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Sample records for routing analysis geographic

  1. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, PE

    2003-09-18

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is used to calculate highway, rail, or waterway routes within the United States. TRAGIS is a client-server application with the user interface and map data files residing on the user's personal computer and the routing engine and network data files on a network server. The user's manual provides documentation on installation and the use of the many features of the model.

  2. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    January 26, 2006 Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis (GIA) Utilizes GIS, ... Geographically-based Infrastructure Analysis GIS Transportation Technologies & Systems ...

  3. Geographic resolution issues in RAM transportation risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLS,G. SCOTT; NEUHAUSER,SIEGLINDE

    2000-04-12

    Over the years that radioactive material (RAM) transportation risk estimates have been calculated using the RADTRAN code, demand for improved geographic resolution of route characteristics, especially density of population neighboring route segments, has led to code improvements that provide more specific route definition. With the advent of geographic information systems (GISs), the achievable resolution of route characteristics is theoretically very high. The authors have compiled population-density data in 1-kilometer increments for routes extending over hundreds of kilometers without impractical expenditures of time. Achievable resolution of analysis is limited, however, by the resolution of available data. U.S. Census data typically have 1-km or better resolution within densely-populated portions of metropolitan areas but census blocks are much larger in rural areas. Geographic resolution of accident-rate data, especially for heavy/combination trucks, are typically tabulated on a statewide basis. These practical realities cause one to ask what level(s) of resolution may be necessary for meaningful risk analysis of transportation actions on a state or interstate scale.

  4. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Joan Ogden Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis Presented at the USDOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Meeting Washington, DC August 9-10, 2006 Acknowledgments UC Davis Researchers: Michael Nicholas Dr. Marc Melaina Dr. Marshall Miller Dr. Chris Yang USDOE: Dr. Sig Gronich Research support: USDOE; H2 Pathways Program sponsors at UC Davis * Refueling station siting and sizing are key aspects of designing H2

  5. Geographic information system applications in coal transportation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Geographic information systems (GIS) offer great potential to the coal transportation industry for capitalizing on the growing availability of spatially-referenced data. As computer-based systems for the collection, storage, retrieval and analysis of spatial data, generating information products in a variety of formats, GIS have a great capability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of coal transportation operations, planning, engineering, and facilities management. Currently GIS are used in the transportation industry at large to analyze, and display information about network infrastructure, fleet operations, property ownership, routing and scheduling, and utilities. Current coal transportation applications include consumer service inquiries, train and locomotive scheduling, and evaluation of network usage. The paper describes the significant potential uses of GIS in the coal transportation sector when integrated with optimization and decision support systems, scientific visualization, data forecasting, and strategic system planning approaches. Ultimately consumer demand and the drive for economic efficiency are likely to stimulate the integration and management of spatial information across the entire coal chain.

  6. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Presentation by Joan Ogden of the University of California at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. ogden_geo_infrastructure_analysis.pdf (5.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies Consumer Water Heater, UEF - v1.0 EIS-0105: Draft

  7. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen ... More Documents & Publications 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Agenda for August 9 - ...

  8. System for Import/Export Routing and Recovery Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ImportExport Routing and Recovery Analysis content top Network Optimization Models (RNAS and ATOM) Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Many critical...

  9. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C.

  10. Analysis shows revamp route to naphtha feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, E.; Ortiz, C.H.; Arzate, E. )

    1988-11-21

    An existing ethylene plant was studied, using a computer-simulated flexibility analysis, to determine the changes required to convert one of the cracking furnaces from ethane feed to naphtha feed. The simulation determined the changes in flow rate, operating temperature, and steam/hydrocarbon ratio that would result from the liquid feed.

  11. The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool: A Web Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casson, William H. Jr.

    2012-08-02

    The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool is a type of Google maps for adversaries. It's a web-based Geospatial application similar to Google Maps. It helps the U.S. government plan operations that predict where an adversary might be. It's easily accessible and maintainble and it's simple to use without much training.

  12. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geographic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information System Data Background NREL's GIS Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and...

  13. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  14. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design

  15. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007.

  16. Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2004-07-01

    This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for the 2004 Composite Analysis. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future).

  17. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable

  18. U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2011-12-01

    This report summarizes U.S. geographic analysis of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. Wind-based water electrolysis represents a viable path to renewably-produced hydrogen production. It might be used for hydrogen-based transportation fuels, energy storage to augment electricity grid services, or as a supplement for other industrial hydrogen uses. This analysis focuses on the levelized production, costs of producing green hydrogen, rather than market prices which would require more extensive knowledge of an hourly or daily hydrogen market. However, the costs of hydrogen presented here do include a small profit from an internal rate of return on the system. The cost of renewable wind-based hydrogen production is very sensitive to the cost of the wind electricity. Using differently priced grid electricity to supplement the system had only a small effect on the cost of hydrogen; because wind electricity was always used either directly or indirectly to fully generate the hydrogen. Wind classes 3-6 across the U.S. were examined and the costs of hydrogen ranged from $3.74kg to $5.86/kg. These costs do not quite meet the 2015 DOE targets for central or distributed hydrogen production ($3.10/kg and $3.70/kg, respectively), so more work is needed on reducing the cost of wind electricity and the electrolyzers. If the PTC and ITC are claimed, however, many of the sites will meet both targets. For a subset of distributed refueling stations where there is also inexpensive, open space nearby this could be an alternative to central hydrogen production and distribution.

  19. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R.

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  20. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Combined Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St.JBEI Route Combined Routes and Schedules (On-SiteOff-Site) Scroll down or click here for schedule...

  1. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  2. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  3. Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Abstract Geographic information...

  4. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for ...

  5. Systems for the Intermodal Routing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K; Liu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The safe and secure movement of spent nuclear fuel from shutdown and active reactor facilities to intermediate or long term storage sites may, in some instances, require the use of several modes of transportation to accomplish the move. To that end, a fully operable multi-modal routing system is being developed within Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System). This study aims to provide an overview of multi-modal routing, the existing state of the TRAGIS networks, the source data needs, and the requirements for developing structural relationships between various modes to create a suitable system for modeling the transport of spent nuclear fuel via a multimodal network. Modern transportation systems are comprised of interconnected, yet separate, modal networks. Efficient transportation networks rely upon the smooth transfer of cargoes at junction points that serve as connectors between modes. A key logistical impediment to the shipment of spent nuclear fuel is the absence of identified or designated transfer locations between transport modes. Understanding the potential network impacts on intermodal transportation of spent nuclear fuel is vital for planning transportation routes from origin to destination. By identifying key locations where modes intersect, routing decisions can be made to prioritize cost savings, optimize transport times and minimize potential risks to the population and environment. In order to facilitate such a process, ORNL began the development of a base intermodal network and associated routing code. The network was developed using previous intermodal networks and information from publicly available data sources to construct a database of potential intermodal transfer locations with likely capability to handle spent nuclear fuel casks. The coding development focused on modifying the existing WebTRAGIS routing code to accommodate intermodal transfers and the selection of

  6. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Final Report M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Technical Report NRELTP-540-40373 October 2006 NREL is operated...

  7. Geographic Information System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Geographic Information System At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Brady Hot...

  8. Route Type Determination Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Stone

    2011-09-01

    According to the 2009 National Household Travel Survey 44.4 percent of all miles travelled by Americans in 2009 (including airplanes, trains, boats, golf carts, subways, bikes, etc.) were travelled in cars. If vans, SUV's and pickup trucks are included, that level increases to 86 percent. We do a lot of travelling on the road in personal vehicles - it's important to be able to understand how we get there and how to rate the fuel economy of our trips. An essential part of this is knowing how to decide if a trip is a city or highway trip.

  9. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  10. Constraint-Based Routing Models for the Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a historic programmatic interest in the safe and secure routing, tracking, and transportation risk analysis of radiological materials in the United States. In order to address these program goals, DOE has funded the development of several tools and related systems designed to provide insight to planners and other professionals handling radioactive materials shipments. These systems include the WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) platform. WebTRAGIS is a browser-based routing application developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused primarily on the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel from US nuclear reactors via railway, highway, or waterway. It is also used for the transport planning of low-level radiological waste to depositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. One particular feature of WebTRAGIS is its coupling with high-resolution population data from ORNL s LandScan project. This allows users to obtain highly accurate population count and density information for use in route planning and risk analysis. To perform the routing and risk analysis WebTRAGIS incorporates a basic routing model methodology, with the additional application of various constraints designed to mimic US Department of Transportation (DOT), DOE, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Aside from the routing models available in WebTRAGIS, the system relies on detailed or specialized modal networks for the route solutions. These include a highly detailed network model of the US railroad system, the inland and coastal waterways, and a specialized highway network that focuses on the US interstate system and the designated hazardous materials and Highway Route Controlled Quantity (HRCQ) -designated roadways. The route constraints in WebTRAGIS rely upon a series of attributes assigned to the various components of the different modal networks. Routes are determined via a

  11. Class network routing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  12. Railroad Routing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-05

    INTERLINE/PC is an interactive program designed to simulate the routing practices of the United States rail system. The rail industry is divided into a large number of independent competing companies. The INTERLINE data base represents these rail companies as 94 separate subnetworks. An additional two subnetworks represent navigable inland/intracoastal and deep draft marine routes. Interchange points between individual rail systems and waterway systems are also identified.

  13. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred; Halstead, Robert J.; Ballard, James D.

    2013-07-01

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous

  14. Collective network routing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  15. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  16. Which route to coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nene, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    Two main methods for producing liquid fuels from coal are currently undergoing intensive evaluation. One, direct liquefaction (e.g., SRC-II, Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and H-Coal) produces liquid fuels directly from coal; the other, indirect liquefaction (e.g., Lurgi gasifier followed by Fischer-Tropsch, and Shell-Koppers gasifier followed by methanol synthesis and Mobil's MTG process) first gasifies coal and then converts the gaseous material into liquid products. This paper compares both routes basing its assessment on yields, thermal efficiencies, elemental balances, investment, complexity, and state of development. It is shown that direct liquefaction is more efficient and produces more product per investment dollar. Higher efficiency for direct liquefaction is verified bY stoichiometric and thermodynamic analysis. All approaches require about the same capital investment per unit of feed. Indirect liquefaction can be either more or less complex than direct liquefaction, depending upon the process. Direct liquefaction is least developed. 8 refs.

  17. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-10

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. Inmore » the model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.« less

  18. Geospatial Products and Techniques at the Center for Transportation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, Bruce E

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights geospatial science-related innovations and developments conducted by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. CTA researchers have been developing integrated inter-modal transportation solutions through innovative and cost-effective research and development for many years. Specifically, this paper profiles CTA-developed Geographic Information System (GIS) products that are publicly available. Examples of these GIS-related products include: the CTA Transportation Networks; GeoFreight system; and the web-based Multi-Modal Routing Analysis System. In addition, an application on assessment of railroad Hazmat routing alternatives is also discussed.

  19. RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on "Strawman" Report: RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES Number Section Comment Response RTG-1-AAR SECTION II Safeguards Routing Regulations, Para. 2 The NRC has identified five types of route characteristics that receive special consideration when NRC staff review routes for approval pursuant to 10 CFR 73: (1) routes through highly populated areas; (2) routes that would place the shipment or escort vehicle in a significantly disadvantageous position (for example, tunnels

  20. Montana Geographic Information Library | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montana Geographic Information Library Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Montana Geographic Information LibraryInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract...

  1. Geographic Information System (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  2. Geographic Resource Map of Frozen Pipe Probabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slide details a resource map showing the probability of frozen pipes in the geographic United States.

  3. Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity...

