique was tested for the degradation of methylene blue, which is known to be a hazardous dye. Although, all these samples synthesized at different operating pressures of the thermal plasma reactor showed the photocatalytic activity; the sample synthesized at 1.33 bar of operating pressure showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The blue shift in the band gap of monoclinic phase, as observed from the photo-absorption spectroscopy, may be attributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. The existence of different defect states and their concentration as, inferred from the photo-absorption measurements were also found to be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the as synthesized samples.

  11. Characterization of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained by a chemical route. Influence of the complexing agent content in the starting solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, Alejo C.

    2015-03-15

    The influence of the amount of complexing agent added to the starting solution on the physicochemical properties of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained through a chemical route, was studied. For this purpose, three Cu–Ni nanoalloy samples were synthesized by a previously developed procedure, starting from solutions with citric acid to metal molar ratios (C/Me) of 0.73, 1.00 and 1.50. The synthesis technique consisted in preparing a precursor via the citrate-gel method, and carrying out subsequent thermal treatments in controlled atmospheres. Sample characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray nanoanalysis and electron diffraction. In the three cases, copper and nickel formed a solid solution with a Cu/Ni atomic ratio close to 50/50, and free of impurities inside the crystal structure. The citric acid content of the starting solution proved to have an important influence on the morphology, size distribution, porosity, and crystallinity of the Cu–Ni alloy microparticles obtained, but a lesser influence on their chemical composition. The molar ratio C/Me = 1.00 resulted in the alloy with the Cu/Ni atomic ratio closest to 50/50. - Highlights: • We synthesize Cu–Ni nanoalloys by a chemical route based on the citrate-gel method. • We study the influence of the complexing agent content of the starting solution. • We characterize the samples by electron microscopy and X-ray techniques. • Citric acid influences the shape, size, porosity and crystallinity of the alloys.

  12. Influence of processing route on electrical properties of Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} ceramics obtained by tape-casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranieri, M.G.A.; Aguiar, E.C.; Cilense, M.; Stojanovic, B.D.; Simões, A.Z.; Varela, J.A.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} thick films were obtained by SSR and PPM methods. • Both systems crystallize in an orthorhombic structure. • Textured characteristics were evidenced. • Grain morphology affects the P–E loops. - Abstract: Bismuth titanate powders (Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}-BIT) were fabricated by solid state reaction (SSR) and polymeric precursor method (PPM). From these powders, Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} pellets were obtained by tape-casting using plate-like templates particles prepared by a molten salt method. The BIT phase crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure type with space group Fmmm. Agglomeration of the particles, which affects the densification of the ceramic, electrical conduction and leakage current at high electric fields, was monitored by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) analyses. FEG-SEM indicated that different shape of grains of BIT ceramics was influenced by the processing route. Both SSR and PPM methods lead to unsaturated P–E loops of BIT ceramics originating from the highly c-axis orientation and high conductivity which was affected by charge carriers flowing normally to the grain boundary of the crystal lattice.

  13. Simultaneous use of camera and probe diagnostics to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of multiple underlying instabilities during the route to plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, S. C. Tynan, G. R.; Brandt, C.; Cui, L.; Gosselin, J. J.; Light, A.

    2014-11-15

    We use multiple-tip Langmuir probes and fast imaging to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of underlying instabilities during the controlled route to fully-developed plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized helicon plasma device. Langmuir probes measure radial profiles of electron temperature, plasma density and potential; from which we compute linear growth rates of instabilities, cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations, Reynold's stress, particle flux, vorticity, time-delay estimated velocity, etc. Fast imaging complements the 1D probe measurements by providing temporally and spatially resolved 2D details of plasma structures associated with the instabilities. We find that three radially separated plasma instabilities exist simultaneously. Density gradient driven resistive drift waves propagating in the electron diamagnetic drift direction separate the plasma into an edge region dominated by strong, velocity shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and a central core region which shows coherent Rayleigh-Taylor modes propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The simultaneous, complementary use of both probes and camera was crucial to identify the instabilities and understand the details of the very rich plasma dynamics.

  14. Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Dolislager, Frederick; Hall, Dr. Linda; Hauschild, Veronique; Raber, Ellen; Love, Dr. Adam

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

  15. A facile and scalable route to nano-crystallized kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} fibers via electrospinning/sulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yuanqiang Liu, Aifang; Mu, Chunhong; Huo, Weirong; Lv, Weiqiang; He, Weidong

    2015-01-15

    Detailed characterization of the microstructure and its properties have been done on the nanocrystallized CZTS nanofibers fabricated via electrospinning following sulfurization. The fiber growth mechanism is proposed to explain the spontaneous reaction and crystallization of CZTS, as confirmed by the thermodynamic calculations. - Abstract: In this work, we report facile route to quaternary kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) microfibers through electrospinning method. Precursor fibers are electrospun from the solution composed of Cu(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}, Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2{sup ,}} and SnCl{sub 4} as the solutes, ethylene glycol methyl ether as the solvent, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the plasticizer. CZTS fibers are obtained after annealing at 773 K for 40 min in a sulfur ambient. Characterization including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra, confirm the formation of single-phased, well-crystallized CZTS fibers, with a band gap of about 1.48 eV estimated from the optical absorption curve. In addition, the fiber growth mechanism is proposed to explain the spontaneous reaction and crystallization of CZTS, as confirmed by the thermodynamic calculations.

  16. The Sasol route to fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dry, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    Details are given of the Sasol operation in South Africa. Flow sheets are provided for Sasol 1 and Sasol 2 and 3. The Sasol 1 plant produces waxes, liquid fuels, pipeline gas and chemicals; the Sasol 2 and 3 plants primarily produce ethylene, gasoline and diesel fuel. The versatility of the process is emphasized. The product selectivities of the fixed bed and Synthol reactors are shown and the properties of the products are compared. The influence of the catalyst on selectivity is examined.

  17. Alternate Routes to Enter Westgate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} synthesized using a chelating route for use in IT-SOFC cathodes: Microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scurtu, Rares; Somacescu, Simona; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Culita, Daniela; Bulimestru, Ion; Popa, Nelea; Gulea, Aurelian; Osiceanu, Petre

    2014-02-15

    Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders were synthesized by a chelating route using different polyfunctional H{sub x}APC acids (APC=aminopolycarboxylate; x=3, 4, 5). Different homologous aminopolycarboxylic acids, namely nitrilotriacetic (H{sub 3}nta), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (H{sub 4}edta), 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetracetic (H{sub 4}cdta) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (H{sub 5}dtpa) acid, were used as chelating agents to combine Sm, Sr, Co elements into a perovskite structure. The effects of the chelating agents on the crystalline structure, porosity, surface chemistry and electrical properties were investigated. The electrical properties of the perovskite-type materials emphasized that their conductivities in the temperature range of interest (600–800 °C) depend on the nature of the precursors as well as on the presence of a residual Co oxide phase as shown by XRD and XPS analysis. The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries were determined by XPS revealing a complex chemical behavior of Sr that exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry within the detected volume (<10 nm). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders by a chelating route and the investigation of the microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} obtained by a chelating synthesis route. • Cubic perovskite structures with crystallite sizes ∼23±2 nm. • The porous nature revealed by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption (BET). • The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries highlighted by XPS. • A complex chemical behavior of Sr exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry.

  19. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucourt, Maximilian de Streitparth, Florian Collettini, Federico; Guettler, Felix; Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U. K.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  20. Reasons for decision in the matter of Sable Offshore Energy Inc., application dated 9 June 1998 for approval of the plan, profile and book of reference respecting the detailed route of a subsea pipeline from the Thebaud platform to a landfall near Goldboro, Nova Scotia, and an onshore pipeline from the landfall point to the inlet of the gas processing plant located east of Goldboro, Nova Scotia: MH-4-98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The National Energy Board approved a natural gas pipeline to be built by the proponents of the Sable Offshore Energy Project within a specified 500-meter-wide corridor. The pipeline will run from an offshore platform near Sable Island to a gas plant on the Nova Scotia mainland. This report summarizes proceedings of hearings held to determine the detailed route of the pipeline within the specified corridor and to consider the most appropriate methods and timing of constructing the pipeline. Specific objections to the detailed route from holders of mineral rights licenses are noted and a Board decision on the detailed route is presented.

  1. New scheelite-type oxynitrides in systems RWO{sub 3}N-AWO{sub 4} (R = rare-earth element; A = Ca, Sr) from precursors obtained by the citrate route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevire, Francois; Tessier, Franck; Marchand, Roger

    2004-06-08

    RWO{sub 3}N oxynitrides were isolated as single phases for R=Nd and Pr, after thermal ammonolysis of reactive precursors prepared using the citrate complexation/calcination route. Both stoichiometric compounds crystallize with a scheelite-type tetragonal unit cell, with a=5.2821(3) A, c=11.5893(8) A (NdWO{sub 3}N) and a=5.299(3) A, c=11.631(9) A (PrWO{sub 3}N). Neutron diffraction experiments performed on the Nd-phase did not evidence any oxygen/nitrogen order within the scheelite anionic subnetwork (space group: I4{sub 1}/a). (Nd,A)W(O,N){sub 4} (A=Ca, Sr) solid solution domains were identified between NdWO{sub 3}N and the AWO{sub 4} oxide composition.

  2. Synthesis of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho) and YBO{sub 3}:Eu using a borohydride-based solution precursor route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkes, Amanda E.; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2008-12-15

    A solution precursor route has been used to synthesize a series of nanocrystalline rare-earth borates. Amorphous precursor powders are precipitated during an aqueous reaction between RE{sup 3+} and NaBH{sub 4}, and the isolated powders can be annealed in air at 700 deg. C to form YBO{sub 3}, NdBO{sub 3}, SmBO{sub 3}, EuBO{sub 3}, GdBO{sub 3}, and HoBO{sub 3}. YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties that are similar to high-quality nanocrystals prepared by other methods. The materials have been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, powder XRD, SEM, DSC, UV-Vis fluorimetry, and TEM with EDS and element mapping. - Graphical abstract: Amorphous nanoscopic precursor powders are formed through the aqueous reaction of RE{sup 3+} with NaBH{sub 4}. Once isolated, the powders can be annealed at 700 deg. C in air to form a series of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} orthoborates. Nanocrystalline YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties when excited with UV light.

  3. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phones electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  4. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Wilson, S.W.

    1982-07-29

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The computer acceleration can then be used to correct the sensed inclination.

  5. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, Donald J.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    1986-01-01

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The acceleration can then be used by the computer to correct the sensed inclination.

  6. Liquid Silane Routes to Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Schulz; Xuliang Dai; Kendric J. Nelson; Konstantin Pokhodnya; Justin M. Hoey; Iskander S. Akhatov; Orven F. Swenson; Jeremiah Smith; John Lovaasen; Matt Robinson; Scott Payne; Philip R. Boudjouk

    2008-12-04

    New chemistries based upon liquid cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12} or CHS) have been used as precursors to silicon-containing electronic materials. Spin-coating of CHS-based inks with subsequent UV light and/or thermal treatment yielded amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. While initial ink chemistries gave a-Si:H with high resistivity (i.e., > 10{sup 6} {Omega}.cm), several doping strategies are under development to address this limitation. In this contribution, the current status of solution processed rectifying diodes and field effect transistors fabricated from CHS-based inks will be presented. Additionally, a new printing approach termed collimated aerosol beam direct write (CAB-DW{sup TM}) was developed that allows the deposition of printed Ag lines 5 {mu}m in width. A status update will be given where CHS-based inks have been used to CAB-DW silicon-based features with linewidths <10 {mu}m. Assuming silicon thin film materials with good electrical properties will be developed, there may be significant cost advantages associated with the ability to controllably deposit the semiconductor in a metered fashion.

  7. DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at 1201 Maryland Ave., S.W. > L'Enfant Plaza - Opposite side of the roadway in front of ... leaving from the Forrestal and L'Enfant Plaza facilities should contact (202) 586-5235. ...

  8. Analysis shows revamp route to naphtha feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, E.; Ortiz, C.H.; Arzate, E. )

    1988-11-21

    An existing ethylene plant was studied, using a computer-simulated flexibility analysis, to determine the changes required to convert one of the cracking furnaces from ethane feed to naphtha feed. The simulation determined the changes in flow rate, operating temperature, and steam/hydrocarbon ratio that would result from the liquid feed.

  9. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  10. Pumping-route-dependent concentration quenching and temperature effect of green up- and down-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingjing; Sun, Jiashi [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Jutao [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Fu, Shaobo; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key laboratory of Photo-electronic Materials, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A comparative study on the concentration quenching behaviors of green down- and up-conversion emissions was carried out for the first time, and the different concentration quenching mechanisms were analyzed. Secondly, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration. Highlights: ? Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er/Yb phosphors were prepared via a co-precipitation reaction. ? Morphology and structure of the phosphors were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? Concentration quenching mechanisms for down and up emissions were studied. ? Thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was studied via temperature sensing tech. - Abstract: Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors with various Er{sup 3+} concentrations and fixed Yb{sup 3+} concentration were synthesized via a co-precipitation method, and their crystal structure and morphology were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration quenching behaviors of green up- and down-conversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} were analyzed, and it was confirmed that the difference between quenching concentration for up- and down-conversion emissions resulted from the different population routes. The temperature sensing properties of the Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were studied, and it was found that the Er{sup 3+} doping concentration slightly affected the sensitivity, and Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors could be used in a broad temperature region for detecting temperature. Finally, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er

  11. TTO Phone List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TTO Phone List TTO Phone List TTO Phone List Revised 04/02/2014 TTO Phone List Revised 04-02-14.docx (23.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Technology Transfer Reporting Form Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Technical Standards Managers Contact List

  12. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta; Dabala, Dana; Neamtu, Camelia Surducan, Vasile Surducan, Emanoil

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  13. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 ? (1 ? X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles i.e. 1 ? 3(1 ? X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 ? X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  14. CB-EMIS CELL PHONE CLIENT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-01-02

    The cell phone software allows any Java enabled cell phone to view sensor and meteorological data via an internet connection using a secure connection to the CB-EMIS Web Service. Users with appropriate privileges can monitor the state of the sensors and perform simple maintenance tasks remotely. All sensitive data is downloaded from the web service, thus protecting sensitive data in the event a cell phone is lost.

  15. Preparation of thin ceramic films via an aqueous solution route

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pederson, Larry R.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1989-01-01

    A new chemical method of forming thin ceramic films has been developed. An aqueous solution of metal nitrates or other soluble metal salts and a low molecular weight amino acid is coated onto a substrate and pyrolyzed. The amino acid serves to prevent precipitation of individual solution components, forming a very viscous, glass-like material as excess water is evaporated. Using metal nitrates and glycine, the method has been demonstrated for zirconia with various levels of yttria stabilization, for lanthanum-strontium chromites, and for yttrium-barium-copper oxide superconductors on various substrates.