  4. ARM - SGP Geographic Information By Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information By Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Geographic Information By Facility Note: BF = Boundary Facility, EF = Extended Facility, and IF = Intermediate

  5. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This work has been authored by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) under Contract No. ... Neither MRI, the DOE, the Government, nor any other agency thereof, nor any of their ...

  6. Determining the Effectiveness of Incorporating Geographic Information Into Vehicle Performance Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sera White

    2012-04-01

    This thesis presents a research study using one year of driving data obtained from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) located in Sacramento and San Francisco, California to determine the effectiveness of incorporating geographic information into vehicle performance algorithms. Sacramento and San Francisco were chosen because of the availability of high resolution (1/9 arc second) digital elevation data. First, I present a method for obtaining instantaneous road slope, given a latitude and longitude, and introduce its use into common driving intensity algorithms. I show that for trips characterized by >40m of net elevation change (from key on to key off), the use of instantaneous road slope significantly changes the results of driving intensity calculations. For trips exhibiting elevation loss, algorithms ignoring road slope overestimated driving intensity by as much as 211 Wh/mile, while for trips exhibiting elevation gain these algorithms underestimated driving intensity by as much as 333 Wh/mile. Second, I describe and test an algorithm that incorporates vehicle route type into computations of city and highway fuel economy. Route type was determined by intersecting trip GPS points with ESRI StreetMap road types and assigning each trip as either city or highway route type according to whichever road type comprised the largest distance traveled. The fuel economy results produced by the geographic classification were compared to the fuel economy results produced by algorithms that assign route type based on average speed or driving style. Most results were within 1 mile per gallon ({approx}3%) of one another; the largest difference was 1.4 miles per gallon for charge depleting highway trips. The methods for acquiring and using geographic data introduced in this thesis will enable other vehicle technology researchers to incorporate geographic data into their research problems.

  7. Category:Geographic Information System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geographic Information System page? For detailed information on Geographic Information...

  8. Comprehensive Monitoring for Heterogeneous Geographically Distributed Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnikova, N.; Karavakis, E.; Lammel, S.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-23

    Storage capacity at CMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 sites reached over 100 Petabytes in 2014, and will be substantially increased during Run 2 data taking. The allocation of storage for the individual users analysis data, which is not accounted as a centrally managed storage space, will be increased to up to 40%. For comprehensive tracking and monitoring of the storage utilization across all participating sites, CMS developed a space monitoring system, which provides a central view of the geographically dispersed heterogeneous storage systems. The first prototype was deployed at pilot sites in summer 2014, and has been substantially reworked since then. In this paper we discuss the functionality and our experience of system deployment and operation on the full CMS scale.

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a...

  10. Comprehensive Monitoring for Heterogeneous Geographically Distributed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comprehensive Monitoring for Heterogeneous Geographically Distributed Storage Citation ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25) Country of ...

  11. Geographical Applications of Remote Sensing (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Geographical Applications of Remote ... DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  12. Photovoltaic Geographical Information System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaic Geographical Information System Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity...

  13. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Wilson, S.W.

    1982-07-29

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The computer acceleration can then be used to correct the sensed inclination.

  14. Route profile analysis system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullenhoff, Donald J.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    1986-01-01

    A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The acceleration can then be used by the computer to correct the sensed inclination.

  15. Behavior-dependent Routing: Responding to Anomalies with Automated Low-cost Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehmen, Christopher S.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Best, Daniel M.; Noonan, Christine F.; Thompson, Seth R.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Fink, Glenn A.; Peterson, Elena S.

    2015-10-12

    This is a conference paper submission describing research and software implementation of a cybersecurity concept that uses behavior models to trigger changes in routing of network traffic. As user behavior deviates more and more from baseline models, traffic is routed through more elevated layers of analysis and control.

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis: Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geographic distribution, using geographic information systems (GIS) and other techniques. ... U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis. (2012). Milbrandt, A. ...

  17. Zone routing in a torus network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer

    2013-01-29

    A system for routing data in a network comprising a network logic device at a sending node for determining a path between the sending node and a receiving node, wherein the network logic device sets one or more selection bits and one or more hint bits within the data packet, a control register for storing one or more masks, wherein the network logic device uses the one or more selection bits to select a mask from the control register and the network logic device applies the selected mask to the hint bits to restrict routing of the data packet to one or more routing directions for the data packet within the network and selects one of the restricted routing directions from the one or more routing directions and sends the data packet along a link in the selected routing direction toward the receiving node.

  18. Spatial data analysis and environmental justice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahadur, R.; Samuels, W.B.; Williams, J.W.; Zeitoun, A.H.

    1997-08-01

    Evaluations of environmental justice for government actions concerned with the transportation of hazardous materials over cross country routes presents a significant challenge in spatial data analysis. The sheer volume of data required for accurate identification of minority and low-income populations along the routes and at the endpoints can be formidable. Managing and integrating large volumes of information with state-of-the-art tools is essential in the analysis of environmental justice and equity concerns surrounding transportation of hazardous materials. This paper discusses the role and limitations of geographical information systems in the analysis and visualization of populations potentially affected by the transportation of hazardous materials over transcontinental ground and water routes. Case studies are used to demonstrate the types of data and analyses needed for evaluations of environmental justice for cross country routes and end points. Inherent capabilities and limitations in spatial resolution are evaluated for environmental assessments in which potentially affected areas are quantified based on the physical characteristics of the hazardous cargo.

  19. Westgate Alternate Routes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westgate Alternate Routes Avoid the white-knuckled commute and antacids for breakfast! If you take I-55 north to Lemont Road to enter through Westgate in the morning, you may want to consider taking an alternate route in order to avoid potential traffic safety risks. Three alternate routes are mapped out, and turn-by-turn directions are listed below. Alternate Route 1 If you're coming from the north: Head south on I-355, and take either the 75th Street exit heading east or the 87th Street

  20. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  1. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 21, 2013 Gasification Mike Schultz, PhD., Project PI A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Goal A hybrid biorefinery design that enables the production of jet fuel and other hydrocarbon fuels from waste biomass System Integration, Optimization and Analysis Integration Gasification & Syngas Conditioning Fermentation & Alcohol Recovery Catalysis Catalysis Gasoline Jet Fuel Diesel Butadiene MEK EtOH 2,3BD Wood Stover Switchgrass Improve Economics and Process

  2. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f,more » ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.« less

  3. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utkin, A.V. Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-15

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf{sub 3}GeO{sub 8} by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds.

  4. New route toward integrating large nickel nanocrystals onto mesoporous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New route toward integrating large nickel nanocrystals onto mesoporous carbons This content will become publicly available on December 30, 2016 Title: New route toward integrating ...

  5. A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal-Organic Frameworks ... A Versatile Synthetic Route for the Preparation of Titanium Metal-Organic Frameworks. ...

  6. A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel Process Employing Heterometallic Alkoxides A Solution Route to Thermoelectric Oxide Nanoparticles - A Sol-Gel ...

  7. Optimal routing of IP packets to multi-homed servers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    Multi-homing, or direct attachment to multiple networks, offers both performance and availability benefits for important servers on busy networks. Exploiting these benefits to their fullest requires a modicum of routing knowledge in the clients. Careful policy control must also be reflected in the routing used within the network to make best use of specialized and often scarce resources. While relatively straightforward in theory, this problem becomes much more difficult to solve in a real network containing often intractable implementations from a variety of vendors. This paper presents an analysis of the problem and proposes a useful solution for a typical campus network. Application of this solution at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is studied and the problems and pitfalls encountered are discussed, as are the workarounds used to make the system work in the real world.

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Route Identification Process TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process Route Identification Process Items Available for Download Routing Discussion Paper (April 1998) (71.87 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1998

  9. U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will

  10. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  11. Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Getman, 2014) Exploration Activity...

  12. Geographic Information System (Nash, Et Al., 2002) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration...

  13. En Route to the Clinic: Diagnostic Sequencing Applications Using the Ion Torrent ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Muzny, Donna [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-03-22

    Donna Muzny on "En route to the clinic: Diagnostic sequencing applications using the Ion Torrent" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will ...

  15. NIST cooperative laboratory for OSI routing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, D.

    1994-05-23

    This document is one of two reports on the Integrated ISIS protocol. Required by the IAB/IESG in order for an Internet routing protocol to advance to Draft Standard Status. Integrated ISIS is an Interior Gateway Protocol and is designed to carry both IP and ISO CLNP routing information. Integrated ISIS is currently designated as a Proposed Standard. The protocol was first published in RFC 1195. Internet Draft was published subsequently to RFC 1195 and documents the current version of the protocol. This report documents experience with Integrated ISIS. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience and the current state of Integrated ISIS implementations. It also presents a summary of the Integrated ISIS Management Information Base (MIB), and a summary of the Integrated ISIS authentication mechanism.

  16. Charting a New Carbon Route to Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.beta.undp.orgcontentundpenhomeourworkenvironmentandenergyfo Cost: Free Language: English Charting a New Carbon Route to Development Screenshot "UNDP recognizes the...

  17. DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. The shuttle bus departure and arrival times may be impacted by traffic, weather, or other logistical interruptions.

  18. A situated knowledge representation of geographical information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gahegan, Mark N.; Pike, William A.

    2006-11-01

    In this paper we present an approach to conceiving of, constructing and comparing the concepts developed and used by geographers, environmental scientists and other earth science researchers to help describe, analyze and ultimately understand their subject of study. Our approach is informed by the situations under which concepts are conceived and applied, captures details of their construction, use and evolution and supports their ultimate sharing along with the means for deep exploration of conceptual similarities and differences that may arise among a distributed network of researchers. The intent here is to support different perspectives onto GIS resources that researchers may legitimately take, and to capture and compute with aspects of epistemology, to complement the ontologies that are currently receiving much attention in the GIScience community.

  19. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides formore » dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.« less

  20. Geographic Visualization of Power-Grid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.

    2015-06-18

    The visualization enables the simulation analyst to see changes in the frequency through time and space. With this technology, the analyst has a bird's eye view of the frequency at loads and generators as the simulated power system responds to the loss of a generator, spikes in load, and other contingencies. The significance of a contingency to the operation of an electrical power system depends critically on how the resulting tansients evolve in time and space. Consequently, these dynamic events can only be understood when seen in their proper geographic context. this understanding is indispensable to engineers working on the next generation of distributed sensing and control systems for the smart grid. By making possible a natural and intuitive presentation of dynamic behavior, our new visualization technology is a situational-awareness tool for power-system engineers.

  1. Geographic Visualization of Power-Grid Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-18

    The visualization enables the simulation analyst to see changes in the frequency through time and space. With this technology, the analyst has a bird's eye view of the frequency at loads and generators as the simulated power system responds to the loss of a generator, spikes in load, and other contingencies. The significance of a contingency to the operation of an electrical power system depends critically on how the resulting tansients evolve in time andmore » space. Consequently, these dynamic events can only be understood when seen in their proper geographic context. this understanding is indispensable to engineers working on the next generation of distributed sensing and control systems for the smart grid. By making possible a natural and intuitive presentation of dynamic behavior, our new visualization technology is a situational-awareness tool for power-system engineers.« less

  2. Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity...

  3. Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale...

  4. Optimizing Geographic Allotment of Photovoltaic Capacity in a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Program Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION; OPTIMIZATION; GEOGRAPHIC ...

  5. Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region...

  6. Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley...

  7. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash &...

  8. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range...

  9. Geographic Information System At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Chena Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date 2005 - 2007 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  10. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  11. Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nash & D., 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Nash & D., 1997)...

  12. Applications of Geographic Information Systems technology for environmental planning and management in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Z.; Wiele-Evans, C. Van Der )

    1993-01-01

    The State of North Carolina is developing a multipurpose geographic information systems (GIS) database for widespread use. The database currently consists of more than fifty categories of information state wide. In addition to basic planimetric information, the data include many categories of environmental significance. Much of the database has proven useful to planners, managers, and consultants involved with environmental policy-making and protection. The database is being used to augment activities in regulatory programs, research programs and in a variety of siting applications. The North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCCGIA) has operated the State's GIS since 1977 and is the lead coordinating agency for geographic information in the state. NCCGIA is able to develop and maintain the corporate database through partnerships with other state, federal, regional, and local government agencies and private organizations. Users access the database at NCCGIA for the production of maps and statistics, to spontaneously generate displays of a project area, to acquire data, and to conduct special studies. This paper describes some of the activities associated with environmental planning and management applications at the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Specifically, it illustrates the following: the conceptual framework for development and maintenance of the corporate database; the contents of the database; several environmental planning documents and applications developed at NCCGIA; and methods of data access.

  13. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-10-01

    In FY 2004 and 2005, NREL developed a proposed minimal infrastructure to support nationwide deployment of hydrogen vehicles by offering infrastructure scenarios that facilitated interstate travel. This report identifies key metropolitan areas and regions on which to focus infrastructure efforts during the early hydrogen transition.

  14. The East Asia geographic map series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terman, M.J.; Bell, E.P. )

    1990-06-01

    During the last 15 years, the Circum-Pacific Map Project Northwest Quadrant Panel (NWQP) has created a map inventory of geoscience data at a scale of 1:10,000,000. Now, for East Asia, a second set of thematic maps is being initiated cooperatively by the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources and the Committee for Coordination of Joint Prospecting for Mineral Resources in Asian Offshore Areas (CCOP). These new maps will constitute the East Asia Map Project, and they will present geoscience parameters at a scale of 1:2,000,000 that can be used to evaluate the potential for undiscovered resources with the application of new deposit modeling methodologies. The following map series are being compiled or are under consideration: geography, geotectonics, geophysics, mineral resources, energy resources, and hazards. The U.S, Geological Survey (USGS) is compiling the East Asia Geographic Map Series. Shorelines, rivers, and international boundaries have been computer plotted by the National Mapping Division from the most detailed version of the World Data Bank II (WDB II). This publicly available bank was hand digitized from a 1:3,000,000-scale global map compiled from a variety of sources. The East Asia series is composed of eight overlapping sheets with Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area Projection having a common point of origin at 120{degree}E and 15{degree}N; neatlines for each sheet are 39{degree} {times} 54.4{degree}. Titles reflect each map's coverage: Sheet 1, Japan/Korea/Northeast China; Sheet 2, Southeast China; Sheet 3, Southeast Asia; Sheet 4, Philippines; Sheet 5, Malaysia/ West Indonesia; Sheet 6, East Indonesia; Sheet 7, Papua New Guinea/ Solomon Islands; and Sheet 8, Western Pacific Islands. Contours have been scribed by the USGS's Office of International Geology.

  15. Geography-based structural analysis of the Internet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasiviswanathan, Shiva; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Yan, Guanhua

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study some geographic aspects of the Internet. We base our analysis on a large set of geolocated IP hop-level session data (including about 300,000 backbone routers, 150 million end hosts, and 1 billion sessions) that we synthesized from a variety of different input sources such as US census data, computer usage statistics, Internet market share data, IP geolocation data sets, CAJDA's Skitter data set for backbone connectivity, and BGP routing tables. We use this model to perform a nationwide and statewide geographic analysis of the Internet. Our main observations are: (1) There is a dominant coast-to-coast pattern in the US Internet traffic. In fact, in many instances even if the end-devices are not near either coast, still the traffic between them takes a long detour through the coasts. (2) More than half of the Internet paths are inflated by 100% or more compared to their corresponding geometric straight-line distance. This circuitousness makes the average ratio between the routing distance and geometric distance big (around 10). (3) The weighted mean hop count is around 5, but the hop counts are very loosely correlated with the distances. The weighted mean AS count (number of ASes traversed) is around 3. (4) The AS size and the AS location number distributions are heavy-tailed and strongly correlated. Most of the ASes are medium sized and there is a wide variability in the geographic dispersion size (measured in terms of the convex hull area) of these ASes.

  16. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Type Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC ...

  17. Bolivia-Brazil gas line route detailed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that state oil companies of Brazil and Bolivia have signed an agreement outlining the route for a 2,270 km pipeline system to deliver natural gas from Bolivian fields to Southeast Brazil. The two sides currently are negotiating details about construction costs as well as contract volumes and prices. Capacity is projected at 283-565 MMcfd. No official details are available, but Roberto Y. Hukai, a director of the Sao Paulo engineering company Jaako Poyry/Technoplan, estimates transportation cost of the Bolivian gas at 90 cents/MMBTU. That would be competitive with the price of gas delivered to the Sao Paulo gas utility Comgas, he the. Brazil's Petroleos Brasileiro SA estimates construction of the pipeline on the Brazilian side alone with cost $1.2-1.4 billion. Bolivia's Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos (YPFB) is negotiating with private domestic and foreign investors for construction of the Bolivian portion of the project.

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary (101.72 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January - February 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  19. National Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... nationwide. Twenty scientists and STEM professionals - from the Energy Department, NASA, BP, and National Geographic, to name a few - engaged in show-and-tell chats with 5th- ...

  20. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  1. Routing performance analysis and optimization within a massively parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen

    2013-04-16

    An apparatus, program product and method optimize the operation of a massively parallel computer system by, in part, receiving actual performance data concerning an application executed by the plurality of interconnected nodes, and analyzing the actual performance data to identify an actual performance pattern. A desired performance pattern may be determined for the application, and an algorithm may be selected from among a plurality of algorithms stored within a memory, the algorithm being configured to achieve the desired performance pattern based on the actual performance data.

  2. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be ... available nanoparticles over multiple length scales, ranging from the nano to the macro. ...

  3. Route-Based Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Today's hybrid electric vehicle controls cannot always provide maximum fuel savings over all drive cycles. Route-based controls could improve HEV fuel efficiency by 2%-4% and help save nearly 6.5 million gallons of fuel annually.

  4. A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating Previous Next List Zhangwen Wei, Weigang Lu, Hai-Long Jiang, and Hong-Cai Zhou, Inorg. Chem., 2013, 52 (3), pp ...

  5. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important...

  6. NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE (NNSS) DRIVERS ROUTE/SHIPMENT INFORMATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSS) DRIVERS ROUTE/SHIPMENT INFORMATION (12/2014 Log No. 2014-229) NOTE: THIS FORM IS TWO (2) PAGES - YOU MUST COMPLETE BOTH PAGES NNSS SHIPMENT NUMBER: CARRIER NAME: TRACTOR NO.: TRAILER NO.: AT ORIGIN AT NNSS Main Gate NNSS OFFICE USE ONLY DEPARTURE DATE: ARRIVAL DATE: DESTINATION AREA: Area 5 DEPARTURE TIME: ARRIVAL TIME: NNSS DEPARTURE TIME: LOCATION: HELD OVER? No Yes REASON: ROUTE INFORMATION REVIEWED BY: ONSITE SHIPMENT (MAP NOT APPLICABLE) DROP YARD; LEAVE THIS FORM WITH SHIPPING

  7. Microsoft Word - Final Temp Route _9_23_08_

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bobby St. John Washington TRU Solutions (575) 234-7348 www.wipp.energy.gov For Immediate Release Temporary Transportation Route Established for WIPP Shipments CARLSBAD, N.M., September 23, 2008 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), in conjunction with Texas and New Mexico departments of transportation, has identified a temporary transportation route for waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), due to roadwork in Texas. Currently, transuranic, or

  8. The fuel efficient missile combat crew routing network. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, E.O. Jr.; Woolley, M.G.

    1980-06-01

    Missile combat crew vehicles are the highest mileage accumulators within SAC and, in the interest of energy conservation, Vice CINCSAC has initiated a long-term study examining utilization of more fuel efficient crew vehicles. This thesis extends the SAC study by determining if alternate dispatch procedures and routes of travel, using currently assigned vehicles, would result in fuel conservation. A network routing model is used to determine the routes of travel for three deployment strategies and five vehicle types at the Minot AFB, ND test base. Fuel efficiency for these fifteen alternatives, measured as gallons of fuel consumed per passenger, is compared with the existing missile combat crew routing network. This study found that ten of the fifteen vehicle/deployment strategy combinations, when employed over the shortest authorized routes of travel that were developed, provided improvement over the fuel efficiency of the MCC routing system that was in effect as of 31 August 1979. The largest potential savings amounted to 52% or 26,255 gallons of fuel per year.

  9. Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Joshi, Girish M. [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Raghupathy, Bala P.C., E-mail: balapraveen2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Research and Advanced Engineering Division (Materials), Renault Nissan Technology and Business Center India (P) Ltd., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeong, Soon Kwan, E-mail: jeongsk@kier.re.kr [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

  10. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by dynamically adjusting local routing strategies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-03-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Each node implements a respective routing strategy for routing data through the network, the routing strategies not necessarily being the same in every node. The routing strategies implemented in the nodes are dynamically adjusted during application execution to shift network workload as required. Preferably, adjustment of routing policies in selective nodes is performed at synchronization points. The network may be dynamically monitored, and routing strategies adjusted according to detected network conditions.

  11. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by routing through transporter nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a destination. Some packets are constrained to be routed through respective designated transporter nodes, the automated routing strategy determining a path from a respective source node to a respective transporter node, and from a respective transporter node to a respective destination node. Preferably, the source node chooses a routing policy from among multiple possible choices, and that policy is followed by all intermediate nodes. The use of transporter nodes allows greater flexibility in routing.

  12. Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes a time-lapse geographical visualization map of early market use of fuel cells for telecommunications backup power. The map synthesizes data being analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation team for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with DOE's publicly available annual summaries of electric disturbance events.

  13. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on

  14. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul; Luis, Martino

    2015-05-15

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time.

  15. The price of commitment in online stochastic vehicle routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers online stochastic multiple vehicle routing with time windows in which requests arrive dynamically and the goal is to maximize the number of serviced customers. Early work has focused on very flexible routing settings where the decision to assign a vehicle to a customer is delayed until a vehicle is actually deployed to the customer. Motivated by real applications that require stability in the decision making, this paper considers a setting where the decision to assign a customer request to a vehicle must be taken when that request is accepted. Experimental results suggest that this constraint severely degrades the performance of existing algorithms. However, the paper shows how the use of stochastic information for vehicle assignment and request acceptance improves decision quality considerably. Moreover, the use of resource augmentation quantifies precisely the cost of commitment in online vehicle routing.

  16. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and

  17. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Wednesday, 29 August 2012 00:00 Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES January 31, 2008 (11.6 KB) December 6, 2007 (11.96 KB) October 4, 2007 (16.46 KB) August 23, 2007 (26.38 KB) June 21, 2007 (41.02 KB) May 31, 2007 (31.04 KB) January 18, 2007 (93.16 KB) December 19, 2006 (28.83 KB) November 9, 2006 (19.84 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic

  19. Geographical features of global water cycle during warm geological epochs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgiadi, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    The impact of global warming on the water cycle can be extremely complex and diverse. The goal of the investigation was to estimate the geographic features of the mean annual water budget of the world during climatic optimums of the Holocene and the Eemian interglacial periods. These geological epochs could be used as analogs of climatic warming on 1 degree, centigrade and 2 degrees, centigrade. The author used the results of climatic reconstructions based on a simplified version of a GCM.