  16. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely controlled, the nanocrystals boast a defined shape, morphology, orientation and size and are synthesized at benign reaction conditions. Adapting the methods of biomineralization towards the synthesis of platinum nanocrystals will allow effective control at a molecular level of the synthesis of highly active metal electrocatalysts, with readily tailored properties, through tuning of the biochemical inputs. The proposed research will incorporate many facets of biomineralization by: (1) isolating peptides that selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum (2) isolating peptides that promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies (3) using two-dimensional DNA scaffolds to control the spatial orientation and density of the platinum nucleating peptides, and (4) combining bio-templating and soluble peptides to control crystal nucleation, orientation, and morphology. The resulting platinum nanocrystals will be evaluated for their electrocatalytic behavior (on common carbon supports) to determine their optimal size, morphology and crystal structure. We expect that such rational biochemical design will lead to highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  17. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  18. NAVIGATING A QUALITY ROUTE TO A NATIONAL SAFETY AWARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREVETTE SS

    2009-05-26

    Deming quality methodologies applied to safety are recognized with the National Safety Council's annual Robert W. Campbell Award. Over the last ten years, the implementation of Statistical Process Control and quality methodologies at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have contributed to improved safety. Improvements attributed to Statistical Process Control are evidenced in Occupational Safety and Health records and documented through several articles in Quality Progress and the American Society of Safety Engineers publication, Professional Safety. Statistical trending of safety, quality, and occurrence data continues to playa key role in improving safety and quality at what has been called the world's largest environmental cleanup project. DOE's Hanford Site played a pivotal role in the nation's defense beginning in the 1940s, when it was established as part of the Manhattan Project. After more than 50 years of producing material for nuclear weapons, Hanford, which covers 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state, is now focused on three outcomes: (1) Restoring the Columbia River corridor for multiple uses; (2) Transitioning the central plateau to support long-term waste management; and (3) Putting DOE assets to work for the future. The current environmental cleanup mission faces challenges of overlapping technical, political, regulatory, environmental, and cultural interests. From Oct. 1, 1996 through Sept. 30, 2008, Fluor Hanford was a prime contractor to the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. In this role, Fluor Hanford managed several major cleanup activities that included dismantling former nuclear-processing facilities, cleaning up the Site's contaminated groundwater, retrieving and processing transuranic waste for shipment and disposal off-site, maintaining the Site's infrastructure, providing security and fire protection, and operating the Volpentest HAMMER Training and Education Center. On October 1,2008, a transition occurred that changed Fluor's role at Hanford. Fluor's work at Hanford was split in two with the technical scope being assumed by the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) CHPRC is now spearheading much of the cleanup work associated with former nuclear-processing facilities, contaminated groundwater, and transuranic waste. Fluor is an integrated subcontractor to CH PRC in this effort. In addition, at the time of this writing, while the final outcome is being determined for the new Mission Support Contract, Fluor Hanford has had its contract extended to provide site-wide services that include security, fire protection, infrastructure, and operating the HAMMER facility. The emphasis has to be on doing work safely, delivering quality work, controlling costs, and meeting deadlines. Statistical support is provided by Fluor to the PRC, within Fluor Hanford, and to a third contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, which is tasked with cleaning up approximately 210 square miles designated as the Columbia River corridor along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The closing months of Fluor Hanford's 12 year contract were busy, characterized by special events that capped its work as a prime cleanup contractor, transitions of work scope and personnel, and the completion numerous activities. At this time, Fluor's work and approach to safety were featured in state and national forums. A 'Blockbuster' presentation at the Washington State Governor's Industrial Safety Conference in September 2008 featured Fluor Hanford's Chief Operating Officer, a company Safety Representative, and me. Simultaneously, an award ceremony in Anaheim, Calif. recognized Fluor Hanford as the winner of the 2008 Robert W. Campbell Award. The Robert W. Campbell Award is co-sponsored by Exxon Mobil Corporation and the National Safety Council. Named after a pioneer of industrial safety, the Campbell Award recognizes organizations that demonstrate how integration of environmental, health and safety (EHS) management into business operations is a cornerstone of their corporate success. Fluor Hanford received the award for corporations with more than 1,000 employees. Campbell Award winners undergo rigorous assessments that include site visits and comprehensive evaluations of their commitment to, and implementation of, EHS practices. Award winners work with an international partnership of 21 organizations to develop case studies that illustrate their superior EHS programs and best practices, for use by top business and engineering schools worldwide. Quality methodologies in place at Fluor Hanford played a key role in the award process. Fluor Hanford's integrated use of Statistical Process Control and Pareto Charts for analyzing and displaying EHS performance were viewed favorably by the award judges.

  19. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks Thermoelectric Developments for Vehicular Applications Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC

  20. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the surface of a block copolymer and be repositioned to another location along the polymeric chain. SAXS studies of the samples, performed at ALS Beamline 7.3.3, confirmed...

  1. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applicatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications ...

  2. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Japan). Research funding: Army Research Office; National Science Foundation; DuPont; 3M; Japan Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture; and the U.S....

  3. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    70NANB14H030; 70NANB14H259; DMR-1104884 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Optics Express Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 17; Journal...

  4. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interacting, electrons could hold the key to engineering novel functionality into a new generation of all-oxide electronic devices. ARPES measurements of a 2DEG in SrTiO3 and...

  5. RAIL ROUTING - CURRENT PRACTICES FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Two types of highly radioactive materials are spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste that resulted from reprocessing spent fuel. Transportation of these radioactive ...

  6. A Route Towards Sustainability Through Engineered Polymeric Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeja-Jayan, B; Kovacik, P; Yang, R; Sojoudi, H; Ugur, A; Kim, DH; Petruczok, CD; Wang, XX; Liu, AD; Gleason, KK

    2014-05-30

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polymer films represent the marriage of two of the most important technological innovations of the modern age. CVD as a mature technology for growing inorganic thin films is already a workhorse technology of the microfabrication industry and easily scalable from bench to plant. The low cost, mechanical flexibility, and varied functionality offered by polymer thin films make them attractive for both macro and micro scale applications. This review article focuses on two energy and resource efficient CVD polymerization methods, initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) and oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition (oCVD). These solvent-free, substrate independent techniques engineer multi-scale, multi-functional and conformal polymer thin film surfaces and interfaces for applications that can address the main sustainability challenges faced by the world today.

  7. Diffusionless fluid transport and routing using novel microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Louise Mary; Shediac, Renee; Reichmuth, David S.

    2006-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have been proposed for 'Lab-on-a-Chip' applications for nearly a decade. Despite the unquestionable promise of these devices to allow rapid, sensitive and portable biochemical analysis, few practical devices exist. It is often difficult to adapt current laboratory techniques to the microscale because bench-top methods use discrete liquid volumes, while most current microfluidic devices employ streams of liquid confined in a branching network of micron-scale channels. The goal of this research was to use two phase liquid flows, creating discrete packets of liquid. Once divided into discrete packets, the packets can be moved controllably within the microchannels without loss of material. Each packet is equivalent to a minute test tube, holding a fraction from a separation or an aliquot to be reacted. We report on the fabrication of glass and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) devices that create and store packets.

  8. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    critical to tailoring the macroscopic properties during nanoparticle assembly. Although DNA has been used to induce self-assembly of nanoparticles with a high degree of...

  9. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    es047morse2012p.pdf (5.3 MB) More Documents & Publications Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Novel Lithium ...

  10. Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel ThermoelectricMaterials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents new concepts for high performance nanostructured bulk thermoelectric materials lee.pdf (1.98 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Materials for Automotive ...

  11. Metallurgical Route to Produce Upgraded Silicon and Monosilane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukashev, B. N.; Abdullin, Kh A.; Tamendarov, M. F.; Turmagambetov, T. S.; Beketov, B. A.; Page, M. R.; Kline, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    We studied alumothermic reduction of silica from silicate slag to obtain silicon-containing Alloy-I and Alloy-II. Phosphorous industry waste and synthetic slag are used as a silicate slag that consists of more than 90% silicon and calcium oxides and less than l0% other elemental oxides. Silicon-containing Alloy-I was upgraded by acid leaching to silicon of a fine powder structure. Using this powder, we grew poly- and mono-crystalline p-type silicon, with resistivity of 0.24 {Omega} cm, by the Czochralski method. Silicon-containing Alloy-II was used for obtaining monosilane by aqueous treatment with hydrochloric acid under atmospheric conditions and without any catalyst. There was no trace of diborane, which is a common source for boron contamination in crude silane.

  12. Exhibit 2 - General Area Map of Proposed Route.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  13. Benzene reduction in RFG, a new low cost route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gildert, R.; Gildert, G.

    1994-12-31

    Benzene has been targeted for reduction in reformulated gasoline because it is the largest single contributor to the toxic emissions group. This presentation describes processes of benzene removal for the petroleum refiner. By making maximum use of existing equipment, the refiner can minimize the changes necessary to produce reformulated gasoline with a reduction in benzene levels.

  14. DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule, April 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The bus stops are located at: > Germantown - East side of Germantown building (cafeteria side) > Cloverleaf Building* - Front entrance (end of sidewalk near the roadway) * Note: At ...

  15. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium ... bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium ...

  16. Routing performance analysis and optimization within a massively parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen

    2013-04-16

    An apparatus, program product and method optimize the operation of a massively parallel computer system by, in part, receiving actual performance data concerning an application executed by the plurality of interconnected nodes, and analyzing the actual performance data to identify an actual performance pattern. A desired performance pattern may be determined for the application, and an algorithm may be selected from among a plurality of algorithms stored within a memory, the algorithm being configured to achieve the desired performance pattern based on the actual performance data.

  17. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Multiple Users | Department of Energy Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of

  18. Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel Thermoelectric

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials;Phonon Blocking & DOS Engineering | Department of Energy Presents new concepts for high performance nanostructured bulk thermoelectric materials lee.pdf (1.98 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Materials for Automotive Applications The Bottom-Up Approach forThermoelectric Nanocomposites, plusƒ Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials

  19. Routes to Ultrahigh Efficiency Photovoltaic and Photoelectrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisler, Carissa; Lloyd, John; Flowers, Cris; Darbe, Sunita; Warmann, Emily; Verlage, Erik; Fountaine, Kate; Hu, Shu; Lewis, Nathan; Atwater, Harry

    2014-10-15

    We discuss ‘full spectrum’ photovoltaic modules that leverage low-cost III-V compound semiconductor cells, efficient optics and unconventional fabrication/assembly methods, and discuss advances in photoelectrochemical water-splitting with high efficiency.

  20. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... National Science Foundation; DuPont; 3M; Japan Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture; and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). ...

  1. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Discharge Elimination System 40 CFR 131 Water Quality Standards 40 CFR 133 Secondary ... 40 CFR 141 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations 40 CFR 142 National Primary ...

  2. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office; National Science Foundation; DuPont; 3M; Japan Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture; and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences...

  3. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    THE CONTRACT ORDER NO. IN ITEM 10A. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) B. THE ABOVE-NUMBERED ... Engineering Manager Applied TechnologyR&D Manager Maintenance Manager Environment, ...

  4. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and this amendment, and is received 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) July 28,2000 - -- ... Engineering Manager Applied TechnologyR&D Manager Maintenance Manager Environment, ...

  5. There's More Than One Route to the Marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Christy M.

    2008-03-01

    PNNL software takes unconventional commercialization path with serial entrepreneur With thousands of researchers working in national laboratories across the country, innovations happen almost every day. Yet many of these innovations never see the light of day. Luckily, when it came to commercializing the much lauded Starlight™ software, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a solution almost as innovative as the technology itself.

  6. A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to mention a general synthetic strategy for various kinds of Ti-MOFs in the literature. ... Sponsoring Org: DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES Country of Publication: United States Language...

  7. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... In the event that overpayment results from the payment of fee on a provisional basis, the Contractor shall reimburse such overpayment to the Government upon demand, payable with ...

  8. An alkyne metathesis-based route toortho-dehydrobenzannulenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miljanic, Ognjen S.; Vollhardt, Peter C.; Whitener, Glenn D.

    2002-11-07

    An application of alkyne metathesis to 1,2-di(prop-1-ynyl)arenes, producing dehydrobenzannulenes, is described. An efficient method for selective Sonogashira couplings of bromoiodoarenes under conditions of microwave irradiation is also reported.

  9. An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    memory chips and highly sensitive magnetic field sensors. The crystalline material lutetium-iron-oxide (LuFe2O4) has, in turn, garnered much attention due to its purported...

  10. Niowave Develops Production Route for Medical Radioisotopes with...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The lack of a domestic supply and current use of techniques requiring weapons grade uranium led Congress to pass the American Medical Isotope Production Act in 2013. The Act ...

  11. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward...

  12. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential for breakthroughs that reverberate through nearly every sector of the economy (medicine, computing, energy, homeland security) is so great that it has already...

  13. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9B. DATED (SEE E M 11) I 1 DE-ACO4-OOALO6020 10s. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) I . CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODlFlCATlON NO. MO99 Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment priw to the hour and date specifid in the solicitation a s amended. by one of the fdlovving methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendmmS (b) By acknwuledglng receipt of this amendment on each oopy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letttx or tdegram which

  14. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) I I DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI18 extended. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By

  15. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Science and Technology. 42 ENGINEERING electro-optical devices; integrated optics devices; optical microelectromechanical devices; plasmonics; nanophotonics and...

  16. Routes to trans A,B-substituted bacteriochlorins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Mass, Olga

    2016-06-14

    Bacteriochlorin of Formula I: wherein R is H or silyl are described, along with compositions containing the same and methods of making and using the same. ##STR00001##

  17. Property:Incentive/Cont3Phone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cont3Phone Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IncentiveCont3Phone Property Type String Pages using the property "IncentiveCont3Phone" Showing 25 pages using this property....

  18. Property:OutagePhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutagePhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OutagePhoneNumber Property Type String Description An outage hotline or 24-hour customer service number Note: uses...

  19. The new phone books are here! | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The new phone books are here In the days of Google search, you may not get as excited as Navin R. Johnson (Steve Martin's character in "The Jerk") that the new phone books are...

  20. Phone List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phone List SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (155KB) Phone List Jobs Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 About Phone List Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Name Office Phone Other Phone Bazzell, Kevin (650) 926-2513 C: (510) 292-0586 Burke, Patrick (650) 926-8573 C:(510) 459-3184 / BSO: (510) 486-7203 Golan,

  1. Geo Hydro Supply | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Supply Jump to: navigation, search Name: Geo Hydro Supply Address: 997 State Route 93 NW Place: Sugarcreek, Ohio Zip: 44681 Sector: Geothermal energy Phone Number:...

  2. Austin Energy Dials Down Home Energy Use With Smart Phones |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Austin Energy Dials Down Home Energy Use With Smart Phones bbrnstoriesaustinenergy9-2-14.jpg Better Buildings Residential Network member Austin Energy used summer's ...

  3. Property:Incentive/ContPhone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type String Pages using the property "IncentiveContPhone" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + (802)...

  4. Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services The local area code for SSRL is 650. All numbers listed below should be dialed as 650-926-xxxx from other area codes. When calling an onsite location from within SSRL simply dial the 4-digit extension. When calling an offsite number within the 650 area code dial, dial 9 plus the 7-digit number. To call a number in another area code dial 9-1-area code - phone number. Beam Lines Beam Line Extension 1-4 5214 1-5 5215 2-1 5221

  5. Other Contracting Authority NNSA ORGANIZATION HCA LIMIT PHONE NUMBER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other Contracting Authority NNSA ORGANIZATION HCA LIMIT PHONE NUMBER NNSA HQ, NA-63, Deputy Director, Office of Acquisition and Supply Management Barbara H. Stearrett > $25M 202-586-7439 NNSA Service Center, Associate Director, Office of Business Services, Albuquerque, NM Donald J. Garcia < or equal to $25M 505-845-5878 Site offices do not have any HCA authority. NNSA SITE OFFICE CO NAME PHONE M&O CONTRACTOR NAME Bettis/Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Mark Dickinson 202-781-6237 Bechtel

  6. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

  7. EZ reader: Embedded AI for automatic electronic mail interpretation and routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, A.; Hus, J.; Angotti, A.; Piccolo, R.

    1996-12-31

    EZ Reader is an intelligent electronic mail (email) reader that employs a unique combination of rule-based parsing and case-based reasoning to automatically and with a high level of accuracy classify and respond to large volumes of incoming email. EZ Reader reduces the time and human resources required to handle incoming email by selecting responses and adding attachments and advice to each incoming message based on how previous similar messages were handled. The application, developed for Chase Manhattan Bank using Brightware, Inc.`s ART* Enterprise{reg_sign} tool, answers emails automatically and decreases processing time for those requiring manual review. Phase I of EZ Reader was deployed in the first quarter of 1996, and handles up to 80% of incoming mail automatically, depending on message content. Later phases will enable automatic processing of a wider variety of messages. By dramatically reducing the effort associated with manual processing, EZ Reader will pay its own development costs within six months and will result in substantial, recurring dollar savings each year. This paper describes EZ Reader in detail, including its Al-based design, testing, implementation and development history.

  8. Nano-Thermal Effect: A Direct Route for Fast Molecular Recognition of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan; Davis, Zachary; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600 x 10{sup -12} g.

  9. UNDP-Charting a New Low-Carbon Route to Development | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (ITCP), from setting objectives and participatory arrangements for the preparation of the Plan, to financing priority activities. The main audience for this publication is the...

  10. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to the transportation sector. Examples include steam reforming of natural gas to provide hydrogen for hydrotreating unit operations within the refinery and production of urea for use as a reductant for diesel after treatment in selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This discussion focuses on the consumption of natural gas in the production pathway of conventional ethanol (non-cellulosic) from corn through fermentation. Though it is clear that NG would also play a significant role in the cellulosic production pathways, those cases are not considered in this analysis.

  11. Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) Pumps: a Route to UHV-XHV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manini, Paolo

    2009-08-04

    Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) technology has been developed in the 1970's and since then adopted by industry, R and D labs, research centres and in large physics projects like accelerators, synchrotrons and fusion reactors. NEG pumps are very compact and vibration-free devices able to deliver very high pumping with minimal power requirement and electromagnetic interference. In the present paper, main features and performances of getter pumps are reviewed and discussed with a special focus to photocathode gun application, where UHV or XHV conditions are mandatory to ensure adequate gun life. NEG coating and future challenges for NEG technology are also discussed.

  12. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: A flat architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-12-01

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Form Contribution 97-0766. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. This contribution covers the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all reside at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. Future contributions will cover the general case where those top-most LGNs reside at different hierarchy levels. This contribution considers a flat ad hoc network architecture--in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the preconfigured level of its top-most LGN.

  13. Synergistic routes to liquid fuel for a petroleum-deprived future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.