  20. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  1. Next Update: November 2016 Geographic Area Capacity In-Service

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Geographic Area Capacity In-Service Data Year NERC Region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Rating (MVa) Month/Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Company Code Company Name Organizational Type Ownership (Percent) Project Name Level of Certainty Primary Driver 1 Primary Driver 2 2014 FRCC AC 200-299 115 460 1/2016 SUB 4 230.00 SUB 7 230.00 3.8 OH 18445 of Tallahassee M 100% 0.00 - SUB 7 230.00 Under Constructio Reliability 2014 FRCC AC 100-120 115 232 12/2016 Sub 14 115 Sub 7 115 6.0

  2. Mike West Potomac Hudson Engineering Sandy Enyeart SAIC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Models used to estimate Impacts * TRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) - TRAGIS is a GIS-based transportation analysis computer ...

  3. Geographic variation of human mitochondrial DNA from Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoneking, M.; Wilson, A.C. ); Jorde, L.B. ); Bhatia, K. )

    1990-03-01

    High resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction maps, consisting of an average of 370 sites per mtDNA map, were constructed for 119 people from 25 localities in Papua, New Guinea (PNG). Comparison of these PNG restriction maps to published maps from Australian, Caucasian, Asian and African mtDNAs reveals that PNG has the lowest amount of mtDNA variation, and that PNG mtDNA lineages originated from Southeast Asia. The statistical significance of geographic structuring of populations with respect to mtDNA was assessed by comparing observed G{sub ST} values to a distribution of G{sub ST} values generated by random resampling of the data. These analyses show that there is significant structuring of mtDNA variation among worldwide populations, between highland and coastal PNG populations, and even between two highland PNG populations located approximately 200 km apart. However, coastal PNG populations are essentially panmictic, despite being spread over several hundred kilometers. The high resolution technique for examining mtDNA variation, coupled with extensive geographic sampling within a single defined area, leads to an enhanced understanding of the influence of geography on mtDNA variation in human populations.

  4. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, Samuel F.; Canter, Larry W.

    2011-09-15

    Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

  5. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials

  6. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  7. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  8. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  9. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  10. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly Print If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of themselves. An important advance toward this goal has been achieved by researchers who have found a simple and yet powerfully robust way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays. By adding specific types of small molecules to mixtures of nanoparticles and polymers, they were able to direct the self-assembly of the

  11. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  12. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  13. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  14. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  15. A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Route to Nanoscale Conducting Channels in Insulating Oxides Print Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs)-narrow conducting channels at the surfaces and interfaces of semiconductor materials-are the bedrock of conventional electronics. The startling 2004 discovery that such 2DEGs could be engineered at the interface between two insulating transition-metal oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, initiated a worldwide effort to harness the functionality of oxide materials for advanced electronic

  16. Holey Germanium - New Routes to Ordered Nanoporous Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holey Germanium - New Routes to Ordered Nanoporous Semiconductors Nanoporous or mesoporous inorganic materials with homogeneous pore sizes have found broad applications in separations, as supports for size selective catalysis, and as low dielectric materials. For all of these applications, it is the pore space that is important, and so the inorganic framework is generally formed from a simple material like silica or another oxide. In an effort to extend the range of potential applications for

  17. Polar Gas to pick route for Arctic Y Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-26

    Polar Gas Project is considering four possible Y line routes to move gas reserves from the Arctic Islands and the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea areas to southern Canada. All four routes are west of the single line route proposed by Polar Gas Ltd. in 1977 to run from the Arctic Islands to Longlac, Ontario, and would connect with existing pipelines at either Longlac, Winnipeg, Calgary, or Edmonton. Marketable reserves in the High Arctic Islands are estimated at 12.7 trillion cubic feet, not counting 3-6 trillion cubic feet probably contained in recent discoveries; the MacKenzie Delta reserves are estimated at 5.8 trillion cubic feet. The gas will be chilled to 0C for passage through permafrost regions, to prevent thawing of the soil, but the gas will be at higher temperatures in other areas, with various construction techniques used to protect the area of discontinuous permafrost from thawing. More than $70 million has been spent on project studies. An application will be filed in 1981, and the pipeline could be completed in 7-10 years.

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS Proposed Task Plan - Routing Topic Group (53.69 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2006

  19. The Australian Geographic Team Marsupial solar-powered car

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.R.; Storey, J.W.V.

    1988-01-01

    As in all vehicles of this type, low weight and aerodynamic drag must be achieved without compromising safety, and in an extremely rugged structure. This has been done by using a chrome-molybdenum steel space-frame, surrounded by a Kevlar/foam sandwich body shell. The solar panel wing, which uses a laminar flow section to obtain low drag, does not tilt except when the vehicle is stationary. A high degree of redundancy is built into the vehicle; for example there are two motors and transmissions, the solar array is divided into seven parallel sub-arrays, and the power electronics is multiply redundant. Built entirely in the garage of a suburban house, the Australian Geographic Team Marsupial car cost less than US$50,000 to construct.

  20. On the mixing time of geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradonjic, Milan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the mixing time of random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). We specifically study the mixing times of random walks on 2-dimensional GTGs near the connectivity threshold. We provide a set of criteria on the distribution of vertex weights that guarantees that the mixing time is {Theta}(n log n).

  1. EIS-0218-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    representative routes for each transport mode for the calculations of the radiological risk. This Supplement Analysis examined the potential impacts of transporting spent...

  2. Interfacing 1990 US Census TIGER map files with New S graphics software. [Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . School of Public Health)

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic base files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) which contain detail on the physical features and census tract boundaries of every county in the United States. The TIGER database is attractive for two reasons. First, it is publicly available through the Bureau of the Census on tape or cd-rom for a minimal fee. Second, it contains 24 billion characters of data which describe geographic features of interest to the Census Bureau such as coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. Unfortunately, the large TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. On the other hand New S, a popular statistical software package by AT T, has easily operated functions that permit advanced graphics in conjunction with data analysis. New S has the ability to plot contours, lines, segments, and points. However, of special interest is the New S function map and its options. Using the map function, which requires polygons as input, census tracts can be quickly selected, plotted, shaded, etc. New S graphics combined with the TIGER database has obvious potential. This paper reports on our efforts to use the TIGER map files with New S, especially to construct census tract maps of counties. While census tract boundaries are inherently polygonal, they are not organized as such in the TIGER database. This conversion of the TIGER line'' format into New S polygon/polyline'' format is one facet of the work reported here. Also we discuss the selection and extraction of auxiliary geographic information from TIGER files for graphical display using New S.

  3. Routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the various routes to spatiotemporal chaos in Kerr optical frequency combs, obtained through pumping an ultra-high Q-factor whispering-gallery mode resonator with a continuous-wave laser. The Lugiato–Lefever model is used to build bifurcation diagrams with regards to the parameters that are externally controllable, namely, the frequency and the power of the pumping laser. We show that the spatiotemporal chaos emerging from Turing patterns and solitons display distinctive dynamical features. Experimental spectra of chaotic Kerr combs are also presented for both cases, in excellent agreement with theoretical spectra.

  4. Fabrication Routes for High Strength High Conductivity Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.; Sims, J.R.; Pantsyrnyi, V.I.; Shikov, A.; Bochvar, A.A.

    1998-10-01

    The development of suitable wires for magnet windings requires both the attainment of suitable combinations of properties (electrical conductivity and strength), the development of a production route capable of fabricating suitable quantity of wire of required dimension (5.2x7.6mm{sup 2} cross-section and 120 m in length) and a product with acceptable fabricability, joinability and service life. In this survey, the authors consider methods of producing suitable wire products by the codeformation of in-situ composites. This will include details of the quality control of the processing of Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb and the assessment of their detailed mechanical properties.

  5. Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Table 2: U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions (10.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 Before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power - Committee on Energy and Commerce

  6. Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-08-23

    Worldwide interest in the deployment of photovoltaic generation (PV) is rapidly increasing. Operating experience with large PV plants, however, demonstrates that large, rapid changes in the output of PV plants are possible. Early studies of PV grid impacts suggested that short-term variability could be a potential limiting factor in deploying PV. Many of these early studies, however, lacked high-quality data from multiple sites to assess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration. As is well known for wind, accounting for the potential for geographic diversity can significantly reduce the magnitude of extreme changes in aggregated PV output, the resources required to accommodate that variability, and the potential costs of managing variability. We use measured 1-min solar insolation for 23 time-synchronized sites in the Southern Great Plains network of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and wind speed data from 10 sites in the same network to characterize the variability of PV with different degrees of geographic diversity and to compare the variability of PV to the variability of similarly sited wind. The relative aggregate variability of PV plants sited in a dense 10 x 10 array with 20 km spacing is six times less than the variability of a single site for variability on time scales less than 15-min. We find in our analysis of wind and PV plants similarly sited in a 5 x 5 grid with 50 km spacing that the variability of PV is only slightly more than the variability of wind on time scales of 5-15 min. Over shorter and longer time scales the level of variability is nearly identical. Finally, we use a simple approximation method to estimate the cost of carrying additional reserves to manage sub-hourly variability. We conclude that the costs of managing the short-term variability of PV are dramatically reduced by geographic diversity and are not substantially different from the costs for managing the short-term variability of similarly sited wind in

  7. Geographic Perspective on the Current Biomass Resource Availability in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the biomass resources available in the United States and map the results using geographic information systems (GIS).

  8. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  9. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Swapan Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr.

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  10. Vehicle routing for the last mile of power system restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Coffrin, Carleton; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2010-11-23

    This paper studied a novel problem in power system restoration: the Power Restoration Vehicle Routing Problem (PRVRP). The goal of PRVRPs is to decide how coordinate repair crews effectively in order to recover from blackouts as fast as possible after a disaster has occurred. PRVRPs are complex problems that combine vehicle routing and power restoration scheduling problems. The paper proposed a multi-stage optimization algorithm based on the idea of constraint injection that meets the aggressive runtime constraints necessary for disaster recovery. The algorithms were validated on benchmarks produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the infrastructure of the United States. The disaster scenarios were generated by state-of-the-art hurricane simulation tools similar to those used by the National Hurricane Center. Experimental results show that the constraint-injection algorithms can reduce the blackouts by 50% or more over field practices. Moreover, the results show that the constraint-injection algorithm using large neighborhood search over a blackbox simulator provide competitive quality and scales better than using a MIP solver on the subproblems.

  11. Investigation of nanocrystalline zinc chromite obtained by two soft chemical routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingasu, Dana; Mindru, Ioana; Culita, Daniela C.; Patron, Luminita; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Preda, Silviu; Oprea, Ovidiu; Osiceanu, Petre; Morena Pineda, Eufemio

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two soft chemical routes to synthesize zinc chromites are described. • Glycine is used as chelating agent (precursor method) and fuel (solution combustion method). • The synthesized chromites have crystallite size in the range of 18–27 nm. • An antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition is observed at about T{sub N} ∼ 18 K. - Abstract: Zinc chromite (ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanocrystalline powders were obtained by two different chemical routes: the precursor method and the solution combustion method involving glycine-nitrates. The complex compound precursors, [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 8}]·9H{sub 2}O and [ZnCr{sub 2}(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 4.5}]·(NO{sub 3}){sub 8}·6H{sub 2}O, were characterized by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and thermal analysis. The structure, morphology, surface chemistry and magnetic properties of ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared and Raman spectroscopy (RS), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis) and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the chromite spinel phase with good crystallinity and an average crystallite size of approximately 18–27 nm. The band gap values ranged between 3.31 and 3.33 eV. The magnetic measurements indicated an antiferromagnetic transition at T{sub N} ∼ 17.5/18 K.

  12. Value of Geographic Diversity of Wind and Solar: Stochastic Geometry Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, V.

    2012-08-01

    Based on the available geographically dispersed data for the continental U.S. (excluding Alaska), we analyze to what extent the geographic diversity of these resources can offset their variability. A geometric model provides a convenient measure for resource variability, shows the synergy between wind and solar resources.

  13. DOE_HQ_Shuttle_Bus_Route-and-Schedule (05-2016).docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May, 2016 DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific

  14. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials salvador.pdf (5.17 MB) More ...

  15. Synthesis of carbon micro-rods via a solvothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi Yuanzhu Hu Weibing; Dan Youmeng

    2009-04-02

    Novel carbon micro-rods with regular and uniform shape have been synthesized in high yield by magnesium acetate and n-butyl alcohol as the precursors via a solvothermal route. The resulting products were characterized by combined techniques including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The carbon micro-rods exhibit diameters ranging from 500 nm to 1 {mu}m and up to 5-10 {mu}m in length. We have found that the optimal reaction conditions for the growth of the carbon micro-rods were 500 deg. C and 12 h.

  16. Solvothermal routes for synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2005-03-01

    Control of the synthesis of nanomaterials to produce morphologies exhibiting quantized properties will enable device integration of several novel applications including biosensors, catalysis, and optical devices. In this work, solvothermal routes to produce zinc oxide nanorods are explored. Much previous work has relied on the addition of growth directing/inhibiting agents to control morphology. It was found in coarsening studies that zinc oxide nanodots will ripen to nanorod morphologies at temperatures of 90 to 120 C. The resulting nanorods have widths of 9-12 nm average dimension, which is smaller than current methods for nanorod synthesis. Use of nanodots as nuclei may be an approach that will allow for controlled growth of higher aspect ratio nanorods.

  17. Tuple spaces in hardware for accelerated implicit routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Zachary Kent; Tripp, Justin

    2010-12-01

    Organizing and optimizing data objects on networks with support for data migration and failing nodes is a complicated problem to handle as systems grow. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that high levels of speedup can be achieved by moving responsibility for finding, fetching, and staging data into an FPGA-based network card. We present a system for implicit routing of data via FPGA-based network cards. In this system, data structures are requested by name, and the network of FPGAs finds the data within the network and relays the structure to the requester. This is acheived through successive examination of hardware hash tables implemented in the FPGA. By avoiding software stacks between nodes, the data is quickly fetched entirely through FPGA-FPGA interaction. The performance of this system is orders of magnitude faster than software implementations due to the improved speed of the hash tables and lowered latency between the network nodes.

  18. EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

  19. Modeling Solar Power Plant Variability: Benefits of Geographic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times with missing data eliminated 5 Summary of Work Analysis focused on solar power variability, which can lead to issues on electric grids with high PV penetration: ...

  20. Generalized chemical route to develop fatty acid capped highly dispersed semiconducting metal sulphide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Jayesh D.; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Mighri, Frej; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Ajji, Abdellah; Chemical Engineering Department, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville Montreal, QC, H3C 3A7

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Chemical route for the synthesis of OA-capped CdS, ZnS and PbS at low temperature. ► Synthesized nanocrystals via thermolysis of their metal–oleate complexes. ► Size quantized nanocrystals were highly dispersed and stable at room temperature. -- Abstract: This work deals with the synthesis of highly dispersed semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) of cadmium sulphide (CdS), zinc sulphide (ZnS) and lead sulphide (PbS) through a simple and generalized process using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. To synthesize these NCs, metal–oleate (M–O) complexes were obtained from the reaction at 140 °C between metal acetates and OA in hexanes media. Subsequently, M–O complexes were sulphurized using thioacetamide at the same temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations show that the synthesized products are of nanoscale-size with highly crystalline cubic phase. The optical absorption of OA-capped metal sulphide NCs confirms that their size quantization induced a large shift towards visible region. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CdS NCs shows a broad band-edge emission with shallow and deep-trap emissions, while PL spectrum of ZnS NCs reveals a broad emission due to defects states on the surface. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that fatty acid monolayers were bound strongly on the nanocrystal surface as a carboxylate and the two oxygen atoms of the carboxylate were coordinated symmetrically to the surface of the NCs. The strong binding between the fatty acid and the NCs surface enhances the stability of NCs colloids. In general, this generalized route has a great potential in developing nanoscale metal sulphides for opto-electronic devices.

  1. Functionalization of SBA-15 mesoporous silica by Cu-phosphonate units: Probing of synthesis route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskowski, Lukasz; Laskowska, Magdalena

    2014-12-15

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 containing propyl-copper phosphonate units was investigated. The structure of mesoporous samples was tested by N{sub 2} isothermal sorption (BET and BHJ analysis), TEM microscopy and X-Ray scattering. Quantitative analysis EDX has given information about proportions between component atoms in the sample. Quantitative elemental analysis has been carried out to support EDX. To examine bounding between copper atoms and phosphonic units the Raman spectroscopy was carried out. As a support of Raman scattering, the theoretical calculations were made based on density functional theory, with the B3LYP method. By comparison of the calculated vibrational spectra of the molecule with experimental results, distribution of the active units inside silica matrix has been determined. - Graphical abstract: The present study is devoted to mesoporous silica SBA-15 containing propyl-copper phosphonate units. The species were investigated to confirm of synthesis procedure correctness by the micro-Raman technique combined with DFT numerical simulations. Complementary research was carried out to test the structure of mesoporous samples. - Highlights: • SBA-15 silica functionalized with propyl-copper phosphonate units was synthesized. • Synthesis efficiency probed by Raman study supported with DFT simulations. • Homogenous distribution of active units was proved. • Synthesis route enables precise control of distance between copper ions.

  2. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is

  3. National Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring Café for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Students | Department of Energy Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring Café for Students National Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring Café for Students February 24, 2016 - 4:20pm Addthis Hands on learning in science and technology gave 90 school kids and their teachers from Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. a first-hand look at STEM careers in February. Here, Carrie Seltzer, a research scientist and program manager at the National Geographic

  4. 3D Torus Routing Engine Module for OFA OpenSM v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-11-12

    This OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) OpenSM routing engine module provides credit-loop-free routing while supporting two quality of service (QoS) levels for an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. In addition it is able to route around multiple failed fabric links or a single failed fabric switch without introducing credit loops, and without changing path Service Level (SL) values granted before the failure.This OFA OpenSM routing engine module improves the operational characteristics of a parallel computermore » built using an InfiniBand fabric with a 3D torus topology. By providing two QoS levels, it allows system administrators to prevent application interprocess communication and file system communication from impacting each other. By providing the capability to route traffic around failed fabric components, it enables repair of failed components without impacting jobs running on the computer system.« less

  5. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbashev, Andrew R.; Plokhikh, Aleksandr V.; Barbash, Dmitri; Lofland, Samuel E.; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2015-10-01

    The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} and (001)LaAlO{sub 3} substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001)BiFeO{sub 3} phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001)SrTiO{sub 3} results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001)LaAlO{sub 3} showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001)SrTiO{sub 3}. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  6. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible to precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.

  7. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible tomore » precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.« less

  8. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  9. Evaluation of alternate routes for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.

    1998-12-31

    The use of coal-derived syngas to produce high value chemicals is an important means of upgrading this resource. One example of a chemical that can be produced from coal-derived syngas is methyl methacrylate (MMA). Poly-methyl methacrylate is widely used in coatings and in various industrial molded products. The most widely practiced commercial technology for the synthesis of MMA is the acetone cyanohydrin (ACH) process. This process requires handling of large quantities of toxic hydrogen cyanide and generates one mole of ammonium bisulfate waste per mole of MMA. This bisulfate must either be regenerated or discarded, either of which substantially increases the cost. The ACH technology is thus environmentally and economically untenable for any new MMA plant expansions that would be needed to meet increasing demand. The RTI-Eastman-Bechtel research team is developing an alternative, environmentally benign route to MMA consisting of three steps; (step 1) synthesis of a propionate from ethylene, carbon monoxide, and steam, (step 2) condensation of this propionate with formaldehyde, and (step 3) esterification of resulting methacrylic acid with methanol to form MMA. This paper describes the preliminary economics of the overall process compared to other emerging processes, and focuses on step 2, including long term testing of catalysts for the condensation of propionic acid with formaldehyde to form MAA.

  10. Resource Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Analysis » Analysis Methodologies » Resource Analysis Resource Analysis Resource Analysis determines the quantity and location of resources needed to produce hydrogen. Additionally, resource analysis quantifies the cost of the resources, as a function of the amount that can be available for hydrogen production. While often associated with renewable resources, resource analysis is also suitable for fossil resources and existing production facilities. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

  11. Connectivity-Enhanced Route Selection and Adaptive Control for the Chevrolet Volt: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Wood, E.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3% respectively. These represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  12. Connectivity-enhanced route selection and adaptive control for the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Wood, Eric; Rajagopalan, Sai

    2016-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3%, respectively. Furthermore, these represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  13. Simple route for the synthesis of supercapacitive Co-Ni mixed hydroxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubal, D.P.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 ; Jagadale, A.D.; Patil, S.V.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel method for deposition of Co-Ni mixed hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle network of Co-Ni hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High specific capacitance of 672 F g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High discharge/charge rates. -- Abstract: Facile synthesis of Co-Ni mixed hydroxides films with interconnected nanoparticles networks through two step route is successfully established. These films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared technique (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wettability test. Co-Ni film formation is confirmed from XRD and FTIR study. SEM shows that the surface of Co-Ni films is composed of interconnected nanoparticles. Contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilic nature of films which is feasible for the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the film is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, and constant-current charge/discharge cycling techniques. Specific capacitance of the Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode achieved 672 F g{sup -1}. Impedance analysis shows that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode provides less resistance for the intercalation and de-intercalation of ions. The Co-Ni mixed electrode exhibited good charge/discharge rate at different current densities. The results demonstrated that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide composite is very promising for the next generation high performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

  14. A survey of routing techniques in store-and-forward and wormhole interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, David Michael; Lee, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of algorithms for directing messages through networks of varying topology. These are commonly referred to as routing algorithms in the literature that is presented. In addition to providing background on networking terminology and router basics, the paper explains the issues of deadlock and livelock as they apply to routing. After this, there is a discussion of routing algorithms for both store-and-forward and wormhole-switched networks. The paper covers both algorithms that do and do not adapt to conditions in the network. Techniques targeting structured as well as irregular topologies are discussed. Following this, strategies for routing in the presence of faulty nodes and links in the network are described.

  15. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by semi-randomly varying routing policies for different packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-23

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Nodes vary a choice of routing policy for routing data in the network in a semi-random manner, so that similarly situated packets are not always routed along the same path. Semi-random variation of the routing policy tends to avoid certain local hot spots of network activity, which might otherwise arise using more consistent routing determinations. Preferably, the originating node chooses a routing policy for a packet, and all intermediate nodes in the path route the packet according to that policy. Policies may be rotated on a round-robin basis, selected by generating a random number, or otherwise varied.

  16. U.S. Geographic Analysis of the Cost of Hydrogen from Electrolysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groups Announce Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement; Will Cut Energy Use for 90 Million U.S. Households, Save Consumers Billions | Department of Energy Energy Department, Pay-Television Industry and Energy Efficiency Groups Announce Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement; Will Cut Energy Use for 90 Million U.S. Households, Save Consumers Billions U.S. Energy Department, Pay-Television Industry and Energy Efficiency Groups Announce Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement; Will Cut

  17. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  18. A lower bound for routing on a completely connected optical communication parallel computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.A.; Jerrum, M.; MacKenzie, P.D.