    2009-07-15

    When compared with biomass gasification/Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO)-based processes have a potential to achieve high biomass carbon conversion to liquid fuel with much lower amounts of supplementary H{sub 2}. On the basis of this observation, we suggest a Hydrogen Bio-oil (H{sub 2}Bioil) process using fast hydropyrolysis/HDO that has a potential to produce nearly double the amount of liquid fuel when compared with the existing biofuel processes while requiring only modest quantities of supplementary H{sub 2}. The optimal operating mode for the H{sub 2}Bioil process is suggested to be in an entrained bed mode in presence of H{sub 2} with gas phase HDO of hydropyrolyzed vapors. A remarkable result due to reduced need for the supplementary H{sub 2} is that it provides synergistic integration of the H(2)Bioil process with a coal gasification power plant or a small scale steam natural gas (NG) reformer leading to a dramatic increase in the liquid fuel production from biomass and coal or NG. Here, hot synthesis gas (T>500{sup o}C) from a coal gasifier or methane reformer supplies H{sub 2}/CO for hydropyrolysis and deoxygenation as well as heat for the process. This result is exciting, because it presents us with an option to build integrated H{sub 2}Bioil processes sooner rather than later when the cost effective H{sub 2}, becomes available from a carbon-free energy source such as solar or nuclear. The H{sub 2}Bioil process and its integrated version with a small scale NG reformer have strong potential to be attractive on a small scale while being more efficient than any current biomass to liquid fuel process in operation.

  14. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide isotopologues: a route toward their astrophysical detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es E-mail: mmogren@ksu.edu.sa

    2014-11-20

    Using state-of-the-art computational methodologies, we predict a set of reliable rotational and torsional parameters for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide monosubstituted isotopologues. This includes rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, torsional levels, and torsional splittings. The accuracy of the present data was assessed from a comparison to the available experimental data. Generally, our computed parameters should help in the characterization and the identification of these organo-sulfur molecules in laboratory settings and in the interstellar medium.

  15. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak P.; Wagner, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH--R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  16. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials for Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Information Center BETO 2015 Peer Review Kristi Moriarty March 24, 2015 2 Goal Statement * The purpose of the Biofuels Information Center (BIC) task is to increase deployment of biofuels production facilities and infrastructure by providing essential biofuels data, tools, and information to all stakeholders * The Bioenergy Atlas tools provide interactive maps and analysis of all relevant biomass data with the purpose of growing the domestic bioenergy market for biofuels and biopower

  18. Fully alternating, triaxial electric or magnetic fields offer new routes to fluid vorticity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2014-10-31

    Noncontact methods of generating strong fluid vorticity are important to problems involving heat and mass transfer, fluid mixing, active wetting, and droplet transport. Furthermore, because zero or even negative shear viscosities can be induced, vorticity can greatly extend the control range of the smart fluids used in magnetorheological devices. In recent work we have shown that a particular class of ac/ac/dc triaxial fields (so-called symmetry-breaking rational fields) can create strong vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions and have presented a theory of the vorticity that is based on the symmetry of the 2-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse.more » In this paper we demonstrate that there are three countably infinite sets of fully alternating ac/ac/ac triaxial fields whose frequencies form rational triads that have the symmetry required to drive fluid vorticity. The symmetry of the 3-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse can be derived and from this the direction of the vorticity axis can be predicted, as can the dependence of the sign of the vorticity on the phase relations between the three field components. Experimental results are presented that validate the symmetry theory. These discoveries significantly broaden the class of triaxial fields that can be exploited to produce strong noncontact flow.« less

  19. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.P.; Wagner, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH-R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  20. Hydrogen-Assisted IC Engine Combustion as a Route to Hydrogen Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andre Boehman; Daniel Haworth

    2008-09-30

    The 'Freedom Car' Initiative announced by the Bush Administration has placed a significant emphasis on development of a hydrogen economy in the United States. While the hydrogen-fueled fuel-cell vehicle that is the focus of the 'Freedom Car' program would rely on electrochemical energy conversion, and despite the large amount of resources being devoted to its objectives, near-term implementation of hydrogen in the transportation sector is not likely to arise from fuel cell cars. Instead, fuel blending and ''hydrogen-assisted'' combustion are more realizable pathways for wide-scale hydrogen utilization within the next ten years. Thus, a large potential avenue for utilization of hydrogen in transportation applications is through blending with natural gas, since there is an existing market for natural-gas vehicles of various classes, and since hydrogen can provide a means of achieving even stricter emissions standards. Another potential avenue is through use of hydrogen to 'assist' diesel combustion to permit alternate combustion strategies that can achieve lower emissions and higher efficiency. This project focused on developing the underlying fundamental information to support technologies that will facilitate the introduction of coal-derived hydrogen into the market. Two paths were envisioned for hydrogen utilization in transportation applications. One is for hydrogen to be mixed with other fuels, specifically natural gas, to enhance performance in existing natural gas-fueled vehicles (e.g., transit buses) and provide a practical and marketable avenue to begin using hydrogen in the field. A second is to use hydrogen to enable alternative combustion modes in existing diesel engines, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, to permit enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Thus, this project on hydrogen-assisted combustion encompassed two major objectives: (1) Optimization of hydrogen-natural gas mixture composition and utilization through laboratory studies of spark-ignition engine operation on H{sub 2}-NG and numerical simulation of the impact of hydrogen blending on the physical and chemical processes within the engine; and (2) Examination of hydrogen-assisted combustion in advanced compression-ignition engine processes. To that end, numerical capabilities were applied to the study of hydrogen assisted combustion and experimental facilities were developed to achieve the project objectives.

  1. DOE_HQ_Shuttle_Bus_Route-and-Schedule (05-2016).docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The bus stops are located at: > Germantown - East side of Germantown building (cafeteria side) > 270 Corporate Center (20300 Century Boulevard) - Front entrance > Portals - Main ...

  2. A Route to Scale up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemie International Edition Year: 2010 Volume: 49 Pages: 1414-1417 ABSTRACT: A new strategy is presented to scale up DNA origami using multi-helical DNA tiles as folding...

  3. Lambda Station: On-demand flow based routing for data intensive Grid applications over multitopology networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyshev, A.; Crawford, M.; DeMar, P.; Grigaliunas, V.; Grigoriev, M.; Moibenko, A.; Petravick, D.; Rechenmacher, R.; Newman, H.; Bunn, J.; Van Lingen, F.; Nae, D.; Ravot, S.; Steenberg, C.; Su, X.; Thomas, M.; Xia, Y.; /Caltech

    2006-08-01

    Lambda Station is an ongoing project of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology. The goal of this project is to design, develop and deploy network services for path selection, admission control and flow based forwarding of traffic among data-intensive Grid applications such as are used in High Energy Physics and other communities. Lambda Station deals with the last-mile problem in local area networks, connecting production clusters through a rich array of wide area networks. Selective forwarding of traffic is controlled dynamically at the demand of applications. This paper introduces the motivation of this project, design principles and current status. Integration of Lambda Station client API with the essential Grid middleware such as the dCache/SRM Storage Resource Manager is also described. Finally, the results of applying Lambda Station services to development and production clusters at Fermilab and Caltech over advanced networks such as DOE's UltraScience Net and NSF's UltraLight is covered.

  4. Colloidal CIGS and CZTS nanocrystals: A precursor route to printed photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhavan, Vahid A.; Goodfellow, Brian W.; Panthani, Matthew G.; Steinhagen, Chet; Harvey, Taylor B.; Stolle, C. Jackson; Korgel, Brian A.

    2012-05-15

    This review article summarizes our research focused on Cu(In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} (CIGS) nanocrystals, including their synthesis and implementation as the active light absorbing material in photovoltaic devices (PVs). CIGS PV layers are typically made using a high temperature (>450 Degree-Sign C) process in which Cu, In and Ga are sequentially or co-evaporated and selenized. We have sought to use CIGS nanocrystals synthesized with the desired stoichiometry to deposit PV device layers without high temperature processing. This approach, using spray deposition of the CIGS light absorber layers, without high temperature selenization, has enabled up to 3.1% power conversion efficiency under AM 1.5 solar illumination. Although the device efficiency is too low for commercialization, these devices provide a proof-of-concept that solution-deposited CIGS nanocrystal films can function in PV devices, enabling unconventional device architectures and materials combinations, including the use of flexible, inexpensive and light-weight plastic substrates. - Graphical abstract: The semiconductor light-absorbing layers in photovoltaic devices can be deposited under ambient conditions using nanocrystal inks. Devices can be fabricated on glass or on mechanically flexible plastic substrates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CIGS and CZTS nanocrystals are synthesized and formulated into inks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystal films are spray deposited and used as light absorbing layers in photovoltaic devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photovoltaic devices were constructed from nanowire mats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photovoltaic device efficiency is limited by electrical transport in the nanocrystal layers.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Trip Prediction and Route-Based Vehicle Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about trip prediction...

  6. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  7. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payette, R.; Chen, Xi You; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has become a major concern as issues of emission cleansing and landfill costs continue to rise. Laboratory tests conducted at the Ohio State University have shown that dry FGD by-products possess certain engineering properties that have proven desirable in a number of construction uses. As a follow on to the laboratory program, a field investigation into engineering uses of dry FGD wastes was initiated. In the present work, an FGD by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined.

  8. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E; Franzese, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  9. Fully alternating, triaxial electric or magnetic fields offer new routes to fluid vorticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2014-10-31

    Noncontact methods of generating strong fluid vorticity are important to problems involving heat and mass transfer, fluid mixing, active wetting, and droplet transport. Furthermore, because zero or even negative shear viscosities can be induced, vorticity can greatly extend the control range of the smart fluids used in magnetorheological devices. In recent work we have shown that a particular class of ac/ac/dc triaxial fields (so-called symmetry-breaking rational fields) can create strong vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions and have presented a theory of the vorticity that is based on the symmetry of the 2-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse. In this paper we demonstrate that there are three countably infinite sets of fully alternating ac/ac/ac triaxial fields whose frequencies form rational triads that have the symmetry required to drive fluid vorticity. The symmetry of the 3-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse can be derived and from this the direction of the vorticity axis can be predicted, as can the dependence of the sign of the vorticity on the phase relations between the three field components. Experimental results are presented that validate the symmetry theory. These discoveries significantly broaden the class of triaxial fields that can be exploited to produce strong noncontact flow.

  10. Highly Scalable, UDP-Based Network Transport Protocols for Lambda Grids and 10 GE Routed Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PI: Robert Grossman Co-PI: Stephen Eick

    2009-08-04

    Summary of Report In work prior to this grant, NCDM developed a high performance data transport protocol called SABUL. During this grant, we refined SABUL’s functionality, and then extended both the capabilities and functionality and incorporated them into a new protocol called UDP-based Data transport Protocol, or UDT. We also began preliminary work on Composable UDT, a version of UDT that allows the user to choose among different congestion control algorithms and implement the algorithm of his choice at the time he compiles the code. Specifically, we: · Investigated the theoretical foundations of protocols similar to SABUL and UDT. · Performed design and development work of UDT, a protocol that uses UDP in both the data and control channels. · Began design and development work of Composable UDT, a protocol that supports the use of different congestion control algorithms by simply including the appropriate library when compiling the code. · Performed experimental studies using UDT and Composable UDT using real world applications such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) astronomical data sets. · Released several versions of UDT and Composable, the most recent being v3.1.

  11. Low-temperature route to metal titanate perovskite nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alammar, Tarek; Hamm, Ines; Wark, Michael; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-11-13

    MTiO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step room-temperature ultrasound synthesis in ionic liquid. The samples we gathered are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, UV–vis diffuse reflectance, Raman and IR spectroscopy and their capability in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and methylene blue degradation was tested. Powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic investigations revealed the products to crystallize in the cubic perovskite structure. SEM observations showed that the obtained CaTiO3 consists of nanospheres, BaTiO3 of raspberry-like shaped particles of 20 nm in diameter. SrTiO3 particles have cubic-like morphology with an edge length varying from 100 to 300 nm. SrTiO3 exhibited the highest catalytic activity for photocatalytic H2 evolution using only 0.025 wt.% Rh as co-catalyst and for the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The influence of parameters such as synthesis method, calcination temperature, and doping with nitrogen on the morphology, crystallinity, chemical composition, and photocatalytic acivity of SrTiO3 was studied. Heating the as-prepared SrTiO3 to 700 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and catalytic activity. Ionothermal prepared SrTiO3 exhibits a higher activity than sonochemically prepared one without co-catalyst due to a synergistic effect of anatase which is present in small amount as a by-phase. Furthermore, after photodeposition of Rh, however, the activity is lower than that of the sonochemically prepared SrTiO3. Nitrogen-doped SrTiO3 showed photocatalytic acivity under visible light irradiation.

  12. Proposed Route to Thin Film Crystal Si Using Biaxially Textured Foreign Template Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teplin, C. W.; Ginley, D. S.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Perkins, J. D.; Young, D. L.; Stradins, P.; Wang, Q.; Al-Jassim, M.; Iwaniczko, E.; Leenheer, A.; Jones, K. M.; Branz, H. M.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a new approach to growing photovoltaic-quality crystal silicon (c-Si) films on glass. Other approaches to film c-Si focus on increasing grain size in order to reduce the deleterious effects of grain boundaries. Instead, we have developed an approach to align the silicon grains biaxially (both in and out of plane) so that 1) grain boundaries are "low-angle" and have less effect on the electronic properties of the material and 2) subsequent epitaxial thickening is simplified. They key to our approach is the use of a foreign template layer that can be grown with biaxial texture directly on glass.

  13. Catalytic Routes for the Conversion of Biomass Derivatives to Hydrocarbons and/or Platform Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silks, III, Louis A.

    2015-10-07

    Unprotected carbohydrates were reacted in amine-catalyzed cascade reactions with various methyl ketones to give a direct access to C-glycosides by an operationally simple protocol. As the reaction mechanism,an aldol condensation followed by an intramolecular conjugate addition is assumed.

  14. Down selection of partitioning routes and transmutation fuels for P and T strategies implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazio, C.; Salvatores, M. |; Yang, W.S.

    2007-07-01

    A review of the role and objectives of Partitioning and Transmutation allows pointing out a limited number of well characterized strategies. Moreover, it is possible to show that the choice of the associated partitioning processes and transmutation fuels can also be limited and that a down selection of technologies is possible in order to focus future R and D efforts and resources. (authors)

  15. Dynamic Power Flow Controller: Compact Dynamic Phase Angle Regulators for Transmission Power Routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-03

    GENI Project: Varentec is developing compact, low-cost transmission power controllers with fractional power rating for controlling power flow on transmission networks. The technology will enhance grid operations through improved use of current assets and by dramatically reducing the number of transmission lines that have to be built to meet increasing contributions of renewable energy sources like wind and solar. The proposed transmission controllers would allow for the dynamic control of voltage and power flow, improving the grid’s ability to dispatch power in real time to the places where it is most needed. The controllers would work as fail-safe devices whereby the grid would be restored to its present operating state in the event of a controller malfunction instead of failing outright. The ability to affordably and dynamically control power flow with adequate fail-safe switchgear could open up new competitive energy markets which are not possible under the current regulatory structure and technology base.

  16. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  17. A fast route to obtain manganese spinel nanoparticles by reduction of K-birnessite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovannelli, F.; Chartier, T.; Autret-Lambert, C.; Delorme, F.; Zaghrioui, M.; Seron, A.

    2009-05-15

    The K-birnessite (K{sub x}MnO{sub 2}.yH{sub 2}O) reduction reaction has been tested in order to obtain manganese spinel nanoparticles. The addition of 0.25 weight percent of hydrazine hydrate, the reducing agent, during 24 hours is efficient to transform the birnessite powder in a hausmanite Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Well crystallised square shape nanoparticles are obtained. Different birnessite precursors have been tested and the reaction kinetics is strongly correlated to the crystallinity and granulometry of the precursor. The effects of aging time and hydrazine hydrate amount have been studied. Well crystallised Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} is obtained in one hour. The presence of feitknechtite (MnO(OH)) and amorphous nanorods has been detected as an intermediate phase during birnessite conversion into hausmanite. The conversion mechanism is discussed. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle after treatment of birnessite with an addition of hydrazine during 24 hours.

  18. Low-temperature route to metal titanate perovskite nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alammar, Tarek; Hamm, Ines; Wark, Michael; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-11-13

    MTiO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step room-temperature ultrasound synthesis in ionic liquid. The samples we gathered are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, UV–vis diffuse reflectance, Raman and IR spectroscopy and their capability in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and methylene blue degradation was tested. Powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic investigations revealed the products to crystallize in the cubic perovskite structure. SEM observations showed that the obtained CaTiO3 consists of nanospheres, BaTiO3 of raspberry-like shaped particles of 20 nm in diameter. SrTiO3 particles have cubic-like morphology with an edge length varying frommore » 100 to 300 nm. SrTiO3 exhibited the highest catalytic activity for photocatalytic H2 evolution using only 0.025 wt.% Rh as co-catalyst and for the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The influence of parameters such as synthesis method, calcination temperature, and doping with nitrogen on the morphology, crystallinity, chemical composition, and photocatalytic acivity of SrTiO3 was studied. Heating the as-prepared SrTiO3 to 700 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and catalytic activity. Ionothermal prepared SrTiO3 exhibits a higher activity than sonochemically prepared one without co-catalyst due to a synergistic effect of anatase which is present in small amount as a by-phase. Furthermore, after photodeposition of Rh, however, the activity is lower than that of the sonochemically prepared SrTiO3. Nitrogen-doped SrTiO3 showed photocatalytic acivity under visible light irradiation.« less

  19. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles- A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  20. Final environmental assessment: Los Reales 115 kV transmission line alternative routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) was authorized as a part of the Colorado River Basin Project Act (Public Law 90-537) on September 30, 1968. The primary purpose of the CAP is to furnish water for agricultural, municipal, and industrial uses in central and southern Arizona, and western New Mexico. Due to its magnitude, the CAP is divided into several major features serving separate but interrelated functions. The Tucson Aqueduct Phase B pumping plants were designed and constructed to operate on a looped power system. The entire looped power system, including two switching stations and connecting 115-kv transmission lines, was identified in the FEIS and approved for construction in the Secretary of Interior's Record of Decision dated September 24, 1985. The loop begins in the vicinity of the Twin Peaks Pumping Plant -- the northernmost Phase B pumping station, at the Rattlesnake Switching Station. All of the looped power system has been constructed with the exception of the switching station and portion of transmission line proposed to be constructed in this project. Without construction of this final portion of the looped power system, the Phase B pumping plants will not be able to operate normally without negatively affecting nearby power sources. The CAP will also not be able to provide the reliability necessary for municipal water systems dependent upon CAP water. The purpose of this EA is to describe impacts that would result from relocating the Los Reales 115-kV transmission line, and possibly the switching station, originally identified in the FEIS. It should be mentioned the Department of Energy will complete a separate NEPA review.