    1993-08-03

    The task of routing a 2-relation on an n-processor completely connected optical communication parallel computer (OCPC) is considered. A lower bound is presented that applies to any randomized distributed algorithm for this task: specifically, it is shown that the expected number of steps required to route a 2-relation is {Omega}({radical} log log n) in the worst case. For comparison, the best upper bound known is O(log log n).

  19. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LanzaTech. All rights reserved. 1 A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas BETO's Project Peer Review, March 2015 Alexandria, VA Alice Havill Senior Process Engineer Project Principle Investigator Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Objective: develop a hybrid conversion technology for catalytic upgrading of biomass- derived syngas to jet fuel and chemicals while ensure the cost, quality and environmental requirements of the aviation industry are met System

  20. INTERLINE 5. 0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. ); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. . Transportation Center)

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  1. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S

    2001-05-22

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other

  2. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-02-07

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas

  3. Baseline requirements of the proposed action for the Transportation Management Division routing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important to shippers, carriers, and the general public. This is particularly true for shipments of radioactive material. The shippers are primarily concerned with safety, security, efficiency, and equipment requirements. The carriers are concerned with the potential impact that radioactive shipments may have on their operations--particularly if such materials are involved in an accident. The general public has also expressed concerns regarding the safety of transporting radioactive and other hazardous materials through their communities. Because transportation routes are a central concern in hazardous material transport, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward resolution of these issues. In response to these routing needs, several models have been developed over the past fifteen years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HIGHWAY routing model is used to predict routes for truck transportation, the INTERLINE routing model is used to predict both rail and barge routes, and the AIRPORT locator model is used to determine airports with specified criteria near a specific location. As part of the ongoing improvement of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Transportation Management Division`s (EM-261) computer systems and development efforts, a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models was held at ORNL on April 27, 1994. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the existing capabilities of the models and data bases and to review enhancements of the models and data bases to expand their usefulness. The results of the Baseline Requirements Assessment Section will be discussed in this report. The discussions pertaining to the different models are contained in separate sections.

  4. Structural and optical properties of ZnO: K synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krithiga, R. Sankar, S.; Subhashree, G.; Bharathi, R. Niruban

    2015-06-24

    The structural and optical behavior of ZnO and ZnO doped with K synthesized by solution combustion route is reported in this article. The XRD patterns confirm the substitution of K atoms into ZnO lattice. There are no secondary peaks observed in the XRD patterns. The band gap of the K doped samples show a red shift on comparison with the bandgap of ZnO. The photoluminescence spectral study discloses the quenching behavior of UV emission and the aggrandizing blue emission when K content increases. The rich presence of defects is confirmed from the optical analysis and a practical mechanism, involving Zn{sub i} for the origin of the blue emission in ZnO is discussed here.

  5. Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

    1980-04-01

    Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

  6. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  7. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a tributary subnetwork before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  8. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Collins, A. M.; Mann, S.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{sup −} ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm{sup −1} and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm{sup −1}. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm{sup −1} and 1709 cm{sup −1} respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the (−110), (001), (−201), (−111), (200), (−211), (210), (120) and (111) according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  9. L-connect routing of die surface pads to the die edge for stacking in a 3D array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated circuit chips and method of routing the interface pads from the face of the chip or die to one or more sidewall surfaces of the die. The interconnection is routed from the face of the die to one or more edges of the die, then routed over the edge of the die and onto the side surface. A new pad is then formed on the sidewall surface, which allows multiple die or chips to be stacked in a three-dimensional array, while enabling follow-on signal routing from the sidewall pads. The routing of the interconnects and formation of the sidewall pads can be carried out in an L-connect or L-shaped routing configuration, using a metalization process such as laser pantography.

  10. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; John Grube

    2004-12-10

    Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated

  11. Deadlock-free class routes for collective communications embedded in a multi-dimensional torus network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Heidelberger, Philip

    2013-01-29

    A computer implemented method and a system for routing data packets in a multi-dimensional computer network. The method comprises routing a data packet among nodes along one dimension towards a root node, each node having input and output communication links, said root node not having any outgoing uplinks, and determining at each node if the data packet has reached a predefined coordinate for the dimension or an edge of the subrectangle for the dimension, and if the data packet has reached the predefined coordinate for the dimension or the edge of the subrectangle for the dimension, determining if the data packet has reached the root node, and if the data packet has not reached the root node, routing the data packet among nodes along another dimension towards the root node.

  12. Kinetic, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Assessment of Associative and Dissociative Methanol Dehydration Routes in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew J.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-03

    Mechanistic interpretations of rates and in situ IR spectra combined with density functionals that account for van der Waals interactions of intermediates and transition states within confining voids show that associative routes mediate the formation of dimethyl ether from methanol on zeolitic acids at the temperatures and pressures of practical dehydration catalysis. Methoxy-mediated dissociative routes become prevalent at higher temperatures and lower pressures, because they involve smaller transition states with higher enthalpy, but also higher entropy, than those in associative routes. These enthalpyentropy trade-offs merely reflect the intervening role of temperature in activation free energies and the prevalence of more complex transition states at low temperatures and high pressures. This work provides a foundation for further inquiry into the contributions of H-bonded methanol and methoxy species in homologation and hydrocarbon synthesis reactions from methanol.

  13. Diffusionless fluid transport and routing using novel microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Louise Mary; Shediac, Renee; Reichmuth, David S.

    2006-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have been proposed for 'Lab-on-a-Chip' applications for nearly a decade. Despite the unquestionable promise of these devices to allow rapid, sensitive and portable biochemical analysis, few practical devices exist. It is often difficult to adapt current laboratory techniques to the microscale because bench-top methods use discrete liquid volumes, while most current microfluidic devices employ streams of liquid confined in a branching network of micron-scale channels. The goal of this research was to use two phase liquid flows, creating discrete packets of liquid. Once divided into discrete packets, the packets can be moved controllably within the microchannels without loss of material. Each packet is equivalent to a minute test tube, holding a fraction from a separation or an aliquot to be reacted. We report on the fabrication of glass and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) devices that create and store packets.

  14. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  15. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  16. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Sacit M; Howard, Rob L; Liu, Cheng; Mueller, Don; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Peterson, Steven K; Scaglione, John M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  17. Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosiano, John J; Bent, Russell W; Linger, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

  18. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Pleistocene Lake Otero

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a geotiff of the geographic extent of Pleistocene Lake Otero; which was used as apart of the groundwater composite risk segment in a Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis.

  19. Emergence of recombinant forms in geographic regions with co-circulating HIV subtypes in the dynamic HIV-1 epidemic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming; Letiner, Thomas K; Korber, Bette T; Foley, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We have reexamined the subtype designations of {approx}10,000 subtype A, B, C, G, and AG, BC, BF recombinant sequences, and compared the results of the new analysis with their published designations. Intersubtype recombinants dominate HIV epidemics in three different geographical regions. The circulating recombinant from (CRF) CRF02-AG, common in West Central Africa, appears to result from a recombination event that occurred early in the divergence between subtypes A and G, although additional more recent recombination events may have contributed to the breakpoint pattern in this recombinant lineage as well. The Chinese recombinant epidemic strains CRF07 and CRF08, in contrast, result from recent recombinations between more contemporary strains. Nevertheless, CRF07 and CRF08 contributed to many subsequent recombination events. The BF recombinant epidemics in two HIV-1 epicenters in South America are not independent and BF epidemics in South America have an unusually high fraction of unique recombinant forms (URFs) that have each been found only once and carry distinctive breakpoints. Taken together, these analyses reveal a complex and dynamic picture of the current HIV-1 epidemic, and suggest a means of grouping and tracking relationships between viruses through preservation of shared breakpints.

  20. An anion substitution route to low loss colossal dielectric CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Andrew E.; Calvarese, T.G.; Sleight, A.W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2009-02-15

    An anion substitution route was utilized for lowering the dielectric loss in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine. This substitution reduced the dielectric loss, and retained a high dielectric constant that was essentially temperature independent from 25 to 200 deg. C. In particular, CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 11.7}F{sub 0.3} exhibited a giant dielectric constant over 6000 and low dielectric loss below 0.075 at 100 kHz within a temperature range of 25-200 deg. C. Fluorine analysis confirmed the presence of fluorine in all samples measured. - Grapical Abstract: An anion substitution route was utilized for lowering the dielectric loss in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine. This substitution, confirmed by fluorine analysis, reduced tan {delta}, and retained a high dielectric constant that was essentially temperature independent from 25 to 200 deg. C at 100 kHz.

  1. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  2. Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL: Preprint

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL Preprint January 2001 * NREL/CP-500-29164 D.M. Heimiller S.R. Haymes To be presented at the 39 th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Reno, Nevada January 8-11, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted

  3. A Geographic Information System approach to modeling nutrient and sediment transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Timmins, S.P.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water quality model to quantify nonpoint-source (NPS) pollution that uses a geographic information system (GIS) to link statistical modeling of nutrient and sediment delivery with the spatial arrangement of the parameters that drive the model. The model predicts annual nutrient and sediment loading and was developed, calibrated, and tested on 12 watersheds within the Lake Ray Roberts drainage basin in north Texas. Three physiographic regions are represented by these watersheds, and model success, as measured by the accuracy of load estimates, was compared within and across these regions.

  4. On-chip electrically controlled routing of photons from a single quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentham, C.; Coles, R. J.; Royall, B.; O'Hara, J.; Prtljaga, N.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Wilson, L. R.; Itskevich, I. E.; Clarke, E.

    2015-06-01

    Electrical control of on-chip routing of photons emitted by a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot (SAQD) is demonstrated in a photonic crystal cavity-waveguide system. The SAQD is located inside an H1 cavity, which is coupled to two photonic crystal waveguides. The SAQD emission wavelength is electrically tunable by the quantum-confined Stark effect. When the SAQD emission is brought into resonance with one of two H1 cavity modes, it is preferentially routed to the waveguide to which that mode is selectively coupled. This proof of concept provides the basis for scalable, low-power, high-speed operation of single-photon routers for use in integrated quantum photonic circuits.

  5. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks | Department of Energy Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_willigan.pdf (494.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Cost-Effective Fabrication

  6. A novel solution-phase route for the synthesis of crystalline silver nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yang; Chu Ying . E-mail: chuying@nenu.edu.cn; Yang Likun; Han Dongxue; Lue Zhongxian

    2005-10-06

    A unique solution-phase route was devised to synthesize crystal Ag nanowires with high aspect-ratio (8-10 nm in diameter and length up to 10 {mu}m) by the reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with Vitamin C in SDS/ethanol solution. The resultant nanoproducts were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction (ED). A soft template mechanism was put forward to interpret the formation of metal Ag nanowires.

  7. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Deepak Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti Kumar, Niteen Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-08-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft.

  8. Transit Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. Application of geographic information systems to waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Burns, M.; Weinrach, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is often difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the generators themselves in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This Process Waste Assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the Process Modeling System and currently being integrated with the InFoCAD Geographic Information System (GIS) . The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation framework written using the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) . Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Development activities include integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS) and provisions for a Best Available Technologies (BAT) database. The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results.

  10. Integration of geographic information systems and logistic multiple regression for aquatic macrophyte modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumalani, S.; Jensen, J.R.; Althausen, J.D.; Burkhalter, S.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Since aquatic macrophytes have an important influence on the physical and chemical processes of an ecosystem while simultaneously affecting human activity, it is imperative that they be inventoried and managed wisely. However, mapping wetlands can be a major challenge because they are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, to shrub or scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrian environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically from season to season, especially when nonpersistent species are present. This research, focuses on developing a model for predicting the future growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This model will use a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze some of the biophysical variables that affect aquatic macrophyte growth and distribution. The data will provide scientists information on the future spatial growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This study focuses on the Savannah River Site Par Pond (1,000 ha) and L Lake (400 ha) these are two cooling ponds that have received thermal effluent from nuclear reactor operations. Par Pond was constructed in 1958, and natural invasion of wetland has occurred over its 35-year history, with much of the shoreline having developed extensive beds of persistent and non-persistent aquatic macrophytes.

  11. EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue...

  12. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  13. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  15. Towards a Scalable and Reliable Real Time In-Network Data Analysis Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Yin, Jian

    2011-12-01

    The smart grid applications requires real time analysis, response within the order of milliseconds and high-reliability because of the mission critical structure of the power grid system. The only way to satisfy these requirements is in network data analysis and build-in redundancy routing for failures. To achieve this, we propose a data dissemination system that builds routes using network flow algorithms, have in network processing of the data and utilize data encoding to cope with high latencies.

  16. Synthesis of Sol-Gel Matrices for Encapsulation of Enzymes Using an Aqueous Route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, C.S.; Bhatia, R.B.; Brinker, C.J.; Harris, T.M.

    1998-11-23

    Sol-gel matrices are promising host materials for potential chemical and biosensor applications. Previous studies have focused on modified sol-gel routes using alkoxides for encapsulation of enzymes. However the formation of alcohol as a byproduct during hydrolysis and condensation reactions poses limitations. We report the immobilization of glucose oxidase and peroxidase in silica prepared by an aqueous route which may provide a more favorable environment for the biomolecules. A two step aqueous sol-gel procedure using sodium silicate as the precursor was developed to encapsulate the enzymes and the dye precursor, o-dianisidine. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to give gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Peroxidase then catalyzes the reaction of the dye precursor with hydrogen peroxide to produce a colored product. The kinetics of the coupled enzymatic reactions were monitored by optical spectroscopy and compared to those occurring in tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) derived silica matrices developed by Yamanaka. Enhanced kinetics in the aqueous silicate matrices were related to differences in the host microstructure as elucidated by microstructural comparisons of the corresponding aerogels.

  17. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanzo, D.; Kimura, C.Y.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1996-06-03

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  18. A case study of pipeline route selection and design through discontinuous permafrost terrain in northwestern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiechnik, C.; Boivin, R.; Henderson, J.; Bowman, M.

    1996-12-31

    As the natural gas pipeline system in Western Canada expands northward, it traverses the discontinuous permafrost zone. As the ground temperature of the frozen soil in this zone is just below freezing, it can be expected that within the design life of a pipeline the permafrost adjacent to it will melt due to the disturbance of the insulating cover by construction activities. Differential settlement at the thawing frozen/unfrozen soil interfaces gives rise to pipeline strain. Based on the calculated settlement and resulting strain level, a cost effective mechanical or civil design solution can be selected to mitigate the differential settlement problem. Since these design solutions can be costly, it is desirable to combine them with a pipeline route that traverses the least amount of discontinuous permafrost terrain while minimizing the overall length of the pipeline. This paper will detail the framework utilized to select the routing for a package of pipeline projects in northwestern Alberta. It is believed that the increased front end effort will result in lower operating costs and an overall reduced life-cycle cost. This basic design methodology can be applied to any project that traverses discontinuous permafrost terrain.

  19. A Time-Slotted On-Demand Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Unmanned Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope Forsmann; Robert Hiromoto; John Svoboda

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of UAVs has increased dramatically because of their successful deployment in military operations, their ability to preserve human life, and the continual improvements in wireless communication that serves to increase their capabilities. We believe the usefulness of UAVs would be dramatically increased if formation flight were added to the list of capabilities. Currently, sustained formation flight with a cluster of UAVs has only been achieved with two nodes by the Multi-UAV Testbed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Park, 2004) Formation flight is a complex operation requiring the ability to adjust the flight patterns on the fly and correct for wind gusts, terrain, and differences in node equipment. All of which increases the amount of inner node communication. Since one of the problems with MANET communication is network congestion, we believe a first step towards formation flight can be made through improved inner node communication. We have investigated current communication routing protocols and developed an altered hybrid routing protocol in order to provide communication with less network congestion.

  20. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  1. Emerging patterns in intercontinental air linkages and implications for international route allocation policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oum, Tae Hoon; Taylor, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of deregulation, or liberalization of the domestic airline market, in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe have been described by many authors. It is generally acknowledged that deregulation fostored airline efficiency through the formation of domestic hub-and-spoke networks and established market conditions that encouraged the emergence of the mega-carriers (United, American, and Delta Airlines). Predictions have been made that similar effects will be observed in the intercontinental markets as liberalization is extended to these markets, and that globalized service networks will appear through strong alliances between major carriers based on different continents. These global service networks will be created by linking up the continental hubs of the partners` networks, in order to provide frequent and efficient services. A nation may be able to influence the formation of the global networks through the appropriate selection of policies for the industry structure and international route allocation. Sections of this paper review the important features of the imminent globalization of airline networks, and describe the emerging patterns of intercontinental linkages being adopted by some major carriers in the US and Europe. Later, alternative route allocation policies are defined, and the policies being followed by the US, Japan, Canada, and Korea are analyzed.

  2. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  3. NATIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION DATABASE AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (NATCARB) FORMER TITLE-MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr

    2004-07-16

    This annual report describes progress in the third year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. The project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project has been extended and expanded as a ''NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)'' to provide national coverage across the Regional CO{sub 2} Partnerships, which currently cover 40 states (http://www.natcarb.org). Advanced distributed computing solutions link database servers across the five states and other publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS) into a single system where data is maintained and enhanced at the local level but is accessed and assembled through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. This project has improved the flow of data across servers and increased the amount and quality of available digital data. The online tools used in the project have improved in stability and speed in order to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The move away from direct database access to web access through eXtensible Markup Language (XML) has increased stability and security while decreasing management overhead. The MIDCARB viewer has been simplified to provide improved display and organization of the more than 125 layers and data tables that have been generated as part of the project. The MIDCARB project is a functional demonstration of distributed management of data systems that cross the boundaries

  4. Tracking a defined route for O[subscript 2] migration in a dioxygen-activating diiron enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Woon Ju; Gucinski, Grant; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Lippard, Stephen J. (MIT); (Pomona)

    2011-09-08

    For numerous enzymes reactive toward small gaseous compounds, growing evidence indicates that these substrates diffuse into active site pockets through defined pathways in the protein matrix. Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase is a dioxygen-activating enzyme. Structural analysis suggests two possible pathways for dioxygen access through the {alpha}-subunit to the diiron center: a channel or a series of hydrophobic cavities. To distinguish which is utilized as the O{sub 2} migration pathway, the dimensions of the cavities and the channel were independently varied by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The rate constants for dioxygen access to the diiron center were derived from the formation rates of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, generated upon treatment of the diiron(II) enzyme with O2. This reaction depends on the concentration of dioxygen to the first order. Altering the dimensions of the cavities, but not the channel, changed the rate of dioxygen reactivity with the enzyme. These results strongly suggest that voids comprising the cavities in toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase are not artifacts of protein packing/folding, but rather programmed routes for dioxygen migration through the protein matrix. Because the cavities are not fully connected into the diiron active center in the enzyme resting state, conformational changes will be required to facilitate dioxygen access to the diiron center. We propose that such temporary opening and closing of the cavities may occur in all bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases to control O{sub 2} consumption for efficient catalysis. Our findings suggest that other gas-utilizing enzymes may employ similar structural features to effect substrate passage through a protein matrix.

  5. Using geographic information systems in the delineation of wellhead protection areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Horton, C.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act established the nationwide wellhead protection program to be administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although individual states have the responsibility to implement wellhead protection, the US EPA provides technical guidance, and approves each wellhead protection plan prepared by the states. A major aspect of wellhead protection strategies is the delineation of wellhead protection areas. These are zones around municipal water supply wells that receive special land use considerations intended to minimize the threat of contamination of the wells. The US EPA has recommended several technical approaches to delineating wellhead protection areas, ranging in sophistication from simple concentric circles around wells to irregular areas determined from groundwater flow and transport analyses. Regardless of the wellhead protection area delineation technique, the resulting area surrounding the municipal well must be accurately mapped. A geographic information system (GIS) approach to mapping the results of wellhead protection area delineation is demonstrated. Using hypothetical groundwater flow regimes, each EPA recommended approach to wellhead protection area delineation is presented in a GIS format. A visual comparison of delineation techniques in terms of area and configuration of the resulting wellhead protection areas is made. Finally, the advantages of using a GIS for representing wellhead protection areas is provided.

  6. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recenmore » t years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1 % versus 55.9 ± 2.1 % and 40.2 ± 1.8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.« less

  7. Feasibility of Close-Range Photogrammetric Models for Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Luke; /Rice U.

    2011-06-22

    The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility of using close-range architectural photogrammetry as an alternative three dimensional modeling technique in order to place the digital models in a geographic information system (GIS) at SLAC. With the available equipment and Australis photogrammetry software, the creation of full and accurate models of an example building, Building 281 on SLAC campus, was attempted. After conducting several equipment tests to determine the precision achievable, a complete photogrammetric survey was attempted. The dimensions of the resulting models were then compared against the true dimensions of the building. A complete building model was not evidenced to be obtainable using the current equipment and software. This failure was likely attributable to the limits of the software rather than the precision of the physical equipment. However, partial models of the building were shown to be accurate and determined to still be usable in a GIS. With further development of the photogrammetric software and survey procedure, the desired generation of a complete three dimensional model is likely still feasible.

  8. Reliability and Geographic Trends of 50,000 Photovoltaic Systems in the USA: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents performance and reliability data from nearly 50,000 photovoltaic (PV) systems totaling 1.7 gigawatts installed capacity in the USA from 2009 to 2012 and their geographic trends. About 90% of the normal systems and about 85% of all systems, including systems with known issues, performed to within 10% or better of expected performance. Although considerable uncertainty may exist due to the nature of the data, hotter climates appear to exhibit some degradation not seen in the more moderate climates. Special causes of underperformance and their impacts are delineated by reliability category. Hardware-related issues are dominated by inverter problems (totaling less than 0.5%) and underperforming modules (totaling less than 0.1%). Furthermore, many reliability categories show a significant decrease in occurrence from year 1 to subsequent years, emphasizing the need for higher-quality installations but also the need for improved standards development. The probability of PV system damage because of hail is below 0.05%. Singular weather events can have a significant impact such as a single lightning strike to a transformer or the impact of a hurricane. However, grid outages are more likely to have a significant impact than PV system damage when extreme weather events occur.

  9. Factors affecting route selection and survival of steelhead kelts at Snake River dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison H. A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Green, Ethan D.

    2015-03-31

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a study that summarized the passage route proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged kelts. Kelts were also tagged with passive integrated transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems (JBS) and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that were related to forebay residence time, route of passage, and survival of steelhead kelts at FCRPS dams on the Snake River. Multiple approaches, including 3-D tracking, bivariate and multivariable regression modeling, and decision tree analyses were used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the greatest effect on forebay residence time, route of passage, and route-specific and overall dam passage survival probabilities for tagged kelts at Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams. In general, kelt behavior and discharge appeared to work independently to affect forebay residence times. Kelt behavior, primarily approach location, migration depth, and “searching” activities in the forebay, was found to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. The condition of kelts was the single most important factor affecting their survival. The information gathered in this study may be used by dam operators and fisheries managers to identify potential management actions to improve in-river survival of kelts or collection methods for kelt reconditioning programs to aid

  10. NREL: Energy Analysis: Geospatial Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy infrastructure, demographics and land ownership, and the earth's physical geography (topography, land use, rivers). NREL's geographic information system models enable...