  1. Biologically Inspired Synthesis Route to Three-Dimensionally Structured Inorganic Thin Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Morse, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic thin films (hydroxide, oxide, and phosphate materials) that are textured on a submicron scale have been prepared from aqueous metal salt solutions at room temperature using vapor-diffusion catalysis. This generic synthesis approach mimics the essential advantages of the catalytic and structure-directing mechanisms observed for the formation of silica skeletons of marine sponges. Chemical composition, crystallinity, and the three-dimensional morphology of films prepared by this method are extremely sensitive to changes in the synthesis conditions, such as concentrations, reaction times, and the presence and nature of substrate materials. Focusing on different materials systems, the reaction mechanism for the formation ofmore » these thin films and the influence of different reaction parameters on the product are explained.« less

  2. Route-Based Controls Potential for Efficiency Gains | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Secondary Batteries | Department of Energy 12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es165_wood_2012_o.pdf (3.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries In-situ characterization and diagnostics of

  3. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Adachi, Michael M.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Sargent, Edward H.; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-04-06

    A simple two-step method was used to produce efficient planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. Films produced using solely iodine containing precursors resulted in poor morphology and failed devices, whereas addition of chlorine to the process greatly improved morphology and resulted in dense, uniform perovskite films. This process was used to produce perovskite solar cells with a fullerene-based passivation layer. The hysteresis effect, to which planar perovskite devices are otherwise prone, was greatly suppressed through the use of this interface modifier. The combined techniques resulted in perovskite solar cells having a stable efficiency exceeding 11%. This straightforward fabrication procedure holds promise in development of various optoelectronic applications of planar perovskite films.

  4. DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Transportation Planning, Route Selection, and Rail Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation made by Judith Holm, Alex Thrower, Mark Abkowitz, and Tim Runyon for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY.

  5. Non-aqueous spray drying as a route to ultrafine ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armor, J.N. ); Fanelli, A.J.; Marsh, G.M. ); Zambri, P.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Spray drying imparts unique powder handling features to a wide variety of dried products and is usually carried out in a heated air stream while feeding an aqueous suspension of some solid material. The present work, however, describes non-aqueous spray drying as a means of preparing fine powders of metal oxides. In this case an alcohol solvent was used in place of water and the slurry sprayed under an inert atmosphere. Using the non-aqueous technique, the product consists of distinct but loosely aggregated primary particles. Such materials have potential for use as catalysts or catalyst supports.

  6. Investigation of some new hydro(solvo)thermal synthesis routes to nanostructured mixed-metal oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David L.; Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Playford, Helen Y.; Sloan, Jeremy; Hannon, Alex C.; Walton, Richard I.

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of two new solvothermal synthesis approaches to mixed-metal oxide materials and structural characterisation of the products formed. The solvothermal oxidation of metallic gallium by a diethanolamine solution of iron(II) chloride at 240 °C produces a crystalline sample of a spinel-structured material, made up of nano-scale particles typically 20 nm in dimension. XANES spectroscopy at the K-edge shows that the material contains predominantly Fe{sup 2+} in an octahedral environment, but that a small amount of Fe{sup 3+} is also present. Careful analysis using transmission electron microscopy and powder neutron diffraction shows that the sample is actually a mixture of two spinel materials: predominantly (>97%) an Fe{sup 2+} phase Ga{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 1.2}O{sub 3.9}, but with a minor impurity phase that is iron-rich. In contrast, the hydrothermal reaction of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)dihydroxide in water with increasing amounts of Sn(IV) acetate allows nanocrystalline samples of the SnO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} solid solution to be prepared directly, as proved by powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: New solvothermal synthesis approaches to spinel and rutile mixed-metal oxides are reported. - Highlights: • Solvothermal oxidation of gallium metal in organic iron(II) solution gives a novel iron gallate spinel. • Hydrothermal reaction of titanium(IV) complex and tin(IV) acetate produces the complete SnO{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} solid solution. • Nanostructured mixed-metal oxide phases are produced directly from solution.

  7. Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; McKibben, J.M.

    1996-03-15

    The safe management of surplus weapons plutonium is a very important and urgent task with profound environmental, national and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Police Directive 13 and various analysis by renown scientific, technical and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths forward for the long term disposition of surplus weapons usable plutonium. The central, overarching goal is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons, as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in civilian spent reactor fuel. One disposition alternative considered for surplus Pu is immobilization, in which plutonium would be emplaced in glass, ceramic or glass-bonded zeolite. This option, along with some of the progress over the last year is discussed.

  8. Slow phase relaxation as a route to quantum computing beyond the quantum chaos border

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, J.; Seligman, T.H. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Kun, S.Yu. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Centre for Nonlinear Physics, RSPhysSE, ANU, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Theoretical Physics, RSPhysSE, ANU, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    We reveal that phase memory can be much longer than energy relaxation in systems with exponentially large dimensions of Hilbert space; this finding is documented by 50 years of nuclear experiments, though the information is somewhat hidden. For quantum computers Hilbert spaces of dimension 2{sup 100} or larger will be typical and therefore this effect may contribute significantly to reduce the problems of scaling of quantum computers to a useful number of qubits.

  9. Synthesis of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Aerogels by a Non-Alkoxide Sol-Gel Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chervin, C N; Clapsaddle, B J; Chiu, H W; Gash, A E; Satcher, Jr., J H; Kauzlarich, S M

    2005-02-11

    Homogeneous, nanocrystalline powders of yttria-stabilized zirconia were prepared using a nonalkoxide sol-gel method. Monolithic gels, free of precipitation, were prepared by addition of propylene oxide to aqueous solutions of Zr{sup 4+} and Y{sup 3+} chlorides at room temperature. The gels were dried with supercritical CO{sub 2}(l), resulting in amorphous aerogels that crystallized into cubic stabilized ZrO{sub 2} following calcination at 500 C. The aerogels and resulting crystalline products were characterized using in-situ temperature profile X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. TEM and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption analysis of an aerogel indicated a porous network structure with a high surface area (409 m{sup 2}/g). The crystallized yttria-stabilized zirconia maintained high surface area (159 m{sup 2}/g) upon formation of homogeneous, nanoparticles ({approx}10 nm). Ionic conductivity at 1000 C of sintered YSZ (1500 C, 3 hours) prepared by this method, was 0.13 {+-} 0.02 {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Activation energies for the conduction processes from 1000-550 C and 550-400 C, were 0.95 {+-} 0.09 and 1.12 {+-} 0.05 eV, respectively. This is the first reported synthesis and characterization of yttria-stabilized zirconia via an aerogel precursor.

  10. Forensic analysis of the microbiome of phones and shoes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lax, Simon; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad T.; Gibbons, Sean M.; Colares, Geórgia Barguil; Smith, Daniel; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-05-12

    Background: Microbial interaction between human-associated objects and the environments we inhabit may have forensic implications, and the extent to which microbes are shared between individuals inhabiting the same space may be relevant to human health and disease transmission. In this study, two participants sampled the front and back of their cell phones, four different locations on the soles of their shoes, and the floor beneath them every waking hour over a 2-day period. A further 89 participants took individual samples of their shoes and phones at three different scientific conferences. Results: Samples taken from different surface types maintained significantly different microbial community structures. The impact of the floor microbial community on that of the shoe environments was strong and immediate, as evidenced by Procrustes analysis of shoe replicates and significant correlation between shoe and floor samples taken at the same time point. Supervised learning was highly effective at determining which participant had taken a given shoe or phone sample, and a Bayesian method was able to determine which participant had taken each shoe sample based entirely on its similarity to the floor samples. Both shoe and phone samples taken by conference participants clustered into distinct groups based on location, though much more so when an unweighted distance metric was used, suggesting sharing of low-abundance microbial taxa between individuals inhabiting the same space. In conclusion, correlations between microbial community sources and sinks allow for inference of the interactions between humans and their environment.

  11. Forensic analysis of the microbiome of phones and shoes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lax, Simon; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad T.; Gibbons, Sean M.; Colares, Geórgia Barguil; Smith, Daniel; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-05-12

    Background: Microbial interaction between human-associated objects and the environments we inhabit may have forensic implications, and the extent to which microbes are shared between individuals inhabiting the same space may be relevant to human health and disease transmission. In this study, two participants sampled the front and back of their cell phones, four different locations on the soles of their shoes, and the floor beneath them every waking hour over a 2-day period. A further 89 participants took individual samples of their shoes and phones at three different scientific conferences. Results: Samples taken from different surface types maintained significantly differentmore » microbial community structures. The impact of the floor microbial community on that of the shoe environments was strong and immediate, as evidenced by Procrustes analysis of shoe replicates and significant correlation between shoe and floor samples taken at the same time point. Supervised learning was highly effective at determining which participant had taken a given shoe or phone sample, and a Bayesian method was able to determine which participant had taken each shoe sample based entirely on its similarity to the floor samples. Both shoe and phone samples taken by conference participants clustered into distinct groups based on location, though much more so when an unweighted distance metric was used, suggesting sharing of low-abundance microbial taxa between individuals inhabiting the same space. In conclusion, correlations between microbial community sources and sinks allow for inference of the interactions between humans and their environment.« less

  12. MENTEE QUESTIONNAIRE Name: Title: Email: Office Phone Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MENTEE QUESTIONNAIRE Name: Title: Email: Office Phone Number: Office Address: Why are you interested in the mentoring program? (This information will be included with the invitation to your potential mentor.) What goals do you want to work on during your participation in the mentoring program? Is there someone you would like to be your mentor? Yes No If yes, please list their name and any other possible mentors in order of preference: Expectations of the Mentoring Program How long? 6-months

  13. Estimation of retired mobile phones generation in China: A comparative study on methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bo; Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Song, Xiaolong

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The sales data of mobile phones in China was revised by considering the amount of smuggled and counterfeit mobile phones. • The estimation of retired mobile phones in China was made by comparing some relevant methods. • The advanced result of estimation can help improve the policy-making. • The method suggested in this paper can be also used in other countries. • Some discussions on methodology are also conducted in order for the improvement. - Abstract: Due to the rapid development of economy and technology, China has the biggest production and possession of mobile phones around the world. In general, mobile phones have relatively short life time because the majority of users replace their mobile phones frequently. Retired mobile phones represent the most valuable electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) in the main waste stream because of such characteristics as large quantity, high reuse/recovery value and fast replacement frequency. Consequently, the huge amount of retired mobile phones in China calls for a sustainable management system. The generation estimation can provide fundamental information to construct the sustainable management system of retired mobile phones and other waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the reliable estimation result is difficult to get and verify. The priority aim of this paper is to provide proper estimation approach for the generation of retired mobile phones in China, by comparing some relevant methods. The results show that the sales and new method is in the highest priority in estimation of the retired mobile phones. The result of sales and new method shows that there are 47.92 million mobile phones retired in 2002, and it reached to 739.98 million in China in 2012. It presents an increasing tendency with some fluctuations clearly. Furthermore, some discussions on methodology, such as the selection of improper approach and error in the input data, are also conducted in order to

  14. Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone WHEN: Jul 17, 2015 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM WHERE: Time Out Pizzeria 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA SPEAKER: Mike Ham CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login iPhone App Development Class Event Description Learn to build an iPhone app that uses U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) data! This three-hour course will cover how to build an

  15. ORISE: Contact Us - phone numbers, email addresses, shipping addresses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Contact Us Employee Phone Directory Enter the name of the person you are looking for: To use this directory, you must know the full last name of the employee. Last Name:* First Name: Search (*required field) General Information Communications Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education MC-100-44 P.O. Box 117 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Work: (865) 576-3146 Fax: (865) 241-2923 communications@orau.org ORISE Director's Office Andy Page, Director Oak Ridge

  16. MENTOR QUESTIONNAIRE Name: Title: Email: Office Phone Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MENTOR QUESTIONNAIRE Name: Title: Email: Office Phone Number: Office Address: is interested in this program because: Are you willing to act as a mentor for ? Yes No Expectations of the Mentoring Program How long? 6-months minimum commitment. Are you willing to commit to the 6-months minimum timeframe? Yes No How much time? You decide with your mentee; 1-4 hours/month is recommended. Please return completed form to Ames Lab Human Resources, 105 TASF. Are you willing to commit 1-4 hours per month

  17. BPA-2013-00150-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Phone (206) 285-1185 * email: seligman48@seanet.com November 5, 2012 Ms. Christina Munro FOIA Office Bonneville Power Administration Routing: DK-7 P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon...

  18. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE ...

  19. report2006.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT INSTRUCTIONS: Complete requested information in each applicable blank. For make of car: Use Ford, Chevrolet, Plymouth, Toyota, Volkswagen, etc., Not model name. Return original

  20. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT INSTRUCTIONS: Complete requested information in each applicable blank. For make of car: Use Ford, Chevrolet, Plymouth, Toyota, Volkswagen, etc., Not model name. Return original

  1. U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addresses | Department of Energy 39: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses August 20, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses PLATFORM: Version(s): 6 beta 4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A remote user can spoof SMS source addresses. Reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027410 Apple.com PCMag.com

  2. OSTIblog Articles in the smart phone Topic | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    smart phone Topic OSTI and Social Media: A Great Way to "Share" DOE STI by Nena Moss 08 ... smartphone-toting consumers drive new paths to DOE research using new social media tools. ...

  3. Special Workshop: Building Location Aware Apps on the iPhone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    build and run an app: 1. A modern Apple computer with wifi running the xCode program (free download), 2. An iPhone with a charging cable. However, these items are not required....

  4. Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Metallic glass could make your next cell phone harder to break Lab researcher works to rearrange the atoms in metals June 20, 2014 New insights to changing the atomic structure of metals New insights to changing the atomic structure of metals Contact Linda Anderman Email Metal and glass objects are all

  5. Lab Phone Numbers - Center for Plasma in the Laboratory and Astrophysics -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UW Madison Physics Department Lab Phone Numbers UW Madison Center for Plasma in the Laboratory and Astrophysics Lab Phone Numbers CPLA Home - Experiments Madison Symmetric Torus Madsion Dynamo Experiment Rotating Wall Machine Plasma-Couette Experiment Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment - Theory Groups MHD Turbulence Transport in Fusion Devices Plasma Astrophysics RFP Theory - Multi-Institutional Centers Center for Magnetic Self Organization Center for Theory and Computation Center for Momentum

  6. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude ofmore » the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.« less

  7. Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite prepared via a precursor route and enhanced catalytic property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Guoli; Wang Hui; Xiang Xu; Li Feng

    2013-01-15

    The present work reported the synthesis of Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes (CoAl-MMO/CNT) nanocomposite from Co-Al layered double hydroxide/CNTs composite precursor (CoAl-LDH/CNT). The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiments, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA), Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results revealed that in CoAl-MMO/CNT nanocomposite, the nanoparticles of cobalt oxide (CoO) and Co-containing spinel-type complex metal oxides could be well-dispersed on the surface of CNTs, thus forming the heterostructure of CoAl-MMO and CNTs. Furthermore, as-synthesized CoAl-MMO/CNT nanocomposite was utilized as additives for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Compared to those for pure AP and CoAl-MMO, the peak temperature of AP decomposition for CoAl-MMO/CNT was significantly decreased, which is attributed to the novel heterostructure and synergistic effect of multi-component metal oxides of nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: Hybrid Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite showed the enhanced catalytic activity in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate, as compared to carbon nanotubes and pure Co-Al mixed metal oxides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Al mixed metal oxides consisted of cobalt oxide and Co-containing spinels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposite exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the decomposition of AP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The superior catalytic property is related to novel heterostructure and composition.

  8. Effect of reductant and PVP on morphology and magnetic property of ultrafine Ni powders prepared via hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jun Wang, Xiucai; Li, Lili; Li, Chengxuan; Peng, Shuge

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The ultrafine Ni powders with the shapes including sphere, pearl-string, leaf, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet and silknet were prepared through one-step hydrothermal reduction using different reductants. Their saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercivity sequentially increase, and the coercivity of hexagonal sheet-like Ni powders increases by 25% compared with the Ni bulk counterpart. - Highlights: • The ultrafine Ni powders with various shapes of sphere, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet, etc. • Facile and one-step hydrothermal reduction using three reductants and PVP additive was developed. • Magnetic properties of the ultrafine Ni powders with different shapes were measured. • Compared with bulk Ni material, coercivity of hexagonal sheet Ni increases by 25%. • The formation mechanism of the shapes was suggested. - Abstract: The ultrafine nickel particles with different shapes including sphere, pearl-string, leaf, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet and silknet were prepared through one-step hydrothermal reduction using hydrazine hydrate, sodium hypophosphite and ethylene glycol as reductants, polyvinylpyrrolidone as structure-directing agent. It has been verified with the characterization of X-ray powder diffraction and transmission/scanning electronic microscopy that as-prepared products belong to face-centered cubic structure of nickel microcrystals with high purity and fine dispersity. The magnetic hysteresis loops measured at room temperature reveal that the values of saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercivity rise sequentially from silknet, sphere to hexagonal sheet. In comparison with nickel bulk counterpart, the coercivity of the hexagonal sheet nickel powders increases by 25%.

  9. Facile fabrication of rutile monolayer films consisting of well crystalline nanorods by following an IL-assisted hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Peng; Liu Xiaodi; Sun, Chuansheng; Ma Jianmin; Zheng Wenjun

    2009-05-15

    In this study, rutile films consisting of rectangular nanorods were facilely deposited on glass substrates from strongly acid solution of TiCl{sub 4}. The highly ordered array of nanorods was realized in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br by following a hydrothermal process. In this process, Degussa P25 nanoparticles served as seeds that were pre-deposited on the substrates to facilitate the array of rutile nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectrum were used to characterize the obtained nanorod films. The measurements showed that the nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, and grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate. The presence of IL was found vital for the formation of rutile nanorods, and the suitable molar ratio of [Bmim]Br to TiCl{sub 4} ranged from 500:1 to 1500:1. The excessive [Bmim]Br may hinder the precipitation of rutile particles. - Graphical abstract: The rutile film consisting of rectangular nanorods is successfully deposited on glass substrate in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br. The nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, which grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate.

  10. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore » mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  11. System for routing messages in a vertex symmetric network by using addresses formed from permutations of the transmission line indicees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, Vance; Moore, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs .GAMMA..sub.d (k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k and .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) with degree 3-1, diameter k+1, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k.gtoreq.4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction .delta..sub.1. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations.

  12. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on α-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing,more » but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.« less

  13. New Synthesis Route and Characterization of Siderite (FeCO{sub 3} ) and Coprecipitation of {sup 99}Tc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Fattahi, Massoud; Grambow, Bernd

    2007-07-01

    Technetium-99 is a long-lived product of nuclear fission. In the ground-waters of European disposal sites Tc is expected to be in the tetravalent state since the geochemical conditions are reducing due to the presence of redox couples such as Fe(II)/Fe(III), and the presence of reducing minerals such as pyrite and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}). Siderite is expected to be formed as well as container corrosion product. Experiments of coprecipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Tc(IV) were conducted in the laboratory under an inert atmosphere at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the co-precipitate is around 3 nm sized particles. Analytical electron microscopy indicates that the precipitate contains 30 atom % of Tc and 70 atom % Fe. The Tc was homogeneously distributed. Selected Area Electron Diffraction does not reveal the formation of siderite, which suggests that the presence of technetium in high concentration inhibit the formation of this phase. (authors)

  14. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on ?-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing, but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.

  15. First Quarter FY 2010 - Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Waste Shipment Routing to the Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR 2011) First Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR 2011) Download the 2011 Quadrennial Technology Review and the 17 Technology Assessments that were carried out as part of the analysis below. These are meant to be accessible summaries of the techno-economic aspects (e.g., current deployment, historical pace of progress) and research and development (R&D) opportunities in the most important energy technologies or systems. Also available below is the QTR

  16. Comparative Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Cellular Dosimetry and Response in Mice by the Inhalation and Liquid Cell Culture Exposure Routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Minard, Kevin R.; Forsythe, William C.; Wang, Wei; Sharma, Gaurav; Karin, Norman J.; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    testing the rapidly growing number of nanomaterials requires large scale use of in vitro systems under the presumption that these systems are sufficiently predictive or descriptive of responses in in vivo systems for effective use in hazard ranking. We hypothesized that improved relationships between in vitro and in vivo models of experimental toxicology for nanomaterials would result from placing response data in vitro and in vivo on the same dose scale, the amount of material associated with cells (target cell dose). Methods: Balb/c mice were exposed nose-only to an aerosol of 12.8 nm (68.6 nm CMD, 19.9 mg/m3, 4 hours) super paramagnetic iron oxide particles, target cell doses were calculated and biomarkers of response anchored with histological evidence were identified by global transcriptomics. Representative murine epithelial and macrophage cell types were exposed in vitro to the same material in liquid suspension for four hours and levels nanoparticle regulated cytokine transcripts identified in vivo were quantified as a function of measured nanoparticle cellular dose. Results. Target tissue doses of 0.009-0.4 μg SPIO/cm2 lung led to an inflammatory response in the alveolar region characterized by interstitial inflammation and macrophage infiltration. In vitro, higher target tissue doses of ~1.2-4 μg SPIO/ cm2 of cells were required to induce transcriptional regulation of markers of inflammation, CXCL2 CCL3, in C10 lung epithelial cells. Estimated in vivo macrophage SPIO nanoparticle doses ranged from 1-100 pg/cell, and induction of inflammatory markers was observed in vitro in macrophages at doses of 8-35 pg/cell. Conclusions: Application of target tissue dosimetry revealed good correspondence between target cell doses triggering inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo in the alveolar macrophage population, but not in the epithelial cells of the alveolar region. These findings demonstrate the potential for target tissue dosimetry to enable the more quantitative comparison of in vitro and in vivo systems advance their use for hazard assessment and extrapolation to humans. The mildly inflammogentic cellular doses experienced by mice were similar those calculated for humans exposed to the same at the existing permissible exposure limit of 10 mg/m3 iron oxide (as Fe).

  17. Superconducting qubit as a quantum transformer routing entanglement between a microscopic quantum memory and a macroscopic resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Alexander; Saito, Shiro; Semba, Kouichi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Munro, William J. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Nemoto, Kae [National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the creation and measurement of an entangled state between a microscopic two-level system (TLS), formed by a defect in an oxide layer, and a macroscopic superconducting resonator, where their indirect interaction is mediated by an artificial atom, a superconducting persistent current qubit (PCQB). Under appropriate conditions, we found the coherence time of the TLS, the resonator, and the entangled state of these two are significantly longer than the Ramsey dephasing time of PCQB itself. This demonstrates that a PCQB can be used as a quantum transformer to address high coherence microscopic quantum memories by connecting them to macroscopic quantum buses.

  18. Ionic liquid assisted microwave synthesis route towards color-tunable luminescence of lanthanide- doped BiPO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cybinska, Joanna; Lorbeer, Chantal; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-08

    Ln3+-doped (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) nanoparticles of BiPO4 with a particle size below 10 nm were synthesized in a straightforward manner from the appropriate mixture of the respective metal acetates and the task-specific ionic liquids choline or butylammonium dihydrogen-phosphate by conversion in a laboratory microwave (120 °C, 10 min). The ionic liquid acts not only as a solvent and microwave susceptor, but also as the reaction partner and nanoparticle stabilizer. The materials were thoroughly characterized not only with respect to their optical properties but also by PXRD, FT-IR, TEM techniques. Furthermore, depending on the lanthanide, the nanomaterial shows intense luminescencemore » of different colors such as: orange (Sm3+), red (Eu3+), green (Tb3+) or even white (Dy3+).« less

  19. Ionic liquid assisted microwave synthesis route towards color-tunable luminescence of lanthanide- doped BiPO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cybinska, Joanna; Lorbeer, Chantal; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-08

    Ln3+-doped (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) nanoparticles of BiPO4 with a particle size below 10 nm were synthesized in a straightforward manner from the appropriate mixture of the respective metal acetates and the task-specific ionic liquids choline or butylammonium dihydrogen-phosphate by conversion in a laboratory microwave (120 °C, 10 min). The ionic liquid acts not only as a solvent and microwave susceptor, but also as the reaction partner and nanoparticle stabilizer. The materials were thoroughly characterized not only with respect to their optical properties but also by PXRD, FT-IR, TEM techniques. Furthermore, depending on the lanthanide, the nanomaterial shows intense luminescence of different colors such as: orange (Sm3+), red (Eu3+), green (Tb3+) or even white (Dy3+).

  20. A Novel Semi-biosynthetic Route for Artemisinin Production Using Engineered Substrate-Promiscuous P450BM3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Fisher, Karl; Woolard, Frank; Ockey, Denise; McPhee, Derek; Renninger, Neil; Chang, Michelle; Baker, David; Keasling, Jay

    2009-11-30

    Production of fine heterologus pathways in microbial hosts is frequently hindered by insufficient knowledge of the native metabolic pathway and its cognate enzymes; often the pathway is unresolved and enzymes lack detailed characterization. An alternative paradigm to using native pathways is de novo pathway design using well-characterized, substrate-promiscuous enzymes. We demonstrate this concept using P450BM3 from Bacillus megaterium. Using a computer model, we illustrate how key P450BM3 activ site mutations enable binding of non-native substrate amorphadiene, incorporating these mutations into P450BM3 enabled the selective oxidation of amorphadiene arteminsinic-11s,12-epoxide, at titers of 250 mg L"1 in E. coli. We also demonstrate high-yeilding, selective transformations to dihydroartemisinic acid, the immediate precursor to the high value anti-malarial drug artemisinin.

  1. Green route synthesis of high quality CdSe quantum dots for applications in light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bera, Susnata, E-mail: susnata.bera@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Singh, Shashi B. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Investigation was made on light emitting diodes fabricated using CdSe quantum dots. CdSe quantum dots were synthesized chemically using olive oil as the capping agent, instead of toxic phosphine. Room temperature photoluminescence investigation showed sharp 1st excitonic emission peak at 568 nm. Bi-layer organic/inorganic (P3HT/CdSe) hybrid light emitting devices were fabricated by solution process. The electroluminescence study showed low turn on voltage ({approx}2.2 V) .The EL peak intensity was found to increase by increasing the operating current. - Graphical abstract: Light emitting diode was fabricated using CdSe quantum dots using olive oil as the capping agent, instead of toxic phosphine. Bi-layer organic/inorganic (P3HT/CdSe) hybrid light emitting device shows strong electroluminescence in the range 630-661 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdSe Quantum dots were synthesized using olive oil as the capping agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light emitting device was fabricated using CdSe QDs/P3HT polymer heterojunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The I-V characteristics study showed low turn on voltage at {approx}2.2 V. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EL peak intensity increases with increasing the operating current.

  2. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.

  3. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  4. En route to Background Independence: Broken split-symmetry, and how to restore it with bi-metric average actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D. Reuter, M.

    2014-11-15

    The most momentous requirement a quantum theory of gravity must satisfy is Background Independence, necessitating in particular an ab initio derivation of the arena all non-gravitational physics takes place in, namely spacetime. Using the background field technique, this requirement translates into the condition of an unbroken split-symmetry connecting the (quantized) metric fluctuations to the (classical) background metric. If the regularization scheme used violates split-symmetry during the quantization process it is mandatory to restore it in the end at the level of observable physics. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of split-symmetry breaking and restoration within the Effective Average Action (EAA) approach to Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) with a special emphasis on the Asymptotic Safety conjecture. In particular we demonstrate for the first time in a non-trivial setting that the two key requirements of Background Independence and Asymptotic Safety can be satisfied simultaneously. Carefully disentangling fluctuation and background fields, we employ a ‘bi-metric’ ansatz for the EAA and project the flow generated by its functional renormalization group equation on a truncated theory space spanned by two separate Einstein–Hilbert actions for the dynamical and the background metric, respectively. A new powerful method is used to derive the corresponding renormalization group (RG) equations for the Newton- and cosmological constant, both in the dynamical and the background sector. We classify and analyze their solutions in detail, determine their fixed point structure, and identify an attractor mechanism which turns out instrumental in the split-symmetry restoration. We show that there exists a subset of RG trajectories which are both asymptotically safe and split-symmetry restoring: In the ultraviolet they emanate from a non-Gaussian fixed point, and in the infrared they loose all symmetry violating contributions inflicted on them by the non-invariant functional RG equation. As an application, we compute the scale dependent spectral dimension which governs the fractal properties of the effective QEG spacetimes at the bi-metric level. Earlier tests of the Asymptotic Safety conjecture almost exclusively employed ‘single-metric truncations’ which are blind towards the difference between quantum and background fields. We explore in detail under which conditions they can be reliable, and we discuss how the single-metric based picture of Asymptotic Safety needs to be revised in the light of the new results. We shall conclude that the next generation of truncations for quantitatively precise predictions (of critical exponents, for instance) is bound to be of the bi-metric type. - Highlights: • The Asymptotic Safety scenario in quantum gravity is explored. • A bi-metric generalization of the Einstein–Hilbert truncation is investigated. • We find that Background Independence can coexist with Asymptotic Safety. • RG trajectories restoring (background-quantum) split-symmetry are constructed. • The degree of validity of single-metric truncations is critically assessed.

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  6. The fabrication of polyfluorene and polycarbazole-based photovoltaic devices using an air-stable process route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovill, E.; Lidzey, D. G.; Yi, H.; Iraqi, A.

    2014-12-01

    We report a comparative study based on the fabrication of polymer:fullerene photovoltaic (PV) devices incorporating carbazole, fluorene, and a PTB based co-polymer. We have explored the efficiency and performance of such devices when the active polymer:fullerene layer is deposited by spin-casting either under nitrogen or ambient conditions. We show that PV devices based on carbazole and fluorene based materials have very similar power conversion efficiencies when processed under both air and nitrogen, with other photobleaching measurements suggesting that such materials have comparatively enhanced photostability. Devices based on the PTB co-polymer, however, have reduced efficiency when processed in air.

  7. Towards a predictive route for selection of doping elements for the thermoelectric compound PbTe from first-principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Elad; Amouyal, Yaron

    2015-05-07

    Striving for improvements of the thermoelectric (TE) properties of the technologically important lead telluride (PbTe) compound, we investigate the influence of different doping elements on the thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical conductivity applying density functional theory calculations. Our approach combines total-energy calculations yielding lattice vibrational properties with the Boltzmann transport theory to obtain electronic transport properties. We find that doping with elements from the 1st and 3rd columns of the periodic table reduces the sound velocity and, consequently, the lattice thermal conductivity, while 2nd column dopants have no such influence. Furthermore, 1.6 at. % doping with 4th and 5th column elements provides the highest reduction of lattice thermal conductivity. Out of this group, Hf doping results in maximum reduction of the sound velocity from 2030 m s{sup −1} for pure PbTe to 1370 m s{sup −1}, which is equivalent to ca. 32% reduction of lattice thermal conductivity. The highest power factor values calculated for 1.6 at. % doping range between 40 and 56 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2}, and are obtained for substitution with dopants having the same valence as Pb or Te, such as those located at the 2nd, 14th, and 16th columns of the periodic table. We demonstrate how this method may be generalized for dopant-selection-oriented materials design aimed at improving TE performance of other compounds.

  8. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  9. T-670: Skype Input Validation Flaw in 'mobile phone' Profile Entry Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input in the The "mobile phone" profile entry before displaying the input.

  10. Thermal decomposition of electronic wastes: Mobile phone case and other parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molto, Julia; Egea, Silvia; Conesa, Juan Antonio; Font, Rafael

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Pyrolysis and combustion of different parts of mobile phones produce important quantities of CO and CO{sub 2}. > Naphthalene is the most abundant PAH obtained in the thermal treatment of mobile phones. > Higher combustion temperature increases the chlorinated species evolved. - Abstract: Pyrolysis and combustion runs at 850 {sup o}C in a horizontal laboratory furnace were carried out on different parts of a mobile phone (printed circuit board, mobile case and a mixture of both materials). The analyses of the carbon oxides, light hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and dioxin-like PCBs are shown. Regarding semivolatile compounds, phenol, styrene, and its derivatives had the highest yields. In nearly all the runs the same PAHs were identified, naphthalene being the most common component obtained. Combustion of the printed circuit board produced the highest emission factor of PCDD/Fs, possibly due to the high copper content.

  11. Austin Energy Dials Down Home Energy Use With Smart Phones | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Austin Energy Dials Down Home Energy Use With Smart Phones Austin Energy Dials Down Home Energy Use With Smart Phones bbrn_stories_austin_energy_9-2-14.jpg Better Buildings Residential Network member Austin Energy used summer's unpredictable weather patterns as an opportunity to remind Austin, Texas, residents of its Power PartnerSM Thermostat incentive. Customers can receive an $85 rebate for one of several "smart" thermostats that they can control remotely from a smart

  12. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no exposure, 50-minute

  13. Agency Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agency Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone Department of the Interior Sarah Harris Chief of Staff to the Assist Secretary - Indian Affairs Tribalconsultation@bia.gov (202) 208-7163 Department of Justice Tracy Toulou Director, Office of Tribal Justice OTJ@usdoj.gov (202) 514-8812 Department of State Reta Lewis Special Representative for Global Intergovernmental Affairs tribalconsultation@state.gov (202) 647-7710 Department of the Treasury Alexander

  14. OSTIblog Articles in the smart phone Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information smart phone Topic OSTI and Social Media: A Great Way to "Share" DOE STI by Nena Moss 08 Jul, 2014 in OSTI's mission is to advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to DOE researchers and the public. As part of this commitment to America's science and technology future, we strive to place information in consumers' hands, specifically, at their fingertips. Rapidly changing technology

  15. AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OF THE UNITED STATES OF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Phone Routing Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg AABY, Darrell K. ....................................541-548-4015 BPA 7K24/ AAKHUS, Knut C. ..................................720-962-7375 WAPA 2E/251B AASEN, Robert K...................................202-586-9192 EE-5B 6073/LENF950 ABADI, Ehud B. .....................................503-230-4243 BPA 6K20/905 ABBOTT, Kim V. ....................................510-486-7909 SC-BSO 1023/BERKELEY ABBOTT, Paul

  16. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  17. New Routes for the Production of Fission Products and Their Separation from the Source Material for the Development of Realistic Nuclear Forensic Debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharibyan, N.

    2015-10-14

    In order to fully characterize the NIF neutron spectrum, SAND-II-SNL software was requested/received from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. The software is designed to determine the neutron energy spectrum through analysis of experimental activation data. However, given that the source code was developed in Sparcstation 10, it is not compatible with current version of FORTRAN. Accounts have been established through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s High Performance Computing in order to access different compiles for FORTRAN (e.g. pgf77, pgf90). Additionally, several of the subroutines included in the SAND-II-SNL package have required debugging efforts to allow for proper compiling of the code.

  18. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Type Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  19. A general time-dependent route to Resonance-Raman spectroscopy including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Bloino, Julien

    2014-09-21

    We present a new formulation of the time-dependent theory of Resonance-Raman spectroscopy (TD-RR). Particular attention has been devoted to the generality of the framework and to the possibility of including different effects (Duschinsky mixing, Herzberg-Teller contributions). Furthermore, the effects of different harmonic models for the intermediate electronic state are also investigated. Thanks to the implementation of the TD-RR procedure within a general-purpose quantum-chemistry program, both solvation and leading anharmonicity effects have been included in an effective way. The reliability and stability of our TD-RR implementation are validated against our previously proposed and well-tested time-independent procedure. Practical applications are illustrated with some closed- and open-shell medium-size molecules (anthracene, phenoxyl radical, benzyl radical) and the simulated spectra are compared to the experimental results. More complex and larger systems, not limited to organic compounds, can be also studied, as shown for the case of Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride.

  20. Hierarchical Na-doped cubic ZrO{sub 2} synthesis by a simple hydrothermal route and its application in biodiesel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Garca, Hugo A.; Romero-Ibarra, Issis C.; Pfeiffer, Heriberto

    2014-10-15

    Hierarchical growth of cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process in the presence of different surfactants (cationic, non-ionic and anionic) and sodium hydroxide. The structural and microstructural characterizations of different ZrO{sub 2} powders were performed using various techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption, scanning electron microscopy and infrared. Results indicated that sodium addition stabilized the cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase by a Na-doping process, independently of the surfactant used. In contrast, microstructural characteristics varied as a function of the surfactant and sodium presence. In addition, water vapor (H{sub 2}O) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sorption properties were evaluated on ZrO{sub 2} samples. Results evidenced that sample surface reactivity changed as a function of the sodium content. Finally, this surface reactivity was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction using the different synthesized samples, obtaining yields of 93%. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical growth of cubic Na-ZrO{sub 2} phase was synthesized by hydrothermal processes in the presence of surfactants and sodium. Sodium addition stabilized the cubic phase by a Na-doping process, while the microstructural characteristics varied with surfactants. Finally, this surface reactivity was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction. - Highlights: Cubic-ZrO{sub 2} phase was synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process. ZrO{sub 2} structure and microstructures changed as a function of the surfactant. Cubic-ZrO{sub 2} phase was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS MECHANICAL AND HEAT ACTIVATION: A NEW ROUTE TO ENHANCE SERPENTINE CARBONATION REACTIVITY AND LOWER CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; J. Diefenbacher; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter; A.V.G. Chizmeshya

    2005-01-01

    Coal can support a large fraction of global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other candidate technologies, which propose long-term storage (e.g., ocean and geological sequestration), mineral sequestration permanently disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable mineral carbonates. Only benign, naturally occurring materials are formed, eliminating long-term storage and liability issues. Serpentine carbonation is a leading mineral sequestration process candidate, which offers large scale, permanent sequestration. Deposits exceed those needed to carbonate all the CO{sub 2} that could be generated from global coal reserves, and mining and milling costs are reasonable ({approx}$4 to $5/ton). Carbonation is exothermic, providing exciting low-cost process potential. The remaining goal is to develop an economically viable process. An essential step in this development is increasing the carbonation reaction rate and degree of completion, without substantially impacting other process costs. Recently, the Albany Research Center (ARC) has accelerated serpentine carbonation, which occurs naturally over geological time, to near completion in less than an hour. While reaction rates for natural serpentine have been found to be too slow for practical application, both heat and mechanical (attrition grinding) pretreatment were found to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity. Unfortunately, these processes are too energy intensive to be cost-effective in their present form. In this project we explored the potential that utilizing power plant waste heat (e.g., available up to {approx}200-250 C) during mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) offers to enhance serpentine mineral carbonation, while reducing pretreatment energy consumption and process cost. This project was carried out in collaboration with the Albany Research Center (ARC) to maximize the insight into the potential thermomechanical activation offers. Lizardite was selected as the model serpentine material for investigation, due to the relative structural simplicity of its lamellar structure when compared with the corrugated and spiral structures of antigorite and chrysotile, respectively. Hot-ground materials were prepared as a function of grinding temperature, time, and intensity. Carbonation reactivity was explored using the standard ARC serpentine carbonation test (155 C, 150 atm CO{sub 2}, and 1 hr). The product feedstock and carbonation materials were investigated via a battery of techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal, BET, elemental, and infrared analysis. The incorporation of low-level heat with moderate mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) was found to be able to substantially enhance serpentine carbonation reactivity in comparison with moderate mechanical activation alone. Increases in the extent of carbonation of over 70% have been observed in this feasibility study, indicating thermomechanical activation offers substantial potential to lower process cost. Investigations of the thermomechanically activated materials that formed indicate adding low-level heat during moderately intense lizardite mechanical activation promotes (1) energy absorption during activation, (2) structural disorder, and (3) dehydroxylation, as well as carbonation reactivity, with the level of energy absorption, structural disorder and dehydroxylation generally increasing with increasing activation temperature. Increasing activation temperatures were also associated with decreasing surface areas and water absorptive capacities for the activated product materials. The above decreases in surface area and water absorption capacity can be directly correlated with enhanced particle sintering during thermomechanical activation, as evidenced by electron microscopy observation. The level of induced structural disorder appears to be a key parameter in enhancing carbonation reactivity. However, particle sintering may contribute to reduced reactivity. The effectiveness of thermomechanical activation at enhancing carbonation reactivity appears to be a complicated function of a variety of process parameters, including grinding intensity, feedstock-to-media ratio, time, temperature, etc.

  2. A low-temperature extraction-solvothermal route to the fabrication of micro-sized MoS{sub 2} spheres modified by Cyanex 301

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Huaqiang; Fu Xun . E-mail: fuxun4483@163.com; Zhou Xiaodong; Wang Debao; Hu Zhengshui

    2006-06-15

    Mono-dispersed molybdenum disulfide micro-spheres with the diameter of 1-3 {mu}m have been successfully synthesized via extraction-solvothermal method at 150 deg. C. The extractant Cyanex 301 (di-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid) acted as phase transferring agent, reductant, sulfur source and morphology-controlling agent in the whole procedure. The obtained MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were characterized by XRD, EDS, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, IR, UV-Vis and TG, respectively. The influences of reaction conditions were discussed while a mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the micro-spheres. Moreover, the tribological properties of liquid paraffin (LP) containing Cyanex 301-modified MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were also evaluated on a four-ball machine, showing that the obtained MoS{sub 2} product was an excellent oil additive in LP and such lubricant had good anti-wear and friction-reducing properties. - Graphical abstract: Mono-dispersed MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres with the diameter of 1-3 {mu}m were synthesized in gasoline via extraction-solvothermal method at 150 deg. C. The MoS{sub 2} product could be well dispersed into organic solvents again and the tribological properties of liquid paraffin (LP) containing MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were improved.

  3. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willigan, Rhonda

    2009-09-30

    The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

  4. A Brief Literature Overview of Various Routes to Biorenewable Fuels from Lipids for the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-products (NAABB) Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.

    2011-03-29

    Renewable methods of producing transportation fuels are currently the focus of numerous large research efforts across the globe. Renewable fuel produced from algal lipids is one aspect of this research that could have profound implications on future transportation fuel requirements. However, technical challenges remain in several areas of algal-lipid-based fuels. These challenges include the identification and development of robust and productive algal species as well as extraction methods to recover the produced lipids. Not the least of these technical challenges is the conversion of the algae lipids to fungible fuels. This brief literature review focuses primarily on state-of-the-art “downstream” applications of producing fuel from fats and lipids, which can be applied to ongoing research with algae-derived lipids.

  5. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5’-Phosphate Production in E. coli

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S.; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Gophna, Uri; et al

    2016-01-28

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous ‘replacer’ gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a ‘target’ gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predictedmore » target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. Here, we perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly.« less

  6. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-15

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  7. An investigation on the influence of milling time and calcination temperature on the characterization of nano cerium oxide powder synthesized by mechanochemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminzare, M.; Amoozegar, Z.; Sadrnezhaad, S.K.

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Synthesis of nanosized CeO{sub 2} was carried out using mechanochemical reactions plus sequential calcinations procedure. ? The effect of milling time and calcinations procedure on crystallite size and surface area of the as-synthesized powders was investigated. ? The extended milling times were exposed to result in the smaller crystallite size, and hence higher surface area for the as-synthesized powder. ? Higher calcinations temperatures, on the other hand, led to the as-synthesized powder with a larger crystallite size and therefore, lower surface area. ? Activation energy for nanocrystallite growth was calculated during the calcinations procedure and the aforementioned crystallite growth was found to be conducted in the light of interfacial reactions. -- Abstract: The synthesis of nano-sized CeO{sub 2} powder was investigated via mechanochemical reactions between hydrate cerium chloride and sodium hydroxide as the starting materials. The process was followed by a subsequent calcination procedure. Characterization of as-synthesized powder was performed using X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, BrunnerEmmettTeller (BET) nitrogen gas absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle size analyzer (PSA). The precursors were milled for different milling times and then were subjected to different heat treatment procedure at variable temperatures from 100 to 700 C. According to the results, milling time and calcination temperatures induce paramountal effects on crystallite size and surface area of as-synthesized powders. In addition, the average activation energy for the growth of nanocrystals during calcination was determined to be about 12.53 kJ/mol, suggesting the influence of interfacial reactions on the crystallite growth during the calcination procedure.

  8. RECOVERY ACT: DYNAMIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION MANAGEMENT OF ROUTING TELECOM AND DATA CENTERS THROUGH REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL (RTOC): Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Moon

    2011-06-30

    This final scientific report documents the Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Stage 2 Concept Development effort on Data Center Energy Reduction and Management Through Real-Time Optimal Control (RTOC). Society is becoming increasingly dependent on information technology systems, driving exponential growth in demand for data center processing and an insatiable appetite for energy. David Raths noted, 'A 50,000-square-foot data center uses approximately 4 megawatts of power, or the equivalent of 57 barrels of oil a day1.' The problem has become so severe that in some cases, users are giving up raw performance for a better balance between performance and energy efficiency. Historically, power systems for data centers were crudely sized to meet maximum demand. Since many servers operate at 60%-90% of maximum power while only utilizing an average of 5% to 15% of their capability, there are huge inefficiencies in the consumption and delivery of power in these data centers. The goal of the 'Recovery Act: Decreasing Data Center Energy Use through Network and Infrastructure Control' is to develop a state of the art approach for autonomously and intelligently reducing and managing data center power through real-time optimal control. Advances in microelectronics and software are enabling the opportunity to realize significant data center power savings through the implementation of autonomous power management control algorithms. The first step to realizing these savings was addressed in this study through the successful creation of a flexible and scalable mathematical model (equation) for data center behavior and the formulation of an acceptable low technical risk market introduction strategy leveraging commercial hardware and software familiar to the data center market. Follow-on Stage 3 Concept Development efforts include predictive modeling and simulation of algorithm performance, prototype demonstrations with representative data center equipment to verify requisite performance and continued commercial partnering agreement formation to ensure uninterrupted development, and deployment of the real-time optimal control algorithm. As a software implementable technique for reducing power consumption, the RTOC has two very desirable traits supporting rapid prototyping and ultimately widespread dissemination. First, very little capital is required for implementation. No major infrastructure modifications are required and there is no need to purchase expensive capital equipment. Second, the RTOC can be rolled out incrementally. Therefore, the effectiveness can be proven without a large scale initial roll out. Through the use of the Impact Projections Model provided by the DOE, monetary savings in excess of $100M in 2020 and billions by 2040 are predicted. In terms of energy savings, the model predicts a primary energy displacement of 260 trillion BTUs (33 trillion kWh), or a 50% reduction in server power consumption. The model also predicts a corresponding reduction of pollutants such as SO2 and NOx in excess of 100,000 metric tonnes assuming the RTOC is fully deployed. While additional development and prototyping is required to validate these predictions, the relative low cost and ease of implementation compared to large capital projects makes it an ideal candidate for further investigation.

  9. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about “Mobile phones and Africa: a success story”. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss “Citizen Problem Solving”. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa’s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries

  10. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa?s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about ?Mobile phones and Africa: a success story?. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss ?Citizen Problem Solving?. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa?s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more

  11. Material flows of mobile phones and accessories in Nigeria: Environmental implications and sound end-of-life management options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osibanjo, Oladele Nnorom, Innocent Chidi

    2008-02-15

    Presently, Nigeria is one of the fastest growing Telecom markets in the world. The country's teledensity increased from a mere 0.4 in 1999 to 10 in 2005 following the liberalization of the Telecom sector in 2001. More than 25 million new digital mobile lines have been connected by June 2006. Large quantities of mobile phones and accessories including secondhand and remanufactured products are being imported to meet the pent-up demand. This improvement in mobile telecom services resulted in the preference of mobile telecom services to fixed lines. Consequently, the contribution of fixed lines decreased from about 95% in year 2000 to less than 10% in March 2005. This phenomenal progress in information technology has resulted in the generation of large quantities of electronic waste (e-waste) in the country. Abandoned fixed line telephone sets estimated at 120,000 units are either disposed or stockpiled. Increasing quantities of waste mobile phones estimated at 8 million units by 2007, and accessories will be generated. With no material recovery facility for e-waste and/or appropriate solid waste management infrastructure in place, these waste materials end up in open dumps and unlined landfills. These practices create the potential for the release of toxic metals and halocarbons from batteries, printed wiring boards, liquid crystal display and plastic housing units. This paper presents an overview of the developments in the Nigerian Telecom sector, the material in-flow of mobile phones, and the implications of the management practices for wastes from the Telecom sector in the country.

  12. "Name","Work Phone","Contact","E-Mail","Location","Manager Group Name"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Name","Work Phone","Contact","E-Mail","Location","Manager Group Name" ", TBD","","","","Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory","STI Managers" ", TBD","","","","Savannah River Operations Office","Technical Information Officers" ", TBD","","","","Office of Environmental

  13. Design of underwater superoleophobic TiO{sub 2} coatings with additional photo-induced self-cleaning properties by one-step route bio-inspired from fish scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hao; Guo, Zhiguang

    2014-05-05

    Self-cleaning properties inspired by the structures and functions of some creatures are of great interest since the late 20th century. In this paper, TiO{sub 2} coatings with hierarchical rutile TiO{sub 2} flowers on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate are fabricated through a simple one-step hydrothermal method. The flower-like coatings exhibit superhydrophilicity in air and superoleophobicity underwater with a contact angle as high as 157°, presenting good underwater self-cleaning performance. In addition, when contaminated by oleic acid, the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} coatings also exhibit excellent photocatalytic capability under ultraviolet irradiation, which demonstrated self-cleaning properties in a different way. This self-cleaning film provides a good strategy for some industrial and ocean applications.

  14. A reactive magnetron sputtering route for attaining a controlled core-rim phase partitioning in Cu{sub 2}O/CuO thin films with resistive switching potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Darma, T. H.

    2013-05-14

    The achievement of a reproducible and controlled deposition of partitioned Cu{sub 2}O/CuO thin films by techniques compatible with ULSI processing like reactive magnetron sputtering has been reported as an outstanding challenge in the literature. This phase partitioning underlies their performance as reversible resistive memory switching devices in advanced microelectronic applications of the future. They are currently fabricated by thermal oxidation and chemical methods. We have used a combination of an understanding from plasma chemistry, thermo-kinetics of ions, and rf power variation during deposition to successfully identify a processing window for preparing partitioned Cu{sub 2}O/CuO films. The production of a core rich Cu{sub 2}O and surface rich Cu{sub 2}O/CuO mixture necessary for oxygen migration during resistive switching is confirmed by XRD peaks, Fourier transform infra red Cu (I)-O vibrational modes, XPS Cu 2P{sub 3/2} and O 1S peak fitting, and a comparison of satellite peak ratio's in Cu 2P{sub 3/2} fitted peaks. We are proposing based on the findings reported in this paper that an XPS satellite peak intensity(I{sub s}) to main peak intensity ratio (I{sub m}) {<=} 0.45 as an indicator of a core rich Cu{sub 2}O and surface rich Cu{sub 2}O/CuO formation in our prepared films. CuO is solely responsible for the satellite peaks. This is explained on the basis that plasma dissociation of oxygen will be limited to the predominant formation of Cu{sub 2}O under certain plasma deposition conditions we have identified in this paper, which also results in a core-rim phase partitioning. The deposited films also followed a Volmer-Weber columnar growth mode, which could facilitate oxygen vacancy migration and conductive filaments at the columnar interfaces. This is further confirmed by optical transmittance and band-gap measurements using spectrophotometry. This development is expected to impact on the early adoption of copper oxide based resistive memory electronic switching devices in advanced electronic devices of the future. The relative abundance of copper is another major complementary driver for the interest in copper oxide films.

  15. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Sacit M; Howard, Rob L; Liu, Cheng; Mueller, Don; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Peterson, Steven K; Scaglione, John M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  16. Structural and dielectric/ferroelectric properties of (La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} synthesized by sol-gel route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao Zhenmian; Saitzek, Sebastien; Roussel, Pascal; Mentre, Olivier; Prihor Gheorghiu, Felicia; Mitoseriu, Liliana; Desfeux, Rachel

    2010-07-15

    A series of compounds with the general formula (La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (0.0{<=}x{<=}1.0) has been prepared by the sol-gel method. The decomposition of the gel was characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis coupled to mass spectrometry, indicating the reaction is achieved above 850 {sup o}C. The lattice parameters versus x show an expected decrease in the a and b parameters while c and the {beta} angle remain almost unchanged with respect to the monoclinic symmetry conserved for the full solid solution. Dielectric, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties were measured on the entire series. - Graphical abstract: XRD patterns of (La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders for various x values. The (hkl) peaks positions (with h and k{ne}0) change with x values while the (00l) peaks positions remain unaffected.

  17. A high-pressure route to thermoelectrics with low thermal conductivity: The solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.10.6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrder, Thorsten; Rosenthal, Tobias; Souchay, Daniel; Petermayer, Christian; Grott, Sebastian; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Gold, Christian; Scherer, Wolfgang; Oeckler, Oliver

    2013-10-15

    Metastable rocksalt-type phases of the solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) were prepared by high-pressure synthesis at 2.5 GPa and 400 C. In these structures, the coordination number of In{sup 3+} is six, in contrast to chalcopyrite ambient-pressure AgInTe{sub 2} with fourfold In{sup 3+} coordination. Transmission electron microscopy shows that real-structure phenomena and a certain degree of short-range order are present, yet not very pronounced. All three cations are statistically disordered. The high degree of disorder is probably the reason why AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} samples with 0.4

  18. MEETING OVERVIEW

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    entities Future topics for consideration: routing issues relevant to tribal entities and local jurisdictions further development of methodologies for mode and route specification...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes ...

  20. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risks Of Transportation Along Various Routes To The Nevada Test Site, Revision 1 Ruth. ... Risks Of Transportation Along Various Routes To The Nevada Test Site, Revision 1 Ruth. ...

  1. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

  2. Notice of Availability (NOA) for the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    route, alignment, and site alternatives required for a transmission line route permit from the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission under the Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act. ...

  3. Directions to External Dosimetry Office | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions to External Dosimetry Office PDF icon Route to Bldg 202 for dosimeters

  4. Untitled Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transuranic Waste Transportation Routes Click on image to view larger version

  5. Consider upgrading pyrolysis oils into renewable fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; nair, Prabhakar; Bain, Richard

    2008-09-01

    New research is identifying processing routes to convert cellulosic biomass into transportation fuels

  6. 7B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ONE SIDE ONLY HEAD TO FOOT U.S. Department of Energy Request for Print, Mail and Visual Media Services Office of Administrative Management & Support E Printed with soy ink on recycled paper INITIALS THIS ITEM IS A SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL DOCUMENT APPROVED BY PA-1 DOE REQUESTOR (Sign) DOE REQUESTOR (Print) RECEIVED BY ROUTING SYMBOL ROOM NO. DATE PHONE NO. LOGGED IN BY ASSIGNED FY JOB CONTROL NO. DOE Badge No.: TOTAL COST OF DUPLICATING Copying Graphics Printing Distribution Operation Date Rec'd

  7. 79350

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SIDE ONLY HEAD TO FOOT U.S. Department of Energy Request for Print, Mail and Visual Media Services Office of Administrative Management & Support E Printed with soy ink on recycled paper INITIALS THIS ITEM IS A SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL DOCUMENT APPROVED BY PA-1 DOE REQUESTOR (Sign) DOE REQUESTOR (Print) RECEIVED BY ROUTING SYMBOL ROOM NO. DATE PHONE NO. LOGGED IN BY ASSIGNED FY JOB CONTROL NO. DOE Badge No.: TOTAL COST OF DUPLICATING Copying Graphics Printing Distribution Operation Date Rec'd

  8. Addresses and Phone Numbers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additions to natural gas in underground storage to be nearly 50% higher this summer Although it's still spring, natural gas supply companies and utilities are already preparing for next winter and are building their inventories of natural gas to meet future heating demand. About 2.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas will be added to gas inventories in underground storage over the summer months to get ready for the winter heating season, which starts November 1. That is significantly higher than

  9. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phone System

  10. Synthesis of 6-Methyl-9-propyldibenzothiophene-4-ol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbraun, E.J.

    1991-02-15

    The synthesis route for preparing the title compound, has been carried out on a small scale for the preparation of a mixture of isomers. Alternative routes for the cyclization are being explored. (DLC)

  11. Synthesis of 6-Methyl-9-propyldibenzothiophene-4-ol. Technical progress report No. 2, October 25, 1990--January 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbraun, E.J.

    1991-02-15

    The synthesis route for preparing the title compound, has been carried out on a small scale for the preparation of a mixture of isomers. Alternative routes for the cyclization are being explored. (DLC)

  12. Microsoft Word - Chapter 03.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 25 visible to viewers on U.S. Route 95. A Geothermal Power Project could alter the visual character and reduce visual quality if facilities are built along U.S. Route 95. ...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and routes of travel. In some cases the NMDOT may require a developer to conduct a feasibility study of the proposed movement or engineering analysis of the highway or route....

  14. Predictive powertrain control using powertrain history and GPS data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weslati, Feisel; Krupadanam, Ashish A

    2015-03-03

    A method and powertrain apparatus that predicts a route of travel for a vehicle and uses historical powertrain loads and speeds for the predicted route of travel to optimize at least one powertrain operation for the vehicle.

  15. Microsoft Word - Cover Page - Exhibit 10

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...GISDataFilesArcDocsPresidential PermitExhibit10OptionRouteBorderCrossing11x17062713.mxd LEGEND Proposed Route Town Boundary State Boundary NEW HAMPSHIRE Map Index

  16. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procurement - Routing criteriaemergency preparedness Tribal Issues Topic Group * TEPP Navajo Nation (Tom Clawson) - 1404 - Needs Assessment * Identified strengths and...

  17. Communicating Logistics

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    States - Route identification - Information dissemination - Change notification - Contact list - Relationship development More Consistency * To increase consistency among DOE ...

  18. Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Some Routes - Dataset | Department of Energy 2: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes - Dataset Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes fotw#932_web.xlsx (198.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #929: June 13, 2016 Heavy Truck Speed Limits Are Inconsistent - Dataset Fact #923: May 2, 2016 Cylinder

  19. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators on GaAs (111) substrates: a potential route to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Zhaoquan; Morgan, Timothy A.; Li, Chen; Hirono, Yusuke; Hu, Xian; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Benamara, Mourad; Salamo, Gregory J.; Fan, Dongsheng; Yu, Shuiqing; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 ; Zhao, Yanfei; Lee, Joon Sue; Wang, Jian; The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 ; Wang, Zhiming M.; State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054; Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083

    2013-07-15

    High quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and n type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  20. NAME ORGANIZATION E-MAIL PHONE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (865) 574-2105 (Alternate) Miller, Ruth Oak Ridge Nat'l Laboratory ... Ashley, Tom CWI, Idaho Cleanup Project thomas.ashley@icp.doe.gov (208) 360-3552 McGary, ...

  1. Property:Phone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alaska Department of Natural Resources + 907.269.8629 + Alaska Division of Oil and Gas + 907.269.8769 + Alaska Division of Oil and Gas + 907.269.8776 + Arizona Corporation...

  2. Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 757-787-9750 800-431-2632 + A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company + 440-934-2859 + A.O. Smith + 414-359-4000 + A1 Sun, Inc. + (510) 526-5715 + A10 Power + 415-729-4A10 or...

  3. SiC Power Module

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. The shuttle bus departure and arrival times may be impacted by traffic, weather, or other logistical

  4. DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY14.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May, 2016 DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific

  5. System and Method for Vehicle Energy Estimation, Adaptive Control and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Routing - Energy Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search System and Method for Vehicle Energy Estimation, Adaptive Control and Routing National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary In the fields of vehicle telematics and navigation, there are algorithms for recommending potential travel routes from a given origin to a desired destination. Such potential

  6. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID 412- 11/16/2012 - Page 1 Log No 2012-263 Reference Materials * Transporting Radioactive Waste to the Nevada National Security Site fact sheet (ww.nv.energy.gov/library/factsheets/DOENV_990.pdf) - Generators contract with commercial carriers - U.S. Department of Transportation regulations require carriers to select routes which minimize radiological risk * Drivers Route and Shipment Information Questionnaire completed by drivers to document routes taken to the NNSS upon entry into Nevada -

  7. Shuttle Bus and Couriers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. The shuttle bus departure and arrival times may be impacted by traffic, weather, or other logistical

  8. Broadening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Arguing that problems with IP multicast (such as complexity of multicast routing protocols, malicious users without credentials joining multicast groups, and congestion control) ...

  9. Center for Energy Nanoscience at USC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic alloys provide a new route for improved efficiency all-organic solar cells CEN Researcher Barry Thompson has demonstrated an alternative approach to broaden the absorption...

  10. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a decision-support tool for NE's spent fuel transportation planning: ...to evaluate transportation routing and emergency preparedness options in the waste management system ...

  11. 2014 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks Dawei Feng, Kecheng Wang, ... A Highly Stable Porphyrinic Zirconium Metal-Organic Framework with shp-a Topology ...

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposed Action Title: (0473-1597) Smart Wire Grid, Inc. - Distributed Power Flow Contro l Using Smart Wires for Energy Routing Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects ...

  13. EIS-0218-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    representative routes for each transport mode for the calculations of the radiological risk. This Supplement Analysis examined the potential impacts of transporting spent...

  14. Cost-effective Interior Wall Retrofit Solutions for Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... & Partners: Teaming with ORNL, Bayer Material Science, Carlisle SynTec and the Air Barrier Association of America provides a direct route to material suppliers as well as ...

  15. Solar Decathlon: How far did they travel? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decathlon Journeys Visualizing the distances that each Solar Decathlon house travelled Click competitors to toggle their journeys on and off. All routes and distances are...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Text Available April 2015 , Springer Control of composition and morphology of stoichiometric bismuth telluride nanoparticles using a wet chemical route with removeable surfactants. ...

  17. DOE/NV--808

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... degree (e.g., the routes used by the FEMP, Earthline, and MEMP, all three located in ... States Environmental Protection Agency FEMP Fernald Environmental Management Project ...

  18. Thermal and Electrical Effects of Partial Shade in Monolithic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... interconnect effective length 230 m oxide interconnect ... Huge lateral current densities develop to route the current ... become very large as the mask approaches zero transmission. ...

  19. 20130113-Zurawski-DMZ-Tutorial-Measurement.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Rebooted router with full route table Gradual failure of optical line card ...egress'queues'to'device' * Transmission*Delay:'Time'needed'to'put'the'packet'o...

  20. Microsoft Word - $ASQrpt78028.DOC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... To date, the optimization of bioethanol production has involved considerable metabolic engineering, including the use of efficient alternate routes and enzymes from multiple and ...

  1. EIS-0439: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Route 62, approximately 40 miles northwest of Blythe, California, and 15 miles west of Vidal Junction, California. On June 10, 2011, the Notice of Availability of the Final...

  2. Microbial community proteomics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... biological function. This route to creation of new cellular functions might be ... and demonstrated the role of PTM in microbial adaptation, evolution and ecology. ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... kinetics of the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR, OER) hinder energy ... devices; thus providing a route to the creation of novel transparent conducting ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    kinetics of the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR, OER) hinder energy ... devices; thus providing a route to the creation of novel transparent conducting ...

  5. Search for: thorium | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sustainable thorium nuclear fuel cycles: A comparison of ... necessitates investigation of alternative production routes. ... and mineral extraction sites, locations of previous ...

  6. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and microkinetic modeling. ... Microkinetic modeling results demonstrate that the HCOO route is the dominant reaction ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Idaho National Laboratory Specific Manufacturing Plant Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho ... A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis Ip, Alexander H. ...

  8. EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cold Fusion Error Unexpected Error Sorry An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has been routed to the appropriate ...

  9. National Clean Fleets Partners Get the Best of Both Worlds with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid electric vehicles combine a combustion engine with an electric motor that draws ... Many projects are collecting data on fuel usage, driver behavior and routing that can be ...

  10. EIS_Summary_TextandFigures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 7. Few differences in impacts related to geology and soils were noted between the HVDC ... Proposed Route because of the regional nature of many underlying factors 1 ...

  11. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... routing, and minimum transfer capability; ... There are grid requirements to ensure AC transient voltage ... nearby communities connected to the AC system and that AC ...

  12. Mike West Potomac Hudson Engineering Sandy Enyeart SAIC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Models used to estimate Impacts * TRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) - TRAGIS is a GIS-based transportation analysis computer ...

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Assesses Risks for Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United Kingdom, PNNL developed new geospatial analytical tools to determine the commonly traveled routes among the 28 major ports on the Atlantic, displaying them as GIS layers. ...

  14. Vincent Mitts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Computer Analyst 3 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9354 Certifications Cisco Networking Academy CCNA Exploration: Network Fundamentals CCNA Exploration: Routing Protocols and ...

  15. Directory Listings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by organization including their telephone number, routing symbol, location (buildingroom number), and fax number (when available) A listing of Field staff by organization ...

  16. SMART BRIDGE: A Tool for Estimating the Military Load

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. SMART BRIDGE: A Tool for Estimating the Military Load Classification of Bridges Charles ... consideration in planning and executing military deployments is determining the routes ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (IE) (United States) USDOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence (IN) (United ... Route for Enhanced Ferroelectricity in Artificial Perovskite Superlattices Wang, Hongwei ...

  18. crabtree.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the effi cient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy...

  19. On Modeling and Analysis of MIMO Wireless Mesh Networks with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the algorithmic development for WMNs, some fundamental mathematical problems also emerge in various aspects such as routing, scheduling, and channel assignment, all of which...

  20. Microsoft Word - Rockwood _CFC_ Silver Peak Area Final EA V4...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 8" to 10" diameter pipeline to route the produced ... Carbon dioxide and methane are greenhouse gases. Although the ... Detailed maps show that an energy corridor is proposed ...

  1. New MIT design revives interest in high-field approach to fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2015-10-15

    Tokamaks made with high-temperature superconductors may offer a less expensive, more compact route to fusion power, if their coils can withstand the tremendous forces.

  2. CONNECTOR ORIENTATION CONVENTIO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIBERS ROUTE ALONG BACKSIDE OF FRAME LOOKING ALONG THE BEAM TOWARDS DOWNSTREAM A - - - RSF 22106 - - - INITIAL ISSUE - - UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER AUTHORIZATION BY THIS UNIVERSITY...

  3. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AISDOE Technology Roadmap...

  4. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/9-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    routing maps; A description of the proposed utility facility, including: The size and nature of the proposed utility facility; The natural resources that will be used during the...

  6. name NISAC description National Infrastructure Simulation and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wp namespaces oembed authentication routes namespace methods GET endpoints methods GET args context required false default view links self http www sandia gov nisac wp json oembed...

  7. Two Novel Ultra-Incompressible Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cutting material made of iron. Though much effort has been exerted to find affordable synthesis routes for diamond, it generally requires high pressure and temperature, as do most...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited ... Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of ...

  9. Using Fermentation and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Products: Biochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    Information about the Biomass Program's collaborative projects to improve processing routes for biochemical conversion, which entails breaking down biomass to make the carbohydrates available for conversion into sugars.

  10. EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cold Fusion Error Unexpected Error Sorry An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has been routed to the appropriate...

  11. EA-1772: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1772: Final Environmental Assessment Multipurpose Haul ... The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide an alternative route, other than ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Appendix D fly sheet.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... and fuel processing plants, nuclear power plants, and transportation routes have ... distributions of wind direction, wind speed class, and atmospheric stability category. ...

  13. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gary Forwarding routing: Les Price, PSRD Bill Seay, FSRD Dave Adler, PSRD Loren Marz, PSRD ... Radioactive contamination at the site is a result of uranium extrusion activities which ...

  14. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find alternative fueling stations near an address or ZIP code or along a route in the United States. Enter a state to see a station count.

  15. SITEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EA-1008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... at NPR-3, would present safety problems associated with operation of ... modification of hazardous waste accumulation areas. Emergency planning and evacuation routes. ...

  16. Navajo Nation Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Feasibility Study for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... line & Hwy 371 (data directory hidden, slope layer still on) substation compressor station natural gas pipeline IS Route 7290 Conduct all planning Define boundaries ...

  17. Definitions of Conservation Features

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maintenance: A regularly scheduled preventive maintenance program for the heating and cooling system involving periodic inspections and routing servicing to keep everything...

  18. NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. ... routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. ...

  19. Final EIS Keystone Pipeline Project Appendix E Pipeline Restrictive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pipeline Project Route Appendix G Public Water Supply Wells Within One Mile of the ... EIS Keystone Pipeline Project Public Water Supplies (PWS Wells and Wellhead ...

  20. name SRSCRO description url http www srscro org namespaces oembed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    description url http www srscro org namespaces oembed authentication routes namespace methods GET endpoints methods GET args context required false default view links self http...

  1. Systems and methods for vehicle speed management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sujan, Vivek Anand; Vajapeyazula, Phani; Follen, Kenneth; Wu, An; Forst, Howard Robert

    2016-03-01

    Controlling a speed of a vehicle based on at least a portion of a route grade and a route distance divided into a plurality of route sections, each including at least one of a section grade and section length. Controlling the speed of the vehicle is further based on determining a cruise control speed mode for the vehicle for each of the plurality of route sections and determining a speed reference command of the vehicle based on at least one of the cruise control speed mode, the section length, the section grade, and a current speed.

  2. Big Eddy-Knight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the transmission line route that would pose an immediate threat to human health or the environment, including large dump sites, drums of unknown substances, suspicious odors,...

  3. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor ... 02139 (United States) ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046 - ...

  4. Microsoft Word - 1_Readers Guide.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... environmental impact statement SNF spent nuclear fuel SR State Route SWEIS site-wide ... For on site use, solar panels are best installed on NTS rooftops, over parking ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, ... synthesis offers a fast, economical and green route for the preparation of Sbsub ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2006-04-lustre-future-40mins.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    network IO guarantees fast client & server side IO Routing enables multi-cluster, multi-network namespace Supports Multiple Network Protocols Lustre's failover...

  7. Clean Cities: State of Delaware Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program, which aims to increase alternative fueled vehicle deployment through rebates, helping to promote en route charging in Delaware through the Charging-Up Delaware...

  8. The Hub of Innovation for American Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... HVAC 3. "Proceed to Highlighted Route" Execute the Strategy 20 | Building America eere.energy.gov Building America Strategic Initiatives * Building America R&D Project Portfolio * ...

  9. The power grid of the future is a platform that

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    automatically report outages, smart relays that sense and recover from faults in the substation automatically, automated feeder switches that re-route power around problems, and ...

  10. How BPA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concern. We take this obligation seriously. BPA will conduct an objective and thorough assessment of EMF exposure for all potential power line routes and will share the results...

  11. New Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and industrial applications and Vision 21 energy plants. ... of "mass customization" as the route to reducing costs. ... Decomposition Reforming Methods SECA Proceedings June 2000 ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. ...

  13. Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2012 interactive map with all alternatives - Guide to finding your property online BPA's preferred alternative - November 2012 Route alternatives and options - May 2011...

  14. MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... TypeSubtype 1000 2000 Amount Enter payment amount 3400 Receiver ABA routing number ... Originator Enter the name of the originator of the payment 6000 Originator to ...

  15. Providing Grid Flexibility in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    microwave route will be used for backhaul of the new substation communication network. ... As depicted in Figure 2, information obtained via the substation last mile technology is ...

  16. AppendixF_SRG_staff_

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    F Contingency Re-routing I. Introduction In the event of a long-term route closure due to unforeseen circumstances, shipments may have to be rerouted to a less prepared or unprepared route. This paper presents the Topic Group's recommendations on how to implement Section 180(c) assistance if it becomes necessary to use unprepared or less prepared routes. The paper also provides background information on the issue and describes the options that the Topic Group considered. II. Background The U.S.

  17. Microsoft Word - Chapter 06.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... A potential solar energy project in Rachel, Nevada, on Toreson Industries property, off Nevada State Route 375 heading east on Smith Well Road, may be implemented. No permit ...

  18. Oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) amphiphiles and methods for self-assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Hulvat, James F.; Sofos, Marina; Tajima, Keisuke

    2008-05-13

    Amphiphilic oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) compounds and methods of use en route to self-assembled composites and device fabrication.

  19. Los Alamos Scientist Wins American Chemical Society Award | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Kiplinger was honored for her work in establishing synthetic routes to novel uranium and thorium compounds that have opened new frontiers in understanding the nature of bonding and ...

  20. MHK Technologies/Green Cat Wave Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    magnet materials and power electronic converters have opened up this extremely straightforward conversion route Unlike a number of devices currently being investigated this...

  1. Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evolution; (3) Membranes: finding the right material and fabrication routes for the multifunctional membrane that is the key ingredient in a photoelectrochemical cell; and...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features and relative stability, mechanical and electronic properties, and possible reactive route for chromium triboride. ...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Price movements were stronger in the Rockies during the week owing to pipeline maintenance in the San Juan Basin that cut supply routes from the region. Before a...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Price movements were stronger in the Rockies during the week owing to pipeline maintenance in the San Juan Basin that cut supply routes from the region. Before a...

  5. Fact Sheet: U.S-Turkey Cooperation in Global Energy Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Turkey with its energy security, as Turkey is a key component of a larger regional strategy for increased energy production and diversification of oil and gas transit routes. ...

  6. BPA-2010-01009-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the plans for routing new 500 KVA power lines from Castle Rock, Washington, to Gresham, Oregon. BPA has completed the search for responsive documents. The search found...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - NTPAHWG_Jones [Compatibility Mode

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More economical More user-oriented Easier to maintain and update ESRI ArcGIS recommended as tool development platform Analyze alternative routing criteria ...

  8. NREL: Transportation Research - DRIVE: Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional output results range from simple tabulated summary statistics to Google Earth route maps, providing information that has enough depth for scientific applications but is ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), Canoga ... river routing and a water management model (WM) that ... parameterized shallow and deep convection has been ...

  10. EIS-0486-NOI-2012.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The routes continue this easterly track north of Greenbrier, near Damascus and Quitman. ... Fairgrounds-Pavilion Building, 1107 Douglas Avenue, Beaver, OK 73932 * January 31, ...

  11. Effects of 12 metal ions on iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP-1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... since this represents a major route of human environmental and occupational exposure to ... B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International ...

  12. XML Engineering Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-07-27

    The XML Engineering Environment is a reconfigurable software system that allows users to translate, enhance and route data from sources to sinks.

  13. Results of 0D batch simulations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ascent routes for deep-seated gases (Ennis-King and ... L., 2000. Reservoir engineering issues in the geological ... acid gases: modelling of water- rock reactions for ...

  14. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    routes responsible for the observed catalytic effects. Such efforts will allow for the optimization of plasma systems so that they may be incorporated into a broad range of...

  15. TRANSCOM (FINAL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    personnel monitor WIPP shipments around the clock from a secure control center, using satellite and terrestrial communications to pinpoint the location of shipments en route. ...

  16. TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries...

  17. Preparation of nickel aluminum-manganese spinel oxides Ni{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} for oxygen electrocatalysis in alkaline medium: Comparison of properties stemming from different preparation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponce, J.; Rios, E.; Gautier, J.L.; Rehspringer, J.L.; Poillerat, G.; Chartier, P.

    1999-06-01

    Two different procedures were used to prepare spinel-type Ni{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0 {le} x {le} 1) compounds to study the effects of solid state properties of mixed oxides on their electrocatalytic properties. The oxalic route, coprecipitation of metal oxalates dissolved in propanol or ethanol, and the propionic route, hydrolysis of metal carboxylates in propionic acid, have been used. In both routes, thermal decomposition produces the corresponding oxides. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the oxides crystallize in a cubic spinel phase with a unit cell parameter a that increases as aluminum is replaced by nickel. At low x values, compounds prepared by the propionic route showed a larger variation for parameter a than compounds prepared by the oxalic route, probably due to oxygen stoichiometric deficiency. This effect was estimated from the tetrahedral force constant (k{sub 1}) values, which showed a fast decrease as x varied from 0 to 1. Electrical conductivity, conduction activation energy, hole mobility, and pHz of oxides prepared by the propionic route were also higher than those from oxides prepared by the oxalic route. Crystallinity grade and particle size were nearly 50% higher in propionic-route samples than in oxalic-route samples. The apparent and real electrocatalytic activities of both types of oxides were compared for O{sub 2} evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. DOE Federal Efficiency Program Wins GreenGov Dream Team Award...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Air Route Surveillance Radar Tower. | Photo credit DOT. Oakland Air Traffic Control Tower. ... steps to reduce energy use and carbon pollution, curb waste, and save taxpayer money in ...

  19. Recommendations - 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 A member reviews drilling documentation for the NSSAB recommended well Letter of Recommendation Regarding Continuation of Existing Transportation Routes 9909 - NSSAB ...

  20. Fire Protection Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Fire Protection Training courses developed that provide needed information and a method to train fire departments and other emergency responders who may be called upon to respond to accidents involving radioactive materials along DOE transportation corridors and routes and to assist emergency responders located at or near a Department of Energy (DOE) site radiological transportation route.

  1. Facile synthesis of one-dimensional peapod-like Sb@C submicron-structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W; Lorger, S; Wang, B; Bommier, C; Ji, XL

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel synthetic route to fabricate a one-dimensional peapod-like Sb@C structure with disperse Sb submicron-particles encapsulated in carbon submicron-tubes. The synthetic route may well serve as a general methodology for fabricating carbon/metallic fine structures by thermally reducing their carbon-coated metal oxide composites.

  2. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  3. QER- Comment of Addison Hall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I and my family own land in Ashfield next to the proposed Kinder Morgan/Tennessee Pipeline route. We are opposed to the pipeline for a variety of reasons, including the highly questionable need for the proposed commodity increase and the inevitable damage to the environment and communities along the proposed route. Addison Hall for the Hall Family Trust.

  4. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Pd4/In2O3 has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and microkinetic modeling. In this study, three possible routes in the reaction network of CO2 + H2 ? CH3OH + H2O have been examined. Our DFT results show that the HCOO route competes with the RWGS route whereas a high activation barrier kinetically blocks the HCOOH route. DFT results also suggest that H2COO* + H* ? H2CO* +OH* and cis-COOH* + H* ?CO* + H2O* are the rate limiting steps in the HCOO route and the RWGS route, respectively. Microkinetic modeling results demonstrate that the HCOO route is the dominant reaction route for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. We found that the activation of H adatom on the small Pd cluster and the presence of H2O on the In2O3 substrate play important roles in promoting the methanol synthesis. The hydroxyl adsorbed at the interface of Pd4/In2O3 induces the transformation of the supported Pd4 cluster from a butterfly structure into a tetrahedron structure. This important structure change not only indicates the dynamical nature of the supported nanoparticle catalyst structure during the reaction but also shifts the final hydrogenation step from H2COH to CH3O.

  5. Eighteen-Month Final Evaluation of UPS Second Generation Diesel Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2012-09-01

    A parallel hybrid-electric diesel delivery van propulsion system was evaluated at a UPS facility in Minneapolis using on-vehicle data logging, fueling, and maintenance records. Route and drive cycle analysis showed different duty cycles for hybrid vs. conventional delivery vans; routes were switched between the study groups to provide a valid comparison. The hybrids demonstrated greater advantage on the more urban routes; the initial conventional vans' routes had less dense delivery zones. The fuel economy of the hybrids on the original conventional group?s routes was 10.4 mpg vs. 9.2 mpg for the conventional group on those routes a year earlier. The hybrid group's fuel economy on the original hybrid route assignments was 9.4 mpg vs. 7.9 mpg for the conventional group on those routes a year later. There was no statistically significant difference in total maintenance cost per mile or for the vehicle total cost of operation per mile. Propulsion-related maintenance cost per mile was 77% higher for the hybrids, but only 52% more on a cost-per-delivery-day basis. Laboratory dynamometer testing demonstrated 13%-36% hybrid fuel economy improvement, depending on duty cycle, and up to a 45% improvement in ton-mi/gal. NOx emissions increased 21%-49% for the hybrids in laboratory testing.

  6. Adaptive powertrain control for plugin hybrid electric vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kedar-Dongarkar, Gurunath; Weslati, Feisel

    2013-10-15

    A powertrain control system for a plugin hybrid electric vehicle. The system comprises an adaptive charge sustaining controller; at least one internal data source connected to the adaptive charge sustaining controller; and a memory connected to the adaptive charge sustaining controller for storing data generated by the at least one internal data source. The adaptive charge sustaining controller is operable to select an operating mode of the vehicle's powertrain along a given route based on programming generated from data stored in the memory associated with that route. Further described is a method of adaptively controlling operation of a plugin hybrid electric vehicle powertrain comprising identifying a route being traveled, activating stored adaptive charge sustaining mode programming for the identified route and controlling operation of the powertrain along the identified route by selecting from a plurality of operational modes based on the stored adaptive charge sustaining mode programming.

  7. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  8. Smart Phone Technologies Reduce Risks to Eagles from Wind Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential Mitigating Wind-Radar ...

  9. Global GPS Phones Market Size, Segmentation, Demand Forecast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    we deeply analyzed the world's main region market conditions that including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry...

  10. Forensic analysis of the microbiome of phones and shoes (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    are shared between individuals inhabiting the same space may be relevant to human health and disease transmission. In this study, two participants sampled the front and back...

  11. Property:RAPID/Contact/ID1/Phone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation + 907.269.3066 + Alaska Department of Natural Resources + 907.269.8629 + Alaska Division of Oil and Gas + 907.269.8769 + Arizona...

  12. Property:Incentive/Cont2Phone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 601-961-5134 + Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) + 515-281-8468 + Air Pollution Control (Indiana) + (317) 439-0759 + Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) +...

  13. Forensic analysis of the microbiome of phones and shoes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Georgia Barguil Colares4, Daniel Smith1,5, Jonathan A Eisen6,7,8 and Jack A ... Genome Biol. 2013, 14. doi:10.1186gb-2013-14-2-202. 2. Lax S, Smith DP, Hampton-Marcell ...

  14. Phone List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phishing Is As Quick As Clicking One Click Too Many Phishing Is As Quick As Clicking One Click Too Many February 6, 2015 - 12:59pm Addthis There are all sorts of impersonators working to obtain our personal information. Phishing is a malicious attempt to collect personal and/or financial information for illegal purposes by masquerading as an email from a trustworthy entity. Phishing has proven to be an effective method of attack in that its success is dependent on the awareness of the user.

  15. Property:Incentive/ContPhone2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) + (713) 320-1772 + AEP Texas Central Company - ENERGY STAR New Home Program (Texas) + (713) 320-1772 + AEP Texas Central Company - SCORE...

  16. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-05-06

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  17. Truck transport of RAM: Risk effects of avoiding metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1997-11-01

    In the transport of radioactive material (RAM), e.g., spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stakeholders are generally most concerned about risks in high population density areas along transportation routes because of the perceived high consequences of potential accidents. The most significant portions of a transcontinental route and an alternative examined previously were evaluated again using population density data derived from US Census Block data. This method of characterizing population that adjoins route segments offers improved resolution of population density variations, especially in high population density areas along typical transport routes. Calculated incident free doses and accident dose risks for these routes, and the rural, suburban and urban segments are presented for comparison of their relative magnitudes. The results indicate that modification of this route to avoid major metropolitan areas through use of non-Interstate highways increases total risk yet does not eliminate a relatively small urban component of the accident dose risk. This conclusion is not altered by improved resolution of route segments adjoining high density populations.

  18. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  19. University of Delaware | CCEI Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership {Image} {Name} - {Affiliation} {Title} {Location} Phone: {Phone} {Email}

  20. Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Some Routes | Department of Energy 2: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Although all states allow the conventional combinations consisting of two 28-foot semi-trailers, only 14 states and six state turnpike authorities allow longer combination vehicles (LCVs) on some parts of their road networks. LCVs are tractors pulling a semi-trailer