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Brian W Bush

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian W Bush Photo of Brian Bush Brian W Bush is a member of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Principal Strategic Analyst On staff from January 2008 Phone number: (303) 384-7472 E-mail: brian.bush@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy and infrastructure modeling, simulation, and analysis High performance computing Software architecture, design, implementation, and testing Discrete-event and continuous simulation Statistical analysis Geographic

  12. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by employing bandwidth shells at areas of overutilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-04-27

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a final destination. The default routing strategy is altered responsive to detection of overutilization of a particular path of one or more links, and at least some traffic is re-routed by distributing the traffic among multiple paths (which may include the default path). An alternative path may require a greater number of link traversals to reach the destination node.

  13. Allocating application to group of consecutive processors in fault-tolerant deadlock-free routing path defined by routers obeying same rules for path selection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Vitus J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Bender, Michael A.; Bunde, David P.

    2009-07-21

    In a multiple processor computing apparatus, directional routing restrictions and a logical channel construct permit fault tolerant, deadlock-free routing. Processor allocation can be performed by creating a linear ordering of the processors based on routing rules used for routing communications between the processors. The linear ordering can assume a loop configuration, and bin-packing is applied to this loop configuration. The interconnection of the processors can be conceptualized as a generally rectangular 3-dimensional grid, and the MC allocation algorithm is applied with respect to the 3-dimensional grid.

  14. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at

  15. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a metal-dielectric-metal lens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dennis, Brian S.; Czaplewski, David A.; Haftel, Michael I.; Lopez, Daniel; Blumberg, Girsh; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2015-08-12

    Passive optical elements can play key roles in photonic applications such as plasmonic integrated circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate passive gap-plasmon focusing and routing in two-dimensions. This is accomplished using a high numerical-aperture metal-dielectric-metal lens incorporated into a planar-waveguide device. Fabrication via metal sputtering, oxide deposition, electron- and focused-ion- beam lithography, and argon ion-milling is reported on in detail. Diffraction-limited focusing is optically characterized by sampling out-coupled light with a microscope. The measured focal distance and full-width-half-maximum spot size agree well with the calculated lens performance. The surface plasmon polariton propagation length is measured by sampling light from multiple out-couplermoreslits.less

  16. Apparatus and method for routing a transmission line through a downhole tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Reynolds, Jay

    2006-07-04

    A method for routing a transmission line through a tool joint having a primary and secondary shoulder, a central bore, and a longitudinal axis, includes drilling a straight channel, at a positive, nominal angle with respect to the longitudinal axis, through the tool joint from the secondary shoulder to a point proximate the inside wall of the centtral bore. The method further includes milling back, from within the central bore, a second channel to merge with the straight channel, thereby forming a continuous channel from the secondary shoulder to the central bore. In selected embodiments, drilling is accomplished by gun-drilling the straight channel. In other embodiments, the method includes tilting the tool joint before drilling to produce the positive, nominal angle. In selected embodiments, the positive, nominal angle is less than or equal to 15 degrees.

  17. A simple route to the synthesis of single crystalline copper metagermanate nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z.; Zhao, H.S.; Tan, W.; Yu, H.Y.; Chen, Y.W.; Zhang Qianfeng; Fan, C.G.

    2009-12-15

    Single crystalline copper metagermanate (CuGeO{sub 3}) nanowires with the diameter of 30-300 nm and length of longer than 100 {mu}m have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal deposition route. X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman analyses confirm that the nanowires are orthorhombic single crystals with a main growth direction along <101>. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a strong blue emission peak at 442 nm with a broad emission band. The blue emission may be ascribed to radiative recombination of oxygen vacancies and oxygen-germanium vacancies. The formation process of CuGeO{sub 3} nanowires is also discussed.

  18. Production of high quality steels using the scrap/electric arc furnace route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houpert, C.; Lanteri, V.; Jolivet, J.M.; Guttmann, M.; Birat, J.P.; Jallon, M.; Confente, M.

    1996-12-31

    Europe, after North America, is increasing the share of electric arc furnace steelmaking at the expense of integrated steel production and the trend appears to be long term. The driving forces for this change are strong: availability of scrap, social pressure to recycle materials and economic benefits to be reaped from the small structure associated with this short and slim production route. The increasing use of scrap does raise some problems however, in terms of the tramp element build up within the scrap deposit over time. Scrap pretreatment, which aims at separating steel from non-ferrous material during preparation, is thus attracting a lot of attention. The purpose of the present work was to investigate quantitatively the potential problems related to increased levels in tramp elements, with two objectives: identify, on a case by case basis, the currently existing practical limits and devise countermeasures to further extend these limits by better controlling process parameters for instance.

  19. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  20. A novel process route for the production of spherical SLS polymer powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Jochen; Sachs, Marius; Blümel, Christina; Winzer, Bettina; Toni, Franziska; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-05-22

    Currently, rapid prototyping gradually is transferred to additive manufacturing opening new applications. Especially selective laser sintering (SLS) is promising. One drawback is the limited choice of polymer materials available as optimized powders. Powders produced by cryogenic grinding show poor powder flowability resulting in poor device quality. Within this account we present a novel process route for the production of spherical polymer micron-sized particles of good flowability. The feasibility of the process chain is demonstrated for polystyrene e. In a first step polymer microparticles are produced by a wet grinding method. By this approach the mean particle size and the particle size distribution can be tuned between a few microns and several 10 microns. The applicability of this method will be discussed for different polymers and the dependencies of product particle size distribution on stressing conditions and process temperature will be outlined. The comminution products consist of microparticles of irregular shape and poor powder flowability. An improvement of flowability of the ground particles is achieved by changing their shape: they are rounded using a heated downer reactor. The influence of temperature profile and residence time on the product properties will be addressed applying a viscous-flow sintering model. To further improve the flowability of the cohesive spherical polymer particles nanoparticles are adhered onto the microparticles’ surface. The improvement of flowability is remarkable: rounded and dry-coated powders exhibit a strongly reduced tensile strength as compared to the comminution product. The improved polymer powders obtained by the process route proposed open new possibilities in SLS processing including the usage of much smaller polymer beads.

  1. Evaluation of Open Geospatial Consortium Standards fur Use In LLNL Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R; Chubb, K; Schek, J

    2005-09-28

    The objective of this project is to evaluate existing and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for use in LLNL programs that rely heavily on geographic data. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to avoid duplication of effort, lower development costs, and encourage competition based on improved capability and performance rather than vendor lock-in. Some of these standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, DOE and DHS. A serious evaluation of this technology is appropriate at this time due to increasing interest and mandated compliance in the Federal government in some situations. A subset of OGC standards is identified and reviewed with a focus on applications to LLNL programs. Each standard or recommendation reviewed was evaluated in general terms. In addition, for specific programs such as Gen&SIS and NARAC, a specific evaluation was made of several of the standards and how they could be used most effectively. It is also important to evaluate the acceptance of these standards in the commercial arena. The implementation of OGC standards by the largest GIS vendor (ESRI) was reviewed. At present, OGC standards are primary useful in specific situations. More generally, many of the standards are immature and their impact on the government and commercial sectors is unclear. Consequently, OGC and related developments need to be observed. As specific standards or groups of standards mature and establish their relevance, these can also be incorporated in LLNL programs as requirements dictate, especially if open implementations and commercial products are available.

  2. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  3. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to

  4. Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Dolislager, Frederick; Hall, Dr. Linda; Hauschild, Veronique; Raber, Ellen; Love, Dr. Adam

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

  5. Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-12-15

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and

  6. Ion-assisted phase separation in compound films: An alternate route to ordered nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Scott A.

    2013-11-28

    In recent years, observations of highly ordered, hexagonal arrays of self-organized nanostructures on binary or impurity-laced targets under normal-incidence ion irradiation have excited interest in this phenomenon as a potential route to high-throughput, low-cost manufacture of nanoscale devices or nanostructured coatings. The currently prominent explanation for these structures is a morphological instability driven by ion erosion discovered by Bradley and Shipman; however, recent parameter estimates via molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this erosive instability may not be active for the representative GaSb system in which hexagonal structures were first observed. Motivated by recent experimental and numerical evidence suggesting the likely importance of phase separation during thin-film processing, we here generalize the Bradley-Shipman theory to include the effect of ion-assisted phase separation. The resulting system admits a chemically driven finite-wavelength instability that can explain the order of observed patterns even when the erosive Bradley-Shipman instability is inactive. In a relevant simplifying limit, it also provides an intuitive instability criterion similar to results in thin-film deposition, as well as predictions on pattern wavelengths that agree qualitatively with experimental observations. Finally, we identify a characteristic experimental signature that distinguishes the chemical and morphological instabilities and highlights the need for specific additional experimental data on the GaSb system.

  7. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embeddedmore » precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.« less

  8. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore » result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  9. Computational Investigations of Trichoderma Reesei Cel7A Suggest New Routes for Enzyme Activity Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, G. T.; Payne, C. M.; Bu, L.; Taylor, C. B.; McCabe, C.; Chu, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellulase (Cel7A) is a key industrial enzyme in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. It is a multi-modular enzyme with a Family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, a flexible O-glycosylated linker, and a large catalytic domain. We have used simulation to elucidate new functions for the 3 sub-domains, which suggests new routes to increase the activity of this central enzyme. These findings include new roles for glycosylation, which we have shown can be used to tune the binding affinity. We have also examined the structures of the catalytically-active complex of Cel7A and its non-processive counterpart, Cel7B, engaged on cellulose, which suggests allosteric mechanisms involved in chain binding when these cellulases are complexed on cellulose. Our computational results also suggest that product inhibition varies significantly between Cel7A and Cel7B, and we offer a molecular-level explanation for this observation. Finally, we discuss simulations of the absolute and relative binding free energy of cellulose ligands and various mutations along the CD tunnel, which will affect processivity and the ability of Cel7A (and related enzymes) to digest cellulose. These results highlight new considerations in protein engineering for processive and non-processive cellulases for production of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  10. Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} synthesized using a chelating route for use in IT-SOFC cathodes: Microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scurtu, Rares; Somacescu, Simona; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Culita, Daniela; Bulimestru, Ion; Popa, Nelea; Gulea, Aurelian; Osiceanu, Petre

    2014-02-15

    Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders were synthesized by a chelating route using different polyfunctional H{sub x}APC acids (APC=aminopolycarboxylate; x=3, 4, 5). Different homologous aminopolycarboxylic acids, namely nitrilotriacetic (H{sub 3}nta), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (H{sub 4}edta), 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetracetic (H{sub 4}cdta) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (H{sub 5}dtpa) acid, were used as chelating agents to combine Sm, Sr, Co elements into a perovskite structure. The effects of the chelating agents on the crystalline structure, porosity, surface chemistry and electrical properties were investigated. The electrical properties of the perovskite-type materials emphasized that their conductivities in the temperature range of interest (600–800 °C) depend on the nature of the precursors as well as on the presence of a residual Co oxide phase as shown by XRD and XPS analysis. The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries were determined by XPS revealing a complex chemical behavior of Sr that exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry within the detected volume (<10 nm). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders by a chelating route and the investigation of the microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} obtained by a chelating synthesis route. • Cubic perovskite structures with crystallite sizes ∼23±2 nm. • The porous nature revealed by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption (BET). • The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries highlighted by XPS. • A complex chemical behavior of Sr exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry.